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Lot 4: 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235 When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort. After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match. To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.

Bowral Saleroom - Antiques, Collectables & Classic cars

by Vickers & Hoad

October 30, 2016

Bowral, Australia

Live Auction
Past Lot
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
  • 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235  When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort.  After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match.  To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.
   
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Description: 1951 MG TD Chassis – TD 11753 Engine – XPAG/TD2/12235 When the world thinks of sports cars, it thinks of MG.Formed in 1923 as Morris Garages, MG was initially a sideline business to market re-bodied Morris cars to a slightly more sporting clientele. By the late 1920s a distinct MG was released that was equipped with what was to be seen as the traditional MG vertical grille. This was followed by the smaller MG Midget, a title that stayed with the marque through to the 1980s. While the MG may be associated with open top sports cars, the company was also responsible for many sporting saloons that proved highly popular to those who wanted a sports car, but needed the practicalities of a closed car. Not long prior to World War Two, MG launched the first of its T-Series Midgets. Both the TA and TB proved to be popular, but with the war, MG turned its attention to assisting the British war effort. After the War, MG released its venerable TC, a model that’s seen by many as the archetypal MG. Despite this, the TC did have its limitations, including being only available in right hand drive – hardly practical for the all-important US market. With Britain in need of overseas funds the government edict was “Export of Perish!” MG’s response was the MG TD in both right and left hand drive. Despite being available with steel disc wheels in place of the traditional wires, the TD proved to be highly successful with 30,000 produced, with many shipped to the US. History tells us that it was the TD that introduced the MG marque to North America. Fitted with a 1,250cc engine developing 55 bhp that was sufficient to provide a top speed of 83 mph. This Australian delivered 1951 MG TD Roadster has been with the same ownership for over 50 years. For the majority of its early years it was used in country New South Wales until purchased during the mid-1960s by the late husband of its current owner. Taken to the Australian Capital Territory, it was used occasionally until the early 2000s when it received a complete body-off professional restoration. Since then it has travelled a mere 2,500 miles resulting in the car still exhibiting its ‘just restored’ condition. The MG TD equipped with independent front suspension, rack and pinion steering, short shift four-speed gearbox and improved brakes ensured that the model was and is a lively performer with handling to match. To this day, the MG TD continues to provide traditional and sporting motoring in a tweed jacket and flat hat style.

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