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Lot 9: Scarce Letter by John Baird, Scottish TV Inventor, on Baird Television Letterhead

Presidential Letters, Free Franks & Speeches: Washington to Bush + Important Autographs in History, Science & the Arts

by Lion Heart Autographs

October 26, 2016

New York, NY, USA

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Description: Scarce Letter by John Baird, Scottish Inventor of Television on Baird Television Letterhead********** BAIRD, JOHN. (1888-1946). Scottish inventor; produced the first televised picture of a moving object in 1926 and in 1928 developed color television. TLS. (“J.L. Baird”). ½p. 4to. London, December 10, 1935. On Baird Television Limited letterhead. To Mr. A. (Arthur?) Buckley. ********** “I thank you for your letter of the 3rd instant. I am sorry I will not be able to be present on January 9th as I will be abroad until the beginning of February. If, however, you are having a Dinner in February, I will be very pleased indeed to be present…” ********** Baird was an inventor with diverse interests who, early in his career, dabbled in such areas as synthetic diamonds, a glass razor, pneumatic shoes, thermal “undersocks,” fiber optics, radar, and video recording. His major contribution to science, however, came with his pioneering television transmission in 1925. His demonstration was repeated for the Royal Society the following year and, in 1927, he transmitted the first long-distance television images between London and Glasgow. In 1928, he again made history by transmitting the first televised images broadcast in color. Baird International Television Limited was formed in 1928 to explore the commercial applications of his innovations, and, beginning in 1929, the BBC transmitted television programming using one of Baird’s systems. Baird’s commercial endeavor was hindered by the total loss, in November 1936, of his Crystal Palace laboratory. By 1937, the BBC switched its transmissions to the competing Marconi system. Nonetheless, Baird continued to make important innovations in television broadcasting up until his death. ********** Folded with minor, light scattered spotting and two irregular file holes in the left margin. In very good condition. Uncommon.

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