The world’s premier auctions
 
 
WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
WE'VE CHANGED OUR NAME
is now
 
To celebrate, we’ve enhanced our site with
larger images and browsing by category to help
you easily find what you’re passionate about.
Remember to update your bookmarks.
Get Started »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options

Lot 146: Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure

Antique American Stoneware and Redware, Summer 2009

by Crocker Farm

July 11, 2009

Sparks, MD, USA

Live Auction
Sold
  • Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure
  • Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure
  • Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure
  • Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure
  • Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure
  • Anthony Baecher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD Redware Dog Figure
   
Looking for the realized and estimated price?

Description: Very Rare Large-Sized Redware Figure of a Dog with Applied Coleslaw Fur, attributed to Anthony Bacher, Winchester, VA or Thurmont, MD, circa 1880, hand-modeled figure of a seated dog with collar, open mouth revealing tongue, and incised eyes produced from balls of clay. Surface embellished with applied clay "coleslaw" fur, and covered in a brown lead and manganese glaze. This dog was used as a doorstop well into the 20th century, and was likely originally intended for this purpose. Figural pieces from the Shenandoah Valley of this size are exceptionally rare. We believe this is the first Bacher dog to be sold at auction in many years, if ever. It exhibits a wonderful facial expression that can be considered humorous or playful, as is noted by leading Shenandoah Valley pottery expert, H.E. Comstock, in his book, The Pottery of the Shenandoah Valley Region. For similarly styled Bacher doorstops in the form of a bear, see Comstock, p. 179, figs. 4.280 and 4.281. Missing arms, but little evidence of where the arms would have been attached to the body suggest they may have been lost during the firing. Missing tail and presumably a small flowerpot from back. Muzzle reglued and missing tip to tongue. Large losses to ears, damage to tips of feet, and general wear to surface. Traces of old blue paint. H 9" ; Width (at base) 6 1/4".

Bid Now on Items for Sale

(view more)
View more items for sale »