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Lot 29: Grant, Ulysses. Autograph letter signed, 1 page, (8 3/4 x 7 3/4 in.; 222 x 197 mm).

The Property of a Distinguished American Private Collector

Platinum House

by Profiles in History

December 18, 2012

Calabasas Hills, CA, USA

Live Auction
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Description:

29. Grant, Ulysses. Autograph letter signed, 1 page, (8 3/4 x 7 3/4 in.; 222 x 197 mm). City Point, Virginia, 2 December 1864. Written to Maj. Gen. Halleck, Chief of Staff; a few marginal tears

Magnificent one page handwritten civil war directive from General Grant after Hood's defeat at the Battle of Franklin (and just two weeks before Hood's defeat at Nashville): Grant writes in full:

Is it not possible now to send reinforcements to Thomas from Hooker's Dept.? If there are new troops, organized State Militia or anything that can go, now is the time to annihilate Hood's Army. Gov. Bramlett might put from five to ten thousand horsemen into the field to serve only to the end of the campaign. I believe if he was asked he would do so.

U.S. Grant Lt. Gen.

With the fall of Atlanta (1 September), Hood devised a plan to divide Sherman's army with the hope that he could defeat Sherman in the mountains. Sherman countered by detaching both Thomas and John McAllister Schofield (1831-1906), in command of the Army of the Ohio, against Hood, who was outnumbered. Forced to abandon his campaign against Sherman, Hood instead launched operations against Thomas and Schofield in Tennessee, hoping to take that key Union base as well as reinforce Lee in Virginia. He suffered heavy defeats at Franklin (30 November) and Nashville (15-16 December).

An important Civil War letter showing Grant's overall philosophy of taking the battle decisively to the enemy and a clear understanding of the opportunity that had presented itself. With the defeat of Hood, the Army of Tennessee ceased to be a threat to the Union.

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