The world’s premier auctions
 
 
WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
WE'VE CHANGED OUR NAME
is now
 
To celebrate, we’ve enhanced our site with
larger images and browsing by category to help
you easily find what you’re passionate about.
Remember to update your bookmarks.
Get Started »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options

Lot 45: APOLLO LUNAR MODULE CABIN RELIEF AND DUMP VALVE PLUG

Natural History Auction

by I.M. Chait

May 16, 2010

Beverly Hills, CA, USA

Live Auction
Past Lot
Looking for the realized and estimated price?

Description: APOLLO LUNAR MODULE CABIN RELIEF AND DUMP VALVE PLUG
This object's disk frame, cut from a solid block of titanium, was to be located forward of the starboard pilot's left leg. Once the astronauts were suited up for a moon walk, the cabin would be depressurized by opening the dump valve and letting the air out.

Though the disk never flew, its history is only scarcely less interesting than if it had.

This particular artifact is a construction method test article, never assigned to a specific LM. Dump valve disks, flight-assigned titanium rock hammers, and other simple shapes were the first objects ever to be cut by machine using what was then affectionately named "rudimentary transporter technology." The phrase referred to experiments demonstrating that 3-D computerized instructions for replicating an object in a room located on another part of the continent was a feasible, albeit expensive concept (though the computers involved were Neanderthal-esque by comparison to today's simplest Game Boy software, the cost of the equipment worked out to about $700 dollars [1967] to manufacture one dump valve disk or moon rock hammer).

To cut these objects, 3-D blueprints were transmitted by phone line from as far away as White Sands to the Grumman machine shop in Bethpage New York, where computer controlled machines duplicated the shapes remotely. Though the process worked (and is now common throughout the world), after 1967 it was decided that no critical space-flight items should be allowed to go from "the replicator" onto the spacecraft. In those days, an object not manufactured by human hands and not under the direct control of human eyes was not to be trusted. (However, all solid titanium geological tools that went to the moon - including the rod to which Alan Shepard attached his golf club-head - were manufactured by replicator programs).

Title
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
 
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
 
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)
Lot title
$0 (starting bid)