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Lot 33: c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope

Presidential Election Auction - Early American History Auctions

by Early American

October 29, 2016

Rancho Santa Fe, CA, USA

Live Auction
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  • c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope
  • c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope
  • c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope
  • c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope
  • c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope
  • c. 1904 Signed Card, GERONIMO with Its Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope
   
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Description: Autographs
c. 1904 Signature of GERONIMO the Famed Apache Leader Together with Its Original Transmittal Envelope
GERONIMO (1829-1909). Best Known Heroic Native American Apache Indian Chief and Leader.
c. 1904 Signed Card, "GERONIMO" Hand-Printed on a 4.5" x 2" off-white heavy card stock, Very Fine. Minor ink runs at "ER" as written by Geronimo himself, together with its original 5" x 4" Transmittal Postal Mailing Envelope, made with an integral embossed period red 2 George Washington Stamp, Used, Postmarked from, "Fort Sill, Okla., Nov 2 1904," being addressed to a "L. N. Skinner, 2306 6 Street, San Diego Calif." - with a second local receipt postmark at San Diego, Nov 5 1904 on the blank verso. Penciled at top left of this envelope is "Geronimo" likely written by the collector/owner, Very Fine. Also present is a 10" x 8" black and white Smithsonian Institution photograph reproduction of a group image captioned, "#699 General Miles - Indian Congress Copyright 1901 by C.D. Arnold." This photo picturing Geronimo, General Nelson Miles, and over twenty others".

In 1894, Geronimo and 341 other Chiricahua Apache prisoners of war were brought to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where they lived in villages scattered around the post. Geronimo was granted permission to travel with Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show and he joined the Indian contingent at several annual World Expositions and Indian Expositions. Geronimo died at Fort Sill in 1909. A remarkable signature of GERONIMO measuring a huge 2.75" long, boldly written in deep heavy brown ink, still together with its original mailing envelope. (3 items).
Apache Chief Geronimo (1829-1909), was born in the upper Gila River country of Arizona. Although he harbored animosity toward the Mexican soldiers who killed his wife and children, he also grew to dislike the Anglo-Americans who took over the region following the 1848 Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo.

After his Chiricahua Apaches were forced onto Arizona's San Carlos Reservation in the mid-1870s, Geronimo led his followers on a series of escapes that bolstered his legend and embarrassed the U.S. government. He surrendered to General Nelson Miles in 1886, and remained a celebrity In 1886, Geronimo had surrendered to troops under the command of General Miles.

In 1894, Geronimo and 341 other Chiricahua Apache prisoners of war were brought to Fort Sill, Oklahoma, where they lived in villages scattered around the post. Geronimo was granted permission to travel with Pawnee Bill's Wild West Show and he joined the Indian contingent at several annual World Expositions and Indian Expositions. Geronimo died at Fort Sill in 1909.

An article in the October 4, 1904, edition of the "Atlanta Constitution" headed "Geronimo Returns," datelined "St. Louis, October 3," reported that "Geronimo, chief of the Apache Indians, departed for his home at Fort Sill, Okla., today. Geronimo has been at the world's fair since June and recently asked permission of Superintendent McCowan of the Indian school, to return home, saying he was homesick."

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