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Lot 42A: Eisenhower on the White Silver Springs Conference with Mexico’s President and Canada’s Prime Minister

Presidential Letters, Free Franks & Speeches: Washington to Bush + Important Autographs in History, Science & the Arts

by Lion Heart Autographs

October 26, 2016

New York, NY, USA

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Description: On the White Silver Springs Conference with Mexico’s President and Canada’s Prime Minister: “I got a much closer understanding of the problems and the thinking of both the President of Mexico and the Prime Minister of Canada” ********** EISENHOWER, DWIGHT D. (1890-1969). American soldier and thirty-fourth president of the United States. TLS. (“Dwight D. Eisenhower”). 1p. 4to. Washington, April 3, 1956. On White House stationery. To prominent Texas Democrat WRIGHT MORROW (1893-?). Marked “personal.” ********** “Thank you very much for your note. I am glad that you feel that the White Sulphur Springs Conference should yield in time, constructive results; I can only speak for myself, but I enjoyed the two days we were there and I can only feel that your interpretation is correct. We had no rigid agenda for the meeting; therefore, there was no urgency to produce any concrete ‘communiqué.’ The whole effort was to establish a setting where people who were already friends could get to know each other better. In the informal conversations that we held certainly I got a much closer understanding of the problems and the thinking of both the President of Mexico and the Prime Minister of Canada. I hope that each one of them carried back to their countries the same conviction. Of course I understand your particular interest in Mexico. I did my best to make President Cortines feel that he was the honored guest of the United States, as indeed he was. Again I hope I was successful. With warm regard…” ********** Elected president during the tense years of the Cold War, Eisenhower’s experiences in World War II and as NATO’s commander left him convinced about the importance of military preparedness and possible use of force. Simultaneously, he used diplomacy to navigate through the perilous events of world politics and, in so doing, ended the Korean War to oversee an era of peace and prosperity not experienced by Americans since the 1920s. ********** Our letter refers to the North American Summit, which Eisenhower hosted from March 26-28, 1956, at the Greenbrier Resort in White Sulphur Springs, West Virginia. At the meeting Eisenhower, Canadian Prime Minister Louis St. Laurent (1882-1973) and Mexican President Adolfo Ruiz Cortines (1889-1973) discussed immigration, illegal fishing and economic collaboration. ********** Morrow, the son of a judge, was a prominent Texas lawyer, a member of the Democratic National Committee and an “important figure among Texas’ Dixicrats,” (Yellow Dogs and Republicans: Allan Shivers and Texas Two-Party Politics, Dobbs). In 1954, Eisenhower nominated him as an alternate delegate to the United Nations but then withdrew the nomination citing a mistake. Nonetheless, Morrow and Eisenhower appear to have maintained a cordial relationship. Both Morrow and his wife, a writer, had a special interest in Mexico, which they frequently visited; he was twice recommended for an ambassadorship to Mexico by the governor of Texas. He was especially outspoken in his opposition to what he called “an overwhelming federal control of the lives and habits of the people and the states,” (quoted in “Wright Morrows Will Be Honored Here,” The Yellow Jacket, October 1, 1953). ********** Folded with some slight creasing. In very good condition.

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