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Winter Assemblage No Reserves And 25% Value Start Price

by Pangaea Auctions

December 10, 2016 (in progress)

Carson City, NV, USA

Live Auction

Lot 392: Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim

(107 views)
Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
  • Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskim
   
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Description: Vintage Inuit stone carving depicting an Eskimo hunter Estimated more than 50 yrs old. Northwest, First Nations, Inuit and Metis art refers to artwork produced by the people of the Arctic North West previously known as Eskimos, a term that is now often considered offensive outside Alaska. Historically their preferred medium was walrus ivory, but since the establishment of southern markets for Inuit art in 1945, prints and figurative works carved in relatively soft stone such as soapstone, serpentinite, or argillite have also become popular. Inuit sculptures had been produced prior to contact with the Western world. Inuit continue to carve pieces entirely by hand. Power tools are occasionally used, but most artists prefer to use an axe and file, as this gives them more control over the stone. The final stage of carving is the polishing, which is done with several grades of waterproof sandpaper, and hours and hours of rubbing. The most common material is now soapstone, serpentine, either deposits from the Arctic, which range from black to light green in color. Other material used in Inuit sculptures include, caribou antlers, ivory from marine mammals, and the bone of various animals. (Wikipedia) Size: See Ruler Photo. (Photos Represent The Condition Of The Lot.)

Condition Report: Good

 
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