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Auction Description for Deutscher and Hackett: Important Australian & International Fine Art

Important Australian & International Fine Art

(143 Lots)

by Deutscher and Hackett

Platinum House

143 lots with images

August 27, 2014

Live Auction

Paddington Town Hall

Corner of Oxford Street & Oatley Road

Paddington, 2021 Australia

Phone: +61 02 9287 0600

Fax: +61 02 9287 0611

Email: info@deutscherandhackett.com

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MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, FOR A LITTLE GIRL, 1929, oil on canvas

Lot 1: MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, FOR A LITTLE GIRL, 1929, oil on canvas

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Description: MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, FOR A LITTLE GIRL, 1929, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Margaret Preston/29DIMENSIONS: 30.5 x 30.5 cmEXHIBITED: Margaret Preston, Grosvenor Galleries, Sydney, 7-31 August 1929, cat. 34, 10 gnsLITERATURE: Margaret Preston Catalogue Raisonné of paintings, monotypes and ceramics, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2005, CD-ROM compiled by Denise Mimmocchi, with Deborah Edwards and Rose PeelPROVENANCE: Leon Gellert, Sydney Elizabeth Gowland (née Gellert), Sydney, a gift from her father Thence by descent Anthony Gowland, Sydney Thence by descent Private collection, SydneyFor a Little Girl, 1929 brings into the public domain an exciting new work by Margaret Preston, virtually unknown until now. It joins those fabulous paintings of the late twenties such as the wonderfully adventurous Implement Blue, 1927 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney) and Aboriginal Flowers of 1928 (Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide), through to Pink Gum Blossoms, 1929 (private collection). Preston must have thought highly of them for in 1960 she gifted Implement Blue, 1927 to the Art Gallery. It is also significant that many of the paintings from this time are in our leading national, state and regional galleries. For a Little Girl 1929 was among these outstanding works included in Preston's exhibition at Sydney's Grosvenor Galleries, being her first solo show of paintings. It was a sell out, as Deborah Edwards noted, 'widely well reviewed (the Home and Art in Australia had been publicising the show months in advance as 'promising to be historical in the art world of Australia').' 1 Leon Gellert was a close associate of Preston's, publishing in 1929, the same year this work was painted, a limited edition of the fully illustrated book, Margaret Preston Recent Paintings. Gellert together with Sydney Ure Smith had been co-editor of Art in Australia since 1922. He was also associated with the stylishly elegant magazine, The Home, and wrote a widely read column for the Sydney Sunday Herald. The Preston 'book', however, was more a portfolio of reproductions of paintings and prints, and a number of her aphorisms. Although For a Little Girl, 1929 was not included, Gellert already had a 1913 Holiday Still Life by Preston, 'in the Impressionist manner'.2 By 1929 she had embraced more adventurous and individual ways, experimenting with form, colour and composition. In For a Little Girl, 1929, things of everyday life are transformed into visual adventures. The commonplace loaf of bread, ceramic jug, and bowl of red and white striped boiled sweets become things visually exciting as, flattened, they take on new shapes, allied to colours likewise decorative. Any tendency towards sweetness is banished through the power of expression, abstract ordering, and delight in underlying geometric forms. The interplay between the flatness of the picture plane and the illusion of depth is central to the painting's fascination. While surface flatness allied to the overall decorative quality wins, illusion keeps tantalizing the eye as it steps into the picture - up the edge of the table cloth, steady tread across its surface, a vertical floral-patterned wall, and then incredibly out-of-doors through the picture of the young girl feeding the birds. While narrative is banned from her painting, Preston illustrates its absence by introducing it into the picture within the picture. The floral patterning of single flowers and full vases has never looked so singular, wondrously changed by the alchemy of Prestons's brush. 1. Edwards, D., Margaret Preston, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2005, p. 139 2. Gellert, L., 'Margaret Preston was one of the greats', Sunday Telegraph, Sydney, 8 January 1967, p. 14, quoted in Butel, E., Margaret Preston: The Art of Constant Rearrangement, Viking in association with Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1985, p. 15 DAVID THOMAS

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MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, LORIKEETS, 1925, hand-coloured woodcut

Lot 2: MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, LORIKEETS, 1925, hand-coloured woodcut

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Description: MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, LORIKEETS, 1925, hand-coloured woodcut, 24th proof from an edition of 50SIGNED: signed with initials in image lower left: MP signed, numbered and titled below imageDIMENSIONS: 25.0 x 24.5 cmLITERATURE: Butler, R., The Prints of Margaret Preston: A Catalogue Raisonné, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1987, cat. 73, p. 101 (illus., another example)PROVENANCE: Private collection, SydneyRELATED WORK: Other examples of this print are held in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra (9th copy), and the Holmes à Court Collection, Western Australia

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MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, NATIVE FUCHSIA, 1925, hand-coloured woodcut

Lot 3: MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, NATIVE FUCHSIA, 1925, hand-coloured woodcut

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Description: MARGARET PRESTON 1875 - 1963, NATIVE FUCHSIA, 1925, hand-coloured woodcut, 6th proof from an edition of 50SIGNED: signed with initials in image lower right: MP signed, dated, numbered and titled below imageDIMENSIONS: 45.0 x 28.0 cmLITERATURE: Butler, R., The Prints of Margaret Preston: A Catalogue Raisonné, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1987, cat. 107, p. 123 (illus., another example)PROVENANCE: Private collection, SydneyRELATED WORK: Other examples of this print are held in the collections of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra (8th proof), and the Holmes à Court Collection, Western Australia (7th proof)

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ROLAND WAKELIN 1887 - 1971, HAYES STREET, NEUTRAL BAY, 1945, oil on board

Lot 4: ROLAND WAKELIN 1887 - 1971, HAYES STREET, NEUTRAL BAY, 1945, oil on board

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Description: ROLAND WAKELIN 1887 - 1971, HAYES STREET, NEUTRAL BAY, 1945, oil on boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: R Wakelin '45 inscribed verso: HAYES ST / NEUTRAL BAYDIMENSIONS: 63.0 x 76.0 cmEXHIBITED: Roland Wakelin Memorial Exhibition (1887-1971), Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 29 March - 17 April 1972, cat. 19 (label attached verso)PROVENANCE: Macquarie Galleries, Sydney Private collection, Sydney Thence by descent Private collection, SydneyRoland Wakelin, together with Grace Cossington Smith, Roy de Maistre and others is recognized as one of the pioneers of Post Impressionism and the modern movement in Australian art. His paintings of colour music, such as Synchromy in Orange Major, 1919 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney), are gems of their time, Sydney providing a rich source of inspiration. Soon after he arrived from New Zealand in 1912, he began painting landscapes in the open. The Fruit Seller of Farm Cove (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra) appeared in 1915, followed by such notable works as Down the Hills to Berry's Bay, 1916 (Art Gallery of New South Wales) and Boat Sheds, 1918 (Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales). Years later, like many of his contemporaries, he was fascinated by the building of the Sydney Harbour Bridge as each side of the great span edged towards the other, recalled in The Bridge Under Construction, c1928-29 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne). The historical interest of this work, in addition to its considerable aesthetic appeal, is shared with many other works, especially Hayes Street, Neutral Bay, 1945. Sydney once had one of the largest tram networks in the world, its usage peaking in 1945, when a record 405 million passenger journeys were made.1 The fact that the year of this happening and the painting Hayes Street, Neutral Bay are the same is no coincidence, for Wakelin painted in this same year another work featuring a tram, Lands Department, Macquarie Place, Sydney (private collection). The historical plot thickens. Hayes Street in Sydney's Neutral Bay runs down to the ferry wharf, the street having been named after the entrepreneur Patrick Hayes whose businesses included the Neutral Bay Ferry Company and the Oaks Steam Brick Company. When electrified in 1909, the Neutral Bay tram network had its depot on his old brickworks site.2 Steep grades obliged trams to be fitted with special brakes. The track down Hayes Street, however, was the steepest without such assistance, captured by Wakelin by the precarious placement of the tram on the very edge. To all this history, Wakelin added his love of colour and the oft employed drama of the skies in which clouds were the principal players. Referring to these 'softly lit' scenes, Leslie Walton, wrote, 'In these landscapes there is an absence of the traditional preoccupation with the effects of the hot sun, the electric blue skies, the brittle torrid climate so frequently felt and represented in Australian painting. They have a rich, luminous effect more akin to the subdued tonality of Constable.'3 In Hayes Street, Neutral Bay, subject and beauty are blended in luminosity. 1. 'Trams in Sydney', Wikipedia Encyclopedia, , viewed 11 July 2014 2. Hoskins, I., and Masson, L., 'Neutral Bay', Dictionary of Sydney, 2008, neutral_bay>, viewed 11 July 2014 3. Walton, L., The Art of Roland Wakelin, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1987, p. 28 DAVID THOMAS

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LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, LANDSCAPE, 1945, oil on canvas on board

Lot 5: LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, LANDSCAPE, 1945, oil on canvas on board

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Description: LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, LANDSCAPE, 1945, oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: L REES / 45DIMENSIONS: 37.0 x 44.5 cmEXHIBITED: Lloyd Rees Retrospective, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2 October - 2 November 1969, cat. 35, then touring to Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, November - December 1969; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1 - 28 February 1970; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 17 March -13 April 1970; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 1-31 May 1970; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 18 June - 21 July 1970; and Newcastle Regional Gallery, New South Wales, 1 - 31 August 1970 (label attached verso, lent by Mr and Mrs Douglas Carnegie, New South Wales)LITERATURE: Free, R., Lloyd Rees, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1972, cat. O99, p. [112], (illus.)PROVENANCE: Mr and Mrs Douglas Carnegie, New South Wales Brigadier R.W.P. Dodd, MC (CMF), Queensland Thence by descent Estate of Molly Dodd, QueenslandThe distinguished history of a work of art gives it special significance, a lustre in the present and honour in the future. So it is with this little gem by Lloyd Rees - painted during a vintage period; first purchased by one of the most discerning collectors of the day; and selected by the artist himself to be included in his memorable retrospective exhibition assembled by the Art Gallery of New South Wales to tour Australia in 1969-70. The exhibition revealed the grandeur of Rees's vision so in harmony with the lyrical appeal of nature. Rees is a painter's painter. Brett Whiteley admired the way in which his paintings are 'completely real descriptions, yet abstract at the same time'1 Of his works of evening, John Olsen wrote of their 'sombre elegiac tonalities that induced a feeling of a warm earth regretfully saying farewell to an evening sky'.2 While Rees's images often dwell on Olympian heights, he opens them up for all to enjoy through his mastery of the shared experience and the humanism with which they are imbued. The secluded moments, as in our painting, are just as special. Only a work of outstanding quality could get away with such a bland title as 'Landscape'. But the artist's intentions are clear and engaging, avoiding external associations, of location or narrative, to concentrate on the captured beauty of the vision. The swell of the land speaks of promise and plenitude, the earth watered by the stream flowing below as all is bathed in an atmosphere of pastoral peace. Technique and imagery harmonise as the easy gesture of the brush celebrates the broad sweep of the land. Drawn to the rhythms of the landscape, Rees commented, 'Subconsciously I've felt the hills have made me think of the feminine form - rhythm associated with figure and landscape.'3 The landscapes of Gerringong, Orange and Bathurst, had a special appeal for Rees, his wife Marjory having come from the latter. One recalls the earlier Evening on the Bathurst Hills, 1936 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney), September Landscape, Orange, 1944 (formerly Mrs John Baillieu, Melbourne), and Evening Landscape, Gerringong, 1946 (Art Gallery of New South Wales), all three being in Rees's 1969 retrospective. Together with Landscape, 1945, each is a work of unique beauty. Though inspired by the Australian scene, they are universal in their appeal, each possessing an inner life springing from the translation of the descriptive into the creative, enveloped by an atmosphere of gentle lyricism. 1. Whiteley, B., quoted in Artists Salute Lloyd Rees on the occasion of his ninetieth birthday [catalogue], Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 1985, p. 7 2. Olsen, J., 'Road to Berry', Art and Australia, vol. 5, no. 3, December 1967, p. 544 3. The artist, Free, R., Lloyd Rees, Lansdowne Press, Sydney, 1985, p. 51 DAVID THOMAS

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ARTHUR STREETON 1867 - 1943, COOGEE AND THE PACIFIC OCEAN, 1907, oil on wood panel

Lot 6: ARTHUR STREETON 1867 - 1943, COOGEE AND THE PACIFIC OCEAN, 1907, oil on wood panel

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Description: ARTHUR STREETON 1867 - 1943, COOGEE AND THE PACIFIC OCEAN, 1907, oil on wood panelSIGNED: signed with initials and inscribed lower right: COOGEE ASDIMENSIONS: 12.5 x 61.0 cmEXHIBITED: Streeton's Sydney Sunlight Exhibition, Bernard's Gallery, Melbourne, 1-5 October 1907, cat. 16LITERATURE: Streeton, A., The Arthur Streeton Catalogue, Melbourne, 1935, cat. 308 (in possession of Mr. E.F. Millar)PROVENANCE: Bernard's Gallery, Melbourne Mr E.F. Millar, Melbourne Thence by descent Private collection, MelbourneIn Australian art golden sunlight and Arthur Streeton are synonymous. Add to that the azure blue of skies over Sydney Harbour and the Pacific Ocean and you have gems that sparkle with all the freshness of the days when they were painted. Coogee and the Pacific Ocean, 1907 is a superb example. The vivacity of the technique expresses so engagingly the artist's immediate response to the brilliant play of light in harmony with the movement of the waters, blues transformed into frothy whites as the ocean meets the yellow sands of Coogee. From his first visit to Sydney in 1890, Coogee attracted Streeton, two of his early, 1890 masterpieces being 'Sunlight Sweet', Coogee and its companion The Blue Pacific. By that time, the newly opened Coogee Palace, featured in our painting, was also attracting Sydneysiders to its aquarium, indoor swimming baths, balcony promenade, bandstand, toboggan slides and donkey rides. The interior of its distinctive architectural dome was decorated in radiating blue and gold, with silver stars and rising sun and moon. Writing at the time to Walter Withers at Heidelberg in Melbourne, Streeton expressed his feeling for the area. 'Coogee is a very jolly place, on warm days that place (which is like a nest) is filled with smiles and sweet humanity.'1 Of the Pacific Ocean he waxed even more lyrical in a letter to Tom Roberts. 'The ocean is a big wonder, Bulldog [Tom Roberts's nickname]. What a great miracle. It's hard to comprehend it, like death and sleep. The slow, immense movement of this expanse moves one very strongly. You're made to clutch the rocks and be delighted, a dreadful heaving and soft eternity.'2 In Coogee and the Pacific Ocean, 1907, the figures enjoying the waves and on the foreshore speak of Streeton's engagement with people, the perfect harmony of paint and figuration enveloped within the breezy freshness of the atmosphere. It also has a freshness of vision that is particular to the panels he painted at this time. In 1906, the year before, he returned to Melbourne after his first sojourn in Great Britain. Visiting Sydney in July through into September of 1907, he saw again those places that had so appealed to him, now enriched with the experiences gained from years abroad. It was a remarkably fruitful time, some thirtyfive views full of the effervescence of the coming spring and glorious splendour of Sydney Harbour. While influenced by Impressionism and the masters of English landscape painting, Streeton's harbour scenes, captured at various times of the day, retain their striking individuality, deepened by experience and excited by seeing again those places that had inspired his youth. When these works were shown in Melbourne under the redolent title 'Streeton's Sydney Sunlight Exhibition', critics reached for superlatives, the art critic for The Age writing of his 'amazingly virile brush work and keen perception of the poetry of the landscape'.3 It was a bravura presentation. 1. Undated letter to Walter Withers, La Trobe Library, State Library of Victoria, Melbourne, quoted in Galbally, A., Arthur Streeton, Landsowne Press, Melbourne, 1979, pp. 25-27 2. Letter to Tom Roberts, quoted in Croll, R. H., Tom Roberts: Father of Australian Landscape Painting, Robertson and Mullens, Melbourne, 1935, p. 9 3. 'Mr. Streeton's Pictures ', Argus, Melbourne, 1 October 1907, p. 6 DAVID THOMAS

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ARTHUR STREETON 1867 - 1943, SIRIUS, ATHOL AND ROSE BAY, 1907, oil on wood panel

Lot 7: ARTHUR STREETON 1867 - 1943, SIRIUS, ATHOL AND ROSE BAY, 1907, oil on wood panel

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Description: ARTHUR STREETON 1867 - 1943, SIRIUS, ATHOL AND ROSE BAY, 1907, oil on wood panelDIMENSIONS: 12.5 x 61.0 cmEXHIBITED: Streeton's Sydney Sunlight Exhibition, Bernard's Gallery, Melbourne, 1-5 October 1907, cat. 13LITERATURE: Streeton, A., The Arthur Streeton Catalogue, Melbourne, 1935, cat. 306 (in possession of Mr E.F. Millar)PROVENANCE: Bernard's Gallery, Melbourne Mr E.F. Millar, Melbourne Thence by descent Private collection, MelbourneAfter years of absence, the emotional and visual appeal of one's homeland is very strong. This was particularly so for Arthur Streeton, after many years in London returning to Melbourne before visiting Sydney in the winter-into-spring of 1907. Here he painted a number of sparkling views of the Harbour, of Mosman Bay, Cremorne, Point Piper, and others. His enthusiastic engagement with the scene, its harbour, coves and beaches is shared with the viewer through the spontaneity of his response, realized with an increased assurance, as seen in Sirius, Athol and Rose Bay, 1907. The panoramic sweep of the harbour is awe-inspiring, enveloped in an atmosphere of sunlight contrasting with the deeper, more intimate touches of the coves to the left, enriched by his time abroad. Of his show in Sydney in July, the critic for the Sydney Morning Herald observed, 'For one thing, whilst handling Australian landscape in his former manner, the artist has now assimilated the ideas of the English painters of the last century for special effects in which they could be utilised in expressing the shadowed fields and dwelling places of the ancient isle. Thus there is the contrast between schemes in light tones and in dark ...'1 Since his first days in Sydney during the nineties when he and Tom Roberts were at Curlew Camp, Little Sirius Cove, the area had a strong appeal. It had resulted in some of the finest works, especially Sirius Cove, c1895 in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. The enthusiasm of his response on return is readily felt in a letter to Roberts. 'I've done a good many panels of Cremorne and the lovely Southern Shore, and yesterday I opened fire on a 48 x 48 about 200 yards above [Curlew] camp. It is still as wild and thick as ever, and one can paint all day and never see a soul. It's a great change & rest for me. The lovely old Banksia trees and a great deal of native flowers and the long pale blue waters beyond.'2 Each work was painted on long, narrow draper's boards, as in Sirius, Athol and Rose Bay, 1907, of richly coloured wood, the format ideally suited to the subject. The warmth of the sky reflects in the harbour waters, the buildings of the growing city to the right contrasting with the bush of the left shore. The twenty-one paintings shown at Bernard's Gallery, Melbourne, which included our work, were strongly poetic in conception and title - A Bronze Arm on a Bosom of Blue, or Sapphire, Bronze, and Gold. The times of day from calm mornings to golden afternoons and dusk are equally so. The paint is sumptuous and lavishly applied, embracing a moment of appealing quietude. 1. 'Mr. Streeton's Exhibition', Sydney Morning Herald, 18 July 1907, p. 3 2. Croll, R. H., Smike to Bulldog: Letters from Sir Arthur Streeton to Tom Roberts, Ure Smith, Sydney, 1946, p. 90 DAVID THOMAS

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RUPERT BUNNY 1864 - 1947, CHATTING, c1910-15

Lot 8: RUPERT BUNNY 1864 - 1947, CHATTING, c1910-15

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Description: RUPERT BUNNY 1864 - 1947, CHATTING, c1910-15 also known as 'Causerie', oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Rupert C.W. Bunny inscribed on stretcher verso: CHATTINGDIMENSIONS: 60.5 x 73.0 cmEXHIBITED: Exposition Rupert C. W. Bunny, Galeries Georges Petit, Paris, 16-31 March 1917, cat. 10 (as 'Causerie') Exhibition of Paintings by Rupert C. W. Bunny, Fine Art Society's Gallery, Melbourne, 15-27 November 1922, cat. 25 Exhibition of Oil Paintings by Rupert C. W. Bunny, Anthony Hordern and Sons Limited, Sydney, 2-31 May 1923, cat. 25 Rupert Bunny Exhibition, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1 October - 10 November 1946, cat.1 100 Years of Australian Painting, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 19 April - 17 May 1948, cat. 18 Rupert Bunny Retrospective, Newcastle City Art Gallery, New South Wales, 31 July - 3 September 1968, cat. 10 Rupert Bunny Loan Exhibition, Manly Art Gallery, Sydney, 21 September - 6 October 1968, cat. 5 Aspects of Australian Art: Art Gallery of New South Wales Travelling Art Exhibition 1976, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1976-77, cat. 14LITERATURE: Geffroy, G., 'Rupert Bunny' [catalogue introduction], Exposition Rupert C. W. Bunny, Galeries Georges Petit, Paris, 1917 Sydney Morning Herald, 2 May 1923, p. 4 Sun, Sydney, 2 May 1923 Daily Telegraph, Sydney, 3 May 1923, p. 6 Sunday Times, Sydney, 6 May 1923, p. 13 Australasian, Melbourne, 12 May 1923, p. 942 Turnbull, C., and Buesst, T., The Art of Rupert Bunny, Ure Smith, Sydney, [1948], p. 70 Badham, H., A Study of Australian Art, Currawong Publishing, Sydney, 1949, pl. 28 (illus.) Smith, B., A Catalogue of Australian Oil Paintings in the National Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1875-1952, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1953, pp. 36-7 Thomas, D., Art Gallery of New South Wales Quarterly, vol. 12, no. 1, October 1970, pp. 554, 563 (illus.) Thomas, D., Rupert Bunny, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1970, p. 68, cat. 0166 Lindsay, R., Aspects of Australian Art, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1976, cat. 14 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, purchased 1923 (label attached verso) Thirty Victoria Street, Sydney Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1985 Tom Silver Fine Art, Sydney Private collection, MelbourneTowards the end of the first decade of the twentieth century and into the years of the Great War, Rupert Bunny turned to painting works of enchanting, secluded beauty, of women relaxing in gardens filled with dappled sunlight. Chatting is a classic example. It was included in Bunny's solo exhibition in Paris in 1917, when Gustave Geffroy, one of the leading French critics of the day wrote of Bunny's paintings expressing 'the luminous joy of daylight, ... the pleasure of living in the shadow of trees looking out on a festival of sunshine.' Bunny, he declared, was 'an observer of truth and a poet of the world of dreams.'1 As the 'war to end all wars' tore Europe and the belle époque to pieces, Bunny sought beauty in the intimate moments of the everyday. Even though hailed as 'a painter of beautiful women', the real subject of his art was light and its sensuous play across figure and dress.2 The Georges Petit exhibition in 1917 was very well received by French and English critics alike. The British-Australasian described it as 'one of the biggest successes of the season, two pictures having been purchased by the French State for the Luxembourg Museum, while many sales were made to private buyers.'3 When Bunny brought a selection of these works to Australia in 1922 for exhibition, buyers from public collections were again to the fore. In Melbourne the Trustees of the National Gallery of Victoria added Girl at a Window, c1917 to its collection through the Felton Bequest. In Sydney, the Art Gallery of New South Wales chose two paintings, Chatting and The Garden Bench. The writer for the Sydney Morning Herald thought Chatting to be 'a composition of winning charm ... The distribution of light is true to nature, and the colour of a plum-coloured silk bodice is fascinating.'4 The Sunday Times said Chatting was 'well worthy to represent Mr. Bunny'.5 Private collectors also bestowed their favours on Bunny. The chief model in this and many of these paintings was Bunny's wife, the beautiful Jeanne-Heloise. She is readily identified by her dark hair and retroussé nose. The mood of the painting is also characteristically Bunny, relaxed moments of 'dolce far niente', the favoured indulgence of doing sweet nothing. It was a title Bunny gave to one of his best paintings, Dolce farniente of c1897, in a private Melbourne collection. Chatting was selected by Bunny to be included in his 1946 retrospective exhibition held at the National Gallery of Victoria. It was the first retrospective given by the Gallery to honour a living Australian artist and was a huge success. 1. Geffroy, G., 'Rupert Bunny' [catalogue introduction], Exposition Rupert C. W. Bunny, Galeries Georges Petit, Paris, 1917 2. Moore, W., Life, Melbourne, 1 September 1911, p. 249. Bunny occasionally gave the name 'sun bath' to these paintings, as in the grand c1913 painting in the collection of the Bendigo Art Gallery, Victoria. 3. 'Australian Artists in Paris', British-Australasian, London, 11 March 1920, p. 12 4. Sydney Morning Herald, 2 May 1923, p. 4 5. Sunday Times, Sydney, 6 May 1923, p. 13 DAVID THOMAS

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IAN FAIRWEATHER 1891 - 1974, THE FAMILY, c1957, gouache on cardboard

Lot 9: IAN FAIRWEATHER 1891 - 1974, THE FAMILY, c1957, gouache on cardboard

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Description: IAN FAIRWEATHER 1891 - 1974, THE FAMILY, c1957, gouache on cardboardSIGNED: signed with monogram lower left: IFDIMENSIONS: 52.0 x 36.0 cmEXHIBITED: Ian Fairweather, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 20 November - 2 December 1957, cat. 17, 20 gns Ian Fairweather, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 19 November - 1 December 1958, cat. 10, 20 gns Fairweather, a retrospective exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 3 June - 4 July 1965, cat. 36 touring to Art Gallery of New South Wales, 21 July - 22 August 1965; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 9 September - 10 October 1965; National Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 26 October - 21 November 1965; Western Australian Art Gallery, 9 December 1965 - 16 January 1966; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 10 February - 13 March 1966 8th Anniversary Exhibition, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, November 1967, cat. 10 Dealer's Choice Exhibition, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, January 1968, cat. 14 Selected Australian Works of Art, Lauraine Diggins, Melbourne, 26 June - 10 July 1985 (illus. p. 23 in exhibition catalogue) Ian Fairweather, Paintings and Drawings 1927 - 1970, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 3-24 October 1985, cat. 37 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Sydney, 1981, pp. 140-143, cat. 139, pl. 69 (illus. p. 143) Ian Fairweather Paintings & Drawings 1927 - 1970, Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 1985, p. 28, cat. 37PROVENANCE: E. York Seymour Mr and Mrs D. Perks, McMasters Beach, New South Wales Christie's, Melbourne, 12 April 1987, lot 408 Private collection, MelbourneThe subject of the family, of mother and child, of people grouped together, appealed to Ian Fairweather both thematically and for its formal possibilities. As early as 1935 he had painted Mother and Child in the Skinner Collection, University of Western Australia, Perth, continuing during the 1950s with works of the same title. This celebration of interlocking forms and feelings reached a crescendo in Anak Bayan, 1957 in the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, accompanied by such equally inclined abstract works of the highest quality as our painting, The Family, c1957, and Ave Maria, 1957 in the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth. Both paintings were included in Fairweather's retrospective exhibition curated by Laurie Thomas and Robert Smith for the Queensland Art Gallery in 1965 and then toured nationally. Significantly, Fairweather said of Ave Maria, '... the title was an afterthought, and had little to do with the intention of the painting - However I don't feel I am a complete abstractionist - I still like - perhaps mistakenly in this age of collectivism - to retain some relic of subjective reality.'1 The subtle balance and interplay between abstraction and figuration in Ave Maria and The Family, c1957 are several of the reasons why these paintings are so captivating. In The Family, c1957 the calligraphic gestures have an almost intoxicating freedom flowing through and across the picture's surface. Illusions of depth and suggestions of adventure into actual space are quickly balanced by the lively play of the paint on the picture's plane. Fairweather's handling of colour in The Family, c1957 is another of its great attractions, his use of a very limited palette showing a restraint of which only a great colourist is capable. He said, 'I don't like bright colours. The Chinese manage to do their finest paintings with no colour at all.'2 While the blues and greys evoke the protective and maternal, shots of terracotta give it a touch of flesh and blood, each colour engaged and overlapping with the next in the perfect marriage of ideas and technique. In the catalogue introduction to Fairweather's touring retrospective of 1965, Robert Smith summed up the artist's central interest - 'In his paintings Ian Fairweather has always been concerned with people - not as individuals, not as types, but as people: part of the vast unfolding tapestry of life.'3 The painting's provenance does it honour. Its first owner was E. York Seymour, a distinguished collector of his time. 1. Fairweather interview with Hazel de Berg, 1 April 1963, quoted in Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Murdoch Books, Sydney, revised edition 2009, p. 141 2. Fairweather, transcript of interview with Peter Loxton for 'Lifestyle', ABC Radio, broadcast 16 June 1973, quoted in Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Sydney, 1981, p. 90 3. Smith, R., 'Introduction', Fairweather: a retrospective exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1965, no pagination DAVID THOMAS

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BRETT WHITELEY 1939 - 1992, ORANGE FRUIT DOVE, FIJI, 1969, oil and mixed media on composition board

Lot 10: BRETT WHITELEY 1939 - 1992, ORANGE FRUIT DOVE, FIJI, 1969, oil and mixed media on composition board

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Description: BRETT WHITELEY 1939 - 1992, ORANGE FRUIT DOVE, FIJI, 1969, oil and mixed media on composition boardSIGNED: signed and inscribed verso: A938 / Brett Whiteley Fiji / 'Orange fruit dove'DIMENSIONS: 136.5 x 122.0 cmEXHIBITED: Brett Whiteley, Bonython Art Gallery, Sydney, June - July 1970 Brett Whiteley: Art & Life, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 16 September - 19 November 1995; Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory, Darwin, 13 December 1995 - 28 January 1996; Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth, 22 February - 8 April 1996; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 9 May - 16 June 1996; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2 July - 26 August 1996; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 18 September - 17 November 1996 Philip Bacon Galleries 40th Anniversary, Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, 18 February - 15 March 2014, cat. 27 (loan exhibition, label attached verso)LITERATURE: Pearce, B., Brett Whiteley: Art & Life, Thames and Hudson in association with the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1995, p. 235, pl. 144 (illus.) Philip Bacon Galleries: 40 Years 40 Paintings, Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, 2014, p. 31 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Private collection, Adelaide Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane Brigadier R.W.P. Dodd, MC (CMF), Queensland, acquired from the above in 1977 Thence by descent Estate of Molly Dodd, QueenslandOf Brett Whiteley's many star-studded paintings, those of birds are among his finest. Their quality and beauty have been acclaimed, the Sydney poet, Robert Gray writing, 'In Whiteley's bird paintings is embodied his finest feeling; they are to me his best work.'1 His retrospective exhibition organized by the Art Gallery of New South Wales for tour in 1995- 1996 included, as well as our painting, a number of works in which birds were the subject - the oil and collage White Dove in Avocado Tree, 1979 and the 1988 bronze sculptures Pelican II and Hummingbird being splendid examples. Eggs and twigs were often added as collage, his inventiveness including ping-pong balls, a leather boot, paint and steel for Boot Owl, 1985. The Orange Fruit Dove was Whiteley's favourite, having written on the back of his 1988 painting, Orange Fijian Fruit Dove, 'probably for me / the most / beautiful bird / in the world'. Leaving the frenzy of New York for the island paradise of Fiji, in 1969, Whiteley's Fruit Dove series of paintings had their genesis there. Others followed in 1979 and later. Our painting, one of the first, pulsates with all that visual excitement of a new experience, entrancingly seductive to the eye, intoxicating all the senses. Here, acute perception of eye and masterly talent for drawing combined to create an individuality of form, striking in its seeming simplicity, dressed in an abundant richness of colour. Enthralled by the bird's beauty, Whiteley generously shares his rapture with the viewer, especially through his employment of embracing rhythms. The repetition of ovals in the body of the dove, its wings, nesting eggs and fruit which it enjoys, is like a leitmotif in music, taken up in the elegant, curvaceous outlines to the left. Returning to Robert Gray, who wrote: 'I like in the bird shapes that clarity; that classical, haptic shapeliness; that calm - those clear, perfect lines of a Chinese vase. The breasts of his birds swell with the most attractive emotion in his work: It is bold, vulnerable, and tender.'2 His reference to the Chinese vase places Whiteley's art among the most rewarding aesthetic experiences, allied to philosophic thought. While stillness commands the flight-filled form in Orange Fruit Dove, Fiji, it offers an enveloping metaphor of freedom, both of body and spirit. It calls to soar high, unrestrained by things terrestrial in harmony with being and nature's plenitude. The sensory is one of Whiteley's principal tools. The cerebral is equally significant, all be it decked out in the profligate splendour of his technical and creative mastery. 1. Gray, R., 'A few takes on Brett Whiteley', Art and Australia, vol. 24, no. 2, Summer 1986, p. 222 2. Ibid. DAVID THOMAS

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JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, SELF PORTRAIT AT PAPINI'S, 1984-85, oil and synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Lot 11: JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, SELF PORTRAIT AT PAPINI'S, 1984-85, oil and synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, SELF PORTRAIT AT PAPINI'S, 1984-85, oil and synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: signed lower left: JEFFREY SMARTDIMENSIONS: 85.0 x 115.0 cmEXHIBITED: Jeffrey Smart, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 21 April - 12 May 1986, cat. 3 Jeffrey Smart Retrospective, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 27 August - 31 October 1999; Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 26 November 1999 - 6 February 2000; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 10 March - 21 May 2000; Museum of Modern Art at Heide, Melbourne, 10 June - 6 August 2000, cat. 69 (label attached verso) Jeffrey Smart: The Question of Portraiture, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria, 4 March - 13 April 2009, cat. 27 Master of Stillness: Jeffrey Smart Paintings 1940-2011, Samstag Museum of Art and Carrick Hill, Adelaide, 12 October - 14 December 2012; TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria, 21 December 2012 - 31 March 2013, cat. 58LITERATURE: McDonald, J., Jeffrey Smart: Paintings of the '70s and '80s, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1990, p. 161, cat. 301 (illus. pl. 40, p. 135) Capon, E., Jeffrey Smart Retrospective, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1999, p. 211, cat. 69 (illus. pp. 9 (detail), 167) Smart, J., Capon, C., and Greer, G., Jeffrey Smart Drawings and Studies 1942-2001, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 2001, p. 126 (illus.) Pearce, B., Jeffrey Smart, The Beagle Press, Sydney, 2005, pp. 184-185 (illus.) James, R., Jeffrey Smart: The Question of Portraiture, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria, 2009, pp. 13-14, 23, cat. 27 (illus. p. 14 and front cover) Pearce, B., Master of Stillness: Jeffrey Smart Paintings 1940-2011, Wakefield Press, Adelaide, 2012, two frontispieces (details), pp. 17, 132, cat. 58 (illus. p. 94) Allen, C., 'A Shifting Canvas', Review, Weekend Australian, 5-6 July 2014, p. 3 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Australian Galleries, Melbourne (label attached verso) Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 1986RELATED WORK: Drawing for Self Portrait at Papini's, 1984-85, pencil and watercolour on paper, 17.5 x 22.5 cm, private collection, illus. p. 15 in James, R., Jeffrey Smart: The Question of Portraiture, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria, 2009, cat. 26 Self portrait, 1993, oil on canvas, 48.0 x 45.0 cm, collection of the University of Queensland, Brisbane, illus. p. 15 in James, R., Jeffrey Smart: The Question of Portraiture, Mornington Peninsula Regional Gallery, Victoria, 2009, cat. 31 Self portrait, 2001, charcoal and pastel on paper, 48.0 x 32.0 cm, collection of the National Portrait Gallery, CanberraFor Jeffrey Smart, portraits are uncommon and self portraits are rare. There is an early oil from 1940, Self Portrait, 1964-65 exhibited in a survey exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria in 1966, Self Portrait at Papini's 1984-85, and another smaller work of 1993 (collection of The University of Queensland, Brisbane). In 1980 he painted Portrait of David Malouf (collection of the Art Gallery of Western Australia, Perth), and Germaine Greer four years later. Then came Portrait of Clive James, 1991-92 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney), although here the figure played the more customary Smart role of providing scale within the picture. Although Smart was a traditionalist working in a heightened realist style, he was well aware of what was happening in the art of his day, affirmed by this picture, undoubtedly his greatest self portrait and in many ways his 'signature work'. Without the palette and brush, he takes on the image of the everyman and employs the background to comment on contemporary art through references to the colour field, hard edge, and the textured. In the study drawing, the figure is to the left, and to the right the doors of squared format are small and insignificant. In the finished painting these same doors have been transformed into a colour field painting of repeated geometric forms that would have done a Dale Hickey proud. They do in fact hint at a Hickey painting in the National Gallery of Victoria - Untitled, 1967-68, acquired through the Felton Bequest in 1968. Yet, Smart's doors have the fascination and integrity of a painting in its own right, complete with the enigmatic touch of being locked. Colourful plastic crates to the left and blue door continue the fascination with colour, an added touch of Pop Art. While Smart's paintings are immaculately composed and presented, they do not reveal themselves readily. It is both part of the artist's intention and their idiosyncratic attraction, particularly so with this present self portrait. In his notes to the study drawing (see Related Work), Smart typically wrote about the setting, not the self. 'Papini was the owner of the petrol service station at Pieve a Presciano, a village in Tuscany. Behind the pumps is the workshop, the doors of which feature in the self portrait, along with Coca Cola crates which furnished some notes of pure colour.'1 And again of a 2001 self portrait in charcoal and pastel Smart commented, 'My studio is not really geared for painting a self portrait and this involved a lot of easel moving and mirror arranging.'2 Perhaps there is a whiff of 'smoke and mirrors' here - avoidance of explanation and associated with the illusionism of magic, so often a part of Smart's game plan. For portraits and self portraits it has long been traditional to include references to the subject's interests or profession. The admiral has his ship, the general his army, and artists their tools of trade. Recall Rembrandt or Goya with brushes and palettes in their hands.3 Smart was not immune to this, as seen in his pun, Margaret Olley in the Louvre Museum, 1994-95 (Art Gallery of New South Wales). While the implication is that Olley is represented in the great art museum, his notes refer to Olley within the painting as being an 'eye-catcher'.4 In Self Portrait at Papini's Smart's look is direct. Intriguing shadows are cast, the face moulded by nature's light and shade, references to the lights and darks of his personality, and of life itself. This is extended in another oil, Self Portrait, 1993, which John McDonald described as 'a lucid and straightforward likeness, without the private jokes and gamesmanship found in portraits of friends such as Clive James, David Malouf or Margaret Olley.'5 In a highly perceptive essay, McDonald continued - '... Smart's best paintings are as ambiguous as dreams. They are infinitely suggestive, but confirm nothing.'6 Sometimes dreams do come true, as in our self portrait where consummate composition and colour speak so eloquently of the artist's interests and provide testimony of status. In a Vincent van Gogh self portrait, every brush stroke pulsates with inner passion. For Smart they are cool and considered. This is Smart's finest portrait and one of his most widely exhibited and reproduced works. 1. Smart, J., Capon, C., and Greer, G., Jeffrey Smart Drawings and Studies 1942-2001, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 2001, p. 126 2. Ibid., p. 175 3. See Rembrandt's Self Portrait at the Easel, 1660, Louvre, Paris; Goya's Self Portrait in the Studio, 1785, Accademia San Fernando, Madrid 4. Smart, Capon, and Greer, op. cit., p. 161 5. McDonald, J., 'Jeffrey Smart', Jeffrey Smart Recent Paintings, Philip Bacon Galleries, Brisbane, 2001, p. 3 6. Ibid., p. 5 DAVID THOMAS

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RUSSELL DRYSDALE 1912 - 1981, MRS FARDAKAS OF THE ACROPOLIS CAFÉ, 1972, oil on canvas

Lot 12: RUSSELL DRYSDALE 1912 - 1981, MRS FARDAKAS OF THE ACROPOLIS CAFÉ, 1972, oil on canvas

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Description: RUSSELL DRYSDALE 1912 - 1981, MRS FARDAKAS OF THE ACROPOLIS CAFÉ, 1972, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Russell Drysdale inscribed verso: "MRS. FARDAKAS OF THE ACROPOLIS CAFÉ" / RUSSELL DRYSDALE / C/o THE LEICESTER GALLERIES / 22A, CORK STREET, / LONDON W.1.DIMENSIONS: 76.0 x 61.0 cmEXHIBITED: Paintings, Drawings and Watercolours by Sir Russell Drysdale, Leicester Galleries, London, 16 June - 15 July 1972, cat. 25 (illus. in exhibition catalogue, label attached verso)LITERATURE: Klepac, L., The Life and Work of Russell Drysdale, Bay Books, Sydney, 1983, pl. 181 (illus., as 'Mrs Fardakis of the Acropolis Cafe')PROVENANCE: Leicester Galleries, London Private collection Geoff K. Gray, Sydney, 13 February 1974, lot 31 Private collection Sotheby's, Melbourne, 19 August 1996, lot 270 Private collection Deutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 10 August 1998, lot 137 Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 9 May 2001, lot 100 Private collection, TasmaniaRussell Drysdale's Mrs Fardakas fills the painting with an abundance of form that mirrors her character. Amplitude expresses a distinctive inner strength and big-hearted generosity that singles her out as someone special. She is just like the Acropolis after which her cafe is named. Towering over the city of Athens, the Acropolis is crowned by the Parthenon, one of the greatest architectural treasures the world has ever known. The individual Mrs Fardakas likewise towers over her domain, treasured as a place to frequent for good food and company. One is tantalized by identification. The person and named place resonate with the iconic and metaphoric; but she is too striking not to be real. And it is this realism which is so engaging. Of Drysdale's many talents, his intuitive grasp of the Australian character, both in terms of the country itself and those who peopled it, was his greatest. The Aboriginal figure was presented in total harmony with the landscape. The European settlers were stoic in their endeavours to triumph in a harsh environment; and those who filled the towns showed a similar determination to succeed. Mrs Fardakas's physical presence recalls Drysdale figures from the forties, The Countrywoman, 1946 (formerly the collection of James Fairfax AC, gifted to the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra in 1999), and the prize-winning Woman in a Landscape, 1949 in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide.1 It was Drysdale's biographer, Lou Klepac, who described Woman in a Landscape as 'the Mona Lisa of the outback'.2 In Mrs Fardakas of the Acropolis Café Drysdale was also responding to the large influx of Greek settlers who had found their way to Australia. Their presence caught the eye of many other artists. Vic O'Connor's 1944 painting The Greek Cafe had its genesis in the concentration of Greeks in Melbourne, the largest in the world outside Athens and Thessalonica. Donald Friend gave it a Biblical bend in The Prodigal Son - Acropolis Cafe, c1949. Acropolis cafes dotted the land from Albury to Gunnedah. Drysdale had a high profile in London by the time of his 1972 exhibition in which Mrs Fardakas of the Acropolis Café made a memorable appearance. It was his last London show, our painting being one of twelve, together with a number of drawings and watercolours. The oils included The Boss Drover, 1972, a single Aboriginal figure in an open composition compared with the close and tightly edged Mrs Fardakas. There were also such notable paintings as Woman at a Window, 1969 and Broken Mountain II, c1972. Reviews appeared in London's Burlington Magazine and Arts Review, while Terry Ingram in Sydney had written the previous December about the anxious wait of collectors upon the coming show.3 1. Woman in a Landscape was awarded the 1949 Melrose Prize amid an Adelaide controversy akin to the Archibald row in Sydney five years before. 2. Klepac, L., The Life and Work of Russell Drysdale, Bay Books, Sydney, 1983, p. 94 3. 'Leicester Galleries', Burlington Magazine, London, August 1972, cxiv, p. 571; Wykes-Joyce, M., 'Russell Drysdale', Arts Review, London, 1 July 1972, p. 393; Ingram, T., 'Collectors Wait on Drysdale Showing', Australian Financial Review, Sydney, 9 December 1971 DAVID THOMAS

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ALBERT TUCKER 1914 - 1999, WOMAN, 1950, gouache, synthetic polymer paint, oil pastel, charcoal on paper

Lot 13: ALBERT TUCKER 1914 - 1999, WOMAN, 1950, gouache, synthetic polymer paint, oil pastel, charcoal on paper

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Description: ALBERT TUCKER 1914 - 1999, WOMAN, 1950, gouache, synthetic polymer paint, oil pastel, charcoal on paperSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Tucker 1950DIMENSIONS: 52.5 x 37.5 cmEXHIBITED: Albert Tucker: Works on Paper 1928-1978, Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne, 25 October - 12 November 1978, cat. 133 (as 'Woman in Door') Albert Tucker: An Aspect of His Work, Tolarno Galleries, Melbourne, 3-21 July 1990, cat. 26 (as 'Woman in Doorway') Meeting a Dream: Albert Tucker in Paris 1948-1952, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 18 July - 5 November 2006LITERATURE: Harding, L., Meeting a Dream: Albert Tucker in Paris 1948-1952, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 2006, p. 58 (illus.)PROVENANCE: The artist, Melbourne, until 1999 Private collection, Melbourne Bonham's & Goodman, Melbourne, 7 August 2007, lot 33 Private collection, SydneyRELATED WORK: Study for (Woman), 1950 (Private collection), illus. p. 36 in Harding, L., Meeting a Dream: Albert Tucker in Paris 1948-1952, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 2006Albert Tucker's Woman, 1950 is a painting of enormous power and invention, a fascinating work at this stage of his creative development. Having its genesis in his Images of Modern Evil spawned by the war years of Melbourne in the 1940s, Tucker responded to the traumatic upheavals of society, revealing its darker sides with the tarts of war paraded in the blackouts and primal urges, pierced by the sharp lights of night, of traffic, tram and lamp post. Moving to Europe in 1947, Tucker took this street nightlife imagery with him, representing it on the boulevards of Paris, the Seine, St Denis, or the bomb-wrecked streets of Frankfurt. He was in Paris in 1950 when Woman was painted - brazenly confrontational, heralding other such masterly works to come - The Old Eve, 1951 (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra), and Girl, 1951 (Art Gallery of Ballarat, Victoria). While the influence of the modernist Jean Dubuffet is so apparent in these two paintings, Woman provides a fascinating insight into his work just prior to the Dubuffet onslaught of emotional savagery and kindred technique intertwined. Works close to Woman, 1950 such as Macro of Place Pigalle, 1949 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne) and Man with Flower, 1950 (The British Museum, London) reveal the earlier, vital influence of Picasso, first touched by art brut. Tucker loved Paris and, no matter their subjects, something of its joys and character spills over into these paintings. 'In a Paris cafe, you could sit there all day, amongst people whom you felt rapport and sympathy with, you could be amongst all that but you were never interfered with. It was a glimpse of civilised life for me.'1 The power of Woman, 1950 owes much to its confronting imagery and colour. The direct look is taken up by bare-bosomed frontalism and the visually rhetorical repetition of forms - unmoving almond eyes, rouged cheeks, scarlet lips of entrapment, bosoms bold, the bare light bulb a metaphor of starkness, light cruel and unforgiving. The femme fatale has become the Medusa of the streets, her look enough to turn any who catch her eyes into stone. The arms manipulative and snaring in their proposed embrace, the enticing doorway encaging the figure. (When exhibited in 1978, it was titled 'Woman in Door', an emphasis likewise found in the preliminary drawing.) Primary colours take up the heart beat as the passion of the night reflects in the skies above buildings angular, rising vertically from which chrome yellows stare out of darkness like some wild beasts of the jungle speaking of the animalism of it all. The beauty of Paris, the city of love may be prostituted, but its star-like flowers hint at beauty. 1. Albert Tucker quoted in Burke, J., Australian Gothic: A life of Albert Tucker, Knopf, Random House Australia, Sydney, 2002, p. 302 DAVID THOMAS

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CLIFTON PUGH 1924 - 1990, A FERAL CAT, 1969, oil on composition board

Lot 14: CLIFTON PUGH 1924 - 1990, A FERAL CAT, 1969, oil on composition board

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Description: CLIFTON PUGH 1924 - 1990, A FERAL CAT, 1969, oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Clifton / MAY '69 inscribed verso: A FERAL CAT IDIMENSIONS: 121.0 x 90.0 cmLITERATURE: Allen, T., Clifton Pugh: Patterns of a Lifetime, Thomas Nelson, Melbourne, 1981, p. 58PROVENANCE: The Blue Boy Gallery, Melbourne Private collection, Queensland Sotheby's, Sydney, 22 August 2008, lot 70 Private collection, QueenslandClifton Pugh has long been considered one of Australia's leading painters. His broad appeal has spanned decades and his contribution to Australian portraiture was outstanding, as his three Archibald Prize winning portraits attest. As the bipartisan court painter to Canberra's colorful political class through the 1960s and 1970s, Pugh's political portraits are legendary and live large in the collective psyche of many Australians. His celebrated 1972 Archibald Prize winning portrait of Gough Whitlam is arguably one of the finest portraits ever painted in Australia, closely followed by his portraits of Lionel Murphy QC, Sir John 'Black Jack' McEwen, H.C. 'Nugget' Coombs and Sir John Kerr. Apart from art, politics and women, Pugh's other great love was the environment. Clifton Pugh was an early and passionate environmentalist, and his understanding of the landscape and his love of nature underpins most of his work. It is in the landscape that Pugh's work reaches lyrical heights, whether it be the drought-ravished outback or the lush bush surrounds of his home at Dunmoochin, then on the outskirts of Melbourne. Pugh's landscapes have a structural unity that ties the various elements together; there is a harmony between the subject and the ground, something that he also used to great effect in his many portraits. He was a master of all mediums and was incredibly adept at combining almost any medium; enamel house paint being a favourite he used often as it created a glassy ground on which the artist could manipulate oil paint to great visual effect. The end results of this combination would leave the work feeling fresh, spontaneous and bristling with nuanced detail. Like the other wildlife around the Dunmoochin compound, the feral cats became a subject for his art. In this series of paintings he presents the feral cat as a reckless invader, a perfectly camouflaged and adept intruder oblivious to the native bush's delicate balance. In A Feral Cat, 1969, the feral cat is the victim. Hungry and thin following a season of drought and fire, the cat's staple diet of small marsupials and lizards has all but gone. Now this big tom is forced to work harder for survival as he stalks his prey, fully aware that his next twitch will trigger the bird's flight to safety. The cat is frozen, so near and yet so far from a meal and survival. Pugh chooses to depict the cat's form as an echo of the surrounding landscape, and in this way he stresses the cat's vulnerability - for it too may soon be absorbed into the landscape. Pugh never revealed the possibility of metaphor in his feral cat pictures, but it is plausible given his strident views and political associations that there was a political undertone to these particular works. As Pugh's biographer Traudi Allen noted in 1981: 'To Pugh a strong element of discord exists in the fact that Australia is inhabited at all ... The Australian bush has until now been a cyclical entity in which minor changes occur constantly but harmoniously and interdependently. Nothing is totally destroyed and nothing foreign is allowed in. Now white technology has entered its borders ... through roads, cities, agricultural and mining activities ... whereas the black man has lived in the same country for centuries leaving only a few peaceful footprints. White Australians have always been foreigners who struggle against a hard land instead of working in harmony with it as the blacks have done.'1 Pugh loved life and delighted in nature, and at times his compassion even extended to the feral cat. 1. Allen, T., Clifton Pugh: Patterns of a Lifetime, Thomas Nelson Australia, Melbourne, 1981, pp. 62-63 HENRY MULHOLLAND

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LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, SOUTH COAST FACADES, 1966, oil on canvas

Lot 15: LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, SOUTH COAST FACADES, 1966, oil on canvas

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Description: LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, SOUTH COAST FACADES, 1966, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: L REES / 66DIMENSIONS: 86.0 x 108.0 cmLITERATURE: Possibly, Free, R., Lloyd Rees, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1972, cat. O243 or O244 (as 'Australian Façade')PROVENANCE: Artarmon Galleries, Sydney Private collection, Victoria, acquired from the above c1968-69 Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 16-17 April 2008, lot 46 Private collection, MelbourneRELATED WORK: Australian Facade, 1965, oil on canvas, 129.5 x 106.5 cm, private collection, illus. in Free, R., Lloyd Rees, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1972, cat. O241, pl. 29 and front cover The Timeless Land, 1965, oil on canvas, 117.0 x 132.0 cm, private collection, illus. in Free, R., Lloyd Rees, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1972, cat. O240, pl. 28Lloyd Rees' South Coast Façades captures that grandeur of the Australian landscape which touches on the universal and the sublime. In celebrating the inspiring beauty and nobility of nature, his art does not overwhelm. Rather, it encourages the viewer to join with the artist in the enjoyment of the spectacle. In this and the related works, The Timeless Land and Australian Façade, he seeks the familiar in the infinite. All three paintings use effectively the motif of the cliff façade and its striking frontality. Generally known as the 'Australian Façade' series, they are among Rees' best works of the period, when he was in full command of his sensibilities, and had the technique at his disposal to realise them in glorious paint. Beginning in 1965 with The Timeless Land and Australian Façade, their inspiration came from Kangaroo Valley and the Blue Mountains. Rees commented: 'The faces of the Blue Mountains ...come into Australian Façade - all the cliffs I ever looked at came in finally in the motif.'1 For our painting the source of inspiration is the south coast of New South Wales, one of Rees' most fertile painting grounds. Given such clear sources, it must be emphasised, however, that in these landscapes Rees makes no attempt at literal transcriptions of nature. For him painting is 'an entirely separate creation.'2 South Coast Façades is quintessentially Lloyd Rees, the projecting foreground rocks and low viewpoint adding to the majesty of the scene, of towering cliffs as ancient as time, and gums noble, tall and straight. It has a wonderful sense of atmosphere and feeling of light, which characterise his best paintings of the sixties. To this is added the richness of the paint, broadly and freely applied, in harmony with the grand manner of his presentation of heroic nature.3 Detailed in imagery and richly textured, the entire surface has been deftly worked with brushes and palette knife. Renée Free, in her monograph on Rees, catalogued three paintings as 'Australian Façade'. The first is dated 1965 and was included in the Rees 1969 retrospective exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales. It is featured as a colour plate in Free's monograph on the artist and once belonged to a private London collector. The two others are a little smaller in size, and date from 1966. The long ownership of South Coast Façades by another eminent Australian artist bears testimony to its aesthetic quality, as one of Rees' outstanding paintings in praise of the grandeur of nature. 1. Quoted in Free, op. cit, p. 82 2. Lloyd Rees, Lloyd, The Small Treasures of a Lifetime, Ure Smith Pty Ltd, Sydney, 1969, p. 151 3. Free, op. cit, p. 78 DAVID THOMAS

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ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, SHOALHAVEN - HILLSIDE WITH BUSHFIRE, oil on composition board

Lot 16: ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, SHOALHAVEN - HILLSIDE WITH BUSHFIRE, oil on composition board

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Description: ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, SHOALHAVEN - HILLSIDE WITH BUSHFIRE, oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed lower right: Arthur Boyd inscribed verso: Hillside with BushfireDIMENSIONS: 91.0 x 60.5 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection Sotheby's, Sydney, 29 November 1991, lot 348 Private collection, MelbourneWhen viewing Arthur Boyd's Shoalhaven paintings, one is immediately struck by the prehistoric beauty of the Australian countryside, untamed and rugged. After spending twenty-one years in England, Boyd returned to Australia and first visited the Shoalhaven in the summer of 1971-72 where he was transfixed by the view of its primordial landscape, so far removed from the romantic wilderness of England and from urbanisation. The wild environment of the Shoalhaven enchanted Boyd, and he would go on to illustrate and explore the craggy rocks, the untamed terrain and the sensuous forms of the area within these acclaimed paintings. Shoalhaven - Hillside with Bushfire is a lyrical example of Boyd's celebrated landscapes. Dominating the scene is the powerful image of the river embankment and the rising hillside set against a pure blue sky. What at first appears as a rather tranquil scene gives way to a terrifying and common threat faced in the Australian bush: fire. Boyd juxtaposes the danger of the fire against the grace of the black swan and the calm river, drawing our attention to the beauty and peril that exists side by side in the Shoalhaven. The swan is safe on the water and appears completely oblivious to the fire and danger above, as it delicately preens its feathers. The only sign of movement is from a sea eagle high in the sky watching for fleeing prey and a magpie which looks poised to swoop on the swan. Although the Shoalhaven paintings are often set in a pure and bright light, there is an element of 'darkness' inherent to the Australian landscape through the instability of life, subject to Mother Nature. When asked how he felt about the Shoalhaven landscape, the artist commented, 'It's foreign ... it is a fierce country, subject to violent changes such as floods and intense heat. The actual size of things about the country, the boulders, the actual timber, is just larger. It's very challenging.'1 Yet despite the presence of danger, there is a sense of joy and serenity that pervades Shoalhaven - Hillside with Bushfire which can only stem from an unequivocal understanding of this landscape, demonstrating Boyd's deep affinity with the Shoalhaven. 1. McGrath, S., The Artist and the River: Arthur Boyd and the Shoalhaven, Bay Books, Sydney, 1982, p. 40 CASSI YOUNG

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SIDNEY NOLAN 1917 - 1992, ELEPHANT IN LANDSCAPE, 1962, oil and Ripolin enamel on composition board

Lot 17: SIDNEY NOLAN 1917 - 1992, ELEPHANT IN LANDSCAPE, 1962, oil and Ripolin enamel on composition board

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Description: SIDNEY NOLAN 1917 - 1992, ELEPHANT IN LANDSCAPE, 1962, oil and Ripolin enamel on composition boardSIGNED: signed centre left: Nolan signed, dated and inscribed verso: M / Elephant in Landscape / 6/3/62 / Nolan bears inscription verso: N. 43 Sydney / (Adelaide) / Ex / Elephant & Landscape / Lilies / NO 7 / 1962DIMENSIONS: 122.0 x 152.5 cmEXHIBITED: African Paintings by Sidney Nolan, Bonython Art Gallery, Adelaide, March 1964 (in conjunction with The Third Adelaide Festival of Arts), cat. 7 (as 'Elephant and Waterlilies') Sidney Nolan: Retrospective Exhibition. Paintings from 1937-1967, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 13 September - 29 October 1967; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 22 November - 17 December 1967; Western Australian Art Gallery, Perth, 9 January - 4 February 1968, cat. 111 (label attached verso) Sidney Nolan, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, 17 January - 7 March 1976, probably cat. 34 Sidney Nolan: African Journey, Nolan Gallery, Lanyon, Australian Capital Territory, 19 November 1986 - 1 February 1987, probably cat. 8 Sidney Nolan 1971 -1992, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2 November 2007 - 3 February 2008; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 22 February - 18 May 2008; Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 6 June - 31 August 2008, cat. 85LITERATURE: Missingham, H., 'Nolan's Animals', Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 5, no. 2, September 1967, pp. 464-465 (illus.) Horton, M. (ed.), Present Day Art in Australia, Ure Smith, Sydney, 1969, p. 144 (illus.) Pearce, B., Sidney Nolan 1971 -1992, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2007, p. 237, cat. 85, (illus. pp. 176 (detail) and 182)PROVENANCE: The estate of the artist Eva Breuer Art Dealer, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, SydneySidney and Cynthia Nolan visited Africa in the northern autumn of 1962. 'Our days, thronged by animals and birds, slid by,' wrote Cynthia in her hypnotic account One Traveller's Africa.1 Sidney's impressions would manifest in his African Journey paintings, first exhibited in 1963 at Marlborough Galleries, London, where both Francis Bacon and Albert Tucker gave their unrestrained support for Nolan's series.2 Within the overcast light of these works, forms hover then nearly dissolve; echoing Nolan's proclamation that 'paintings should look like camouflage, that's it'.3 In the present painting, the back of the elephant absorbs the sky's grey hues while reflected in the pale waters, the silhouette retreats and reshapes amidst orange flashes of water lilies. The 'strange anthropomorphic resonance, a kind of animal existentialism'4 of Nolan's African Journey series emanates throughout the work. The animal's ancient profile emerges from this ephemeral scene as a fleeting and solitary portrait. 'There were stretches of cinebar [sic], eroded, short cliffs - the plain as it were taking a step up, then going off again behind them. Perfectly placed in front of one of these cliffs and slightly to the right of two flowering trees stood an elephant. He was splotched and lichen-like, having recently rolled or showered himself in mud and water. His great ridged backbone sloped down to end in a tail which seemed an imitation, a cord attached to a palm frond swung majestically from side to side; his ears flapped back and forth continuously. He was alone, aged and disgruntled.'5 Nolan's 'African Journey' extended his painting techniques. Cloth-blended washes were overlaid with dashes of expressive brushwork and scraped back sections, as though Nolan was leaving his own condensed tracks and slithers across layers of time worn sediments. African landscape, 1963, in the collection of Art Gallery of New South Wales, verges on abstract expressionism; with plains and mountains articulated by sweeping, crisp strokes of vivid colours that swirl under the weight of the cloth-polished darkening sky that presses down on the scene. While subtler in palette and passages, the earlier work Elephant in Landscape, 1962 shares the suffused autumnal light and introspective, heavy-skied atmosphere of this resonant series. 1. Nolan, C., One Traveller's Africa, Methuen and Co Ltd, London, 1965, p. 26 2. Pearce, B., 'Nolan's Parallel Universe', in Pearce, B., Sidney Nolan, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2007, p. 51 3. Nolan, C., op. cit., p. 163 4. Hansen, D., 'Sidney Nolan, Elephant, 1963,' Sotheby's, Melbourne, 14 August 2012, lot 15 5. Nolan, C., op. cit., p. 110 AMY MARJORAM

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FRANK AUERBACH born 1931, British, DAVID LANDAU SEATED, 1992, oil on canvas

Lot 18: FRANK AUERBACH born 1931, British, DAVID LANDAU SEATED, 1992, oil on canvas

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Description: FRANK AUERBACH born 1931, British, DAVID LANDAU SEATED, 1992, oil on canvasDIMENSIONS: 71.0 x 61.0 cmEXHIBITED: The Collectors Exhibition, Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney, 19 February - 17 March 2005 On loan to Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Feaver, W., Frank Auerbach, Rizzoli, New York, 2009, cat. 685, p. 317 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Marlborough Fine Art, London (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney Liverpool Street Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, AdelaideIn 1956, art dealer Helen Lessore at the Beaux-Arts Gallery in London, gave Frank Auerbach his first solo exhibition. By this time, Auerbach, who was sent to Britain from his birthplace in Berlin at the age of seven to escape the Holocaust (which claimed the lives of both parents), had set the direction for his remarkable life as an artist. At sixteen he left Bunce Court, a progressive boarding school in Kent, and abandoned his ambition to become an actor after winning a place at St Martins School of Art in London. There he met fellow artist Leon Kossoff. Auerbach was also, at the time, taking lessons from the influential painter David Bomberg when he suggested Kossoff join him, and so began a lifelong friendship and artistic bond. Bomberg encouraged Auerbach to study the work of Paul Cezanne and it was then he developed his technique of layering vast amounts of paint. Commenting on the 1956 Beaux Arts exhibition, art critic, David Sylvester enthused, 'Auerbach ... has given us, at the age of twenty four, what seems to me the most exciting and impressive first one man show by an English painter since Francis Bacon in 1949.'1 All great artists create their own unique visual language and methods of working. Frank Auerbach's is particularly intense and complex. He famously used to take only one day's holiday a year, travelling down to Brighton and back. His life revolves around his studio in Camden. He even sleeps there most nights and rises at dawn, when night-clubbers are emerging into the weak north London light, to draw his immediate surroundings. But it is the portraits that matter most. He will have up to a dozen of them under way at any one time. His handful of loyal sitters (mainly family members, writers and curators and close friends) arrive for a few hours each week, year after year, sometimes decade after decade. Originally a medical doctor, former Chairman of the National Gallery Company, London, and founder of Print Quarterly, Dr David Landau, portrayed in this classic work, wrote to Auerbach in 1983 wishing to commission a portrait of the Provost of Worcester College, Oxford, Asa Briggs. 'I wrote to him that I thought he was the greatest living painter.'2 But as both men realised that neither the paint encrusted studio nor the gruelling regular commitment would suit the busy schedule of Baron Briggs, Landau instead offered himself as a sitter. Auerbach cautioned, 'My behaviour is disturbing and it might take two years.'3 Landau recalls, 'He said he would if I was reliable and could sit on Fridays. I've been sitting on Fridays for 24 years.'4 Although the artist and sitter agreed to the weekly schedule which began in 1984, it would be two years of Friday morning sessions until one finished drawing was produced and not until 1987 that a painting in oil was deemed complete by the artist. Landau's insights into the evolution of this portrait are even more revealing about Auerbach's general working methods. Over many years, the paint surface is scraped off, rebuilt, reshaped and 'sculpted', as if his raw material is modelling clay rather than pigment. After each sitting, he ruthlessly scrapes the paint off so that just a shadow of an image remains for the next session: 'It is a bit disturbing ... particularly on those occasions when you remember from the last time that the painting was quite good. You think this was a really beautiful picture and yet it wasn't good enough for him. Next time you arrive it will be a scraped-down ghost.'5 Eventually, there is a 'one take' finish, paint and fiery language flung about with heat-seeking accuracy. 'He has a physicality with his painting', Landau continues. 'He goes into a state of creative orgasm with all the signs of excitement, groans and screams. And he talks to himself all the time, saying "rubbish, it's not good enough, complete rubbish". But you realise that at some point in this act of creation he is suddenly being a little more content. He suddenly goes into a state of meditation and touches the canvas with great delicacy, and you think that maybe he has reached a stage where he is satisfied.'6 1. Sylvester, D., 'Young English Painting', The Listener, 12 January 1956 2. Jury, L., 'Auerbach & the Art of Painting', The Independent, London, 3 February 2007 3. The artist quoted in Feaver, W., Frank Auerbach, Rizzoli, New York, 2009, p. 21 4. Ibid. 5 . David Landau quoted in O'Mahony, J., 'Frank Auerbach: Surfaces and Depths', The Guardian, 15 September 2001 6. Ibid. WE ARE GRATEFUL TO DR PETER HILL FOR HIS ASSISTANCE WITH THIS CATALOGUE ENTRY.

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LUCIAN FREUD 1922 - 2011, British, PLUTO AGED TWELVE, 2000, etching on Somerset White paper

Lot 19: LUCIAN FREUD 1922 - 2011, British, PLUTO AGED TWELVE, 2000, etching on Somerset White paper

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Description: LUCIAN FREUD 1922 - 2011, British, PLUTO AGED TWELVE, 2000, etching on Somerset White paper, edition: 46/46SIGNED: signed with initials and numbered below image printed by Marc Balakjian at Studio Prints, London published by Matthew Marks Gallery, New YorkDIMENSIONS: 57.0 x 76.0 cm (sheet); 43.0 x 59.5 cm (image)EXHIBITED: Lucian Freud Etchings, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, 11 November - 23 December 2000 Lucian Freud: Etchings 1946-2004, touring exhibition, 2004: Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh; Abbot Hall, Kendal; The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; 2005: Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery; Marlborough Fine Art, London (another example) Lucian Freud, The Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 16 December 2007 - 10 March 2008, cat. 85 (another example) Lucian Freud Portraits, National Portrait Gallery, London, 9 February - 27 May 2012, cat. 126 (another example)LITERATURE: Marks, M. (ed.), Lucian Freud Etchings - with Esther Freud's "Ode to Pluto", Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, 2000, cat. 42 (illus. front cover and cat. 42, unpaginated, another example) Hartley, C., Lucian Freud Etchings 1946-2004, Scottish National Gallery of Modern Art, Edinburgh and Marlborough Graphics, London, 2004 (illus., another example) Smee, S., Lucian Freud, 1996-2005, Alfred A. Knopf, New York, 2005, cat. 45 Feaver, W., Lucian Freud, Rizzoli, New York, 2007, cat. 303 Figura, S., Lucian Freud, The Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2008, cat. 91, pp 32, 121, 138 (illus. pl. 91, p. 121, another example)PROVENANCE: Matthew Marks Gallery, New York Private collection, Adelaide, acquired from the above in 2001Lucian Freud loved animals. As a boy recently arrived in England from Berlin, he used to sleep at night with the horses in the stables of his school. Later in life, he painted all forms of fauna from a rat to a baboon (the latter in lieu of one of his infamous gambling debts). Artists from Rembrandt to Giacometti have looked for 'the skull beneath the skin', but Freud was always more interested in finding what he called 'the animal beneath the clothes'. In his book on Freud, art critic William Feaver quotes him saying, 'I'm inclined to think of [my models] naked, or if they're dressed, as animals dressed up.'1 In many cases he preferred animals to people, both as models and companions. None more so than his whippet Pluto, depicted in this exquisitely detailed etching. The first time Freud included a dog in a painting was in 1951 in Girl with a White Dog (collection of Tate Gallery, London). His first wife, Kitty Garman, her white breast rolling out of a lemon-coloured dressing gown, supports the head of a gray Bull Terrier whose eyes seem to be reflecting and locking in to the stare of the artist painting them. The last time a dog appeared was in the final painting before Freud died, Portrait of the Hound, 2011, featuring Eli, the great, great-niece of his beloved Pluto. Eli is said to have filled the huge gap in his life left by the death of Pluto. In many of his portraits of humans, Freud depicts them with a certain amount of forensic cruelty. Not so with the animals, especially the dogs, for whom he has only tenderness and affection. One of the most enigmatic elements of this etching is the hand, entering the composition diagonally from the top right, like the near-touching fingers of God and Adam in Michelangelo's Sistine Chapel. Artists from Paolo Uccello to Philip Guston have used diagonals as a formal way of activating the picture plane, and Freud uses this device with great confidence. He is presenting us with a visual riddle, and taunts us by leaving us to work it out for ourselves. Whose hand is it? Not the artist's, for he is drawing. Pluto has a long pedigree of being at the enigmatic heart of a Freud work. As Freud memoirist Geordie Greig has written, 'The raw, naked portraits are the most recognizable of Lucian's paintings, but he also often brought narrative intrigue to his work. Sunny Morning - Eight Legs is a painting in which [Freud's assistant] David Dawson sprawls naked across a bed, his arm around Lucian's whippet Pluto ... Two of the legs referred to in the title belong to David, four to Pluto, and then there are two further anonymous male legs emerging from under the bed. Do they belong to a corpse? To someone hiding?'2 Another enigma couched within a riddle. Pluto was to have a life after his own death, and that of his master, in the company logo that Freud designed for his daughter Bella's fashion label. And the hand entering this etching looks very like Bella's hand, resting on her lap, in the etching Bella In Her Pluto T-Shirt, 1995 (lot 20). 'Classically English with a dash of sex, drugs, or rock 'n' roll'3 is how her clothing company has been described, and it is Pluto's head that gazes out from the various T-shirts worn by Courtney Love, Madonna, Kate Moss (one of Freud's many models), and Sophie Dahl. 1. Quoted in Gaudoin, T, 'The Artist as Sartorialist', Wall Street Journal, 2 March 2012, p. 16 2. Greig, G., Breakfast with Lucian, Jonathan Cape, London, 2013, Kindle edition, p. 2103 of 4001 3. Durrant, S., 'Bella Freud Bares All', Telegraph, London, 12 November 2012, p. 17 DR PETER HILL

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LUCIAN FREUD 1922 - 2011, British, BELLA IN HER PLUTO T-SHIRT, 1995, etching on Somerset Satin White paper

Lot 20: LUCIAN FREUD 1922 - 2011, British, BELLA IN HER PLUTO T-SHIRT, 1995, etching on Somerset Satin White paper

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Description: LUCIAN FREUD 1922 - 2011, British, BELLA IN HER PLUTO T-SHIRT, 1995, etching on Somerset Satin White paper, edition: 24/36, 3rd stateSIGNED: signed with initials and numbered below imageDIMENSIONS: 81.5 x 71.0 cm (sheet): 68.0 x 59.5 cm (image)EXHIBITED: Lucian Freud Etchings, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, 11 November - 23 December 2000 (another example) Lucian Freud 'Etchings 1946-2004', touring exhibition, 2004: Scottish National Gallery, Edinburgh; Abbot Hall, Kendal; The Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge; 2005: Waterhall Gallery, Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery; Marlborough Fine Art, London (another example) Lucian Freud, The Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 16 December 2007 - 10 March 2008, cat. 68 (another example)LITERATURE: Hartley, C., Lucian Freud: Recent Etchings, Marlborough Graphics, London, 1999, cat. 51, supplement to catalogue raisonné published 1995, (illus., unpaginated, another example) Marks, M. (ed.), Lucian Freud Etchings, Matthew Marks Gallery, New York, 2000, cat. 23 (illus., unpaginated, another example) Figura, S., Lucian Freud, The Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2008, cat. 68, pp. 6, 7, 28, 85, 137 (illus. p. 6, frontispiece and p. 85, pl. 53, another example)PROVENANCE: Matthew Marks Gallery, New York Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney Private collection, SydneyRELATED WORK: Another example of this print is held in the collection of the Tate Gallery, LondonThis print of the artist's daughter Bella has a fascinating back story, linked to at least three important aspects of Lucian Freud's roller-coaster life; a life that centred around family, animals, and models. Freud painted super model Kate Moss naked, through an introduction by fashion designer Bella. He made many new acquaintances through his daughter, some becoming lovers, others opening up windows to different layers of society. Her husband James Fox was the ghost writer of Keith Richards's autobiography. The London gangsters, the Kray twins, threatened to cut off his painting hand over bad gambling debts. He was officially recognised as father to fourteen children by numerous partners, but the unofficial tally could be as high as forty (three were born to different mothers within a few months). Freud's life was never dull. Novelist Tom Wolfe described it as 'about as messy a life as was ever lived'.1 Bella was just one product of that great messiness, but father and daughter grew to embrace a deep love for each other. Lucian Freud specifically requested that Bella wear this particular T-Shirt for the pose. It features the logo he designed for her fashion company, based on the head of his favourite whippet Pluto. The work's title draws our attention to it, otherwise it might be missed amongst the bold hatching on the shirt, the radiating stripes of the chair, and the strong tonal contrasts of arms, hands, and face. Bella's mother was the gardener and writer Bernardine Coverley. She never married Freud but 'took his name to appease family and shopkeepers'.2 The book Hideous Kinky, written by Bella's younger sister the novelist Esther Freud is a fictionalised memoir about 'their bohemian childhood on the hippy trail in Morocco'.3 Lucian Freud is the grandson, and Bella the great-granddaughter of the founder of psychoanalysis Sigmund Freud. Lucian was born in Berlin on 8 December 1922. All of his gambling disasters came from using his 'lucky' birth number 8 in picking horses. Fittingly, he died at the age of 88 in 2011. And Bella, who dominates this remarkable print, had the double tragedy of coping with losing her mother within four days of her father's death. 'You know with my father', she told Sabine Durrant, 'we all knew he was going to die. We were all preparing ourselves. We had no idea my mother was ill.'4 Freud's oft-quoted description of humans as 'animals wearing clothes' is given a further twist in this work where the clothing (the T-Shirt) is so obviously wearing the animal, Pluto. 'Freud had a mystical connection to animals', Geordie Greig writes in Breakfast With Lucian. 'He kept a pair of sparrowhawks in his house. To feed them, he would shoot rats with his gun on the canal bank at Regent's Park. He once brought home a pair of buzzards. His whippets Eli and Pluto were part of his entourage and he drew, painted and engraved them.'5 According to fashion writer Sabine Durrant, 'Over the past decade if a company - Jaeger, Biba or Barbour - needed a designer to sprinkle the magic dust of cool, it was Freud they chose.'6 Lucian and Bella did not get to know each other well until her teenage years when she first started modelling for him. Her branch of the complex Freud clan eventually moved to Tunbridge Wells where she studied at a Steiner school and where her mother was a dinner lady. As soon as she could, she left, and immediately found a job working at Vivienne Westwood's London store. She is still strongly inspired by Westwood's activism and has herself founded a charity called Hoping, with Karma Nabulsi, for Palestinian refugee children. 1. Greig, G., Breakfast with Lucian, Jonathan Cape, London, 2013, Kindle edition, quote on book cover 2. Durrant, S., 'Bella Freud Bares All', Telegraph, London, 12 November 2012, p. 17 3. Ibid. 4. Ibid. 5. Greig, G., op. cit., p. 2149 of 4001 6. Durrant, S., op. cit., p. 17 DR PETER HILL

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LEON KOSSOFF born 1926, British, OUTSIDE KILBURN UNDERGROUND NO.4, c1979, charcoal on paper

Lot 21: LEON KOSSOFF born 1926, British, OUTSIDE KILBURN UNDERGROUND NO.4, c1979, charcoal on paper

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Description: LEON KOSSOFF born 1926, British, OUTSIDE KILBURN UNDERGROUND NO.4, c1979, charcoal on paperDIMENSIONS: 56.0 x 75.0 cmEXHIBITED: Leon Kossoff : paintings and drawings, 1974-1979, Fischer Fine Art, London, May - June 1979 Important Works on Paper, Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney, 1988PROVENANCE: Fischer Fine Art, London Jeffrey Makin, Melbourne Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1988Like all things about Leon Kossoff's life, his infatuation with Kilburn Underground Station is both simple and complex. 'It's near me. It's interesting. And I like drawing there',1 he says. Kilburn is a suburb of North West London and the underground is on the Jubilee line. Like Kossoff, I used to live about five minutes' walk from it, and can testify to its ebb and flow of commuters, and its rattle and rush of trains, entering and exiting this outpost of the metropolis. The Tate Gallery, London has an encyclopaedic collection of his drawings and paintings depicting both the interior and exterior of this station. According to Kossoff, 'I have done many, many drawings of the subject; I couldn't possibly enumerate.'2 The Tate's researchers, however, are paid to do just that, and the list they have come up with is long and detailed (the prints alone go up to at least twelve states and give a fascinating insight into how his vision of the subject as a whole evolved over many years). The exterior drawings, for example, are always seen from the left hand side of Christchurch Avenue, looking towards Kilburn High Road. When Kossoff exhibited in the British Pavilion at the Venice Biennale in 1995 the catalogue pointed out that his forensic examination of the London he knows and loves was given added impetus several years earlier by 'the Thatcher government's rebuilding of East London with slogans such as: CANARY WHARF, IT WILL FEEL LIKE VENICE AND WORK LIKE NEW YORK.'3 Kossoff is five years older than his friend Frank Auerbach, who himself exhibited in Venice in 1986. Their early lives and their later painting techniques frequently mirror each other, and they both acknowledged a huge debt to their inspirational teacher David Bomberg, part of what's known today as the Slade Art School's 'crisis of brilliance'. 'Ever since the age of twelve I have drawn and painted London', Kossoff says. 'The strange ever-changing light, the endless streets, and the shuddering feel of the sprawling city linger in my mind like a faintly glimmering memory of a long-forgotten, perhaps never-experienced childhood, which, if rediscovered and illuminated, would ameliorate the pain of the present.'4 This archetypal drawing of Kossoff's has a top layer that is executed with speed and precision. It is both confident and bursting with energy. Yet, as he says, 'The truth is that all my life I've been filled with self-doubt.'5 And it is this life-enhancing doubt that is the scaffolding underpinning this drawing and supporting its final resolution. Like Auerbach, palimpsest is built upon palimpsest in these drawings, like a house of cards that is continually built up and then demolished. 'Just imagine', writes Michael Glover, 'the sight of his finger ends. He used to draw and paint in a mood akin to frenzy, with ferocious slashings and wrigglings of marks. The colours were most often sombre - greys edging off to black. He has always loved architectural decrepitude, often seen from a fairly high view point: gantries; a gasometer; the demolition site; conventionally unlovely industrial locations; places between places; grubby edgelands.'6 Kossoff, the son of a Jewish baker, and now 87 years old, is a small, intense man with white hair and blue chip eyes. His last exhibition travelled from London to Paris, New York, and California. Jackie Wullschlager, the well-travelled art critic for The Financial Times, described it as 'the most enthralling exhibition I have seen this year'.7 1. The Tate Gallery 1984-86: Illustrated Catalogue of Acquisitions Including Supplement to Catalogue of Acquisitions 1982-84, Tate Gallery, London, 1988, pp. 397-399 2. Ibid. 3. Overton T., Leon Kossoff, Venice Biennale Group Show, British Council website, London, 1995, , viewed 29 July 2014 4. Ibid. 5. Wullschlager, J., 'Coming Home', The Financial Times, London, 3 May 2013, p. 23 6. Glover, M. The Independent , Tuesday 14 May 2013, p. 24 7. Wullschlager, J., op. cit., p. 23 DR PETER HILL

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BARBARA HEPWORTH 1903 - 1975, British, MAQUETTE FOR LARGE SCULPTURE

Lot 21A: BARBARA HEPWORTH 1903 - 1975, British, MAQUETTE FOR LARGE SCULPTURE

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Description: BARBARA HEPWORTH 1903 - 1975, British, MAQUETTE FOR LARGE SCULPTURE: FOUR-SQUARE (FOUR CIRCLES), 1966, slate, edition: 3/3DIMENSIONS: 28.0 cm heightEXHIBITED: Barbara Hepworth, Gimpel Fils, London, May - June, 1966, cat. 31 (another example)LITERATURE: Bowness, A. (ed.), The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960-69, Lund Humphries, London, 1971, cat. 407, pl. 145 (illus.) Curtis, P., and Wilkinson, A., Barbara Hepworth: A Retrospective, Tate Gallery Publications, London, 1994, pp. 106-107 (illus. related works)PROVENANCE: John Crowther OBE, Truro, United Kingdom, a gift from the artist in 1966 David Lay Auctions, Cornwall, United Kingdom, 30 July 2009, lot 534 Peter Nahum at The Leicester Galleries, London Private collection, SydneyRELATED WORK: Four-Square (Four Circles), 1966, slate, 60 cm height, in Bowness, A., The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960-69, Lund Humphries, London, 1971, cat. 416, pl. 142 (illus.) Four-Square (Four Circles), 1966, bronze, 60 cm height, edition of 7, in Bowness, A., The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960-69, Lund Humphries, London, 1971, cat. 428 Four-Square (Walk Through), 1966, bronze, 429 cm height, edition of 3, in Bowness, A., The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960-69, Lund Humphries, London, 1971, cat. 433 We are grateful to Dr Sophie Bowness of the Hepworth Estate for her assistance cataloguing this work.'It is the first time in my life that I have achieved an idea, so exact, that it could be carried out posthumously, at full scale - i.e. to enter - if ever a site could be found.'1 A site was found: in fact, the monumental version of this work, Four-Square (Walk Through),1966, was cast in an edition of three and installed in the grounds of Churchill College, Cambridge, United Kingdom; Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena, United States of America; and the Barbara Hepworth Museum and Sculpture Garden, Cornwall, United Kingdom. At over four metres in height, the work is a celebrated example of Hepworth's abstract forms that explore architecture, light and human interaction. Four-Square (Walk Through), 1966 was Hepworth's first work which allowed people to walk through the sculpture, fulfilling her desire to physically engage the viewer: 'I wanted to involve people, make them reach to the surfaces and the size, finding out which spiral goes which way, realising the differences between the parts'.2 Previously restricted by the limitations of working with carved stone, Hepworth began to use bronze as it allowed her to experiment with size, scale and cast editions. The large bronze slabs of Four-Square (Walk Through) overawe the senses as the sculpture envelops the viewer and shadows cast by the circular apertures illuminate the form in either sunlight or starlight. The imposing assemblage is reminiscent of the ancient stones that punctuate the English countryside and like Stonehenge, which is simultaneously foreign against the landscape yet deeply rooted to the earth, Four-Square (Walk Through) adheres to and questions the surrounding environment. Maquette for Large Sculpture: Four-Square (Four Circles), 1966 is a rare and significant work from Hepworth's oeuvre, allowing us to closely study the model for Four-Square (Walk Through). Although it has been claimed that Hepworth never worked from a smaller maquette, there are three small scale versions of Four-Square (Walk Through), including the sculpture on offer.3 This provides an exceptional insight into Hepworth's practice, 'the size of the slate maquettes ... which Mullins called "table-sized" - suggests a process of scaling-up. Both of the maquettes establish some of the fundamental relationships of form. This included the rectangular form of the elements, the slippage between those of each pair - so that they project over the base to different extents - and the notable difference in height in the upper air.'4 Although smaller in size than its larger counterpart, Maquette for Large Sculpture: Four-Square (Four Circles) embodies all of the same ideological elements and notions of form and scale, imperative to Hepworth's art. The 1960s was an exceptionally successful period for Hepworth. Acknowledged as the world's greatest female sculptor, she was awarded honorary degrees by the universities of Birmingham in 1960, Leeds in 1961, Exeter in 1966 and Oxford in 1968 among others, and held major exhibitions internationally. Yet despite the widespread success and public recognition during these later years, Hepworth faced a private struggle as she was diagnosed with cancer in 1965. Confronted with mortality, the topic of death pervades Hepworth's work in the ensuing years and was a strong factor in the monumental size of Four-Square (Walk Through). 'Yes of course it was [related]. It was the same in 1938. If war was imminent, or you're very ill or something's threatening, you want to put something down for big work while you can. I was in an absolute fever of ideas, without much hope of fulfilment.'5 Perhaps this desire to fulfil the image of Four-Square (Walk Through) led Hepworth to create these extraordinary maquettes, in an effort to achieve perfection in an otherwise turbulent and bittersweet period of her life. Hepworth's Maquette for Large Sculpture: Four-Square (Four Circles) is at one with humanity and nature, as the artist herself describes, 'I cannot write anything about landscape without writing about the human figure and human spirit inhabiting the landscape. For me, the whole art of sculpture is the fusion of these two elements - the balance of sensation and evocation of man in this universe.'6 1. The artist in a letter to the original owner, John Crowther, dated 22 February 1966 2. Wilkinson, A., 'Cornwall and the Sculpture of Landscape: 1939-1975' in Curtis, P., and Wilkinson, A., Barbara Hepworth: A Retrospective, Tate Gallery Publications, London, 1994, p. 108 3. Gale, M., 'Four-Square (Walk Through), 1966', Tate, London, 1998, viewed 5 August 2014 4. Ibid. 5. Hepworth, B., cited in Bowness, A. (ed.), The Complete Sculpture of Barbara Hepworth 1960-69, Lund Humphries, London, 1971, p. 12 6. Hepworth, B., cited in Wilkinson, A., 'Cornwall and the Sculpture of Landscape: 1939-1975', op. cit., p. 108 CASSI YOUNG

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CLEMENT MEADMORE 1929 - 2005, NIGHT AND DAY, 1979-80, bronze

Lot 22: CLEMENT MEADMORE 1929 - 2005, NIGHT AND DAY, 1979-80, bronze

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Description: CLEMENT MEADMORE 1929 - 2005, NIGHT AND DAY, 1979-80, bronze, edition: 2/6SIGNED: signed, dated and numbered at base: Meadmore 1980 2/6DIMENSIONS: 34.0 x 91.0 x 14.0 cmLITERATURE: Gibson, E., The Sculpture of Clement Meadmore, Hudson Hills Press, New York, 1994, p. 120, colour illustration of the larger version installed at Chelsea Harbour, LondonPROVENANCE: Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York Private collection, New York Private collection, Melbourne Deutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 9 May 2007, lot 11 Private collection, MelbourneIn Australia during the late fifties into the sixties there emerged a number of sculptors of quality who raised the art in this country to a new level of achievement and appreciation. Coming from a variety of countries - Lithuania, Austria, England, Hungary, Germany, as well as the nativeborn - they were as stylistically different as their backgrounds. A group in Melbourne exhibited together under the name Centre 5, established in 1961, the same year as the Mildura Prize for Sculpture. In 1964, under the curatorship of Gordon Thompson, then Deputy Director of the National Gallery of Victoria, a national survey exhibition, Recent Australian Sculpture, went on tour to the state capitals, Canberra and Newcastle. One of the leading figures in this show was the Melbourneborn Clement Meadmore. The sense of the monolithic was already present in his exhibited work, Duolith III (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne), of welded sheet steel in the expressionist style then in vogue. Moving to New York in 1963, his extrovert sculpture took on something of the exhilaration and latent power of the megatropolis, populating some of its famous public places and institutions. A 1978 work is titled Six-foot model for six-hundred-foot skyscraper sculpture. Embracing international fame, his works are now found from London to Tokyo, throughout Australia, and in prestigious collections the like of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Art Institute of Chicago. A master of Minimalist sculpture, his works celebrate the grandeur of complexity translated through the power of simplicity. On whatever scale, his sculptures are imbued with a feeling of monumentality, found equally in the gigantic Awakening, 1968 (Australian Mutual Provident Society, Melbourne) or in the more human size of Night and Day. If the Hellenistic sculptor of Laocoön was the master of the twist of ancient times, Meadmore won the accolade for the curve in our own. In Night and Day the balanced harmony of movement in opposition unites at the juncture of that twist, one half supported by the ground on which it stands, the other suspended, weightless, magically impossible. The fluidity and balance echo that of a prima ballerina, of elegance and finesse, giving, through its line and mass, a special presence to the environment of its placement. DAVID THOMAS

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BRONWYN OLIVER 1959 - 2006, STRIATION, 2004, copper

Lot 23: BRONWYN OLIVER 1959 - 2006, STRIATION, 2004, copper

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Description: BRONWYN OLIVER 1959 - 2006, STRIATION, 2004, copperDIMENSIONS: 212.0 cm heightEXHIBITED: Bronwyn Oliver, Christine Abrahams Gallery, Melbourne, 17 November - 11 December 2004PROVENANCE: Christine Abrahams Gallery, Melbourne Private collection, SydneyTwisting and turning in an effortless motion, Striation is an ethereal example of Bronwyn Oliver's flawlessly constructed forms that juxtapose fragility against strength and the familiar against the foreign. Derived from the word stria, the title of this sculpture refers to the parallel 'scratches or tiny grooves on the surface of a rock, resulting from the action of moving ice, as of a glacier'.1 Recreating this natural phenomenon, Oliver has taken these parallel markings and weaved them into an organic form, achieved through an equal partnership between the artist and the independent life of the sculpture. The viewer is drawn to the exposed skeleton of this otherworldly object, alluding to a primordial foreign creature or an overgrown botanical organism. We are not entirely sure what the object is, or what it looks like, but the sensuous curves and the enigmatic form exudes familiarity. Upon closer inspection, it becomes apparent that the evenly spaced copper strands are too perfect for the natural world and as Oliver herself has discussed, she was never interested in the observation of nature, despite the many parallels between her sculptures and various creatures and natural objects.2 Rather, her primary concern was in the structure of materials and the idea of a sculpture taking on its own life. In Striation, Oliver has stripped the ideology and associations of the sculpture down to the bare bones, both in a physical and metaphorical sense, revealing a delicate husk and the life inside. Oliver's creations belong neither to past or present civilisations and are neither mythical nor factual. Timeless in their appearance, they are disconnected from a specific place, object or era and instead suggest a precious life force that connects deeply to the human soul. Manipulating the copper through her meticulous craftsmanship, Oliver is regarded as one of Australia's most significant contemporary sculptors - 'the delicate friction between surface and depth breathes life into her objects: dense surfaces with translucent and vital interiors of air and light. Her objects are often sphere-like with hollow spaces or openings - openings which lead to somewhere else, devolving from where they started. In the exchange between these aspects, Oliver's sculpture suggests a passage from one place to another, a journey from a material dimension into an imaginative, other world.'3 As demonstrated in Striation, Oliver leaves behind a legacy of pure beauty, fragility, strength and life. 1. The Macquarie Dictionary, Macquarie University, New South Wales, 1981, p. 1678 2. Sturgeon, G., Contemporary Australian sculpture, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1991, p. 72 3. Bullock, N., in Bond, T., and Tunnicliffe, T. (eds), Contemporary: Art Gallery of New South Wales Contemporary Collection, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2006, p. 326 CASSI YOUNG

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DEL KATHRYN BARTON born 1972, BUT PASSION HAS MADE HIS FACE LIKE PALE IVORY, 2011-12, synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and ink on polyester canvas

Lot 24: DEL KATHRYN BARTON born 1972, BUT PASSION HAS MADE HIS FACE LIKE PALE IVORY, 2011-12, synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and ink on polyester canvas

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Description: DEL KATHRYN BARTON born 1972, BUT PASSION HAS MADE HIS FACE LIKE PALE IVORY, 2011-12, synthetic polymer paint, gouache, watercolour and ink on polyester canvasSIGNED: signed lower centre: - del kathryn barton - signed, dated and inscribed verso: del kathyn barton / 2012 / acrylic, gouache, watercolour and / ink on polyester canvas / title / but passion has made his face / like pale ivoryDIMENSIONS: 170.0 x 150.0 cmEXHIBITED: del kathryn barton: the nightingale and the rose, Heide Museum of Modern Art, Melbourne, 10 November - 9 December 2012 del kathryn barton: the nightingale and the rose and new work, Newcastle Art Gallery, New South Wales, 15 December 2012 - 17 February 2013 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Barton, D.K., Oscar Wilde's The nightingale and the rose, Art and Australia, Sydney, 2012, pp. IX - XI, LI, (illus. pp. IX, X, XI) Ewington, J., DEL KATHRYN BARTON, Piper Press, Sydney, 2014, pp. 73, 74 (illus. p. 74)PROVENANCE: Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, SydneyThe delicate linear qualities and exuberant patterning at the heart of Del Kathryn Barton's practice combine in but passion has made his face like pale ivory, 2011-12. The artist's drawn lines articulate the male subject's facial planes like a tender topographical map. This intimate rendering of every minor shadow is charged with the romantic and passionate connotations of lingering observation. An intimacy that is accentuated by the concentrated gaze of the subject's own eyes and the nearly pointillist force field that encircles him. Male figures rarely appear in Barton's paintings and here there is a particular resonance, for the boy is the student from Oscar Wilde's The Nightingale and the Rose, 1888. With the student 'sorrow has set her seal upon his brow'.1 This spurs the nightingale, as selfless heroine, to seek out a red rose to enable the student's love to flourish. The fairy tale aspect within Barton's work is exacerbated by the motif of Wilde's fable where elaborate confection collapses in to a darker sacrificial realm. 'Only a Nightingale's heart's-blood can crimson the heart of a rose.'2 The pale skin of the love-struck student appears both paper-thin and heavy as marble, echoing the force and fickleness of passion and the eerie distillation of corporeal realities within the mythic realm. Throughout the artist's wider practice, the perils of enchantment are similarly addressed; 'the whole that is everything, this consuming whole of pleasure, is as fatal as it is fertile, as voiding and emetic as it is fulfilling'.3 Wilde's text and Barton's paintings of The Nightingale and the Rose were brought together in a lavish hardcopy book published in 2012 by Art and Australia. Across the pages, Barton's suite of twenty paintings and drawings embody the unabashed intensity of the classic tale. The importance of our present offering within the series is highlighted by the commanding presence it holds in this publication. Barton's intense and intricate approach to painting has made her a leading Australian figurative artist. This has led to inclusion in significant institutional and private collections including Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney; National Gallery of Australia, Canberra; Museum of Old and New Art, Hobart; Artbank; and the BHP Billiton Collection, Melbourne. Notably, Barton was twice awarded the prestigious Archibald Prize, in 2008 and again in 2013. 1. Wilde, O., The Nightingale and the Rose, 1888, in Barton, D.K., Oscar Wilde, The Nightingale and the Rose, Dott Publishing, Art and Australia Pty Ltd, 2012, p. 4 2. Ibid., p. 36 3. Colless, E., 'Eden and After', in The Whole of Everything, Karen Woodbury Gallery, Melbourne, 2008, p. 35 AMY MARJORAM

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COLIN McCAHON 1919 - 1987, New Zealand, NOUGHTS AND CROSSES, SERIES 2, NO. 2, 1976, synthetic polymer paint on Steinbach paper

Lot 25: COLIN McCAHON 1919 - 1987, New Zealand, NOUGHTS AND CROSSES, SERIES 2, NO. 2, 1976, synthetic polymer paint on Steinbach paper

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Description: COLIN McCAHON 1919 - 1987, New Zealand, NOUGHTS AND CROSSES, SERIES 2, NO. 2, 1976, synthetic polymer paint on Steinbach paperSIGNED: signed with initials, dated and inscribed lower left: II NOUGHTS & CROSSES 2. C. McC. '76.DIMENSIONS: 110.5 x 73.0 cmEXHIBITED: Colin McCahon: Paintings - Noughts and crosses, Rocks in the sky, On the road, Barry Lett Galleries, Auckland, 23 August - 3 September 1976, cat. 2 (as 'Noughts and Crosses (second set)') Colin McCahon: Necessary Protection: the catalogue of a travelling exhibition of paintings from Colin McCahon's various series from 1971 to 1976, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1-25 September 1977; Manawatu Art Gallery, Palmerston North, 5-30 October 1977; Robert McDougall Art Gallery, Christchurch, 8 November - 4 December 1977; Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin, 14 December 1977 - 8 January 1978; Sarjeant Gallery, Wanganui, 18 January - 12 February 1978; National Art Gallery, Wellington, 22 February - 19 March 1978; Hawkes Bay Art Gallery and Museum (Inc.), Napier, 29 March - 23 April 1978; Gisborne Museum and Art Centre, Gisborne, 3-28 May 1978; Waikato Art Museum, Hamilton, 12 July - 6 August 1978; cat. 21 (as 'Noughts & Crosses II 2') On loan to Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney (label attached verso)LITERATURE: McCahon's 'Necessary Protection', Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth, 1977, p. 42, cat. 21 (illus. p. [33]) Bloem, M., and Browne, M., Colin McCahon: A Question of Faith, Craig Potton Publishing & Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 2002, p. 261 Colin McCahon Online Catalogue, www.mccahon.co.nz, ref. cm001171PROVENANCE: Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington Private collection, New Zealand, acquired from the above in 1978 Peter McLeavey Gallery, Wellington Private collection, Brisbane, acquired from the above in 2001One of the great masters of twentieth century painting, Colin McCahon is widely revered for his prophetic vision which imbues the vernacular with universal significance to powerfully interrogate sacred questions of faith and doubt, life and death, meaning and despair. Yet while McCahon invariably draws inspiration from the most mundane objects and events in his spiritual quest, the original sources for his meditations are rarely self-evident from the works themselves. Rather it is the existential situation that emerges from the artist's response to this impetus - his reflection distilled through the alchemy of time, memory and recollection - that is immortalised in the sublime incarnations constituting his remarkable legacy. As with several themes from this decade influenced by the minutiae of the artist's daily life at Muriwai, the inspiration for the Noughts and Crosses series came to McCahon while watching his daughter Victoria play games of noughts and crosses with her young son Tui. As Martin Browne elucidates '... In their discarded scraps of paper, McCahon discovered a rich metaphor for the universal "game" of life. For in life, as in noughts and crosses, each individual must play within a given set of rules, the choices made and chances taken determining what follows thereafter ... Accordingly, now the crosses represented both a positive and affirmative act and, through the metaphor of the Crucifixion, the promise of redemption. As well as the "x" traditionally marking the "cross" in the game, McCahon employs the shape of the Latin Cross - "T" - the Cross of Christ's Crucifixion. By contrast, the noughts here threaten the possibility of the abyss; a primordial void from which there is no hope of escape.'1 Exploiting the brutal intellectual and spiritual implications of this seemingly innocent children's game, McCahon thus embarked upon the acclaimed Noughts and Crosses series which, comprising fourteen paintings (another reference to the numerical symbology of the Stations of the Cross) is divided into two sets of seven known as 'the first set' and 'series 2'. While each of 'the first set' depicts two completed games and common to all but one is the victory of the crosses, in series two, the imagery is reduced to single games whose results become far more ambiguous. Now only the present work and no. 3 repeat the victory of the Latin Crosses that so distinguished the first series. Furthermore, although technically a 'win', the fact that two of the three black crosses in the work on offer are almost obfuscated within the dark background smoke from a fiery hell visibly portends the doubt and despair to follow. Indeed, in paintings no. 4 and 5, the results are inconclusive; in no. 6 the victory of the crosses is rendered with a line of black 'x's rather than the Latin Cross employed previously; while finally, in no. 7, the last painting of the series, the hope offered by the Latin Cross has been completely extinguished, the crosses here appearing in black against a black background while victory lies with the noughts. Despite such an ostensibly pessimistic finale, the Noughts and Crosses series remains compelling for the beauty, mystery and sophistication with which the artist transforms the everyday into the wonder of an authentic spiritual encounter. For, as with the best of McCahon's work, 'it is the existential situation that prevails ... The viewer is asked to stand with the artist, in a situation where each person must decide the issue in their own way ... It is art used to give the conflict of faith and doubt coherence of thought, effort and expression in its most positive form.'2 1. Bloem, M., and Browne, M., Colin McCahon: A Question of Faith, Craig Potton Publishing & Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, 2002, p. 226 2. Brown, G.H., Colin McCahon: Artist, A.H. & A.W. Reed, Wellington, 1984, pp. 117-118 VERONICA ANGELATOS

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JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, SECOND STUDY FOR MATISSE AT ASHFORD, 2004, oil on canvas

Lot 26: JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, SECOND STUDY FOR MATISSE AT ASHFORD, 2004, oil on canvas

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Description: JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, SECOND STUDY FOR MATISSE AT ASHFORD, 2004, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower left: JEFFREY SMARTDIMENSIONS: 39.5 x 66.5 cmEXHIBITED: Jeffrey Smart, Paintings and Studies 2004 - 2006, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 28 September - 8 October, 2006 and Australian Galleries, Sydney, 17 October - 4 November, 2006, cat. 10LITERATURE: Allen, C., Jeffrey Smart, Paintings and Studies 2004 - 2006, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 2006, p. 37 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Australian Galleries, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 2011RELATED WORK: Matisse at Ashford, 2004, oil on canvas, 86.0 x 138.0 cm, collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, in Pearce, B., Jeffrey Smart, Beagle Press, Sydney, revised edition 2011 (illus. on cover)Second Study for Matisse at Ashford 2004 is a classic Jeffrey Smart in composition, imagery, and inspiration. Developed through two oil studies, Smart attains his characteristic perfection through his beloved golden section, of compositional balance and interplay of verticals and horizontals. The emphasis on the picture plane is contrasted with the recession of the posters into a distant background of apartments in serried ranks of sameness. The figures, as Smart has often remarked, are there for scale, bright touches of colour amid the encroaching evening blues. While the autobahns and road signs have been replaced with platforms and large posters, Smart's fascination with things to do with travel is present in this stationary view from a railway carriage. The inspiration is Ashford station in Kent, the first British stop for the Eurostar in its Paris-London trip under the British Channel. That everpresent element of expectation is provided by the darkening afternoon light, casting its enigmatic shadows. They seem to take on lives of their own. The posters for the Henri Matisse exhibition at London's Royal Academy add a series of further bizarre notes, the sinuous, blue figures of the Matisse nude contrasting with the rectilinear organization of the other forms. Smart was on his way to London when the train's pause at Ashford gave him the idea for the painting, quickly sketched in pen and ink. Back in his studio near Arezzo in Tuscany, the sketch grew into the first study in oil in which the basic ideas and forms were painted on a canvas of 38 by 54 centimeters. This was followed by our painting, which is slightly larger, figures positioned as in the final painting, a line of yellow flowering bushes introduced, and individual shadows placed more exactly. The differences between this second study and the larger painting in the collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales are mainly ones of detail and size. A rubbish bin has been added to the right in the far platform and the flowers changed into a low hedge. While the homage to the great Matisse nude cut-out is obvious, the close presence of the rubbish bin is not. Irony is an on-going element in his art. Despite Smart's protestations that his art is all about formal qualities, his paintings view the contemporary world with a quizzical look beneath the surfaces of things. Unlike the prophets of old, Smart eschews the wilderness for the urban scene, Second Study for Matisse at Ashford providing a fascinating introduction and complement to one of his later masterpieces. DAVID THOMAS

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CHARLES BLACKMAN born 1928, RED GARDEN, c1970, synthetic polymer paint on canvas (diptych)

Lot 27: CHARLES BLACKMAN born 1928, RED GARDEN, c1970, synthetic polymer paint on canvas (diptych)

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Description: CHARLES BLACKMAN born 1928, RED GARDEN, c1970, synthetic polymer paint on canvas (diptych)SIGNED: signed lower left, left panel: BLACKMANDIMENSIONS: 211.0 x 346.0 cm (overallLITERATURE: Amadio, N., Charles Blackman The Lost Domains, Alpine Fine Arts Collection, New York, 1980, pp. 92-93, cat. 6.15 (illus. double page)PROVENANCE: Private collection, Sydney, acquired directly from the artist c1978'The Blackman Garden is very often frequented by a white cat, which is a symbol of many things: innocence, chidlhood, a familiar, a night-self visiting secret places - the enchanted gardens of memory.'1 The enigmatic white cat of Red Garden is a frequent character in Charles Blackman's highly celebrated garden scenes. Replacing the iconic figures from the Alice and Schoolgirl series, Blackman employs the white cat as an allegory of innocence and youth. Throughout the garden series we are offered various glimpses into the daily life of the white cat, who in this instance sits with its back to the viewer. Partly ensconced by the plants and trees, the cat is deeply engaged by something or someone that we cannot see and like many of the figures in the Schoolgirl series, the cat's facial features are concealed, providing an air of mystery. Combined with the absence of a horizon and the enhanced vivid colours that radiate from the large golden sun, there is a surreal quality to this painting as Blackman explores the fairytale land of the white cat's garden. With its haunting beauty and lush foliage, Red Garden entices the viewer into the landscape which is simultaneously foreign and familiar, arousing nostalgic memories of one's youth. This is the overgrown garden of our childhood imagination, an exotic jungle where mysterious creatures prowl and exciting adventures await. It is as if we have stepped into a somewhat wilder version of the hidden garden in Frances Hodgson Burnett's classic novel The Secret Garden; a forbidden but magical place. The garden plays an integral role in Blackman's oeuvre, as a theme evocative of the fantasy world explored in the Alice in Wonderland series: 'For him, it is a garden - the domain he lost some time in his childhood and has been painting his way back to ever since.'2 Blackman's garden series originally drew inspiration from Claude Monet. Like Monet, Blackman began to depict the same subject at various times of the day, experimenting with the effect of light. Some scenes are depicted during the day, others in the evening whilst Red Garden is illuminated in a warm dusk light that pervades the canvas as dark leaves and foliage spread across the foreground. However, as demonstrated in the picture on offer, Blackman's use of colour and the formation of his shapes are very different to Monet's soft muted tones and impressionist brush strokes. As Blackman continued to explore this theme 'the garden acquires a crisper look, with cut-out shapes and unreal colours ensuring a disengagement from nature'.3 The magical world of the cat's garden provided a great source of inspiration for Blackman and the pure imagination of this series resonates strongly with the viewer: 'I was trying deliberately to create a sense of unreality, of it being in the cat's garden with no human being in it. A world shut off from everything else. It's funny, while I was working on it, my daughter Christabel came home from the library with a book, and started reading me a story about a cat stepping into a wardrobe and out into his own garden. The wardrobe was the only possible entrance. I don't say I'm psychic or anything, but the two did coincide.'4 1. Amadio, N., Charles Blackman: The Lost Domains, Alpine Fine Arts Collection, New York, 1980, p. 80 2. Ibid. 3. St John Moore, F., Charles Blackman: Schoolgirls and Angels, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1993, p. 11 4. Hall, S., 'Blackman - Ten Years After the Antipodean Affair', Bulletin, 5 July 1969, p. 32 CASSI YOUNG

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GARRY SHEAD born 1942, CORONATION, 1996, oil on composition board

Lot 28: GARRY SHEAD born 1942, CORONATION, 1996, oil on composition board

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Description: GARRY SHEAD born 1942, CORONATION, 1996, oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Garry Shead 96 dated and inscribed verso: THE CORONATION / GARRY SHEAD 96DIMENSIONS: 91.0 x 122.0 cmLITERATURE: Grishin, S., Garry Shead: Encounters with Royalty, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1998, (illus. pl. 7, p. 45 and back cover)PROVENANCE: Eva Breuer Art Dealer, Sydney Private collection, SydneyWhen Queen Elizabeth II toured Australia in 1954, her presence made a profound impression upon the Australian public that would endure for years. As the first reigning British monarch to ever visit Australia, the response from the people was enormous and it is estimated that approximately seventy percent of Australia's population flocked to see the Queen and her husband Prince Phillip during their two month tour. Garry Shead was just twelve years old when his school journeyed to the Sydney Showground to welcome the Queen. As she passed slowly in an open car, Shead remembers the exact moment he laid eyes on her, 'I remember seeing her and feeling the eye contact as she passed. I also remember dreaming about her (sometimes sexual dreams) - there was possibly nothing sexy about her, she was like a Walt Disney Cinderella, but I encountered her at the dawning of my own pubescence. There was something unearthly and untouchable in her beauty, a sort of "Noli Me Tangere", so that even a prime minister could not touch her elbow. She passed like an incarnate spirit.'1 The vision of this pure and ethereal monarch remained with him for years and became the impetus for the Royal Suite series, created some forty years after the royal tour. Coronation is a graceful example of Shead's tender portrayals of the royal family imbued with his own personal relationships and desires. In particular, Coronation demonstrates the close bond between Shead and his mother, and his pubescent fantasy of the Queen. Merging the two identities together, the features of the female figure resemble Shead's mother, whilst she is adorned with the jewels and the regalia of the Queen. The result is the unearthly white goddess who appears foreign and alien against the pure blue sky and the iconic Sydney Harbour. The many narratives of the Royal Suite series are set against the Australian landscape, contrasting the pomp and ceremony of the Crown against comical kangaroos and koalas. As Sasha Grishin explains, 'The series can also be interpreted as an allegory, an expression of a naïve belief in a white goddess, one who was seen as supernatural, who could not be touched or experienced, but could only be worshipped. She came from a remote place and appeared to her subjects in the form of a celestial apparition ... Perhaps on the simplest level, the series is about a quest for beauty and a lost innocence, a quest for a new Holy Grail. It is a tale about the gradual process of disillusionment where realisations of reality gradually dissolve the illusions of the absurd.'2 1. Grishin, S., Garry Shead: Encounters With Royalty, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1998, p. 12 2. Ibid., p. 27 CASSI YOUNG

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TIM STORRIER born 1949, EVENING EDGE (WATERLINE), 2000, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Lot 29: TIM STORRIER born 1949, EVENING EDGE (WATERLINE), 2000, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: TIM STORRIER born 1949, EVENING EDGE (WATERLINE), 2000, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Storrier signed and inscribed verso: 'Evening Edge (Waterline). / StorrierDIMENSIONS: 76.5 x 152.5 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection Cooks Hill Galleries, Newcastle Private collection, New South Wales, acquired from the above in 2003In the early 1980s Tim Storrier began experimenting with a unique kind of performative art. Locating remote and usually barren settings in the Australian outback, Storrier would suspend a piece of rope or wire between two poles and set it alight, documenting the experience of watching these hypnotising flames. Thus became the basis of his 'point to point' series, which is perhaps the most well-known in the artist's oeuvre. Storrier's waterline paintings continue this tradition of mesmerising depictions of fire, but they have evolved into more complex narratives than the artist's earlier work. In our painting we encounter the artist's distinctive flat horizon line and immense, uncompromising landscape. But the wire here has been replaced with a burning log on a sandy shoreline, invoking a host of dark associations relating to natural disasters and displacement, to watching one's house burn down or a ship go up in flames. The surrounding stretch of ashen water acts as a kind of isolating barrier. We cannot reach this traumatic scene, we cannot help, we can only look on from the distance. The sky is scattered with pink sweeps of cloud: it is dusk, and we are reminded that the day is fading but the fire will continue to burn. Storrier is perpetually intrigued by the forces of nature - in particular the four elements - and the comparative triviality of human life when set against the power and the endurance of the natural world. His paintings engage with the isolated Australian landscape, but Storrier imbues it with a highly personalised and romanticised quality, experimenting as he does with light, stillness, silence and decay. Above all, Evening Edge (Waterline) is a lesson in mortality. In the burning log we see the full force of nature - the devastation of destruction and the wonder of renewal. There is a great nostalgia in this painting, an immense experience of loss, but also a humbling encounter with beauty and acceptance. Born in 1949, Tim Storrier was the youngest ever recipient of the Art Gallery of New South Wales Sulman Prize for painting at the age of 19, winning it again in 1984. Storrier has a Doctor of Arts, has been a Trustee of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, and in 1994 was awarded a Member of the Order of Australia (AM) for his contribution to the arts. In 2012 Storrier won the Archibald prize for his painting Histrionic Wayfarer (after Bosch). His work is represented in major public and private collections throughout Australia and overseas, including the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, the National and Tate Galleries in London, the Louvre Museum in Paris, and the Metropolitan Museum of Modern Art in New York.

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LIN ONUS 1948 - 1996, GUMINGI (MAGPIE GEESE), 1987, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Lot 30: LIN ONUS 1948 - 1996, GUMINGI (MAGPIE GEESE), 1987, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: LIN ONUS 1948 - 1996, GUMINGI (MAGPIE GEESE), 1987, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Lin OnusDIMENSIONS: 112.0 x 167.0 cmLITERATURE: Isaacs, J., Aboriginality: Contemporary Aboriginal Paintings and Prints, University of Queensland Press, Brisbane, 1992, p. 27 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Japingka Gallery, Perth Private collection, Perth, acquired from the above in 2004In 1986 Lin Onus travelled to Maningrida in Western Arnhem Land with the Aboriginal Arts board, a visit that would have a profound and lasting effect not only on his painting but also changed his outlook on life. This was the first of sixteen regular 'spiritual pilgrimages' to Maningrida and Garmedi between 1986 and 1996 that introduced him to a spiritual and cultural experience he had not previously been exposed to. He was introduced to 'kinship systems in which he and his family were assigned skin names, to language that he used for many of the titles of his works and to ceremony and Dreaming stories'.1 Arguably the most important influence upon Onus's stylistic evolution came from the relationship he developed on his trips to Arnhem Land with the highly esteemed Aboriginal painter, Jack Wunuwun. Inspired by the older artist's traditions and bark painting techniques such as rarrk (cross-hatched designs), Onus observed Wunuwun's depth of knowledge about the land, learnt the importance of symbols, pattern and designs as well as experiencing the formal process of passing on levels of knowledge. The Yolngu artist, welcomed him into the Murrungun- Djinang clan and gave him permission to use some of the traditional images in his paintings. Onus had always incorporated a diverse range of mediums, methods and styles in his work: the illustrative qualities of his work being derived from Western culture and the added layered images evolving from his Aboriginal heritage. Already aware of his ancestral connections to the Barmah Forest country, Onus was now permitted to access new sites of significance such as Arafura Swamp, or his adoptive community at the outstation Garmedi and he was now able to bricolage all these elements into his work. In Gumingi, Magpie Geese, 1987, meticulously painted Magpie Geese stand in an Arnhem Land wetland, most likely the Arafura Swamp. The surface of the swamp is carpeted with rarrk designs spreading far into the distance and beyond, alluding to ever present aboriginal spirituality that pervades every natural place. It is this spiritual narrative that ebbs and flows through Onus's work, first appearing in works such as Guminji, 1987 and Jimmy's Billabong, 1988 in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra and flowing on through his later lilypond and fish paintings and the large reflective Barmah Forest canvases. Onus grew up in a culturally rich and politically engaged household in Melbourne with his father Bill Onus, a Yorta Yorta man, and his mother Mary McLintock Kelly, of Scottish origin. He grew up in Deepdene, Melbourne and suffered the torments of school bullying and the fear and loathing inherent in 1950s and 1960s suburban racism. His father, who was an important figure in Aboriginal politics concerned with civil rights and land claim campaigns, opened Aboriginal Enterprises, producing and selling Aboriginal Art and Crafts at Belgrave in the Dandenong Ranges.2 Onus was raised surrounded by ideas of learning, artistry and the power of community and both his activist and creative ambitions collide powerfully in his distinct and celebrated work. Yet his activism found its greatest voice through his prodigious talent for painting and his ability to stop people in their tracks with his powerful image making. 1. Neale, M., Urban Dingo: The Art of Lin Onus 1948-1996, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 2000, pp. 15-16 2. Kleinert, S., 'Rear-vision mirror, A Koori Context', in Neale, M., Urban Dingo: The Art of Lin Onus 1948-1996, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 2000, p. 27 CRISPIN GUTTERIDGE

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JOHN OLSEN born 1928, PAELLA BY THE SEA, 2014, watercolour and pastel on paper

Lot 31: JOHN OLSEN born 1928, PAELLA BY THE SEA, 2014, watercolour and pastel on paper

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Description: JOHN OLSEN born 1928, PAELLA BY THE SEA, 2014, watercolour and pastel on paperSIGNED: signed lower left: John / Olsen signed, dated and inscribed verso: 'Paella by the Sea' / John Olsen / 014DIMENSIONS: 80.0 x 88.0 cmPROVENANCE: The artist, Sydney

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TIM STORRIER born 1949, CAPON'S CROWNS, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

Lot 32: TIM STORRIER born 1949, CAPON'S CROWNS, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvas

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Description: TIM STORRIER born 1949, CAPON'S CROWNS, 2010, synthetic polymer paint on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Storrier inscribed, signed and dated verso on frame: 'Old Hats' / Storrier / 2010 label attached verso: Philip Bacon Galleries, BrisbaneDIMENSIONS: 51.0 x 31.0 cmPROVENANCE: The artist, Bowral, New South Wales

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BILL HENSON born 1955, UNTITLED 1985/86, 1985-86, type C photograph

Lot 33: BILL HENSON born 1955, UNTITLED 1985/86, 1985-86, type C photograph

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Description: BILL HENSON born 1955, UNTITLED 1985/86, 1985-86, type C photographDIMENSIONS: 106.5 x 86.5 cmEXHIBITED: Bill Henson, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 8 January - 3 April 2005; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne 23 April - 10 July 2005 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Henson, B., and Annear, J., Mnemosyne, Scalo, Zurich, in association with the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2005, p. 302 (illus.)PROVENANCE: The artist, Melbourne

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ALEX SETON born 1977, INFLATABLE CROWN (REGENCY), 2014, black polyester and spigot

Lot 34: ALEX SETON born 1977, INFLATABLE CROWN (REGENCY), 2014, black polyester and spigot

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Description: ALEX SETON born 1977, INFLATABLE CROWN (REGENCY), 2014, black polyester and spigot, A/P 2/2, for bronze edition of 8 from original marble carving first displayed at Art Basel Hong Kong 2014SIGNED: signed, dated and numbered on base: AP.2 / A Seton 2014DIMENSIONS: 16.0 x 33.0 x 33.0 cmPROVENANCE: The artist, Sydney

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LINDY LEE born 1954, DARK LIGHT OF LUNAR NIGHT, 2009, acrylic and wax on five Dibond aluminum panels

Lot 35: LINDY LEE born 1954, DARK LIGHT OF LUNAR NIGHT, 2009, acrylic and wax on five Dibond aluminum panels

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Description: LINDY LEE born 1954, DARK LIGHT OF LUNAR NIGHT, 2009, acrylic and wax on five Dibond aluminum panelsSIGNED: each signed and dated verso: Lindy Lee / 09DIMENSIONS: 41.0 x 145.0 cm (overall)EXHIBITED: Lindy Lee: Flames from the Dragon's Pearl, Roslyn Oxley9 Gallery, Sydney, 23 April - 16 May 2009, cat. 5PROVENANCE: The artist, Sydney

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GUAN WEI born 1957, ON CLOUDS NO. 2, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on linen

Lot 36: GUAN WEI born 1957, ON CLOUDS NO. 2, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on linen

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Description: GUAN WEI born 1957, ON CLOUDS NO. 2, 2008, synthetic polymer paint on linenSIGNED: signed, dated and inscribed verso: 'on clouds' No. 2 / ... / Guan Wei / 2008.DIMENSIONS: 130.0 x 79.5 cmPROVENANCE: The artist, Sydney

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JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, IN THE PARK, 1962, oil on board

Lot 37: JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, IN THE PARK, 1962, oil on board

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Description: JEFFREY SMART 1921 - 2013, IN THE PARK, 1962, oil on boardSIGNED: signed lower right: JEFFREY SMARTDIMENSIONS: 17.5 x 23.5 cmEXHIBITED: The Show of Eights, The Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 14-19 February 1962, cat. 56, 8 gns (as 'In the Dark')LITERATURE: Quartermaine, P., Jeffrey Smart, Gryphon Books, Pty Ltd, Melbourne, 1983, p. 108, cat. 390PROVENANCE: The Macquarie Galleries, Sydney Private collection, Sydney, acquired 1962RELATED WORK: Port Germein, 1958, oil on canvas, 29.0 x 49.0 cm, in Quartermaine, P., Jeffrey Smart, Gryphon Books, Pty Ltd, Melbourne, 1983, p. 106, cat. 333 We are grateful to Stephen Rogers for his assistance with this catalogue entry.

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LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, NEAR PARRAMATTA, c1924, oil on canvas on board

Lot 38: LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, NEAR PARRAMATTA, c1924, oil on canvas on board

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Description: LLOYD REES 1895 - 1988, NEAR PARRAMATTA, c1924, oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: signed lower right: REESDIMENSIONS: 22.5 x 30.5 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection, Melbourne

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ROLAND WAKELIN 1887 - 1971, FERRY WHARF, NEUTRAL BAY, c1945, oil on board

Lot 39: ROLAND WAKELIN 1887 - 1971, FERRY WHARF, NEUTRAL BAY, c1945, oil on board

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Description: ROLAND WAKELIN 1887 - 1971, FERRY WHARF, NEUTRAL BAY, c1945, oil on boardDIMENSIONS: 54.5 x 76.0 cmEXHIBITED: Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings by Roland Wakelin (Supplementary to the Official Retrospective Exhibition at the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 8-30 April 1967), held under the auspices of the Arts Council of Australia (New South Wales Division) in collaboration with Macquarie Galleries and Darlinghurst Galleries, at Darlinghurst Galleries, Sydney, 5-15 April 1967, cat. 22PROVENANCE: Darlinghust Galleries, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, Sydney Thence by descent Private collection, Sydney

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VIDA LAHEY 1882 - 1968, CUSTOMS HOUSE AND ST JOHN'S CATHEDRAL, BRISBANE, FROM KANGAROO POINT, c1924-26, oil on canvas on board

Lot 40: VIDA LAHEY 1882 - 1968, CUSTOMS HOUSE AND ST JOHN'S CATHEDRAL, BRISBANE, FROM KANGAROO POINT, c1924-26, oil on canvas on board

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Description: VIDA LAHEY 1882 - 1968, CUSTOMS HOUSE AND ST JOHN'S CATHEDRAL, BRISBANE, FROM KANGAROO POINT, c1924-26, oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: signed lower right: F.V. LAHEY.DIMENSIONS: 30.5 x 50.5 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection, Germany

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GRACE COSSINGTON SMITH 1892 - 1984, LANDSCAPE AT LAKE MACQUARIE, 1942, oil on pulpboard

Lot 41: GRACE COSSINGTON SMITH 1892 - 1984, LANDSCAPE AT LAKE MACQUARIE, 1942, oil on pulpboard

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Description: GRACE COSSINGTON SMITH 1892 - 1984, LANDSCAPE AT LAKE MACQUARIE, 1942, oil on pulpboardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: G. Cossington Smith 42. inscribed verso: Landscape at Lake Macquarie / 42DIMENSIONS: 40.0 x 35.0 cmEXHIBITED: Deutscher Fine Art, Melbourne, 13 October - 15 November 1985, cat. 79 Grace Cossington Smith Survey Exhibition 1919 - 1971, Painters Gallery, Sydney, 8-26 September 1987 and Niagara Galleries, Melbourne, 7-24 October 1987, cat. 27, pl. 12 (illus. in exhibition catalogue) (labels attached verso)PROVENANCE: Deutscher Fine Art, Melbourne Private collection, Sydney Thence by descent Private collection, London

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JOHN PASSMORE 1904 - 1984, UP THE ORCHARD, 1946, oil on canvas

Lot 42: JOHN PASSMORE 1904 - 1984, UP THE ORCHARD, 1946, oil on canvas

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Description: JOHN PASSMORE 1904 - 1984, UP THE ORCHARD, 1946, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed with initials and dated lower right: JP 46DIMENSIONS: 45.0 x 34.5 cmEXHIBITED: John Passmore, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, November - December 1951, cat. 13 Fifty Years of Macquarie Galleries: The Third Decade, 1945-55, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, May 1975, cat. 36 John Passmore Retrospective, 1904-84, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 19 December 1984 - 10 February 1985, cat. 11. (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Pearce, B., John Passmore Retrospective 1904-84, Art Gallery of New South Wales and Beagle Press, Sydney, 1985, p. 38 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Private collection, a gift from the artist, 1946 Sotheby's, Melbourne, 25 August 1998, lot 110 Private collection, Sydney

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JOHN PASSMORE 1904 - 1984, UNTITLED, 1970s, oil on composition board

Lot 43: JOHN PASSMORE 1904 - 1984, UNTITLED, 1970s, oil on composition board

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Description: JOHN PASSMORE 1904 - 1984, UNTITLED, 1970s, oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed lower right: JP inscribed verso: PT 84DIMENSIONS: 46.0 x 68.0 cmEXHIBITED: On loan to Campbelltown City Art Gallery, New South Wales, 1989PROVENANCE: Private collection, Sydney

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JOHN OLSEN born 1928, STILL LIFE, 1954, oil on canvas

Lot 44: JOHN OLSEN born 1928, STILL LIFE, 1954, oil on canvas

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Description: JOHN OLSEN born 1928, STILL LIFE, 1954, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: J OLSENDIMENSIONS: 61.0 x 50.5 cmEXHIBITED: Sydney Still Life, The Painters Gallery, Sydney, 17 June - 5 July 1986, cat. 25PROVENANCE: Macquarie Galleries, Sydney Margo Snape, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1954 Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1985When the young Turk becomes Australia's greatest living artist, one looks with different eyes at the youthful creations, seeing and admiring those first stirrings that made his art so great. So it is with John Olsen and his painting. He was just out of art school, having studied under John Passmore during 1948 to 1953, Still Life, 1954 being so redolent with the beneficial Passmore influence. But like all gifted people, it was the beginning from which he developed his own striking individuality, a vitality and vision today so readily identified with Australia and being Australian. The chair, table, jug and flowers are common props of still life painting. The high viewpoint looking down at the group gives opportunity to dispense with pictorial illusions of depth and ply the paint across the picture plane in patterns of colour and textured surfaces. The master of landscapes and still lifes, Cézanne, and Cubism comes to mind. As Deborah Hart in her monograph on Olsen has observed, 'Passmore's importance for Olsen as a teacher was felt not only in direct observations about drawing and painting, but also through his interest in literature.'1 Olsen became a hungry reader, his love of poetry still evident today in his writings and speaking. For Olsen, even the prosaic genre of still life, as in our painting, is given a poetic touch. The lively colours touch upon the lyrical; forms rhyme and repeat with a metered beat. The presence of a table, bottle and jug hint at the bon vivant to come, paintings titled Portuguese Kitchen, 1966 (two versions), and Duck à la Orange, 1981, with eggs as constant fertility symbols within the landscape talk a lot of one fond of food. One also recalls a bigger canvas of the time, Still Life with Boy, 1954 in the collection of the Newcastle Art Gallery, Newcastle being Olsen's birthplace. The table is loaded with preparations for a meal, a fish central to the scene. Interwoven throughout our painting one can sense the personality of the artist, to grow so irrepressible in his later art and life, intoxicated with a sense of fun. The early fifties found figurative art sitting heavily on the Australian art scene, yet to be slowly but surely overwhelmed by abstract expressionism. Looking back through the telescope of history, one sees Still Life, 1954 as quite a bold achievement for its time. As his craft developed, the figurative eased into abstraction and freedom. The first triumph was the Bicycle Boys paintings of 1955, The Bicycle Boys being in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, and The Bicycle Boys Rejoice in the collection of James Fairfax, where it hangs alongside Passmore. A sense of fun and rejoicing is central to Olsen's art. 1. Hart, D., John Olsen, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1991, p. 14 DAVID THOMAS

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ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, FIGURE WITH BEAST, c1962-64, glazed ceramic tile

Lot 45: ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, FIGURE WITH BEAST, c1962-64, glazed ceramic tile

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Description: ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, FIGURE WITH BEAST, c1962-64, glazed ceramic tileSIGNED: signed lower right: Arthur BoydDIMENSIONS: 51.0 x 56.0 cmPROVENANCE: Sotheby's, Melbourne, Dr John L. Raven Collection, 17 April 1989, lot 525 (as 'Ceramic') Savill Galleries, Sydney Private collection, New South Wales

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JOHN PERCEVAL 1923 - 2000, SMALL MAN AND BIG DOG, 1943, oil on board

Lot 46: JOHN PERCEVAL 1923 - 2000, SMALL MAN AND BIG DOG, 1943, oil on board

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Description: JOHN PERCEVAL 1923 - 2000, SMALL MAN AND BIG DOG, 1943, oil on boardSIGNED: signed lower left: PercevalDIMENSIONS: 37.5 x 37.5 cmEXHIBITED: Possibly Paintings by Australian Artists, Australian National University, Canberra, 1965; or John Perceval, Albert Hall, Australian National University, Canberra, 14-24 July 1966, cat. 15 (label attached verso) Modern Australian Paintings, Charles Nodrum Gallery, Melbourne, 8-29 August 1990, cat. 13 (illus. in exhibition catalogue)LITERATURE: Allen, T., John Perceval, Melbourne University Press, Melbourne, 1992, p. 148PROVENANCE: Dudley Cain, Melbourne, acquired directly from the artist c1986 Dr Ross Mellick, Sydney Charles Nodrum Gallery, Melbourne Private collection, Melbourne, acquired from the above in 1994

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ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, NEBUCHADNEZZAR EATING GRASS, 1972, oil on canvas

Lot 47: ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, NEBUCHADNEZZAR EATING GRASS, 1972, oil on canvas

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Description: ARTHUR BOYD 1920 - 1999, NEBUCHADNEZZAR EATING GRASS, 1972, oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Arthur BoydDIMENSIONS: 20.0 x 25.0 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection Sotheby's, Melbourne, 25 August 1998, lot 98 Art Galleries Schubert, Queensland (label attached verso) Private collection, SydneyRELATED WORK: Nebuchadnezzar eating grass, 1966-67, oil on canvas, collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra Nebuchadnezzar eating grass in a hilly landscape, 1968-69, oil on canvas, collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra

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JOHN BRACK 1920 - 1999, THE BRIDE, 1960

Lot 48: JOHN BRACK 1920 - 1999, THE BRIDE, 1960

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Description: JOHN BRACK 1920 - 1999, THE BRIDE, 1960 FROM THE WEDDING SERIES, oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: John Brack / 60DIMENSIONS: 71.0 x 47.0 cmEXHIBITED: John Brack, Johnstone Gallery, Brisbane, 26 April - 13 May 1960, cat. 6LITERATURE: Langer, G., 'A painter with a taste for satire', Courier-Mail, Brisbane, 26 April 1960 Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, vol. I, p. 79, vol. II, cat. o107, pp. 16, 114 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Johnstone Gallery, Brisbane Private collection, Brisbane DC Art, Sydney (label attached verso) Private collection, SydneyJohn Brack's best bridal paintings have an engaging confection about them akin to the icing on wedding cakes - sweet and delicious, the first sight or taste inviting more, with an acerbic slice underneath. The series of nine oil paintings and others on paper received its spark of life, as Robert Lindsay tells us, from Brack's chance discovery 'of an illustration of a wedding cake attached to a toy cake-icing set belonging to one of his daughters. It gave him the solution - to focus away from the celebrants and onto the cake, the symbol of the union.'1 In The Bride, 1960, the confection is the bridal dress itself, the whole picture providing an image of repeated smiles, as that on her happy face echoes throughout the composition. The upturned edges of the mouth, neckline, and ample bosoms are quite infectious, translating, through the curves of the arms, into a warm embrace. The reverse curve hangs above and likewise repeats itself as if to remind us that life is full of ups and downs, to be remembered on the wedding day when commitment is made for better or for worse. Brack's precise handling of form within a limited, subtly modulated palette, speaks of early mastery, the interplay between positive and negative shapes introducing a comic light-heartedness. The latter finds its apotheosis in The Bride and Groom, 1960 (one of the chief works in the series), in the collection of the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. One senses the figurative play across an abstract base of solid foundation. The blend of technical exploration and ideas continue in Brack's highly sensual use of impasto creating an almost irresistible desire to touch. Helen Brack wrote of the early 1960s of 'John's experimentation with impasto as a language, not a literal extension of the word "painting" ...'.2 Brack's art always sets us on a chase as the mind explores what is offered and draws its conclusions. In this series with the wedding as the subject, Helen continued, he took Rembrandt's great Jewish Bride in the Rijks Museum, Amsterdam, 'as reference, but the impasto language, for him, did not go beyond sensuality'.3 It is wrapped, however, in that satire unique to Brack, a wrapping through which we observe the farcical sides of our ways. Sharp as his vision and execution may be, there is a poignant touch to his vision of the human condition that makes his art all that more powerful. 1. Lindsay, R., John Brack, A Retrospective Exhibition, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1987, p. 18 2. Brack, H., ''This Oeuvre - The Work Itself', in Grant, K., with Grishin, S., Lindsay, R., and McAuliffe, C., John Brack, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2009, p. 14 3. Ibid. DAVID THOMAS

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CHARLES BLACKMAN born 1928, ALICE SERIES, six colour silkscreen prints with title page and contents page in presentation Solander box

Lot 49: CHARLES BLACKMAN born 1928, ALICE SERIES, six colour silkscreen prints with title page and contents page in presentation Solander box

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Description: CHARLES BLACKMAN born 1928, ALICE SERIES, six colour silkscreen prints with title page and contents page in presentation Solander box, edition: 42/75SIGNED: each signed, titled and numbered below imageDIMENSIONS: 105.5 x 75.0 cm (3); 75.0 x 105.5 cm (1); 76.0 x 56.0 cm (2)PROVENANCE: Private collection, New South Wales Thence by descent Private collection, New South Wales

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