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Lot 3: 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267 Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US. The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run

Bowral Saleroom - Antiques, Collectables & Classic cars

by Vickers & Hoad

October 30, 2016

Bowral, Australia

Live Auction
Past Lot
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
  • 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1  Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267  Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US.  The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run
   
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Description: 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 Chassis – BN½19267 Engine – 1B/219267 Body - 1965/5191 Launched to great acclaim at the 1952 Earls Court Motor Show in London, the Healey 100 literally overnight became the Austin-Healey 100 following a handshake deal between Donald Healey and Leonard Lord of the British Motor Corporation. Production started at Austin’s Longbridge factory in May 1953 and carried through until August 1955 when the 100 BN2 was released. In total 10,010 Austin-Healey 100 BN1s were built, of which just over 1,000 were imported into Australia. While precise figures are not known, it is thought that there are less than half that left in the country which includes a number of more recent imports from the US. The Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was powered by Austin’s 2,660cc four-cylinder engine that developed 90bhp and 144lb/ft. of torque. Fitted with twin SU carburettors and driving through a three-speed gearbox and electrically operated overdrive, the car in standard form had a top speed of 106mph.Following the end of Austin-Healey 100 production in 1956, the six-cylinder 100/6 was released after which the Austin-Healey 3000 in its various guises was produced until late 1967. This 1954 Austin-Healey 100 BN1 was sold new in Melbourne during December of that year. The Austin-Healey proved to be popular for racing and the middle 1950s saw this car being raced at Albert Park, Phillip Island and Fisherman’s Bend as well as many Victorian hill climb venues. In late 1961 it was purchased by a gentleman from southern New South Wales and during his ownership it received little use until it was sold again in 2012. Since then it has received a bare metal respray along with the rebuilding of many components such as the engine, gearbox, suspension and brakes. Since the early 1990s the prices of Austin-Healeys has remained buoyant and of late have escalated significantly. The early cars with their cleaner, more aesthetic styling have proved to be highly popular. To drive an Austin-Healey, while taking you back to a different era is an experience as their performance is exciting to say the least compared with the climate controlled cars of today. Just perfect for that Sunday morning coffee run

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