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Auction Description for RM Sotheby's: Arizona - Thursday
Auction Description:
Kicking off the collector car auction season on a strong note, RM Sotheby’s returns to the vibrant grounds of the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix, 19–20 January, for its 18th annual Arizona sale. Last year’s sale was highlighted by the 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Special Roadster that sold for $9.9 million before a packed house. The auction’s impressive results represented a new benchmark for any automobile sold in Arizona auction week history, breaking the previous record set by RM in 2015. In total, 17 lots broke the million-dollar mark, with the event generating a total of $62.8 million with 85 percent of all lots sold.   RM Sotheby’s 2017 Arizona sale is set to continue the company’s strong track record in Phoenix, presenting more than 100 blue-chip automobiles from the world’s most iconic marques. Hand-selected by RM’s international team of specialists, the catalogue is set to span the spectrum of the market, from pre-war classics through to important sports and racing cars and contemporary supercars. Leading up to the sale, the grounds of the Biltmore will play host to the Arizona Concours d’Elegance, creating the ideal destination for enthusiasts looking to enjoy a week of classic car camaraderie.

Arizona - Thursday (71 Lots)

by RM Sotheby's


71 lots with images

January 19, 2017

Live Auction

Phoenix, AZ, USA

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Duesenberg Murphy Towncar Model by Tom Miller

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Description: One of the most scarce formal body styles for the Duesenberg Model J chassis, the handsome town car by Murphy of Pasadena, California, was installed on only eight cars. Its clean lines and elegant appearance have won the survivors homes in some of the world’s most prominent collections and museums.Crafted by Tom Miller of Johnston, Pennsylvania, this beautiful and unique Murphy town car model reportedly took eight years to painstakingly create from scratch. All of the body and frame parts are hand-formed steel, which was painted using hand-finished lacquer in the traditional Duesenberg “sweep panel” color scheme. The engine is a faithful reproduction of the supercharged 320 horsepower SJ motor with dual overhead cams. All accessories are professionally chrome plated, including the headlamps, which are solid brass with custom poured plastic lenses. Dyed deerskin was used for the roof, trunk, and driver’s compartment upholstery, while the rear interior is upholstered in red velour, surrounded by genuine walnut garnish moldings and crystal bud vases.Perhaps most remarkably, the wheels were hand-made from aluminum with stainless steel spokes and mounted with tires made from advertising ashtrays produced by high-end tire companies during the Classic Era. Thus, the tires are miniatures of what would have been used on a Duesenberg “back in the day!”This fascinating and remarkably detailed piece of art will look right at home in a new owner’s collection, perhaps alongside a full-size Model J!

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1967 Matchless G80CS

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Description: 28 hp, 497 cc, OHV four-stroke single-cylinder engine, four-speed transmission, front telescopic and hydraulic fork suspension, rear spring-loaded swing arm suspension, and front and rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 55 in.One of the last G80CS scramblers builtOffered from private ownership since 1999Fully restored and beautifully presentedAlthough Associated Motor Cycles (AMC) never attained the financial wherewithal of its rival BSA, they did establish a reputation in off-road competition throughout the 1950s. Ultimately, AMC would win the British 500 Motocross Championship on four separate occasions. In the United States, victories by such riders as Bud Ekins and Walt Fulton ensured a steady demand for the Matchless G80CS and AJS 18CS scramblers.In June 1945, AMC announced its post-war lineup of Matchless and AJS singles. Mounted in a rigid frame with a “Teledraulic” front fork, the overhead-valve single-cylinder engine was mated to a four-speed constant-mesh transmission (with right foot shift). Hairpin valve springs were adopted for 1949, and a swinging-arm frame was introduced—the latter initially for export only. Models so-equipped where designated with an “S” suffix; the “C” stood for Competition, while the “S” referred to Suspension (versus a rigid rear frame). The production scramblers also received the new frame that the factory team had been using since 1948. The 500-cubic centimeter “long stroke” G80CS was produced from 1951 through 1955. In 1956 it was replaced by the shorter stroke. A new duplex frame appeared for 1960 and there were further engine improvements as AMC continued to develop its four-stroke scramblers to the end of production, but by then the days of such heavyweight machines were coming to an end, and AMC built their last G80 in June 1967.This very late production G80CS was fully restored when it was acquired by the consignor in 1999. The paintwork remains in excellent condition, as does all of the brightwork and stainless trim. Beautifully presented throughout, it has hardly been ridden, if ever, as it shows no more than 15 miles on its odometer.

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1960 Willys Jeep Gala Runabout

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Description: Model DJ-3A. 72 bhp, 134.2 cu. in. L-head inline four-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 80 in.Rare Gala model JeepBeautifully presented restorationIdeal for relaxed trips to the beachThe Jeep Dispatcher, Model DJ-3A, a two-wheel drive version of the CJ-3A Universal Jeep for industrial and commercial use, was introduced in 1955. Powered by the L-head version of Willys’ 134-cubic inch four, it had a column-shifted three-speed transmission. Several different versions were offered, with soft tops, hardtops, and a full van body. The United States Postal Service even purchased a fleet of right-hand drive Dispatchers for mail delivery. Henry Kaiser retired to Hawaii in the mid-1950s, shortly after he purchased Willys-Overland. Among several businesses there, he owned the Hawaiian Village resort complex on Waikiki Beach, which he later sold to Conrad Hilton. Thus sprang up a Gala edition of the DJ-3A, with striped upholstery and a fringed top. The vehicle was offered to resort guests as a rental vehicle. In 1959, the Gala was added to the export line and sold in resort areas like Hawaii, the Caribbean, and Mexico. Three color schemes were offered: Tropical Mist (a light pink), Cerulean Blue, and Jade Tint Green. Grille, bumper apron, windshield, and front fender reveals were done in contrasting Glacier White. Additional brightwork, not available on Dispatcher models, included chrome bumpers and wheel discs. Later that year, the Gala was marketed domestically as the Surrey. About 1,000 were built through 1964. This Cerulean Blue Jeep Gala is fresh from a comprehensive body-off restoration. Body panels are straight, and the paint is exceptional. The seats are upholstered in blue and white striped vinyl; the rear seat nestles between seat cushions on top of the rear wheel wells, resulting in seating capacity for plenty of friends on outdoor adventures. Thick fabric mats are fitted to the floor. The engine compartment is detailed to a very high standard, without being overdone. Showing just 45 miles since completion, this rare Jeep Gala comes with full photo documentation of the restoration. Perfect for any summer fun, it is ready to be enjoyed to the fullest.

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1947 Divco

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Description: Ideal rolling billboard to advertise a local company or businessIconic Twin Coach design, dating to the early 1930sAn older restoration that retains its original bakery delivery truck interiorThe Detroit Industrial Vehicles Company (DIVCO) was a builder of delivery trucks from 1926 to 1986. The company owes its existence to George Bacon, the chief engineer of the Detroit Electric Vehicle Company. In 1922, Bacon designed what was thought to be a revolutionary milk delivery truck at the time; it was able to be driven from four positions—front, rear, or from either running board. Unfortunately, its battery power was no match for wintery weather, heavy loads, or long working days due to the limited range of electric power. Bacon’s employer was not keen on making a gasoline-powered vehicle, so he and a group of investors formed Divco to produce the vehicle he designed. Following the testing of a prototype in 1924 and a further 25 more prototypes a year later with the Detroit Creamery, production began in 1926. Divco quickly became known for its patented “Stand and Drive” mechanism, which enabled the operator to drive the vehicle while standing by using steering column-mounted brake and throttle controls.In 1937, Divco bought the Twin Coach Truck Company, a Kent, Ohio, manufacturer of trucks and buses. Under the direction of the Fageol family, vehicles were known as the Divco-Twin until the Twin Coach name was dropped in 1944. Henceforth, the company was known simply as the Divco Corporation. The Divco truck that most are familiar with is the Model U, introduced in 1937. This was an all-new design with Art Deco details. It featured an all-steel van body with snub-nosed hood that remained virtually unchanged through the end of production in 1986. This vehicle, a Twin Coach design, comes from a large Wisconsin collection. According to a 2004 appraisal, it originally served as a commercial bakery truck in California. The interior remains intact and in largely original condition. Though an older restoration, great attention was paid to detail at the time it was completed while leaving the interior as per original. The consignor notes that mechanically, this delightful truck runs well and has been recently examined, at which time the coil was replaced. It is finished in a subtle maroon and red exterior and would serve a local business nicely as a unique moving billboard advertisement. Other than local parades, it has not been shown and with its whimsical “Mouldy J. Mildew” livery, it will no doubt attract attention and be a popular site wherever it appears.

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1973 Citroën DS 23 Pallas

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Description: 115 hp, 2,347 cc OHV inline four-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, hydro-pneumatic suspension, and hydraulically assisted front disc and rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 123 in.Offered from a prominent American Citroën collectionDesirable Euro-spec model with turning headlamps and five-speed transmissionVery solid and enjoyable original condition; approximately 40,000 kilometers from newDriven in the Parisian celebration of the 50th anniversary of the DS in 2005Recent hydraulic system servicing by Grand Central CitroënThere have been few automobiles in modern history that exploded upon the scene quite like the Citroën DS did upon its debut at the 1955 Paris Motor Show. It, quite frankly, set the automotive world upon its ear with incredibly futuristic streamlined styling by Flamino Bertoni. (Yes, this most iconic of French automobiles was designed by an Italian.) Yet, the breathtaking styling of the DS was the least of its marvels. The steering wheel turned on a single spoke, providing a ready view of the dashboard instruments. The brake pedal was simply a button in the floor. The drivetrain was a remarkable combination of front-wheel drive, servo-assisted front disc brakes, hydraulically assisted steering, and fully independent hydro-pneumatic suspension with automatic ride control.Simply put, the DS was a spaceship by the standards of its time. Yet in the first day of its exhibition at Paris alone, the factory had collected 749 orders of the car; by the end of the event, orders numbered well over 12,000; and by the time the ever-evolving DS series ended production 20 years later, 2,786,000 had been built and sold all over the world. Thus, the DS is remembered today as one of the most successful automobiles of all time, alongside such similar legends as the Ford Mustang and Volkswagen Beetle.The “ultimate” DS 23 offered here represents the peak of the DS’s engineering and styling evolution, with the most powerful engine and best-developed chassis. Even more special, it is a European-specification model, with such desirable features as a five-speed manual transmission and headlamps that turn with the front fenders. Acquired by its current owner, a prominent Southern California collector and longtime Citroën enthusiast, in France in 2004, it received a transmission, clutch, and motor service by a French specialist the following year. Shortly thereafter it participated in the 50th Anniversary of the DS by being driven, by the owner and his wife, from Cannes to Paris, where it was used in a parade on the Champs-Élysées amidst much press coverage.Since its return stateside, the DS 23 has had its hydraulic system serviced by Grand Central Citroën in Redlands, California. It has about 40,000 kilometers (24,000 miles) from new and retains a wonderful original interior; the body is straight, original, and in very good condition. Most importantly, the car has been titled in California, and is street-legal for American roads.A wonderful example of the best version of an iconic DS, this car has few peers, even in the pantheon of other “Goddesses.”Addendum:Please note that contrary to the printed catalogue the hydraulic system was serviced by Grand Central Citroën, not SM World.

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1930 Lincoln Model L Five-Passenger Sport Phaeton

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Description: Body Style 176-A. 90 bhp, 384.8 cu. in. L-head V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 136 in.One of only 53 examples builtLong-term California enthusiast history; single ownership since 1981Reportedly featured in the classic 1958 film God’s Little AcreWell-maintained older restoration of a good original carClassic Car Club of America (CCCA) Full ClassicThe 1930 model year marked the end of the run for Lincoln’s original Model L, first introduced in 1919. It was a testament to the quality of Henry Leland’s engineering that, 11 years after it was first introduced, the Model L remained a superb luxury automobile and one of the finest American cars. Improvements had been limited to running engineering changes, including a larger engine, and updates to the styling. Its horsepower rating, a “mere” 90, was misleading, as anyone who has driven a well-maintained Model L can attest; in the words of one enthusiast, “There are only 90 horses, but they are all Clydesdales!”The car offered here is the factory-bodied Five-Passenger Sport Phaeton, body style 176-A; only 145 of these were made in 1929 and 1930, the only two years that this style was offered, with just 53 of them being sold in the latter year.The current owner has enjoyed the Lincoln since 1981, when he acquired it from a Rolls-Royce dealer. The dealer had taken it in trade from Donna Shade of Bakersfield, California, who had this car and a 1932 Chrysler restored, and displayed both at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. She had found the concours scene not to her liking, and subsequently traded both cars on a new Rolls-Royce Corniche! In acquiring the Lincoln, the consignor was informed that the car had been formerly owned by the late, great enthusiast Jack Passey, and that it had been featured in the classic 1958 film, God’s Little Acre, in which it was driven by Aldo Ray.The car has now remained in its current ownership for 35 years. Its restoration is well-preserved and in overall good condition, both inside and out. The maroon finish still has a good, rich shine, contrasting to the red striping and wire wheels. Similarly, the interior is older but well-kept, and still very presentable. Overall, it would be a superb Lincoln to drive and enjoy, as indeed many owners of these cars do; they are popular in Lincoln Owners Club events and for CCCA CARavans, for good reason.

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1970 Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser

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Description: 125 bhp, 3,878 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension with single-acting hydraulic tubular-type shock absorbers, full-floating front axle and semi-floating rear axle with hypoid drive, and front and rear hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in.Comprehensive restoration completed in April 2016Just 25 miles since completion; never shownNew interior, including rear jump seats and floor matsThe Toyota FJ40 Land Cruiser has quickly become an icon of all-wheel drive and the all-terrain vehicle segment of the hobby. Toyota first developed the BJ Series in 1951 at the request of the United States Military. Officials were seeking an all-wheel-drive utility vehicle to be used by soldiers and military police stationed in Japan. Series production did not commence until 1953, from which point forward the vehicles were constantly upgraded and refined. Beginning in 1954, the Land Cruiser name appeared starting with the Series 20 introduced in 1954 and the Series 40 in 1960. U.S. imports began in 1963, quickly becoming Toyota’s best-sellers in the United States during the mid-1960s. As time passed, Land Cruisers were offered in various wheelbases along with several different styles, including a pickup as well as hard and soft top configurations. Even a station wagon was available with seating up to seven passengers. Both Toyota gasoline and Hino diesel engines were eventually offered, though most were equipped with gasoline-powered “F-series” inline six-cylinder engines, such as this example. The model continues to exist today, though it has moved considerably upscale, and is Toyota’s longest-running nameplate.The frame-off restoration of this beautiful example, painted Olympus White over Freeborn Red, was completed in April 2016 by the consignor, who purchased it from an avid 4 × 4 enthusiast. It has never been shown and has completed just 25 miles since restoration. Beginning with an Arizona vehicle, it was disassembled and given a detailed restoration to a high standard. The consignor notes that all body panels are extremely straight, with expert fit and finish. The engine compartment and undercarriage are nicely detailed with all correct and original ID tags. A new, correct black vinyl interior has been fitted, along with rear jump seats, floor mats, and a refinished dash with correct Toyota 4 × 4 operating instruction plates. Five new Goodyear tires ride on refinished white rims, contrasting with the red exterior while matching the white roof. Features include right- and left-hand outside rear view mirrors, oil filter, heater, front locking hubs, and power-assisted brakes. The consignor reports that the engine is a “strong runner” and that this exceptional FJ40 runs and drives beautifully, as one would expect of an enduring icon.

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1986 BMW Alpina B6 2.7

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Description: 210 bhp, 2,700 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with Macpherson struts, independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 101.2 in.Based on the famed Alpina C2, dubbed the B6 for the Japanese marketThe 40th of only 67 examples producedCompletely original and corrosion free; 35,000 original kilometersHeralded as one of BMW’s finest creations, the E30 3-Series has stood the test of time. Alpina’s interpretation further refines that platform into something truly unique and special. Starting at the very heart of the car, Bavaria’s famed tuning house took the original M20B25 engine and bored it out to 2.7 liters. Custom flathead pistons from Mahle were installed, along with a more aggressive camshaft with higher lift and duration. Harder valve springs, a revised ignition system, and a higher compression ratio of 10.2:1 complete the engine modifications. Altogether, the silky smooth inline six-cylinder produces 210 horsepower and 195 foot-pounds of torque. That’s roughly an additional 40 horsepower over the stock 325i, and with a top speed touching 140 miles per hour, the B6 2.7 was the fastest E30 on sale before the larger engined B6 3.5 became available. Furthermore, Alpina fitted a close ratio five-speed gearbox, dry sump lubrication, and its own custom exhaust system to round out the upgrades. The 1986 Alpina B6 2.7 presented here is an exceedingly rare Japan-only car. An official Alpina plaque designates that it is just the 40th of only 67 total examples produced. Due to government legislation, the larger 3-liter of the B6 was unable to pass the strict emission standards, and as such, Alpina opted to install the C2 drivetrain for that market. Other than the smaller engine displacement, the vehicle is all standard B6. Cosmetically, front and rear spoilers offer a more aggressive look, and the classic Alpina wheels provide the car with a sporty stance. Distinctive gold, deco stripes complete the exterior package. The interior is standard E30 apart from the striped upholstery and snug front seats. The Alpina steering wheel reminds the driver of how unique the car is every time they go for a drive. This example is an astounding condition with zero signs of rust or corrosion. All four wheels, including the spare in the trunk, are in excellent condition, without any curb rash, and look flawless. A recent tune up of the entire fuel system ensures that the car is in outstanding running order. Only 35,430 kilometers (approximately 22,000 miles) appear on the odometer, making this a unique opportunity for anyone looking for a refined E30 experience.

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1949 Packard Eight Station Sedan

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Description: 22nd Series. 135 bhp, 288.0 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission with overdrive, independent coil spring front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 120 in.Elegant, rare wood-bodied Station SedanDesirable overdrive transmissionThorough nut-and-bolt restorationPackard built wood-bodied station wagons prior to World War II, in both the six-cylinder 115 and eight-cylinder One-Twenty models. The new Clipper styling in 1941, however, was not compatible with timber construction. After the war, all Packards adopted the Clipper style, so the station wagon was omitted. For 1948, Packard’s new 22nd Series used a wider and lower adaptation of the sleek Clipper lines, ruling out a traditional station wagon body. Instead, Packard took four-door, six-passenger sedans off the production line, and body supplier Briggs Manufacturing Company changed the roofline to incorporate a lift and tailgate. Using ash and maple, Briggs converted the sedan into a full station wagon, with steel supports at the B-posts and D-posts. As a result, the wood had little structural function, making this Packard one of the first steel-framed station wagons. In 1948, the Packard Station Sedan was an exclusive and expensive station wagon that sold for $3,424. It was the most expensive of the short-wheelbase Packards, even the Super Eight models. Production reached fewer than 3,900 in slightly more than two years, most of them built in 1948. A few were carried over into the 23rd Series as 1950 models.This beautiful 1949 Packard Station Sedan has undergone a thorough nut-and-bolt restoration. A local California car, its condition is exemplary. Paint and brightwork are flawless, and the Northern Maple wood has a beautiful finish. The engine compartment exhibits great attention to detail. Inside, the leather has been completely re-done to better-than-new standards. Features include overdrive, a radio, heater, and a dashboard clock. The Packard straight-eight idles smoothly and produces incredible torque to propel the 4,075-pound car swiftly to cruising speed. At that point, the desirable overdrive kicks in to give the car long legs for traveling.This Packard has won numerous first place awards and is ready to be reliably driven and proudly shown.

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1959 Mercedes-Benz 190 SL

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Description: 120 bhp (SAE), 1,897 cc SOHC inline four-cylinder engine with dual Solex carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent coil spring suspension with front control arms and rear swing axles, and four-wheel power-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in.Very elegant white over black color combinationIncludes desirable matching hardtopOne of the most desirable Mercedes-Benzes todayFollowing the success of the 300 SL Coupe and Roadster, Mercedes-Benz’s United States importer, Max Hoffman, suggested that a similarly styled, less costly alternative might be successful. The resulting car was the 190 SL, and it featured styling that was derived from the Gullwing, which many an enthusiast adored but only few could afford. The car proved to be popular with the public at the 1954 New York Auto Show, and it remained in strong demand throughout its nine-year production run.While the performance-driven and expensive 300 SL came out of Mercedes-Benz’s racing department, the 190 SL (internally coded W121) was an open-air boulevard cruiser that had been developed by the passenger car team. It was based on the popular “pontoon”-style sedans, coupes, and cabriolets that were introduced in 1953. The 190 SL made an immediate impression and presented sleeker bodylines that were purposely reminiscent of its senior sibling. It was available as a convertible with a folding soft top or a removable hardtop, or both.Mercedes-Benz successfully marketed the 190 SL as a grand touring sports car from 1955 to 1963, alongside the 300 SL, and it was the only open SL choice until the Gullwing was replaced by the 300 SL Roadster in 1957. It was solidly built in the Mercedes-Benz tradition, with a flawless finish and exquisite detail, and it found favor among the international elite. Such celebrities as the Aga Khan, Grace Kelly, and Zsa Zsa Gabor owned 190 SLs. In 1955, Road & Track wrote, “The outstanding achievement of the 190 SL is . . . its quality in design and workmanship. But a close second is the general feeling of solidity, which it immediately conveys . . . . We say it’s well worth the money.”The fact that the 190 SL was both stunning to behold and a good deal more practical for real-world use helped to seal the deal for well-healed buyers. More than 26,000 examples found owners during the 190 SL’s production run from 1955 to 1963, and they are very well regarded to this day.The car offered here is beautifully finished in white over black, as it was the recipient of a full restoration. Equipped with the desirable Becker High Fidelity radio, Kienzle VDO clock, and the very desirable removable hardtop, it retains its original chassis number tag under the hood. The beautiful chrome wheels, with their distinctive body-color centers, are shod in whitewall tires, an elegant match to the creamy finishes of the body. Chrome throughout is sparkling, and the interior shows only light wear and is still tight and very attractive. The odometer recorded 66,430 miles at the time of cataloguing.This 190 SL is in excellent condition and would surely attract lots of attention at any Mercedes-Benz club event in the future.

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1965 Porsche 356 C 1600 C Cabriolet

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Description: 75 bhp, 1,582 cc OHV air-cooled horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine with dual Solex carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with laminated torsion bars, parallel trailing arms, and tubular shock absorbers; independent rear swing axles with torsion bars and tubular shock absorbers; and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 82.7 in.Original matching-numbers drivetrainFour owners from newIncludes Certificate of Authenticity and copy of KardexAn older restoration that presents beautifullyNot including the rare and costly Carrera, the 1600 C and SC Cabriolets were Porsche’s most exclusive road cars of the era, offering comfort, performance, and enjoyable handling, especially when fitted with a special, optional rear camber-compensating leaf spring that tamed any tendencies toward oversteer. According to its Certificate of Authenticity, this lovely example left the factory on 20 October 1964 and was finished in Ruby Red over black leatherette with a black German canvas folding top. The Reutter-built Cabriolet was ordered with a broad range of desirable options, including Koni shock absorbers, a transverse rear camber spring, 165 × 15 Dunlop SP tires mounted on chrome wheels with painted crest center caps, an elegant wood-rimmed “LL” steering wheel, radio antenna and dual speaker package, and two pairs of seat belts. With 75 horsepower, the C Cabriolet could cruise easily at 80 mph and see the ton on a good day, while disc brakes at all four corners could easily scrub off speed.According to its factory Kardex, this cabriolet was delivered through the Georg Rittersbacher agency in Kaiserslautern, West Germany, which catered to the American military community at nearby Ramstein Air Base. The first owner was a Dr. C. Van Vooren, who was attached to the 86th TAC Hospital at Ramstein, headquarters for the United States Air Force in Europe. The Kardex shows the doctor had his new Porsche regularly maintained by Rittersbacher until late July of 1965. In 1971, Dr. Van Vooren sold the car to an enthusiast in northern Minnesota, who retained ownership for 42 years. Less than five years ago, the car was subjected to a comprehensive cosmetic restoration that included a bare-metal re-spray in its original color scheme of Ruby Red. In late 2013, the car was entrusted to Todd Trimble at Trophy Performance in Las Vegas, Nevada, to be freshened. Work included a top-end engine rebuild with new valve guides, a full case re-seal with new piston rings and related parts, attention to the brakes, a seat bracket repair, and some minor electrical debugging, at a cost of nearly $6,000. A California collector acquired the cabriolet in early 2014 and sold it that summer to the current owner.Now showing 90,939 miles on its odometer, this handsome and well-optioned cabriolet is supplied with a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity, an owner’s manual, and a spare wheel, and it needs very little for club-level concours or enjoyable weekend touring.

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1988 Ferrari 328 GTS

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Description: 270 bhp, 3,185 cc DOHC transverse-mounted V-8 engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transaxle, independent front and rear suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs, stabilizer bar, and telescopic dampers; and front and rear ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 92.5 in.Classic colors with low mileageArguably Pininfarina’s most classic design from the 1970s and ’80s is that of the Ferrari 308. Boasting a much more forward-thinking and angular design than its voluptuous predecessor, the 246 Dino, the 308 was an instant hit and became one of Ferrari’s most iconic automobiles.Considering the success of the 308 GTB and GTS models, Ferrari knew that it was in its best interest to retain the same formula for the car’s successor, the 328. Stylistically, the design remained very similar to its predecessor, save for molded bumpers, a slightly smaller front grille, and its most readily distinguishable feature: a small roof spoiler that was mounted just aft of the rear seats. Pininfarina’s designers took the time to smooth out the lines on the body, making the car appear to be slightly less aggressive but more refined overall. Inside, the 328 received more supportive seats, along with updated ergonomics, in an effort to further refine the driving experience.Of course, the engine was addressed too, and cubic capacity was increased to 3,186 cubic centimeters through increasing the bore and stroke, hence the car’s designation of “328.” Horsepower was increased to 270 brake horsepower at 7,000 rpm, leading the 328 to a top speed of 160 mph with a 0–60 mph time of 5.5 seconds, estimable performance even by today’s standards.This car has resided in its present ownership for some time, acquired in Ontario, and currently shows less than 9,200 original miles. As such, the condition, as might be expected, is outstanding, from the red livery to the tan upholstery, and any cosmetic imperfections are only visible upon closer examination. Included in its file are a leather owner’s manual with books, including the radio instruction manual and remote control, all of which are likewise in excellent condition.Considered by many to be one of the most reliable Ferraris ever built, 328s have always been the enthusiast’s favorite, as they offer excellent performance, wonderful road manners, and service costs that will not break the bank. Simply, this particular 328 is one that checks all the right boxes and will please the most discerning of enthusiasts.

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1986 Ferrari Testarossa 'Flying Mirror'

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Description: 380 bhp, 4,943 cc DOHC horizontally opposed 12-cylinder engine with Bosch KE-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with unequal-length wishbones, coil springs, and anti-roll bars; and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 100.4 in.Desirable early production “flying mirror” model8,000 original miles; original tool roll, jack, and manualsRecent service records, including fresh belt serviceFerrari Classiche certifiedUnveiled to the world the night before the opening of the 1984 Paris Motor Show at the famed Lido nightclub on the Champs-Élysées in Paris, the Ferrari Testarossa would become nothing short of legend. With a 0–60 mph time of just over five seconds and a top speed of near 180 mph, its performance and dramatic styling had enthusiasts falling head over heels for Ferrari’s newest flat-12 creation. It soon became the poster child for a generation with numerous appearances in movies, music videos, and television shows—most notably in a starring role in Miami Vice alongside Don Johnson and Philip Michael Thomas. The Testarossa offered here is a desirable early production example, with a single mirror on the driver’s side, mounted high on the A-pillar—dubbed the “flying mirror” in Ferrari parlance, and widely considered more attractive than later versions. Originally delivered in May 1986 by Steven Kessler Motor Cars of New York City, it was finished, as it is today, in the classic combination of Rosso Corsa over Nero. Today it remains in utterly splendid condition from nose to tail, with fewer than 8,000 miles recorded at the time of cataloguing, and is still complete with its original tool set, jack, and owner’s manual set, as well as a spare set of keys.Recent services, for which receipts are on file, included changing fluids and installing two new front tires, as well as a fresh belt service completed in time for the auction. The receipts compiled, in fact, record regular and proper maintenance back to 2010. The car has also, quite desirably, received the important full Red Book Classiche Certification from Ferrari, noting that it retains all of its original drivetrain and body components, and remains very much the car that it was delivered as in 1986.Every enthusiast who came of age in the 1980s wanted a Testarossa, and the early “flying mirror” variant is the most desirable. With low mileage, well-preserved condition, a good service history, and Classiche Certification, the example offered here is certainly the best of all possible worlds.

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1932 Ford V-8 Drophead Coupe

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Description: Model 18. 65 bhp, 221 cu. in. L-head V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with transverse semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 106.5 in.Extremely rare and attractive British custom coachworkPebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award-winnerBeautifully and authentically restored for its owner of 30 yearsClassic Car Club of America (CCCA) Full ClassicAn iconic ’32 Ford that looks like a small Bentley!While Fords were being built in England in 1932, the new V-8 model was not among them; it was being produced only in the United States and Canada. British customers who desired the latest and greatest Henry Ford engineering had to look across the pond for a chassis, and then would have coachwork produced by their own country’s fine craftsmen. This resulted in a handful of custom automobiles that combined the “Deuce’s” excellent performance with gorgeous European styling.The car shown here was built at Ford’s Canadian factory with right-hand drive, as signified by its original chassis number. Its chassis was exported to England, where the well-proportioned and attractive drophead coupe body was built by the Carlton Carriage Company of London. Carlton was perhaps the builder of dropheads in England during the 1930s, specializing in very attractive examples of this style on a wide variety of chassis. In particular, they were famed for their work on Rolls-Royce and Bentley, and thus it is no surprise that this Ford wound up resembling a jewel-like “miniature” of one of Crewe’s finest!The current owner notes that he acquired the car in 1986, from a retired United States Navy captain who had owned it since 1958, when he purchased it in England. “The 1932 V-8 Ford engine had some initial problems since it was the first year of production,” the owner notes. “This resulted in many of these engines being replaced with later models, and this car was no exception. We were able to source and install a correct ’32 engine. Many other parts in 1932 were special to that year, and finding them was a difficult and time-consuming process.” Nonetheless, several years were spent in the authentic restoration, and all of the correct parts were found to make “the Carlton” as it had appeared in 1932, including new woodwork throughout. The body was finished in a rich, menacing black, with contrasting bright red interior and wire wheels shod, as was typical for a British car of the period, in blackwall tires.Following completion of the restoration, the Ford was exhibited at the 2003 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance as part of a special class for pre-war Ford V-8s with custom coachwork, where it was awarded 2nd in Class. It returned to Pebble Beach in 2011, receiving another class award. Further, the owner was successful in having the Classic Car Club of America recognize the car as a Full Classic; it was subsequently judged at 96.75 points at the Annual Meeting in 2011.Very few 1932 Fords were built with custom coachwork, and fewer still remain. “The Carlton” is certainly among the most attractive and most beautifully restored, with lines and a color scheme that evoke the best of Bentley and other sporting British machines of its era. It would be a wonderful addition to any collection of fine coachbuilt automobiles—just as it has been for the current owner for 30 years.

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1947 Ford Super DeLuxe Sportsman Convertible

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Description: 100 bhp, 239 cu. in. V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front and rear axles with transverse leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 114 in.One of the rarest and most desirable post-war FordsRecent interior restoration, including correct red leather seatsOriginal wood trim, inside and outAfter the war, Ford was caught flat-footed when word came that Chrysler was planning a new line of wood-bodied cars based on its pre-war Town and Country. With no time to design a car from scratch, Henry Ford II asked Ford designer E.T. “Bob” Gregorie to engineer a wood-bodied car based on the existing Ford lineup to fit between its convertibles and woodie station wagons.The Ford design and engineering teams met at the company’s Iron Mountain sawmill and body plant with some initial design drawings and a Ford Super DeLuxe convertible, and set about designing what would become the Sportsman “woodie” convertible. They adorned its sides with beautiful mahogany panels, framed and mortised with solid maple harvested from the Michigan forests surrounding the plant. Unlike the Town and Country, which used body panels that were structurally wood, the Sportsman is structurally steel, so the doors are less prone to sagging over time. Ford used the rear fenders from a 1941 sedan delivery model to allow easier fitment of the wood. The power hydraulic window system was taken from the Lincoln Continental, and the gas filler lid from the Ford station wagon.Inside was an Art Deco-inspired dash in mahogany with handsome color-keyed trim. Considered a premium model, the Sportsman came with seats upholstered in genuine leather facings in tan or red and included French stitching. The Sportsman was intended as a halo car, helping to draw customers into showrooms and serving as an example of the best that the company could produce.One of 2,274 Sportsmans built in the 1947 model year, the car offered here has been meticulously maintained. An older show-quality restoration with a bare-metal re-paint in correct Glade Green, it is complemented by a tan power-operated convertible top, excellent brightwork, and many desirable options and accessories. Among them are front and rear bumper guards, correct Ford fog lights, dual chrome-plated mirrors integrated into the bodyside chrome strips, and a set of wide whitewall tires, mounted on Glade Green steel wheels adorned with chrome-plated trim rings and hubcaps. The door locks are shielded with small chrome lids.The immaculate interior was in 2015 fitted with correct red leather upholstery and is equipped with correct heater, electric clock, and Wonder Bar radio. The interior wood trim is original and remains in excellent condition throughout. The correct hydraulic window lifts, quite a luxury in 1947, are fitted. The engine bay is thoroughly detailed and features a correct Ford flathead V-8 engine; the engine is believed to be original, but a fire destroyed records from this period, so this cannot be confirmed. Underneath and throughout, this Sportsman is immaculate.Among the most desirable of early post-war Fords, the Sportsman is a piece of Americana, a rolling symbol of post-war optimism. This is a fine example that has not been shown publicly for many years and not since its restoration was completed. It is ready to be driven in touring events or to be shown at AACA, Early Ford V-8 Club of America, and National Woodie Club meets.

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1931 Packard Deluxe Eight Convertible Victoria

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Description: Series 840. Body Style no. 1879. 120 bhp, 384.8 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 140.5 in.The 1931 New York Automobile Show carOriginally delivered to legendary steel magnate Charles SchwabLong-term ownership by Packard historian Edward J. BlendOriginal body, chassis, and engineA superb Individual Custom Packard with exceptional provenanceTHE HISTORIAN’S CARThe late Edward J. Blend was among the most devout of Packard aficionados, in particular of the twelve-cylinder Eleventh Series models of 1934, on which he wrote a landmark book that is still referenced by enthusiasts. In addition to “Cyrano,” his prized 1107 Twelve coupe roadster, his fleet included “the ol’ veteran” or “Charley’s Packard,” as he dubbed this 840 Deluxe Eight Convertible Victoria. No second fiddle, “Charley’s Packard” was scrupulously researched and documented by its owner in a comprehensive cover feature for Antique Automobile magazine’s May/June 1982 issue.According to Mr. Blend, his car, one of 11 Individual Custom Convertible Victorias built by Dietrich for Packard in 1931, had been exhibited at both the 1930 New York Salon, at the Commodore Hotel, and at the 1931 New York National Automobile Show at the Grand Central Palace. Confirming his belief, two coats of paint were found on the car during restoration: grey (the Commodore color) and then black (the New York show color). The car was reportedly the only one of the 11 cars to have been built with rear-mounted spares, giving it an especially long, low, and attractive appearance. Furthermore, according to Mr. Blend, a later re-upholstery job discovered “1879/1931 SHOW CAR,” hand-written in Raymond Dietrich’s distinctive handwriting, under each seat panel, although this is no longer present.The car was subsequently acquired by Charles Schwab, renowned leader of Bethlehem Steel and, at the time, chairman of Stutz Motors. One wonders what the Stutz employees in Indianapolis said every time they saw a Packard carry the boss up to the factory! Perhaps for that reason, the Packard was eventually relegated to Immergrun, the Schwab country estate in Loretto, Pennsylvania. Mrs. Rena Schwab used the car for riding around the estate and for local errand-running. Locals recalled to Mr. Blend that during the worst days of the Great Depression, Mrs. Schwab rode around in the car, driven by a chauffeur and surrounded by baskets of food, which she would distribute to the needy.The Schwab Packard was subsequently acquired by Doyal Ervin, also of Pennsylvania, who sold it to Mr. Blend in 1952 for less than $1,000. Mr. Blend and his father proceeded to drive the car in the 1953 Glidden Tour, where it was admired—and pursued for purchase—by early collector James Melton. Well over 99,000 miles had been traveled in the Packard by 1965, attending shows and driving on tours.After Mr. Blend’s father passed in the mid-1960s, the Packard was given a complete restoration, which took nearly 14 years to complete to its perfectionist owner’s standards. While the work obviously now has a fine patina throughout, it remains thoroughly beautiful, including wonderful rich black leather upholstery, and a wonderful tuxedo-like color scheme. Numerous correct accessories are found throughout, including the “Toro” horn (which Mr. Blend described as producing “sounds like an agitated bull”), a pair of accessory mirrors (which took eight years to source), and a correct “new old-stock” Packard heater. Even the onyx dashboard knobs, a correct original option, were painstakingly sourced.“Charley’s Packard” was a deserved prizewinner in both AACA and CCCA judging, and it remained beloved by Mr. Blend for well over another decade before finally passing from his ownership. It has had only a handful of further caretakers and has been continuously and conscientiously well-maintained to the same high standards. It would make an ideal basis for minor freshening and further show appearances, or as the most distinctive and illustrious automobile for a CCCA CARavan.Very few genuine Dietrich “semi-custom” bodies from this era survive today. The car offered here undoubtedly has one of the finest histories, as a show car originally owned by an American business legend, and subsequently owned, enjoyed, and restored by one of the foremost Packard historians of modern times.

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1956 Jaguar XK 140 Roadster

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Description: 190 bhp, 3,442 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent wishbone front suspension with torsion bars and anti-roll bar, rear live axle with semi-elliptical springs, and four-wheel Lockheed drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in.Numbers-matching engine per its Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust CertificatePresented in Old English White over red leather, as originally builtRestored by Hibernia Auto Restorations; comprehensively refreshed in 2015Essentially a re-engineered XK 120 specifically intended for the United States market, the XK 140 was launched at the Earls Court Motor Show in October 1954. Nearly 90 percent were sold with left-hand drive and exported stateside during the model run from 1954–1957; 3,301 of the 3,347 roadsters built were so equipped. Changes were aimed at comfort—the most important being a roomier cockpit—designed to appeal to American buyers. Jaguar moved the bulkhead three inches forward, affording more legroom for taller drivers. The dashboard was raised an inch to give extra room beneath the steering wheel, and all roadsters were given an extra three inches of seat travel. These changes combined to make the XK 140 cockpit a more pleasing driving environment for its drivers. Lucas J700 headlamps, different front turn indicators and rear taillights, and license plate mountings were fitted. A boot lid handle was included for the first time, adding to subtle exterior changes over its predecessor. Badging proudly proclaimed Jaguar’s Le Mans wins, and the chrome strip that ran down the bonnet was continued on the boot lid. Like the bonnet and doors, it was skinned in aluminum. An improved cooling system with an eight-blade fan, rack-and-pinion steering, sturdier bumpers, and a single 12-volt battery replaced the twin 6-volt units that lived under the bonnet (rather than behind the seats), completing the transformation from XK 120 to XK 140. According to its Jaguar Daimler Heritage Trust Certificate, this matching-numbers example is painted Old English White with a black cabriolet roof over red leather, as it was originally delivered. Wide whitewall tires on steel rims and rear fender spats are authentically presented as Sir William Lyons desired. It was restored by Hibernia Auto Restorations of Rockaway, New Jersey, in 2008 and comprehensively refreshed in 2014–2015. Today, it maintains its exceptional fit and finish all around and comes complete with its tools and spare tire.Most recently at The Quail in 2015, this car was named by Motor Trend as one of its 25 favorites, referring to it as “a stunning example.” The trophy and plaque are included in the purchase of this desirable XK that will certainly delight Jaguar and sports car aficionados alike.Addendum:Please note that the title is in transit.

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1966 Ferrari 330 GT 2+2 Series II

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Description: 300 bhp, 3,967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with three Weber 40 DCZ/6 carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent unequal-length wishbone front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and coil springs over telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel dual-circuit Dunlop disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104 in.Very desirable single-headlamp Series II model; one of 455Long-term known historyFactory air conditioning; an ideal gran turismoOffered with owner’s manual and partial tool kitBy 1966, Ferraris with four seats were a mainstay in the company’s lineup. Starting with the 250 GTE, the company quickly found out that there was certainly a market for a grand touring car for four that offered similar performance to its two-seater models. Customers were eager to have a Ferrari that allowed them to carry three passengers or additional luggage on longer trips.Following the success of the 250 GTE and the conclusion of the 250 series in general, Ferrari introduced the 330 GT 2+2 as an all-new model to replace the GTE after the interim 330 America. Mechanical updates were numerous, with the 330 featuring Koni adjustable shock absorbers, a Dunlop dual-circuit braking system, and a wheelbase increased by 50 millimeters. But the most noticeable change was to the nose, which gained an unusual quad-headlamp layout that was allegedly introduced to attract American customers.Ferrari introduced the second series of the 330 GT 2+2 halfway into the 1965 model year. The Series II was graced with dual front headlights (versus the quad-lamp design) and a nose that mimicked the design of the 275 GTS, and its gorgeous Pininfarina bodywork beautifully reflected its personality of a sporty grand tourer for four. Ten-hole cast-alloy knock-off wheels were made standard, while the earlier Borrani wire wheels remained as options. The most significant change to the interior was a revised transmission tunnel that was now connected to the central dashboard, which in turn brought further changes in the dashboard switchgear location. Just 455 examples of the Series II 330 GT were produced before the more aggressive yet less stately 365 GT arrived in 1967.CHASSIS NUMBER 08485Chassis number 08485, offered here, was completed by the factory on 13 May 1966, finished in Blu Chiaro (19343 M) over Beige (VM 3309) and equipped with power windows and factory air conditioning. It was sold new later that year to a local Italian client, Signore Cola of Naples.In the early 1970s, the car was exported to the United States and sold to Joseph C. Brincat of Farmington Hills, Michigan. It would remain in Michigan for most of the decade, owned later by Gary Ray of Ortonville, who displayed it at the FCA Central States Region Tosi’s Meet at Stevensville in 1976, and subsequently by Charles Holder of Kalamazoo, in whose care it won 2nd in Class at the 15th FCA Annual Meet in 1977.That year, the Ferrari was sold to the well-known enthusiast Herb Lederer of Riverside, Illinois, in whose ownership it remained until 1984. That year, it was offered for sale in the Ferrari Market Letter and subsequently sold to Richard Patterson of Normal, Illinois. It passed in 1986 to Paul Whobrey of Decatur, Illinois, and then in 1994 to noted Ferrari authority Hilary A. Raab Jr. of Crown Point, Indiana. A handful of short-term California owners followed, ending with the current owner, who acquired it in August 2004 and has maintained it in his collection for a dozen years.Now finished in Blu Azzurro with Crema interior, the car retains its original equipment, including the factory air conditioning, and now shows 30,000 miles since restoration (at the time of cataloguing). According to an RM Sotheby’s specialist who recently inspected the Ferrari, it also retains the original, numbers-matching engine, with the operable original fuel system and updated electric window system. It is a very attractive automobile that would make an excellent summer grand tourer for its new owner, showing off fabulous Pininfarina performance and V-12 power.

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2016 Porsche 911 Carrera GTS Rennsport Reunion Edition

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Description: Type 991. 430 bhp, 3,800 cc DOHC horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine, seven-speed manual transmission, front suspension with MacPherson struts and anti-roll bar and multi-link LSA rear suspension with anti-roll bar, and four-wheel ventilated and cross-drilled disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.One of just 25 examples produced to celebrate the Rennsport Reunion VVirtually as-new with single ownership and 72 miles from newHighly desirable seven-speed manual transmission exampleBilled as the preeminent gathering of Porsche race cars, road cars, and enthusiasts, the Rennsport Reunion was first held in 2001 in Lime Rock, Connecticut. It was the brainchild of racer Brian Redman and Bob Carlson of Porsche Cars North America, who sought to bring their love of Porsche to the racetrack in an effort to celebrate the company’s storied history. So well received was the first event that it quickly outgrew Lime Rock and was instead held at Daytona Motor Speedway in 2004 and 2007 before moving to Laguna Seca for 2011 and 2015. While only five events have taken place over the last 15 years, Rennsport Reunion has quickly gained a reputation for attracting an incredible assortment of historically significant Porsches and is considered a must-attend event for any Porsche owner or enthusiast. With collaboration from Porsche in the event from its beginnings, Porsche stepped up its involvement for Rennsport Reunion V by unveiling a special edition of the 911 Carrera GTS at the event. Finished in Fashion Grey with unique black and red decals on the doors, hood, roof, and rear decklid, the Rennsport Reunion Edition cars stand out as distinctive from first glance. In addition to the GTS package, the Rennsport Reunion Edition cars are also equipped with a number of desirable options, including 18-way power sport seats, 20-inch Sport Classic wheels, Porsche’s PASM adaptive suspension, a Bose stereo, and rear park assist. Only 25 examples would be built, all fitted with a seven-speed manual transmission, and all destined for North America. Presented in virtually as-new condition, this particular example needs nothing and would be a perfect daily driver or addition to a modern Porsche collection. Many enthusiasts believe that the 991.1 generation of 911s will be the last naturally aspirated models of Porsche’s iconic sports cars. As a result, many high-performance, low-mileage examples are already commanding a strong premium in the marketplace. Further, many believe the GTS to be the most exciting and livable model of the current generation, perfectly straddling the gap between the standard Carrera S and the more aggressive GT3. With its production run of 25 examples only adding to its pedigree, this is an automobile for a true Porsche enthusiast to drive, enjoy, and cherish for many years.

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1970 Ferrari 365 GTB/4 Daytona Berlinetta

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Description: 352 bhp, 4,390 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, independent front and rear suspension with unequal-length wishbones and coil springs over telescopic shock absorbers with anti-roll bars, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in.European specification with Plexiglas noseEquipped with desirable factory air-conditioningDocumented by Ferrari historians Marcel Massini and Jarrett RothmeierRecently freshened restorationBy 1968, Ferrari had a new and serious rival in the supercar sweepstakes, a tractor-maker whose factory was just east of Maranello in Sant’Agata Bolognese. Its name was Lamborghini and it set the automotive world afire with its mid-engined Miura in 1966. While Ferrari offered a mid-engined 206 GT road car in early 1968, it also introduced a front-engine V-12 coupe—the 365 GTB/4 in early 1968 at the Paris Auto Show—as a counter offensive to the upstart Lamborghini. At just under $20,000, it was the most expensive production model that Ferrari had offered to date, and it was cloaked in aggressive, yet handsome styling by Pininfarina. It was also the fastest car Ferrari had ever built . . . faster, in fact, than the Miura. In 1968, that was what mattered most.First shown at the Paris Auto Salon in 1968, the 365 GTB/4 quickly became known as the Daytona. The name was unofficially given to the car by the media following a 1-2-3 Ferrari victory at the 1967 Daytona 24-Hour race. The popular nickname stuck, apparently to the chagrin of Enzo Ferrari. Production continued through 1974 with 1,285 coupes and 127 spiders built. The Daytona was built on the same wheelbase as its predecessor, the 275 GTB/4, also styled by Pininfarina and bodied by Scaglietti. Early cars, including all European-spec models, were equipped with four headlights, set behind a full-width Plexiglas nose. U.S. regulations, however, did not approve of the setup, and those that followed gave way to a more conventional pop-up headlight system. The 365 GTB/4 was blessed with a near-perfect 52/48 weight distribution with the big aluminum block engine set as far back in the chassis as possible and the five-speed manual transaxle. An all-independent suspension provided excellent handling with double wishbones and coil springs all-around, anti-roll bars front and rear, and four-wheel disc brakes for confident stopping power. At its heart was a new version of the Lampredi V-12 with four chain-driven camshafts fed by six twin-choke downdraft Weber carburetors good enough for 352 horsepower at 7,500 rpm; hardly a coincidence that it was two horsepower more than its competitor, the Miura. As delivered from the factory, Road & Track testing proved a top speed of 174 mph and a 13.8-second quarter-mile at 107.5 mph. Ferrari claimed a 0–60 mph time of 5.5 seconds, and a 0–100 mph time in just a tick over 12.5 seconds—numbers that would be the envy of many manufacturers nearly 50 years later. Despite having more creature comforts than any Ferrari before, this remained one serious supercar, with performance its number one priority. It was a grand touring automobile in the finest tradition, designed to reliably travel long distances at a high rate of speed.Unlike Lamborghinis of the day, the 365 GTB/4 also proved itself on the racetrack, where it was among the finest handling of the conventional supercars. Special lightweight versions of the Daytona even finished 5th and 9th overall at Le Mans in 1972 and 2nd overall at Daytona as late as 1979. Ferrari historians have confirmed that chassis number 13183, offered here, was completed at Maranello on 5 February 1970. Finished in Rosso Chiaro (20-R-190) with Nero (VM 8500) leather interior, this left-hand-drive “Euro-spec” Daytona was fitted with the early Plexiglas nose and delivered to dealer Romeo Pedini in Perugia, Italy, and was first purchased by a Mr. Rossi later in the month of February. It was equipped with highly desirable factory air-conditioning as well as power windows, a radio, and knock-off Cromodora alloy wheels. The car was exported from Italy to the United States in the late-1970s and confirmed to be in the ownership of Avi R. Brand of Woodbury, New York, in 1979; later it was sold in 1982 to an undisclosed owner, who offered the car for sale with Graham Cox of Hallendale, Florida, and Motorcars International of Springfield, Missouri, in 1994. Ferrari Market Letter ads described it as “365 GTB/4, S/N 13183 (1970 Euro prod.). Red with tan interior. Plexiglass nose, Borrani wire wheels, factory a/c. Same owner since 1982. 38,409 miles. Extremely nice and original. Don’t miss this one.” Another Ferrari Market Letter ad shows the car offered in California in April/May 1995; it was then sold to a collector in Japan later that year.An older restoration, the car has received a cosmetic freshening and remains in its as-delivered configuration and color combination. It is equipped with highly desirable factory air conditioning, power windows, radio, and Michelin XWX tires on knock-off Cromodora alloy wheels and is described as being very correct overall, providing solid driving performance.As an iconic Ferrari equipped with rare factory air conditioning, the early Euro-spec Plexiglas nose, and restored in its original colors and configuration, this is an outstanding example worthy of a collector who will enjoy driving his or her car as it was intended.

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2003 Aston Martin DB AR1 Zagato

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Description: 435 bhp, 5,935 cc V-12 engine with four overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder, six-speed manual transmission with a twin-plate racing clutch, four-wheel independent suspension, and four-wheel Brembo disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in.The 37th of only 99 examples built800 actual miles; beautiful conditionLooking to reinvigorate sales and interest in the Aston Martin brand, Ford once again teamed up with Zagato in 2002 to create a limited-production, coachbuilt grand touring car in the spirit of the DB4GT Zagato of the 1960s and the V8 Vantage Zagato of the 1980s. A design collaboration between Andrea Zagato and Aston Martin’s then-chief designer Henrik Fisker, the DB7 Zagato utilized key design cues from both Aston Martin and Zagato to help give the car a distinct look but make it instantly recognizable to enthusiasts as both an Aston Martin and Zagato product. Based on Aston Martin’s existing DB7 platform, the car was powered by a 6.0-liter V-12 engine, which produced 435 horsepower and provided the car with a 0–60 time of 4.9 seconds and a top speed of 189 mph.As the United States market was not offered the DB7 Zagato coupe, it was only right that Aston Martin and Zagato offer another limited-production product for their American clients, and thus, the DB AR1 was born. First shown at the 2003 Los Angeles Auto Show, the DB AR1 was an exciting fully open roadster that remained largely similar to its closed sibling, and it was instantly regarded as one of the best designs that both Aston Martin and Zagato had ever produced.Finished from new in Tungsten Silver over Light Tan, the beautiful example offered here was the 37th of the 99 DB AR1 roadsters built. With only 800 actual miles, it remains in excellent condition throughout. It is complete with the original pair of umbrellas (mounted inside of the trunk lid).The DB AR1 remains as popular and iconic today as when it was first built, and opportunities to acquire one are few and far between. This example, in excellent colors and with low original mileage, would be a superb addition to any Aston Martin connoisseur’s stable.

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1953 Mercedes-Benz 220 Sedan

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Description: 86 bhp, 2.2-liter SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with single dual-downdraft Solex carburetor, four-speed column-shift transmission, independent front and swing-axle rear suspension with coil springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in.Two-owner car driven only 63,000 kilometers (39,l46 miles)Incomparable restoration by second owner over 20 years, completed in 2012Unusual Webasto sliding canvas roof Entirely original automobile, including engine, transmission, and suspensionPerfect car to complete any Mercedes-Benz enthusiast’s collectionMercedes-Benz re-entered the automobile market in 1949 with the W137-chassis 1.7-liter 170 sedan built using tools and dies hidden away during the war. Its X-configured oval-tube frame was stronger and more stable than the ladder-frames of competitors. At the 1951 Frankfurt Motor Show, the company introduced the W137 with a 2.2-liter engine, hence the 220 model name, distinguishable from its predecessor only by the headlights faired into the front fenders. Possibly impressed by the quality of the first examples sold on the West Coast, in 1953 the director of the California Department of Transportation ordered this example from the Mercedes-Benz representative, specifying the optional Webasto sliding sunroof, appropriate to the sunny California climate. After driving it for nine years, he sold it to a mechanical technician working at least occasionally for the movie industry. That owner would drive the car throughout his career, which was distinguished by his patented design of the pneumatic operating mechanism for “Bruce,” the animatronic shark in the blockbuster Jaws. When this owner retired to Arcata, California, he applied the same skill and attention to detail to the painstaking, part-by-part restoration of the car that would obsess him for the next 20 years, deviating from original only in painting the fenders in a contrasting color. He had just completed his work when he died in 2012. The car is offered complete with original tool kit. This unique car will be perfect for the discerning collector wishing to extend the range of a collection of stellar cars to include an example of the first post-war luxury Mercedes-Benz sedan sold in the United States, restored to a quality comparable to any in the collection, regardless of price. With its reliable drivetrain, it is capable of modern highway speeds on high-end classic driving tours but could as easily be a prime contender for best of show at Mercedes-Benz Club of America concours d’elegance events.

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1932 Ford Five-Window Coupe Street Rod

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Description: 350 cu. in. Chevrolet small-block V-8 engine with Edelbrock aluminum heads, Crane camshaft, and four-barrel Weber carburetor, manual transmission, front four-bar suspension with tube shocks, rear ladder-bar suspension coil-overs, and front hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 106 in.A genuine street rod by the legendary Boyd CoddingtonBuilt around an original 1932 Ford, in current ownership since 1957Quintessential ’32 “five-window” stylingIconic Chevrolet small-block V-8 powerThe classic 1932 Ford five-window coupe, better known as “the Deuce,” has been, and always will be, the ultimate hot rod. An American icon, the ’32 Ford was immortalized in the early 1960s by the Beach Boys’ “Little Deuce Coupe,” and in 1973, George Lucas’ American Graffiti reintroduced old-style hot rods to a new generation.Among hot-rodders and customizers, the popularity of the 1932 Ford has always remained strong. In the early days, Deuces of any body style were plentiful and inexpensive, and being simple cars made them easy to strip down and modify. A cultural phenomenon, and an entire industry, was born from these humble beginnings, and today a new generation of enthusiasts has embraced “the Deuce.”This custom ’32 “five-window” was acquired by the current consignor nearly 50 years ago, in 1967. It was not until 1979 that the customization began, when he sent the Ford out to have the top duly “chopped” by two inches. The coupe was then sent to noted street rod builder Boyd Coddington in 1984, to complete the transformation.The five-window coupe was fitted with a Chevrolet 350-cubic inch small-block engine with Edelbrock aluminum heads, a Crane camshaft, four-barrel Weber carburetor, and finished with long-tube headers. The suspension is set up with a dropped tube axle up front along with a Ford nine-inch rear axle. Appropriate to the style at the time, the body was “smoothed” with a clean cowl, firewall, hood sides, doors, and a filled grille shell for a very attractive and unadorned look. A dropped headlight bar and period aluminum wheels with radial tires complete the look. The interior has been fitted with bucket seats, tilt steering wheel, air conditioning, and a simple aluminum gauge insert with period-correct gauges. According to the consignor, the engine was recently disassembled, blueprinted, and dyno-tested.A hot coupe from one of the most famous modern builders, this sexy street rod would be an ideal addition to any performance collection – just as it has been for its current owner of 50 years, who has watched its transformation into the best of modern customization.

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1955 Porsche 356 A 1600 Speedster

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Description: 60 hp, 1,582 cc OHV air-cooled horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine with dual Solex carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with laminated torsion bars, parallel trailing arms, and tubular shock absorbers; independent rear swing axles with torsion bars and tubular shock absorbers; and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 82.7 in.Original matching-numbers 1600 engineFinished in original white over red color combinationIncludes Certificate of Authenticity and copy of KardexOlder restoration that continues to present wellPorsche’s iconic 356 Speedster first appeared in 1954 after United States distributor Max Hoffman convinced the factory that it needed a product with which to compete with lower-cost British imports. What Porsche delivered was a bare-bones roadster with a base price of just under $3,000, which was exactly what Hoffman needed to get customers in the door. Unlike the luxurious 356 Cabriolet, with its fixed windshield and numerous comfort features, the Speedster was minimal in design, with side curtains instead of roll-up door glass, a removable windshield, ventilated thin-shell non-reclining bucket seats, and little else—though a lot of fun.It was a true dual-purpose sports car. Owners could readily use their Speedsters for everyday driving and then take it to the track on weekends, remove the bumpers, top, windshield, floor mats, and other trim, tape on some numbers, and go racing. Speedsters offered excellent performance due to their light weight, and they soon established themselves as the cars to beat. Speedsters remained competitive well into the 1970s and 1980s, winning many national championships throughout the United States and Europe. By the time T2 Speedster production wound down in 1958, only 1,129 examples had been built, and that group is considered to be the most modern and drivable today.Offered is a well-maintained Porsche 356 Pre-A Speedster that was completed by the factory on 28 October 1955, fitted with the larger 1600 engine, and sent to Hoffman’s dealership in New York. It was restored approximately 10 years ago, at which point it is believed that the floors and longitudinals were replaced. The rear decklid and trunk hood are noted as original per the correct body stampings. The condition remains excellent throughout with only minor flaws, including slight cracking in the dash, minor wear to the driver’s seat, and a few signs of age in the Ivory White paint, which nevertheless remains very presentable and complements the red leatherette interior very nicely. The Speedster does include sealed beam headlights as well as a U.S. speedometer. Included is a jack and tonneau cover, as well as the Porsche Certificate of Authenticity and a copy of the original Kardex, which confirms that the Speedster retains its original matching-numbers engine.A true delight to drive, every collection needs a 356 Speedster!

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2011 Porsche 911 GT3 RS

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Description: Type 997.2. 450 bhp, 3,797 cc DOHC horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine, six-speed manual transmission, independent double-wishbone front suspension with trailing links, divided control arm monotube dampers with progressive coil springs, multilink rear suspension with five control arms, coil springs with monotube dampers, and four-wheel anti-lock disc brakes. Wheelbase: 92.72 in.Only 11,900 original milesOne of nine paint-to-sample black cars with red wheels and graphicsCompletely original and unmodifiedPorsche’s GT3 is a synthesis of sports car purity and motorsport pedigree. The third car to wear the GT badge after the exclusive GT2 and GT1 of the 1990s, the GT3 was homologated for a lower category of racing. As a result, production numbers were higher and the performance was more accessible. The first generation Type 996 GT3, introduced in 1999, was an immediate success for Porsche. With an intense focus on competition, this spartan 911 lacked sound deadening, sunroof, air conditioning, and rear seats in order to keep the weight as low as possible. Power came from the legendary Mezger engine, which had previously been utilized in the 962 and GT1. In this naturally aspirated application, the 3.6-liter motor produced 355 horsepower. Grip and handling characteristics were improved thanks to larger brakes; revised, lowered suspension; and the addition of a new rear wing and front bumper. The RS variant became available in 2003 and was even more track focused. Weight was cut even further by fitting a polycarbonate rear window and using carbon fiber construction in the hood and rear wing. The engine received updates in the form of reshaped intake and exhaust ports. Production ran until 2005, although no 996 GT3 RS was ever offered for sale in North America. With the introduction of the Type 997, Porsche upped the performance of the new GT3 even further. The engine remained at 3.6 liters but now produced 415 horsepower. High-tech equipment like the Porsche Active Suspension Management (PASM) system allowed the suspension to be electronically controlled. The Porsche offered here is a second generation Type 997.2 GT3 RS. These cars received an even larger 3.8-liter engine, which produces 450 horsepower. Heavily revised bodywork, including a new front end and larger rear wing, help achieve even greater downforce. The wider body shell shared with the Carrera 4 allows the RS to run a greater track width and improve directional stability and cornering grip. This example is believed to be one of only nine cars finished in a paint-to-sample black and is offset with red wheels and graphics. Factory options include Seat Deviating Stitch Color, Sound Package Plus, Sport Chrono Package without PCM, Sport Chrono Timer in Guards Red, cup holders, floor mats to match the interior, as well as an aluminum foot rest. All original throughout, including the paint, this GT3 has only been driven 11,900 miles and makes for an incredible opportunity for any Porsche collector or track day enthusiast.Addendum:Please note that the title is in transit.

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1998 Ferrari F355 F1 Spider

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Description: 380 bhp, 3,496 cc DOHC V-8 engine, Bosch Motronic M2.7 electronic injection, six-speed manual transmission, unequal-length wishbones, coil springs over gas-filled telescopic shock absorbers and anti-roll bar, front and rear suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.45 in.Purchased new by Reba McEntireOnly 6,275 original miles from newGorgeous Azzuro California over Crema color combinationRecent service in October 2016Offering a number of technological improvements over the outgoing 348, the F355 was first introduced at the Geneva Motor Show in March of 1994. Powered by a new 3.5-liter engine with five valves per cylinder (hence the car’s ‘355’ nomenclature), it featured a new engine management system along with a larger and more sophisticated exhaust system. With power rated at 380 brake horsepower and a top speed of 183 mph, and a 0–60 mph time of 4.7 seconds, this was a properly fast automobile. The model’s biggest change came about in 1997, when Ferrari introduced its new F1-style gearbox management system. Operated by two paddles on each side of the steering wheel, this meant that the driver did not have to take his hands off the wheel to shift gears, similar to the gearboxes on Ferrari’s Formula 1 cars. A convertible version of the F355, dubbed the F355 Spider, first broke cover in 1995. This would be the first Ferrari to utilize a power-operating folding soft top, and it proved to attract even more customers into Ferrari’s dealerships. What better way was there to enjoy the sound of that all-new V-8 than by lowering the top?This F355 F1 Spider stands out from the rest not only due to its gorgeous color combination, but also due to its celebrity ownership. Purchased new by country music singer and songwriter Reba McEntire, the car was titled in the name of her then-husband Narvel Blackstock and remained in their ownership until 2016. Finished in Azzuro California over a Crema interior with contrasting Blu seat piping, the car’s only optional extra is its F1-style transmission. The F355 remains in exceptional condition throughout, showing only 6,275 original miles on its odometer. A service was performed on the car in October of 2016 and at that time, all fluids were replaced and the convertible top was serviced and confirmed to be in fully functioning condition. Furthermore, it is accompanied by a full set of owner’s manuals, tools, and some previous service invoices.Today, the F355 remains an icon of the Montezemolo era and is adored by tifosi for its gorgeous looks, exciting performance, and incredible exhaust note. Low-mileage F355s are becoming increasingly more difficult to find, and one in a condition such as this, with celebrity ownership to its name, simply cannot be missed.

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1970 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL 'Pagoda'

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Description: 170 hp, 2,778 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed automatic transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, independent rear suspension with low-pivot swing axles, trailing arms, and coil springs; and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in.Excellent recent restoration Optional factory air conditioningVery desirable white and blue color and trim combinationVery collectable and usable example of Mercedes-Benz styling and engineeringThe 280 SL roadsters built on the W113 chassis are without a doubt at the very sweet spot of the Mercedes-Benz year and model range, still affordable in spite of rapidly increasing values over recent years, and yet stylish, reliable, and competent to be used for pleasure on a frequent basis. The first version of the W113, with its 2.3-liter engine, was well-received, but its performance was a bit disappointing due to its limited power. Without changing the basic body and trim design, it was replaced in 1967 with the interim 250 SL, and then in 1968 by the more powerful 280 SL 2.8-liter inline six-cylinder engine. The 280 SL would stay in production for three years before Mercedes-Benz replaced it with the R107-chassis 350 SL.The elegant and understated styling of these roadsters, penned by designer and artist Paul Bracq, made the model a desirable accessory in movies like Two for the Road with Audrey Hepburn and Albert Finney, and a popular vehicle for young celebrities in Hollywood during the late 1960s and early 1970s. This example, with its brilliant white paint and rich blue interior and soft top, is among the most popular, and is certainly a very attractive color scheme. It looks just as classy with the white “Pagoda” hardtop installed.Designed with both a soft top that folded neatly under a tonneau cover behind the front seats, and a detachable hardtop with an open and airy appearance, the W113 was practical and enjoyable in all weather. The “Pagoda” nickname came from the shape of the removable hardtop, with its concave upper surface created by reinforcing ridges running front to back on the outside edges, giving it the upturned look of traditional Japanese building style. In this case, with the two tops and the optional factory-installed air conditioning—unusual on any car even into the 1970s—the car can be enjoyed on long trips and in any weather.This recently restored example displays careful attention given to every detail down to the body-color hub caps accented by chrome trim rings and impeccable interior and engine compartment. It should be a delight to own and drive, shown with pride at Mercedes-Benz Club of America and regional multi-marque concours events and driven for fun on backroads tours or fashionable boulevards.

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1932 Cord L-29 Cabriolet

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Description: 125 bhp, 322 cu. in. side-valve inline eight-cylinder engine, front-wheel drive, three-speed transmission, quarter-elliptical front leaf springs at the front, with rear semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 137.5 in.Believed to have been the last Cord L-29 cabriolet builtThe most desirable late-production specification; larger, more powerful “FF” engineAn Arizona resident since the 1970s; current ownership for 15 yearsMultiple award-winner in Southwestern concours d’eleganceIdeal for Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club (ACD) and Classic Car Club of America (CCCA) activitiesThis cabriolet, serial number 2930287, was produced only some 20 units before the last Cord L-29 serial number and may well have been the final L-29 cabriolet built, as no other is known to have a later number. Like all L-29s from mid-1931 forward, it was equipped with the very desirable “FF” engine: a bored-out 322-cubic inch unit that was stronger than earlier versions, could reportedly produce more horsepower, and came with a more efficient exhaust manifold.The Cord was acquired by its current owner from Thomas F. Olson of Scottsdale, who had completely restored it to original condition after inheriting it from his father, Robert, a resident of Paradise Valley. Robert S. Olson, the retired co-chairman of Ford Motor Credit Company, had acquired the L-29 in 1959, and eventually retired with it to Arizona. Altogether, the Cord has been in the Valley of the Sun since the early 1970s and in the present enthusiast's ownership for over 15 years.While the car’s restoration is older, it remains extremely attractive; the rich cream and black finish is well preserved, aside from the expected minor chipping around the engine cover, and the blue leather interior is still beautiful. Chromed wire wheels and dual side-mounted spares, with fitted mirrors, as well as a black trunk, add to its period-correct flavor. Testament to its quality, the car has still been a favorite in Southwestern concours; it was exhibited in 2014 at the inaugural Arizona Concours d’Elegance, and later that year was an award-winner in the special Cord class at the Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance, in addition to receiving the Chairman’s Trophy.The Cord front-drive cabriolet is one of the hottest and most desirable Full Classics on the market today. That offered here is a particular special and important example, as one of the last built and to the most desirable specification, now for sale for the first time in two decades.

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1975 Maserati Bora 4.9

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Description: 320 bhp, 4,930 cc DOHC V-8 engine, five-speed manual ZF transaxle, front and rear independent suspension with unequal length A-arms, coil springs with anti-roll bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.2 in.One of 571 Maserati Boras produced from 1971–1980Low-mileage example with less than 39,000 miles from newKnown history and records dating to the early 1990sDesirable 4.9-liter engineShortly after Citroën took a controlling interest in Maserati in 1968, the concept of a mid-engine two-seat sports car was proposed in order to remain competitive with Lamborghini and Ferrari. Dubbed the Bora, the new model debuted at the Geneva Auto Salon in March 1971. Power was initially supplied by a four-cam, four-valve-per-cylinder, 4.7-liter V-8, upsized to 4.9 liters in 1975 when horsepower was increased to 320 enabling a top speed of 160+ mph. Compared to its competitors it was more civilized and practical, offering a full trunk in front along with a hydraulically powered pedal cluster and a tilt and telescoping steering wheel. A total of just 571 were produced before production ceased in 1980. This stunning 1975 Maserati Bora 4.9 coupe is finished in Blu Ischia Metallizzato over blue/black leather with black Wilton wool carpets. A U.S.-delivery car, it has been in California since the early 1990s, and is believed to have been there earlier in its history as well. Having only traveled a presumed correct 38,690 miles from new, this matching-numbers Bora has records dating back to its ownership through the 1990s. Earlier in its life, the car was disassembled for a complete, bare-metal repaint, which still presents exceptionally well.The leather seats have been re-done with the correct pleats. The door panels and the Wilton wool carpets have been replaced, and the dash removed and fitted with the correct mouse hair. The headliner has been left original and in excellent condition along with the lower center console and rear window trim surround. All of the chrome and stainless remain in beautiful original condition, showing minimal age and no real pitting. All body seals have been replaced, new Michelin XWX tires have recently been fitted, and the hydraulics have been sorted and checked with everything working properly. Tie rods and control arms have just been replaced along with a full tune up, including spark plugs, wires, cap, rotor, carb rebuild, and a change of fluids. The consignor notes that turn signals, brake lights, headlights, side marker lights, and interior lights are all operating as designed, and he adds that the engine starts right up and idles smoothly and freely and that the clutch feels strong. The suspension is smooth and quiet and the steering tight and precise. He further describes the Bora as a superb running and driving car that has excellent power and a smooth quiet ride. The body is straight and completely rust free. The undercarriage is nicely detailed and free from any rust, corrosion, or any kind of damage or accident repair. Accompanying the car is the original tool roll, jack, matching XWX spare tire, shop and parts books, as well as numerous other service documents and registration cards dating back to the 1990s.This is a thrilling Maserati for any grand sports car collection.

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1940 Packard One Twenty Convertible Victoria

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Description: Series 1801. 120 hp, 282 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed synchromesh manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in.One of approximately 24 genuine One Twenty “Darrins” built by PackardFormerly owned by Robert KellnerAuthentic restoration; Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award-winnerClassic Car Club of America (CCCA) Full ClassicThe Packard “Darrin” was a remarkable blending of all the glory that was Packard in the Classic Era with all the impudence that was the stock in trade of Howard “Dutch” Darrin. The result was glamour with lots of pizzazz—a perfect fit in the luxury maker’s lineup for an exclusive, halo automobile.Without Darrin’s insistence, the car likely would never have been built. Following his days in Paris, the inimitable Darrin settled in Hollywood, where he immediately established himself as the purveyor of custom coachwork to the stars. The polo-playing Darrin was quickly accepted by the Hollywood crowd; his well-cultivated French accent fit in perfectly. He named his shop “Darrin of Paris,” and his first client was Dick Powell, for whom he fashioned a two-passenger Ford roadster in 1937. Shortly thereafter, he built a two-seat convertible victoria roadster on a 1937 Packard One Twenty chassis for actor Chester Morris. It led to the idea of building a five-passenger version and selling Packard on the idea of including it as part of its lineup. The initial word from Detroit was no, but that didn’t stop him. Darrin began with a standard Packard Eight Business Coupe, little of which remained when the transformation was completed. Most memorable were the sweeping cut-down curves of the doors, the car’s signature styling feature commonly referred to as the “Darrin Dip.” The rakish body looked downright racy when compared to competitor Lincoln’s Zephyr Continental, yet the car remained unquestionably and distinctly, a Packard. Darrin arranged to have the car parked outside the Packard Proving Grounds at the time of the annual dealer’s meeting, precisely where the dealers could not help but see it. That, as they say, was that! Under pressure from its dealers, Packard included the “Darrin” as part of its catalogue for 1940 with three models: Sport Sedan, Convertible Sedan, and Convertible Victoria. It is estimated that 100 were built through 1942 when production was halted prior to World War II. “Darrins” were real celebrity cars—Tyrone Power, Errol Flynn, Al Jolson, Ruby Keeler, Preston Foster, and Gene Krupa all had one. The One Twenty Convertible Victoria cost $3,820. Virtually every item on the car except for the headlight pods was either modified or handcrafted by the Central Manufacturing Company of Connersville, Indiana, one of the last remnants of the Auburn-Cord-Duesenberg empire. By the end of the model year, however, Auburn had signed contracts with both Ford and Willys to build Jeep bodies, so production of the 1941 Darrins was moved to the Sayers & Scoville plant in Cincinnati, Ohio. Despite the beauty of the design, extensive advertisements, and the wide press coverage given by automotive writers, sales never reached the goals of both Darrin and Packard. Though most “Darrins” were built on the senior One Eighty chassis, it is universally agreed that a limited number were built on the One Twenty chassis. James Hollingsworth, in his book Packard 1940: A Pivotal Year, notes that at least 15 were produced with five known to exist, as well as 44 on the One Eighty chassis. Packard expert Don Figone states that 24 of the One Twenties were produced, along with another 48 One Eighties for the model year. Regardless, they were built in limited numbers, which only adds to their desirability today among collectors.According to Mr. Figone, this particular car was acquired many years ago by Robert Kellner of California in the Southern United States and stored for many decades awaiting restoration. The car was finally completed in the mid-1990s, with mechanical work by Just Packards in Northern California. It was then shown at Pebble Beach in 1996 and 1997, receiving a class award in the latter year. Subsequently, it was owned by the Blackhawk Collection, and was displayed at the Imperial Palace in Las Vegas, Nevada. Unfortunately, little is known of its earliest history, though this Convertible Victoria is regarded as an authentic and beautifully presented example. The car is finished in a classic combination of Packard Maroon over tan leather—a handsome combination on any vintage Packard.The offering of a genuine “Packard Darrin” is rare, indeed, and this example is one of the most attractive recently made available for sale. It is a spectacular Packard with all the Hollywood glitz and glamour one could wish for!

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1970 Shelby GT350 Fastback

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Description: 290 bhp, 351 cu. in. V-8 engine with Autolite four-barrel carburetor, four-speed wide-ratio manual transmission, factory “heavy-duty” independent front suspension with coil springs, asymmetrical leaf springs with live rear axle, and power front disc brakes and rear hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 108 in.Gorgeous Grabber Blue GT350Numerous options, including Selectaire air conditioningQuality older restorationThe updated GT350 of 1969 introduced a number of stylistic and mechanical changes and, like any good car, a touch of drama. The GT350’s new engine was a Windsor 351-cubic inch V-8, registering 290 brake horsepower. Cosmetic changes included a new grille, hood, side ducts to help cool the engine and rear brakes, and an overall body length that grew by four inches. Ford handled the redesign work of the 1969 GT350 itself, giving Carroll Shelby little input. As a result, Shelby pulled his contract with Ford in the summer of 1969. With this in mind, Ford wanted to keep consumer interest in the GT350 alive, leading to some corporate mischief. Ford sent the 788 unsold 1969 Shelbys to Kar Kraft, the aftermarket shop that assembled the Boss 429 in Dearborn, Michigan, to outfit them with hood stripes and a chin spoiler. Ford made these modifications in 1969 in order to avoid an upcoming federal law that required the installation of an anti-theft locking steering column in 1970. Upon leaving factory grounds for a third time, these unsold 1969 Shelbys were given new VIN numbers and data plates for 1970, since the FBI destroyed the 1969 data plates. Attractively finished in Grabber Blue, this GT350 was purchased in fully restored condition in 2006. The interior is correctly finished in White Clarion Knit with Hi-Back bucket seats in Corinthian Vinyl. Options include a 3.00 standard axle ratio, four-speed wide-ratio manual transmission, Goodyear tires, a sport deck rear seat, power front disc brakes, power steering with tilt-away, Selectaire air conditioning, an AM radio, heavy-duty battery, trip odometer, tachometer, visibility group, and tinted glass. The car’s Marti report shows that it left the Dearborn Michigan plant in June 1969 and was originally delivered to Dub Richardson Ford in Oklahoma City. The Marti report also confirms that the engine is the one originally fitted to the car. This beautiful GT350 would be wonderful for any collection of fine American muscle cars.

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2005 Porsche Carrera GT

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Description: 610 bhp, 5,733 cc DOHC water-cooled mid-mounted V-10 engine with Bosch Motronic electronic fuel injection, six-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 107.5 in.U.S.-specification example of Porsche’s iconic supercarMatching-numbers drivetrain; just 1,132 miles from newPorsche Certificate of AuthenticityRecently serviced by Porsche GBIt is difficult to overstate the impact the Carrera GT made on the automotive world upon its unveiling at the Paris Auto Show in 2000. The project had actually begun in 1995, as Porsche’s engineers sought a replacement for the stunning 911 GT1 Le Mans prototype. With a new design already well along, an unexpected change in regulations forced Porsche to go back to the drawing board, hoping to recoup its considerable investment by creating an exclusive high-performance automobile that could be driven on the street. The new carbon-fiber monocoque chassis and sub-frame were manufactured by the Italian specialist firm of ATR Composites Group. Power came from a water-cooled, normally aspirated V-10 of 5.7-liter displacement, originally designed—in slightly smaller form—for the Footworks Formula 1 effort of the early 1990s. When that program folded, the engine design was put aside until the Le Mans prototype project emerged. After economic pressures forced Porsche to turn its engineering prowess to developing a new SUV rather than a new race car, the V-10 was resurrected for the Carrera GT.This fascinating powerplant feeds through a small-diameter flywheel and multi-plate carbon-ceramic clutch, allowing an extremely low ride height, and improved handling characteristics. The V-10’s massive power (more than 600 brake horsepower and 442 foot-pounds of torque) was delivered via a rear-mounted six-speed transaxle with limited slip. The engine was fitted with dry-sump lubrication to ensure proper oiling at high RPM or extreme driving conditions. The fully independent double wishbone front and rear suspension was highly advanced and based on proven racing designs, featuring a single coil spring surrounding a gas-pressure shock absorber at each corner, individually adjustable and mounted inboard and actuated via pushrods and levers. Anti-roll bars were similarly adjustable front and rear. Steering was by power-assisted rack-and-pinion. Stopping chores were assigned to Porsche’s hugely effective ceramic-composite (PCCB) disc brakes with power assist. The front brake calipers were eight-piston aluminum alloy monoblock, while those in the rear were four-piston aluminum monoblock units, clamping ventilated brake rotors nearly 15 inches in diameter. Elegant lightweight forged magnesium alloy center-lock road wheels, 19 inches in diameter up front and 20 inches in diameter in the rear, were fitted with 265/30R and 335/30R high-performance tires, and the car is equipped with a tire-pressure monitoring system. Color-coded locking nuts ensured that the wheels would be mounted correctly.Weighing just 2,755 pounds, the Carrera GT is capable of mind-bending performance, achieving 60 mph in less than four seconds, and can double that speed in just 10 seconds, with a maximum track speed of about 200 mph. To ensure safety and stability at higher speeds, there is a traction-control system, while the underside of the chassis incorporates a thoughtful ground-effects package that draws the car closer to the pavement. A retractable rear wing extends at speeds above 75 mph to aid rear downforce. To prove its over-the-road capabilities, factory test driver Walter Röhrl achieved an astonishing lap of 7:28 at the Nürburgring Nordschleife in July 2004, a Porsche record that stood until 2010.Inside the cabin, the driver and passenger are cosseted by rich leather, brushed aluminum, and carbon-fiber trim. There is a pair of manually adjustable racing-style seats with special leg and knee bolsters to ensure comfort. Although the Carrera offers racing-car levels of performance, it is equipped with air conditioning and power windows. Along with the standard array of instrumentation, there is a color TFT screen that provides varying levels of data to the driver, along with a comprehensive navigation system. A pair of removable lightweight roof panels can be stored aboard when not in use. The 24-gallon fuel tank allows reasonable distance between refills.Presented in its original GT Silver Metallic over Dark Natural Grey leather color scheme, this lovely Carrera GT is one of only 1,270 examples produced, half of which were sold to U.S. customers. Barely driven from new and in very good condition throughout, it shows only 1,132 miles on its digital odometer. Its Certificate of Authenticity states that it was completed on 15 February 2005 and lists its original factory-installed equipment, including a set of matching dark grey leather luggage, a car cover, Porsche Online Becker Pro CD Radio with Bose Surround Sound System, and a manually adjustable air conditioning system. Originally delivered through Porsche Zentrum in Munich, this Carrera GT reached the United States via Porsche Cars of North America, arriving at Porsche of The Fox Valley in Wisconsin, where a delivery inspection was carried out on 11 April 2005.Currently registered in Germany, this car was shipped to England in late 2014 and placed in long-term storage. Accompanying documents show that it was serviced in late 2016 by Porsche Cars Great Britain and is described by the consignor as being in superb full working order. It is currently supplied with its correct center-lock wrench, spare key, manuals and service booklet, German registration paperwork for 2015, and a battery charger.Carefully stored and maintained from new, this Carrera GT would be the capstone to any comprehensive Porsche or supercar collection.

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1955 Austin-Healey 100-4 BN1

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Description: 90 bhp, 2,660 cc OHV inline four-cylinder, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with coil springs, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs and anti-sway bar, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 90 in.Stunning color schemeMeticulous restoration to concours standardsComprehensive documentation and correspondenceOriginal matching-numbers engineIncludes British Motoring Industry Heritage Trust CertificateMost likely prompted by his work with Nash, Donald Healey set about building a prototype around British Austin running gear in time for the October 1952 London Motor Show at Earls Court. Healey saw the popularity of British sports cars with American servicemen in Europe and wisely conjectured that there was a market for his sporting roadster. The concept was really quite simple. Healey began with a 2.6-liter four-cylinder engine used in the Austin A90 sedan—complete with transmission and rear axle—around which he designed a simple but rugged ladder frame. He worked in the existing Austin front suspension along with a graceful and flowing two-seat body styled by Gerry Coker. He then took the car to Jabbeke, the Belgian highway that was considered de rigueur in testing the high-speed capability of any new sports car of the time. The new car covered the flying kilometer at 111 mph. Just a few days and headlines later, he presented the car, quite appropriately, at Earls Court. The car was christened the Healey Hundred, reflecting its 100 mph-plus top speed. Needless to say, the Healy Hundred stole the show and caught the fancy of Sir Leonard Lord, the grand old man of Austin. Sir Lord realized that merely using the componentry of his Austin 90 did not a sports car make; he asked for a few words with the car’s creator. What resulted was a 20-year contract for the use of his name with Healey calling the shots about the development of the car while receiving a royalty for each one built. Quite neatly, the Healey Hundred became the Austin-Healey 100. Healey proved himself correct, as eventually 90 percent of all production went to export markets. As was the case with most British sports cars, the cost to meet U.S. safety and emission requirements sealed the fate of the car and it was cancelled in 1968 after nearly 72,000 were produced, including more than 14,500 100s from 1953–1956.According to its owner, this car has been prepared to exacting standards and to compete at the highest level of judging as dictated by Austin-Healey Club requirements. Numerous photos and a CD of the restoration are available for inspection upon request. Also included are notes for maintaining the car along with records, owner’s paperwork, and photos dating to 1955. Finished in a stunning Ice Blue over dark blue leather, this Healey has been the beneficiary of a meticulous frame-off restoration resulting in a beautifully presented automobile that any enthusiast would be proud to own. It is accompanied by its British Motoring Industry Heritage Trust Certificate, confirming that it is still fitted with its original engine, and is currently equipped with correct painted knock-off wire wheels. It comes complete with its spare wheel, complete tool roll, and knock-off hammer.If ever a car was made to go with a tweed cap, driving gloves, and an ascot, this is it!

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1993 Porsche 911 Carrera RS America

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Description: Type 964. 247 bhp, 3,600 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with electronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with lower control arms, MacPherson struts with combined coil springs and dampers and an anti-roll bar, independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms, combined coil springs and dampers, and an anti-roll bar, and four-wheel power-assisted disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in.One of only 701 RSAs built 15,380 original milesAttractive Guards Red over blackExtremely clean condition throughoutOnce described as “the car that the Porsche Club of America built,” the 911 RS America was based on the Type 964 Carrera 2 and was created as a limited-production, lightweight, performance version of the 964 for the United States market. On its introduction in 1992, the factory stated that the new model was a “Pure protein Porsche 911,” designed to handle more like a competition 911. For markets other than the United States, Porsche had offered the 964 Carrera RS in both Lightweight and Touring versions, plus two racing models, the Competition and the Carrera Cup. Like its fabled predecessor, the Carrera RS 2.7 of 1973, the 964 Carrera RS and its derivatives could not be imported to the United States and legally registered, but an intense lobbying effort by Porsche Cars of North America, the PCA, and former factory driver Vic Elford, led to Porsche creating a higher-performance version that met American import requirements. The new model would be listed as the Type 964-320 and called the RS America. It would be offered initially in only four colors: red, black, silver, and dark metallic blue, with white added later. Essentially a “de-contented” Carrera 2, it did away with non-essential items like sound insulation, power steering, electric seats, the usual door trim, and air conditioning, although A/C, a limited-slip differential, a sunroof, and a stereo player were available if a buyer so chose. Electric windows were standard.To create a more visceral “driver’s car,” the RSA used non-assisted rack-and-pinion steering and the lower and stiffer M030 Sport suspension package from the C2 Turbo. That included progressively wound coil springs, a larger 22 millimeter front anti-roll bar (20 millimeters in back), uprated shock absorbers, and 17-inch diameter Mille Miglia Cup 1 alloy wheels—seven inches wide in front and 8 inches in the rear. Brakes were four-piston fixed-caliper discs with ABS. Externally, there was a distinctive, large rubber-edged whale-tail deck spoiler and “RS” decals.Offered is a very attractive RS America in Guards Red over black with black-anodized window trim, showing just 15,380 miles on its odometer. The bodywork, interior, and road wheels appear in pristine condition, suggesting very careful use by its previous owners. The interior includes drilled aluminum pedals and footrest. This car is supplied with a set of OEM rubber pedal covers, a pair of aftermarket mirror covers, a performance chip, a spare muffler, and an uninstalled Blaupunkt Savannah stereo head unit. Additionally, service invoices throughout the life of the car are included, along with a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity (COA). The COA documents the car as being optioned with a limited-slip differential, AM/FM radio, and electric sunroof. Today, the RSA is a much sought-after model, relatively few in number, able to provide a thrilling motoring experience to the discerning enthusiast. “The RS America,” wrote David Coleman in Excellence Magazine, “captures the look, feel, and spartan quality of the Carrera Cup car in a 911 you can drive with impunity every day.”

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1979 Lamborghini Countach LP400 S Series I

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Description: 375 bhp, 3,929 cc DOHC V-12 engine with six Weber horizontal two-barrel carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, unequal length A-arm front suspension with coil springs and an anti-roll bar, upper lateral-link rear suspension with lower A-arms, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar; and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.One of only 50 Series I examples producedDesirable “low-body” design with “Bravo” wheelsRetains its original engineIt is easy to forget how shocking the Marcel Gandini-designed Lamborghini Countach prototype was at its Geneva introduction in 1971. Its impossibly low wedge profile, scissor doors, mid-mounted V-12, and angular styling set the language for nearly every supercar since. Lamborghini has remained true to the Countach’s original design for 45 years, with its influences still seen today in the current Aventador.The Countach had lost none of its power to astonish when the production version, the LP400, debuted in 1974. In the United States particularly, where the streets were still filled with muscle cars and full-sized sedans, it resembled nothing less than a road-going spaceship. In 1978, the updated Countach LP400 S was introduced, featuring an aggressive front splitter, hugely wide Pirelli tires, muscular fender flares, magnesium Campagnolo “Bravo” wheels, and revised suspension geometry. Three series of the LP400 S were produced, the first two series sharing the chassis and low body of the original LP400. Series I cars featured the stylish Bravo wheels, and only 50 of these were produced. The Series I Countach has the aggressive look of the later models but still retains the pure design that made the LP400 an icon.This first series Countach left the factory in September 1979 and was first sold by the Hubert Hahn dealership in Dusseldorf, Germany. Originally finished in the striking color combination of Blu Acapulco over natural leather with gold Bravo wheels, it was soon repainted black while in Europe in the early 1980s. In 1984, the car was imported to the United States under “exempt” status, meaning that the performance-robbing steel bars in the doors, catalytic converts, gas restrictor caps, smog pump, larger bumpers, and braces in the rear trunk were not added and it remained true to its original factory specifications. The 4.0-liter engine is factory stock with its six 45 DCOE Weber carburetors, 10.5:1 compression ratio, and high lift camshafts with a redline of 8,000 rpm. In 2002, the drivetrain was removed to perform a comprehensive service and rebuild to ensure its mechanical condition and future reliability. The pistons, crankshaft, liners, and rods were all carefully checked and found to be in excellent condition. The valves were replaced with new items, the valve springs were reconditioned, and new valve guides were installed. The radiators were reconditioned and new radiator fans helped the cooling system. New rings, oil lines, a throw out bearing, a clutch disk, gaskets, thrust bearings, and countless other items in the engine were also replaced at this time. More recently, the current owner replaced the old heavy exhaust with a period-correct Ansa Sport exhaust system. To prevent corrosion and for more efficient heat insulation, the exhaust system was ceramic coated. The shocks were found to be in good working order when the suspension was re-done three years ago and new brake pads were installed in 2014. In 2015, the drivetrain was removed once more so that the transmission and engine could be properly serviced. At this time, a new clutch disk was fitted, the seals and an aluminum ring in the transmission were replaced, all six carburetors were cleaned, the timing was set, the fuel pumps were repaired, fuel lines were replaced, and the top of the engine was blueprinted. In 2016, further work was performed, including repairing small cracks from age in the tube frame brackets, cleaning and re-sealing the undercarriage, and replacing all the hoses. The air conditioning system was serviced and blows cold, the clutch (including the master and slave cylinders) was replaced, and small dents in the aluminum fenders were repaired. To return the car to factory specifications, the bulky square reflectors on the rear fenders were removed, correct Sebring mirrors were installed, and the bull that had been added to the rear panel was also removed. The roof, engine lid, and rear portion of the car were repainted. While the original leather interior remains in great condition, the carpeting was replaced 10 years ago.This is an attractive, well-sorted, low-body Countach that is being offered by its owner of 22 years. Many of these cars have become the victims of modifications and a lack of maintenance, but this example remains entirely stock and has always been regularly driven and carefully serviced. The owner reports that it is incredible to drive on fast mountain roads and that the car is rust and accident free. Included with the sale are extensive records and photos documenting all of the work the owner had done to the car, import records from 1984, the original owner’s manual, original engine manual, and two reprinted technical manuals. This Countach is an exceptional classic supercar that will keep turning heads for decades to come.

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1983 Ferrari 512 BBi

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Description: 340 bhp, 4,942 cc horizontally opposed 12-cylinder engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension with unequal-length A-arms, twin rear coil springs, an anti-roll bar, hydraulic dampers, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in.Formerly the property of several well-known collectorsFinished in its original color combinationRetains its matching-numbers engineIncludes original books and jackThe 365 GT4 BB came along in 1974. The name translated to 365 cubic centimeters per cylinder, grand touring, four-cam Berlinetta Boxer. The 4.4-liter flat-12 was mid-mounted, and it was the first Ferrari use of a toothed belt to drive the overhead camshafts. Like its predecessors, the 365 GT4 BB used steel for the main structure and aluminum for the hood, doors, and engine access cover. Suspension was all independent, along with a multi-tube chassis using square and rectangular sections that were much easier for the factory to fabricate.Ferrari built upon the success of the 365 GT4 BB beginning in late 1976 with the introduction of the 512 BB. The name reverted to Ferrari’s more typical liters/cylinders nomenclature. The new 512 featured a small chin spoiler in front, NACA ducts on the lower body sides ahead of the rear wheels, four taillights (in lieu of six), and a tail 1.5 inches longer.Introduced to the public at the 1981 Frankfurt Salon, the new 512 BBi offered the advanced and reliable Bosch K-Jetronic fuel-injection system for the first time in a 12-cylinder Ferrari, hence the “i” in its nomenclature. A handful of cosmetic upgrades accompanied the new model. Exposed driving lights were added at the front, and rectangular parking lights were fitted adjacent to the exhausts at the rear. For the Ferrari faithful, the addition of the fuel injection was a welcome change, and the 512 BBi is generally considered to be the most civilized of Ferrari’s Berlinetta Boxers.The change from carburetors to fuel injection brought about an increase of 20 foot-pounds of torque, helping the engine to feel much more tractable overall. Performance remained extraordinary, and the 512 BBi could reach 60 mph from a dead start in just 5.4 seconds, leading to an estimable top speed of 174 mph. By the time production came to an end and the 512 BBi was replaced with the Testarossa, Ferrari had built just 1,007 examples.This exceptional 512 BBi, originally finished in the same color is sports today, was first imported into the United States by William Lyon in July 1983. It was then acquired by Michael Jean of Denver, Colorado, in 1985. Shortly thereafter, he sold the car to another gentleman in Colorado, noting that the BBi had only 2,700 miles at the time. In 1987, with less than 3,000 miles, the car was acquired by Karl Dedolph of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Dedolph maintained the car for the next five years when he offered it for sale in 1992. Eight years later, the Ferrari was offered once more where it was bought by Richard Scott of Sidney, Ohio. At the time, it was noted that the odometer had been changed. Several years later, the 512 BBi was acquired by collector Robert Iannucci, who maintained it until 2011, when he sold it to Frank Gallogly of Lakeville, Connecticut. It was subsequently acquired by the current consignor in 2012. Today, the car presents exceptionally well and remains highly original throughout. The BBi also retains is original owner’s manuals in their original pouch, as well as the original jack in its bag.Sergio Scaglietti, whose firm made the bodies, noted, “It was something special. It was the last car where we made everything by hand.” We cannot say it better.

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1989 Lamborghini Countach 25th Anniversary

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Description: 425 bhp, 5,167 cc DOHC V-12 engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel Girling ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.One of 657 25th Anniversary editionsAll-original with just 3,620 kilometers (2,245 miles) from newRecent service by Lamborghini of DallasImportant and highly collectible 1980s supercar iconAs the successor to what is considered the world’s first supercar—the Lamborghini Miura—the encore begged to be nothing short of sensational. When the Countach was revealed in 1971, the automotive world was once again set on its ear. Astonishing is perhaps the best word to describe the new Countach, as no one had ever seen anything like it. Remarkably, 45 years later, the car still looks like something out of the future; words that describe few, if any, other vehicles ever produced. Its angular, origami shape was attributed to Marcello Gandini of Bertone; its various scoops, scallops, and spoilers only added to the muscular, if not menacing, design. As if the geometric lines were not enough, the Countach was fitted with scissor doors, which have since been copied time and again by tuners, designers, and purveyors of fast machinery.A special 25th Anniversary Edition was announced in 1988 to celebrate a quarter century of Lamborghini automobiles. Similar to the then 5000 QV version of the Countach, the unique offering sported considerable styling revisions credited to designer Horacio Pagani. Among the notable changes included the enlargement and extension of the rear airbox intakes, OZ Racing wheels shod with Pirelli P Zero tires, a redesigned engine bay cover, new rear bumper, and myriad aerodynamic refinements which also improved engine cooling. Of course, there was also the enormous signature rear wing. It was the fastest Countach to date with 0–60 mph in 4.7 seconds and a top speed of 183 mph. The special model was offered through 1990 with just 657 examples produced.This incredible Countach has traveled just 3,620 kilometers (2,245 miles) from new! It is a U.S.-delivery car finished in white with a red leather interior trimmed with contrasting white piping. Fully equipped with air conditioning, an Alpine stereo radio, power windows, and power seats, it has been in the consignor’s collection, an avid Lamborghini collector, for the past five years. Most importantly, it was comprehensively serviced by Lamborghini of Dallas in 2012. Included at the time, the air conditioning was serviced, exhaust cats removed (returning the car to European specification), and a cracked flywheel replaced. The original exhaust cats and the flywheel are included with the sale. Copies of the invoice, totaling more than $21,000, are included on file. Since then, this commemorative edition has been driven just 120 miles.In addition to the low miles, the car remains all original and the consignor notes that it has never been shown. The original owner’s manual is included in the wallet. A virtual time warp example back to 1989, this Countach is perfect for the most discerning collector who values both authenticity and originality first and foremost.

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1939 Lincoln-Zephyr Three-Window Coupe

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Description: 110 hp, 267.3 cu. in. L-head V-12 engine, three-speed sliding gear transmission with two-speed Columbia rear axle, solid front axle with transverse leaf spring, three-quarter floating rear axle with transverse leaf spring, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 125 in.Formerly owned by Paul Teutul Jr. Very rare unmodified example; one of 2,500 three-window coupes built for 1939Spectacular example of a pioneering streamlined American automobileEquipped with Columbia two-speed rear axle for effortless highway cruisingHighly desirable production year with its Art Deco trim and waterfall grilleThe first Lincoln-Zephyr was introduced in November 1935 for the 1936 model year. Its streamlined teardrop styling was credited to designer John Tjaarda of the Briggs Body Company, with help from a young Ford designer, Eugene T. “Bob” Gregorie, as well as input from Edsel Ford. The sturdy monocoque body was an early attempt at unitized construction, while its name echoed that of the new-fangled streamlined modern diesel trains in operation on the Burlington Railroad. Ultimately, the trio was credited with fashioning the first successful streamlined car in America. The Zephyr was powered by a new V-12 engine derived from the standard Ford flathead V-8. The advanced styling and novel powerplant arguably kept the Lincoln division of Ford Motor Company alive through the Great Depression. Formerly in the collection of Paul Teutul Jr. of American Chopper fame, this striking unmodified Lincoln was the feature car in episode 13, season 8 of Velocity Channel’s Chasing Classic Cars with Wayne Carini. In addition, it starred in a prominent Hewlett Packard commercial, entitled Making a Mark, which featured Teutul driving this car along New York’s Hudson River.It remains in stock trim and is beautifully presented in elegant black over a grey broadcloth interior, with a gorgeous headliner, door panels, and a back of seat storage compartment, as well as a near perfect trunk compartment with a special “Zephyr” script emblazoned on the back seat trunk panel. This example has the stunning and distinctive split rear oval window, as well as a magnificently restored dashboard with a large round center binnacle. Just as importantly, it has the one-year-only unique shifter arm that connects through the side of the center console, as opposed to the floor. Options include radio, cigar lighter, dual side view mirrors, a driver side A-pillar-mounted spotlight, and, most importantly, the Columbia two-speed rear end for effortless highway cruising.Considered one of the first and most iconic Art Deco American cars, its forward-looking stance gives the Zephyr the appearance of motion while standing still. This car amazingly escaped the fate of customization, as is often the case with these high-style three-window coupes, and is as stunning today as when it was new.

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1933 Rolls-Royce Phantom II All-Weather Tourer

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Description: Est. 120 bhp, 7,688 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with a single two-jet carburetor, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension, and four-wheel servo-assisted brakes. Wheelbase: 150 in.A very rare U.S.-delivery “Derby” Phantom II, with stunning linesSpecially ordered Continental-specification engine and suspensionFormerly owned by the Luks Family and Edward McAnlisBeautifully restored over a 20-year periodDocumented with copies of original build paperworkIn the early 1930s, most of the handful of Rolls-Royce Phantom II chassis delivered to the United States were of the AJS and AMS series, purposely built for the American market and regularly fitted with Brewster coachwork. There was a certain élan, however, to ordering a “true” Derby chassis, such as the high-performance Continental or its ilk, and having coachwork built in its home country by one of the fabled artisans to royalty. The car offered here is one of those wonderful rarities.Chassis 110MY was ordered on 19 October 1932 by A.A. Hutchinson of New York City. The chassis was delivered to the fabled London coachbuilders Hooper on 4 December 1933 and was bodied with this unusual and attractive open tourer, featuring roll-up windows in a nod to the East Coast climate and American tastes. Interestingly, Mr. Hutchinson specified the car with a “Continental-type engine and features such as springing and additional shock absorbers,” both as specified on the original build cards. These features gave the elegant Phantom II most of the performance characteristics of the famous Continental model, but in a more formal package—a true “wolf in sheep’s clothing.”The next known owner of the Phantom II was Paul Lutey of New York, who sold it in 1953 to Kraemer Luks of New Jersey. Mr. Luks and his wife, in particular, fell in love with the sleek Rolls, which would remain a treasured family heirloom for nearly 30 years, passing eventually to Mrs. Luks and then to their daughter, Cynthia Luks Martin. Only in 1982 did Mrs. Martin part with the prized Phantom II, selling it to the well-known Rolls-Royce enthusiast and collector Edward Ardis of Media, Pennsylvania.With the help of his friend, Roy Wilson, Mr. Ardis began restoring the car. While he sold it before completion to Lawrence and Jane MacElree, also of Pennsylvania, he was contracted to continue the work. Restoration was finally completed in the late 1990s by Sam Rawlins Service of Roswell, Georgia, for the present owner. It has been fastidiously and beautifully maintained in his renowned collection ever since, and he notes that during his ownership, he rebuilt the engine and installed a new radiator, keeping the car in tip-top running order.The car has a beautiful, modern appearance in British Racing Green with a butter-soft tan leather interior, matching soft top, and, in classic Rolls-Royce tradition, warm burled walnut surroundings. No less beautiful is the engine compartment, which has been detailed and features abundant brightwork, giving the impression of gazing into the back of a fine watch.Documented by copies of its original build records and other information supplied by the Hunt House and Rolls-Royce Foundation, this is among the most interesting and exciting Phantom IIs to recently come to market. It boasts decades of wonderful known history, a fascinating performance specification, gorgeous lines, and a quality restoration by marque specialists—truly the best of all worlds.

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2011 Porsche 911 GT2 RS

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Description: 620 bhp, 3,600 cc DOHC flat six-cylinder engine with twin turbochargers, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension, and front and rear carbon-ceramic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 92.5 in.Single ownership and just under 4,650 miles from newOne of only 500 examples producedThe fastest and most powerful 997-generation 911For the 993 and 996 generations of Porsche’s 911, the GT2 was the highest-performance iteration of the fabled sports car made available for road use. Originally built in order to meet homologation regulations for GT2-class motorsports, the aptly named GT2 took the 911’s performance one step further than the already manic Turbo, making for an invigorating and uncompromising performance machine.Following the success of the new 996 and 997 GT3 RS models and looking to silence critics in support of the new Nissan GT-R, Porsche developed a lightweight, skunk-works model of the GT2 in an effort to take back the Nürburgring record from Godzilla. Enter the 997 GT2 RS. As if the ‘standard’ GT2 didn’t provide enough performance, Porsche figured that it could extract a little bit more performance from what was the most powerful road-going 911 to date. To achieve this, Porsche took a back-to-basics approach by adding power while shedding weight. One hundred and fifty-four pounds of weight was shed through fitting a single-mass flywheel, carbon-fiber hood, replacing various steel components with aluminum, fitting single-lug wheels, and even shedding nine pounds through fitting thinner carpeting. Through an increase of 2.9 psi of boost to the turbochargers, Porsche’s engineers were able to add 90 horsepower to its 3.6-liter engine, bringing total output to 620 horsepower. This made the GT2 RS the most powerful 911 ever produced upon its unveiling. Of the 500 GT2 RSs produced, just over 20 percent of those were destined for United States customers, and this is one such example. Produced in December of 2010 as the 409th GT2 RS built, it was finished in Carrera White with a contrasting Black/Red leather interior and black wheels. Further options include lightweight carbon-fiber bucket seats and satellite navigation. Having been lovingly maintained in the custodianship of just one owner from new, the car retains all of its original books and two sets of keys. It was serviced in mid-2016 and remains in outstanding condition throughout. As high-horsepower Porsches have been commanding strong interest in the market, the GT2 RS remains as one of the most desirable 911s produced in the last decade. Refining the GT2 platform by adding more weight and less power, the GT2 RS commands all of its driver’s attention. Finished in a highly attractive color combination and coming from single ownership with just under 4,650 miles on its odometer, this GT2 RS would be a wonderful addition to the garage of the enthusiast looking for the most performance that the 997-generation of 911s has to offer.

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1958 Porsche 356 A 1600 S Cabriolet

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Description: 88 bhp, 1,582 cc OHV horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, torsion bar independent front suspension, swing axle independent rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 82.7 in.Revered Porsche 356 A 1600 SuperMatching-numbers engine and transmissionSuperb fresh restorationWhile the 911 is Porsche’s longest-lived model, it was the 356 that established the marque’s sterling reputation. More than 76,000 were built from 1948 to 1965: coupes, cabriolets, and speedsters. While its basic form changed little, there were several generations. The first cars, with split windshields, continued through 1954. Six engines were offered, three of them available in the United States: 1,100, 1,300, and 1,500 cubic centimeters. The larger two were available in “S” (Super) form with upgraded crankshafts, bearings and camshafts, plus a larger carburetor and higher compression.An updated model, the 356 A, debuted in 1956, with curved windshield and modified suspension. A new “1600” engine replaced the old 1.5-liter powerplant, and it, too, had a Super version, now making 88 horsepower. A new instrument panel included a tachometer and a fuel gauge (previous cars had relied on a reserve ration). A lowered floor afforded extra leg room in a surprisingly spacious little car.By far, most Porsche bodies were built by Reutter of Stuttgart. Karosseriesfabrik Reutter & Co. had a long alliance with Porsche. Established in 1906, the firm was an early user of aluminum and also pioneered lightweight bodies using Weymann fabric patents. They had built prototypes for Ferdinand Porsche in 1932, for the genesis of the Volkswagen, and also bodied BMWs and Mercedes in the thirties. When the Porsche company returned to Germany from Austria in 1950, Reutter leased them some factory space for car production, and built the early bodies. This 1600 S Cabriolet is an exceptionally well–dialed-in example. The deep rich black paint highlights an extremely straight body with excellent contours and panel fit. It has a white convertible top and the upholstery is done in brown leather. The dashboard is fitted with a Blaukpunkt multi-band radio. It drives every bit as well as it looks. The car benefits from a full restoration, less than 250 miles ago, and careful maintenance. It has been recently serviced by European Car Specialists of Costa Mesa, California. Accompanied by a Porsche Certificate of Authenticity confirming its Super pedigree and production on 17 July 1958, this 356 is bound to please the most discerning Porschephile.

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1963 Lincoln Continental Convertible

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Description: 320 bhp, 430 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, three-speed automatic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel power hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 123 in.An American automotive design iconFactory air conditioningElegant presentationAfter the relatively unsuccessful debut of its all-new 1958 model, Lincoln designers went back to the drawing boards to create a new car that would debut in 1961. Focusing on quantity, the line would be pared down to a single model, the Continental, which would be offered only as a four-door sedan and as a four-door convertible, with the latter being the last of its kind to be built by a Detroit automaker, when the model was discontinued in 1969.The new Continental, created under the leadership of Elwood Engel, was smaller than earlier models. The decision to “downsize” the Continental resulted in one of its most distinctive features: suicide-style rear doors, as there was simply not enough room between the wheel wells for four doors, and a generous rear passenger seat without hinging the back doors at the rear.In order to accommodate an ultra-low ride height, the Continental boasted an innovative driveshaft that was lowered as far as possible to reduce the interior tunnel. Other advanced features included extensive factory rustproofing, curved window glass, and a standard one-year 1,000-mile factory warranty, which was the first of its kind offered on an American car. Each Continental underwent exhaustive road testing prior to its delivery to its original owner. It is no wonder that the model was such a lasting success, with styling that would be used through 1969, and it has become one of Lincoln’s design landmarks.The Continental offered here is optioned with power seats, factory air conditioning, and power steering. Its current owner purchased this Lincoln 10 years ago from a long-term owner and enjoys regular drives in it from his home in Northern California to Lake Tahoe. Four years ago, Kreations Auto Body in Eureka, California, gave it a new coat of black paint and installed a new convertible top. At this time, Cashman rebuilt the hydraulics for the top to make sure everything was in working order. Virtually all other aspects of the car remain unrestored and in excellent original condition. It is believed that the previous owner had the engine rebuilt, but any documentation regarding that has been lost.Today, the car is attractively presented and in excellent running and driving condition, and it remains wonderfully elegant and true to the Lincoln tradition.

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1972 Maserati Ghibli SS 4.9

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Description: 335 bhp, 4,930 cc DOHC V-8 engine, five-speed manual transmission, upper and lower A-arms, coil spring and anti-roll bar front suspension, live axle, radius arms, semi-elliptical leaf spring rear suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 100.4 in.Supercar icon with legendary styling and V-8 performanceOne of just 1,149 coupes built over the production runRare and final year of the desirable 4.9-liter SSDocumented, largely known ownership and service historyLike its sisters the Mistral and later the Khamsin, the Ghibli was named after European winds. Maserati’s penchant for using such nomenclature proved apropos as the cars were able performers in contemporary road tests. Being of a small boutique manufacturer, the Ghibli shared its tubular chassis with other cars in the company repertoire: the Quattroporte sedan and the Mexico coupe. The Ghibli’s wheelbase was reduced 3.5 inches from the Mexico, and the strictly two-seater was blessed with a gorgeous body all its own. Unveiled at the 1966 Turin Auto Show, the beautiful lines were penned by Giorgetto Giugiaro, then chief designer at Ghia. The styling was long, low, and wide, with hidden headlamps and a grille prominently punctuated by the firm’s trident emblem foreshadowing the styling of Maseratis to-come in the 1970s. Production began in 1967, and the Ghibli quickly proved a worthy competitor against the Ferrari 275 GTB and Lamborghini 400 GT, its chief rivals. Overall height was just 46 inches, despite being 180 inches long, making this one of the longest European two-seaters ever built. The long hood/short deck proportions were flawless, and the Ghibli looks perfect even when compared to today’s standards. The svelte body was so sexy it failed to dissuade seven-foot basketball great Wilt Chamberlain, who purchased a Ghibli when new. Maserati upped the ante in 1970 with the introduction of the SS model, like this example, featuring a 335-horsepower 4.9-liter engine with solid-state ignition, four Weber 42 DCNF carburetors, and a top speed of 175 mph. In total, just 1,149 coupes and 125 spiders were produced over the production run.This stunning and handsome example is from the Ghibli’s final year, made more desirable in very limited production 4.9 SS configuration. Finished in iconic and original Ghibli Red over a sumptuous tan leather interior, it is equipped with power steering, power windows, air conditioning, five-speed manual transmission, and AM-FM stereo/cassette radio. According to the consignor, it is well documented, including largely known ownership and service history from new with invoices going back to the original owner. The consignor adds that the Ghibli has very strong mechanicals and boasts a cosmetic restoration of the engine compartment in late-2016. Given its rarity and stunning good looks, this is a special opportunity to purchase one of the most desirable GT cars of the early supercar era.

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1931 Chrysler CG Imperial Dual-Cowl Phaeton

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Description: 125 bhp, 384.8 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission with overdrive and freewheeling, solid front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 145 in.An excellent genuine, authentic, and well-known exampleOne of about 10 known survivors of 85 originally builtOriginal chassis, engine, and bodyFormerly of the Terry Radey and Joseph Morgan collectionsRestored by the respected craftsman Bud HicksBy 1931, Chrysler’s Imperial had grown from simply an upmarket version of lesser models into something truly unique and special. It had been graced with classically beautiful styling, which was inspired by the Cord L-29, and was noteworthy for its massive 145-inch wheelbase chassis and smooth 125-horsepower straight-eight. Not only was this car big and powerful, but it was also a superb driver, with advanced steering geometry that made it shockingly easy to swing through wide corners at speed. The term “driver’s car” is seldom applied to American Classics of this era, but it is apt for the Imperial.Drivers with funds to spare could opt for “semi-custom” bodywork that had been supplied by the LeBaron imprint of Briggs and styled by Ralph Roberts. With aviation in the forefront of American culture, the open LeBaron custom body styles adopted aircraft-like leather interiors that wrapped around the cowl and over the doors. Riding in one of the 85 Dual-Cowl Phaetons built in 1931 was like coasting along the ground in one’s biplane.Surviving 1931 Imperial Dual-Cowl Phaetons are scarcer than their 1932 or 1933 counterparts, with only 10 examples known to exist today.AN ORIGINAL IMPERIAL DUAL-COWL PHAETONImperial historian Joseph Morgan has traced and documented the known ownership histories of many of the surviving Dual-Cowl Phaetons. He notes that the example offered here, serial number 7802580, was acquired during the 1950s by Joe Fisher of Media, Pennsylvania, an early enthusiast of Classic Era Imperials, who performed the first restoration. Mr. Fisher retained the car until his death in 1982, at which point it was sold to the well-known Canadian collector, Terry Radey, who submitted the Chrysler to Bud Hicks of Marshall, Michigan, for restoration.Now retired, Mr. Hicks was considered one of the Midwest’s foremost professional restorers, winning numerous honors in CCCA and concours d’elegance competitions nationwide. In a recent telephone conversation with RM Sotheby’s Research and Editorial team, he recounted that the Chrysler was a solid, complete older restoration, with good body wood and strong, largely rust-free original sheet metal, none of which had to be replaced in the course of the fresh body-off, ground-up restoration. The car was finished in “Hicks Yellow,” the unusual and attractive hue regularly used on his personal cars, with an interior in rich forest green leather. The restoration was awarded a CCCA National First Prize.Mr. Hicks remains extremely proud of the Chrysler, and he considers it one of the finest restorations that he ever completed—a fact still evident in how well-preserved its finishes are, inside and out, to this day. Mr. Morgan, too, speaks well of the correctness, noting that the car was “done very well.” No surprise, the Imperial historian eventually acquired the Chrysler for his own personal collection and enjoyed it enough that he would own it twice over the intervening years. After over a decade in another private collection, it joined the current owner’s wonderful stable several years ago and has enjoyed good maintenance and care ever since.A beautiful and rare example of what is arguably one of the most beautiful Full Classics, this Chrysler deserves a fine home in a new collection—one where its excellent older restoration will continue to be looked after and preserved for many years to come. It is due for a fresh round of show appearances, or, given the CG Imperial’s famous drivability, enjoyment on CARavans and tours. The possibilities are beautiful and endless.

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1962 Alfa Romeo Giulietta SZ II 'Coda Tronca'

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Description: 100 hp, 1,290 cc DOHC inline four-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with transverse quadrilaterals, coil springs, hydraulic shock absorbers, stabilizer bar, rear suspension with rigid axle, upper wishbone, longitudinal push rods, coil springs, hydraulic shock absorbers, and front disc and rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 88.5 in.One of 44 “Coda Tronca” examples builtEligible for historic racing and track events the world overAn older restoration that presents wellIncludes spare 1.3-litre engine, believed to be originalThe Sprint Zagato is the ultimate sporting development of Alfa Romeo’s legendary Giulietta. Two series of Sprint Zagato were produced between 1957 and 1962. In the hands of private racers, the SZ won a series of impressive races, oftentimes outperforming cars of greater engine capacity. The Lotus Elite and the Abarth Simca 1300 proved to be formidable competitors, so in order to remain competitive, Alfa offered the second series SZ. In collaboration with the Servizio Esperienze Speciale (test department), Carrozzeria Zagato, and the results of aerodynamic studies by Kamm, the SZ II was born. Even with an engine of just 1.3 liters, the cars were very successful and surprisingly fast, capable of easily topping 120 mph. The lightweight bodywork by Zagato, in combination with specially tuned engines which featured more power thanks to high compression, tighter tolerances, more aggressive cams, and careful tuning, made the car a winner right out of the box. Initially, Zagato had to use an uneconomical method of private elaboration—requiring the coachbuilder to acquire the cars at full price, then dismantle and rebuild them (that situation changed in 1959). Once the chassis was sent to Zagato, more than 300 hours was required to build the body, resulting in an expensive automobile, keeping production at a minimum. Little more than 200 examples were built, the last of which were 44 “coda tronca” versions such as this example. Most were modified in some manner, as few were actually used as touring cars. To fully exploit the car’s potential, Ercole Spada, a newly employed designer, fashioned more aerodynamic bodywork. Bodies with lower roofs and long tails ending in a Kamm treatment (very much in the style of the Giulia 1600 TZ which immediately followed in production) helped the car gain top speed. Other technological advancements included Girling front disc brakes and three-shoe big finned rear drums, along with a standard five-speed transmission. A higher final drive ratio was sometimes included in order to enhance speeds made capable by the streamlined body shape. Along with Giulia-type instruments, the SZ IIs featured steel inner wheels with aluminum outer rings. The SZ’s inherent stability and instantaneous response to steering input made it a driver’s car par excellence and the preferred choice of many private racers. When new, the car proved virtually unbeatable, and its desirability continues today in historic motorsports as it remains eligible for a wide variety of prestigious events. According to the consignor, chassis number 207 was completed on 11 August 1962 and sold on 22 November that same year in Vercelli, Italy. While little is known of its subsequent history until September 1993, it is understood by experts to have been in the United States for some time under the ownership of renowned enthusiast Peter Sachs. It was later imported to Japan by a Swiss owner. Mr. H. Suzuki sold it to the consignor, a U.S. enthusiast of Italian cars with a collection of competition-oriented vehicles, in 2014.While in the consignor’s possession, Zagato body number stampings of “634” have been located, fitting properly within the sequence of Zagato factory numbers and confirming its authenticity. Chassis number 207 is currently fitted with a non-original Alfa Romeo 1750 engine (re-stamped to read: “AR00120 01011”). Accompanying the car is a 1300 Type 750 Veloce engine, number AR00120 00634 (long block, unrestored), believed to be original to the car. Also, paperwork including Japanese export and shipping documents, United States import documents, email correspondence concerning its purchase, and the 2014 purchase receipt, are included with the sale. An older restoration, the car is described as an excellent driver. The body has straight panels and both the brightwork and paintwork remain highly presentable. The window glass, lenses, and emblems are all intact and in good order, and the windshield appears to have been replaced during the car’s tenure in Japan. A smart set of headlight covers are installed and the car retains its rare bi-metal wheels. The interior also displays nice cosmetics, including a rare Nardi wood rimmed steering wheel, correct under dash mounted windscreen washer bag, original switchgear, and proper Zagato seats.A rare and a very attractive Alfa Romeo, this SZ II is eligible for a host of prestigious international rally and historic driving events.

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1967 Jaguar E-Type Series 1 4.2-Litre Roadster

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Description: 265 bhp, 4,235 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with triple SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with transverse wishbones, torsion bars, telescopic shocks, and an anti-roll bar; independent rear suspension with lower transverse tubular links and twin coil springs; and four-wheel Dunlop twin-circuit hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96 in.Exceptional, well-documented concours-quality restorationMatching chassis number, cylinder head engine number, and gearboxFeatures matching removable hardtopIncludes tool roll, jack and hammer, and reproduction owner’s manualJaguar Daimler Heritage Trust (JDHT) CertificateOnce called “the most beautiful car in the world” by Enzo Ferrari, the Jaguar E-Type persists as a timeless icon of automotive design. Offered is one of the finest 4.2-liter Series 1 E-Types available. From June 2013 to September 2015, it underwent a painstaking, cost-no-object restoration by Chuck Rumschlag of The Color Works in Las Lunas, New Mexico. Stripped down to its bare essentials, the E-Type was re-assembled to specifications far exceeding even factory quality. The body and underlying structure received thorough overhauls, resulting in an arrow-straight build with tight panel gaps and mirror-quality shine. Under the skin, the frame was strengthened with rigid tubes inserted in the frame members and tied within the structure, greatly reducing the E-type’s tendency to flex. Fresh, gleaming Opalescent Silver Blue paint and an underside treatment help ensure that it will remain corrosion free for years to come. New chrome, rubber, and trim finish off the beautiful exterior. The springs, shocks, brakes, and steering were properly refreshed and detailed. Modern tires wrapped around all-new polished stainless wire wheels round out the handling improvements made to the car. The spare has never touched the ground.Improving the reliability, performance, and drivability of the renowned Jaguar XK 4.2-liter inline six was another restoration goal. Atop the rebuild, stainless headers (replacing the old ceramic-coated units, included) feed into a full polished stainless steel exhaust system. Improved cooling is aided by a higher-volume aluminum water pump and high-volume fan, while charging duties are better served by a modern alternator running through a completely new, properly grounded correct harness. The extremely well-detailed engine runs beautifully and is afforded more relaxed cruising with a preferred 3.31 final-drive ratio. The end result is an E-Type that can perform as good as it looks, while evenly idling in traffic or grand touring at speed.Inside, the complete interior was replaced in Jaguar Navy Blue leather, Ambla, wool, and correct vinyl as specified. Again, modern refinements aiding safety and comfort include three-point “Jaguar” safety belts, Dyna-mat sound and heat proofing, and MP3 playback through a period-looking radio. Outstanding fit and finish best describe this E-Type. Virtually all components were either refurbished, replaced, or discretely upgraded. Included is just about everything an owner needs: original tool kit, jack, knock-off hammer, matching removable hard top, detailed restoration log, and even the 2015 Santa Fe Concours trophy obtained at its only national outing. Furthermore, the comprehensive restoration has been meticulously documented by the consignor, for which a detailed report can be found on file and will be available for review at the Access the Knowledge desk onsite. This Jaguar has been renovated to a very high standard and would be an asset to most any collection. You will find no greater opportunity to get your hands on a Series 1 E-Type of this quality.

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1936 Bentley 3½-Litre Sedanca Coupe

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Description: 105 bhp, 3,669 cc OHV inline six-cylinder engine with two SU carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension with hydraulic shock absorbers, and mechanical brakes. Wheelbase: 126 in.One of the most beautiful 3½-Litre BentleysSpectacular lightweight, aerodynamic one-off coachworkCommissioned by its original owner for a Royal Automobile Club tourFormer Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award-winnerFeatured in many important Bentley reference textsThis Bentley 3½-Litre, chassis B111FC, is absolutely unique, as tailored by Windovers for its original owner, B. Gootnick, who accepted delivery in March of 1936. The chassis and build information sheets for this car, copies of which are on file, state that the car was built for “Town work and touring . . . the car will be used for RAC rally and acceleration should be ‘specially considered.’” Undoubtedly, Mr. Gootnick was a gentleman, but he was a gentleman with a lead foot.As noted in Michael Ellman-Brown’s book, Bentley: The Silent Sports Car, 1931–1941, chassis number B111FC “could easily have come from the drawing board of a continental coachbuilder. Although the rear portion of the roof has the appearance of a drophead coupe and is fabric-covered, it is in fact fixed; the hood irons are dummies. Also unusual on this car is the very narrow scuttle section, necessitating widening of the bonnet top at the rear, in order to achieve a more graceful flow into the door, the leading edge of which is forward of the norm, because of the rake of the windscreen. The wheel discs are also unusual for an English coachbuilder, adding to the continental flavor.”The car’s subsequent collector ownership included the well-known Bentley and Rolls-Royce enthusiast, Dr. Mark Sheppard. Following Dr. Sheppard’s passing in 1978, it was sold to the renowned West Coast collector Herbert Boyer, who exhibited it at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1983, winning 1st in Class and the Lord Montagu Trophy. Consistent with his reputation, Mr. Boyer then commissioned a fresh body-off restoration of the car before showing it yet again at Pebble Beach, in 1993. It was later acquired by the Blackhawk Collection, and passed in 2002 to Chuck Swimmer, who, a year later, returned it to Pebble Beach. When one considers how seldom a car is invited to that famed event, that this car appeared every 10 years for 30 years is incredible, indeed!Boasting an honest and prestigious provenance, the car is listed on page 96 of Stanley Sedgwick’s seminal tome on the marque, All the Pre-War Bentleys – As New. In addition, it is pictured on page 175 of the 2003 edition of Johnnie Green’s Bentley: Fifty Years of the Marque. It is accompanied to sale here by the aforementioned Hunt House documentation, as well as by information received from the Rolls-Royce Foundation. The car remains in fine condition throughout, evidence of its good care, with paint, interior, chrome, and brightwork that all present very nicely. The tool kit in the boot is complete, and rather spectacular in its own right.In many ways, B111FC represents the “Silent Sports Car’s” first tentative steps back toward its performance roots. Specified with lightweight bodywork for fast touring, with aggressive modern lines, it could be considered the “3½-Litre Continental”—one of the quickest and most attractive Derby Bentleys of its era.

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1931 Pierce-Arrow Model 41 Convertible Sedan

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Description: 132 hp, 385 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine with two-barrel updraft Stromberg carburetor, four-speed manual transmission with freewheeling, solid front and live rear axles with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 147 in.Formerly of the Matt and Barbara Browning collectionRestored by Pierce-Arrow specialist Eric RosenauPebble Beach Concours d’Elegance award-winnerReportedly one of only four examples built in 1931For its top-of-the-line Model 41 series of 1931, Pierce-Arrow revived the splendor of past days with a majestic 147-inch-wheelbase chassis, carrying a new 132-horsepower straight-eight, the most powerful eight-cylinder engine in its class. A deeper radiator shell and heightened brightwork effectively offset the growing trend to more restrained exterior colors, while further technical innovations to the chassis included free-wheeling, allowing for easy downhill coasting without the need to disengage the transmission or depress the clutch pedal.Pierce-Arrow offered the Model 41 with a variety of luxe “semi-custom” bodies, produced by the renowned coachbuilders LeBaron. Indications are that only about 25 LeBaron bodies were ordered for the Model 41, in all styles, and only four of those were the four-door convertible sedan. Especially attractive in its subtle design, the convertible sedan bears a striking resemblance to LeBaron’s work on Chrysler and Packard chassis of this same era, including the distinctive beltline molding and very long hoodline, which emphasize its length and power.The convertible sedan offered here is perhaps the most famous and well-respected example. Its history is known back to the early 1950s, when it was purchased by the late, well-known enthusiast James Weston of California. Mr. Weston subsequently sold the Pierce-Arrow, in excellent original condition, to Matt and Barbara Browning of Ogden, Utah, in 1972. The Brownings were, in their time, the most renowned Pierce-Arrow collectors in the country, building a wonderful private museum that’s depth, breadth, and quality has yet to be surpassed. All of their cars were beautifully, correctly restored or excellent original examples, and they remain some of the finest of their kind, 16 years after the collection was dispersed.This was the final car restored for the Brownings, and like many of the greatest automobiles in their collection, the work was done by the late Eric Rosenau, the foremost Pierce-Arrow authority on the West Coast, in a wonderful light and dark brown with orange pinstriping. Fresh out of restoration at the time of its sale in 2000, the car was shown by its new owner at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 2001, winning a class award. Today the paint, interior, and chassis remain beautiful and well-presented, a testament to the lasting quality of Mr. Rosenau’s renowned workmanship. Further, it is well-equipped with correct accessories, including not only the famous “archer” mascot, but twin side-mounted spares with contoured mirrors, Tilt-Ray headlamps, dual running lights, dual horns, and an Arrowlite taillight. The leather seats are adjustable, and footrests are provided for the rear passengers.A superb Pierce-Arrow with desirable “semi-custom” coachwork and a wonderful, pure history filled with the best of names, this would be an outstanding addition to any collection of Buffalo’s finest automobile.

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1999 Lamborghini Diablo VT

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Description: 492 bhp, 5,707 cc DOHC V-12 engine, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with coil springs and anti-roll bars, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.3 in.Two private owners from newOnly 7,300 original milesA fine example of a landmark Lamborghini modelUnveiled in 1993, the Diablo VT would be the second major iteration of Lamborghini’s supercar for the 1990s. The abbreviation “VT” stood for Viscous Traction, Lamborghini’s variable four-wheel-drive traction system, which greatly assisted in adequately putting the power down where the most traction is needed. When the rear wheels begin to lose traction, a maximum of 40% of additional torque can be diverted to the front wheels in an effort to maintain stability.Along with the welcome addition of traction control, Lamborghini also took the chance to address other areas that could use updates for the Diablo VT. In looking to increase driver and passenger comfort, upgrades included a lighter clutch and slightly bigger seats. Intakes were added at the front, near the driving lights, to assist with brake cooling. Power steering also helped to make the car easier to control, along with an active suspension with electronically adjustable dampers. Nineteen ninety-nine saw the introduction of the second-generation Diablo VT, which was built in small numbers before the modernized Audi-backed Diablo 6.0 was released. Thus, 1999 Diablo VTs had open headlights, a redesigned interior, ABS brakes as standard, 18-inch wheels, and a 529-horsepower 5.7-liter V-12. Exact production numbers for the 1999 VT Coupe are unknown, but Lamborghini sold only 265 cars that year, most of them being SVs and VT Roadsters. U.S.-specification VT coupes had SE30-style rear brake ducts and bumpers from the VT Roadster as standard, while for every other country, those features were optional. The 1999 Diablo VT is the final and most refined Diablo before Lamborghini entered the 21st century with the modernized and refined Audi-backed Diablo VT 6.0.Finished in the classic Italian color combination of Rosso over beige leather interior with red piping, this 1999 Diablo VT has had two collector owners from new. The current owner purchased the vehicle in 2003 and today it has 7,300 original miles, 2,800 of them being from the current owner. Photos documenting its engine-out service performed by Evans Automotive in Columbus, Ohio, in 2003 are included with the sale, as are as other service records.This Diablo VT represents the end of an era for Lamborghini, a time before Audi brought the brand into the modern era and encouraged production on a much larger scale.

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1983 Lotus Turbo Esprit

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Description: 210 hp, 2,174 cc DOHC sixteen-valve turbocharged four-cylinder engine, five-speed manual rear transaxle, independent front suspension with upper A-arms, lower lateral links, coil springs, and anti-roll bar; independent rear suspension with upper/lower lateral links, angled trailing arms, and coil springs; and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96 in.Highly desirable first-year example, in exceptional low-mileage conditionOne-of-one in Silver with full red leather interiorImpressive history fileRigorously maintained West Coast carOne of the most memorable designs of Italian styling legend Giorgetto Giugiaro, the groundbreaking Lotus Esprit was among the most famous sports cars of the late 1970s and early 1980s, and would remain in production, with the same basic shape but evolving drivetrains, for over 20 years. Low, dramatic, and advanced, with all-independent suspension, a mid-mounted sixteen-valve four-cylinder engine, and four-wheel disc brakes, its performance was as thrilling as its appearance. No wonder that, for a brief time in the films The Spy Who Loved Me and For Your Eyes Only, an Esprit briefly supplanted the Aston Martin as James Bond’s company car of choice.The Esprit featured in For Your Eyes Only meets an explosive end not long into the film, but its time on-screen was memorable enough to lock it into the minds of enthusiasts worldwide. It was the high-performance, 210-horsepower Turbo model, very similar to the car here, delivered in August 1983 as the 82nd of the 150 examples produced that year. Only seven Turbo Esprits were finished in Silver Metallic in 1983, and this is the only example to be built in that color with a red leather interior.First registered in Washington State, it was subsequently sold to California in the mid-1990s, and remained there until quite recently. Routinely serviced as-required over the years, it is reported to run and drive virtually as new, with 32,000 actual miles, and even the air conditioning still blowing ice-cold. In fact, in more recent times it was used extensively for touring California and the wine country. Its most recent servicing included new tires.A “one-of-one” Turbo Esprit with 007 élan, excellent low-mileage originality, and a fine service history, this car marks one of the finest of its kind ever offered at public sale. It is as dramatic and enthralling today as when it was new – a bold but accurate statement, just like the Turbo Esprit itself.

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