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Auction Description for Early American: Historic Autographs, Coins, Currency & Americana
Viewing Notes:
Auction Lot viewing by special arrangement only. Please phone us to discuss the details. (858) 759-3290

Historic Autographs, Coins, Currency & Americana

(563 Lots)

by Early American


563 lots with images

June 29, 2013

Live Auction

P. O. Box 3507

Rancho Santa Fe, CA, 92067 USA

Phone: 00 1 858 759 3290

Fax: 00 1 858 759 1439

Email: auctions@earlyamerican.com

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ANSEL ADAMS Signed Letter, Self Portrait Drawing Mentioning Hawaii Photography

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Description: AutographsAnsel Adams Signed Letter with a Small Pencil Drawing of Himself Mentioning His Photography In HawaiiANSEL ADAMS (1902-84). Photographer and Conservationist, best known for his exceptional Nature Photographs of Yosemite National Park.Original "Thursday" Typed Letter Signed, "Ansel", in giant vivid pencil, along with a small Pencil Drawing of His Head, at top in upper left, and pencil word "Wheeee!" written just after the first line of the text. This bold black Typed one page, Undated Letter, measures 11" x 8.5" at Honolulu T.H. (Territory of Hawaii), no date, Very Fine. Written to "Nick," on the morning of his departure to the mainland. It reads in part: "... The Holder and packs arrived, and I have made a few good photographs... it took four! days for an airmail letter to reach me from S.F... - P.S. Last pictures here chieflt [sic] Hasselblad and 35 mm type... Promoted the 4x5 before a group of local photogs and am pleased to report vast excitements! ..." The magnificent, bold and rather wildly written pencil signature, "Ansel" measures 3.25" long and 1.5" high! A very rare nice content with a hand-drawn self portrait letter.The Territory of Hawaii or Hawaii Territory was an organized incorporated territory of the United States that existed from July 7, 1898, until August 21, 1959, when its territory, with the exception of Johnston Atoll, was admitted to the Union as the fiftieth U.S. state, the State of Hawaii.

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SUSAN B. ANTHONY, Autograph Letter Signed in 1891

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Description: Autographs1891 "Susan B. Anthony" Signed Autograph LetterSUSAN B. ANTHONY (1820-1906) American Civil Rights Leader who played a pivotal role in the 19th Century Women's Rights Movement to Introduce Women's Suffrage into the United States.April 18, 1891-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Susan B. Anthony," at Washington, Very Fine. This original, clearly written letter is one and one-half pages, and measures 4.5" x 8", inviting an unnamed recipient to hear a "distinguished English woman" speak at the Universalist Church. Her signature is exceptionally large, measuring 4.5" long. This letter reads, in full:"Parlor - 59 - Ness' House Washington - April 18/91 --- My Dear Friends, --- It will - I am sure not be amiss for me to enclose Miss Johnson's card inviting you to meet the distinquished English Woman - Who makes but the briefest visit to Washington. - But if you cannot call on Judy - don't fail to her on Monday night at the Universalist Church - I am told there she is by far the most able & eloquent of all the English speakers women of course! - Truly yours, - (Signed) Susan B. Anthony"This letter is hinged to a heavier and slightly larger paperboard backing for a prior display and is placed along side of a black and white print image of Anthony. In addition, also laid down onto the flip side of this same paperboard is a Typed Letter Signed, "S. B. Elkins," dated August 19, 1895 at Bedford, PA. This additional Typed letter, likely regarding his review of a manuscript regarding Politics, addressed to Mr. Frank G. Carpenter of Washington D.C. It reads, in part:"You will find manuscript herewith returned. As you will see, I have made some changes in the text, particularly in speaking about Sherman, Blaine and Grant, and the Presidential candidates. You know, one has to be careful, and it wont do to tell all the facts for fear of bringing on controversies..."Stephen B. Elkins served in Andrew Johnson's and Grant's administrations, he was the Secretary of War under President Benjamin Harrison, and served in the U.S. Senate until his death in 1911. (2 items).

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Major General JOHN ARMSTRONG Signed Autograph Letter, War of 1812 Sec. of War

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Description: AutographsMajor General John Armstrong Signed Autograph Letter JOHN ARMSTRONG (1758-1843). Major General in the American Revolutionary War, In 1756 he led the Kittanning Expedition, President James Madison's Secretary of War during the War of 1812, Pennsylvania Delegate to the Continental Congress, United States Senator and Diplomat.July 1, 1813-dated War of 1812 Period, Autograph Letter Signed, "John Armstrong," War Dept., Extremely Fine. A one page letter measuring 9.75" x 7.75" to Brigadier General Henry Burbeck, New London, Connecticut ordering that certain recruits are to be dismissed with the President's thanks. This following the August 1814 burning of the City of Washington's public buildings by British forces, reguarded as being one of the most humiliating events in U.S. history, John Armstrong resigned amidst blame for failing to defend the capital against the invasion. The paper is bright and crisp with some toning on the reverse. The penmanship is very good and easily read.Body of Letter transcribed in full:"Dear Genl. -- Call in Col. Benjamins recruits & with them garrison your Forts. The militia can be ill spared at this busy season, you will therefore dismiss them with the Presidents thanks for the promptitude with which they turned out and expressions of his confidence in their zeal & courage, should farther trials be necessary. Mr. Tracy will furnish you with materials ... for putting the forts in good order.I am Sir very respectfully Your Obedient Servant,John Armstrong"Docketed, "Orders from the W. department 1 July." Ex: the Papers of General Henry Burbeck.John Armstrong (October 13, 1717 - March 9, 1795) was an American civil engineer and soldier who served as a major general during the Revolutionary War. He was a delegate to the Continental Congress for Pennsylvania. Armstrong County, Pennsylvania is named in his honor.In 1756 he led the Kittanning Expedition. In 1758, Colonel Armstrong led 2,700 Pennsylvania provincial troops on the Forbes expedition, the approach of which compelled the French to vacate and blow up Fort Duquesne. Armstrong became a good friend to the other militia commander in this expedition, Colonel George Washington.In the early stages of the American Revolutionary War, Armstrong was a brigadier general in the Pennsylvania militia. On March 1, 1776, the Continental Congress appointed him to that same rank in the Continental Army. He was sent south to begin preparations for the defense of Charleston, South Carolina. He contributed his engineering talents to the construction of defenses that enabled them to withstand the Battle of Sullivan's Island later that year. When General Charles Lee arrived to take command, he returned to his duties with the main army and with the Pennsylvania militia. Pennsylvania named him major general in charge of the state militia. This ended his service in the Continental Army, but not the war or his cooperation with General George Washington.At the Battle of Brandywine on September 11, 1777, Armstrong's militia held the far left of the American line. They were also to guard the army's supplies. After a hard day's fighting the Americans were forced to withdraw or face being surrounded. Armstrong brought the supplies and his militia out from Pyle's Ford after dark.In the Battle of Germantown on October 4, General Armstrong led the American right. His mission was to skirt the British left flank and attack there and in their rear. Despite delays and the troubles some units had in moving, the overall attack was going well, until the center was held up at the Benjamin Chew House. The attack then collapsed after a friendly fire incident in the fog in which General Adam Stephen's men fired on Anthony Wayne's troops causing their withdrawal. Armstrong, whose men had advanced nearly to the center of Germantown, but were not greatly involved in the fight later complained that it was "....a glorious victory fought for and eight tenths won, ....mysteriously lost, for to this moment no one man can ....give any good reason for the flight."After Germantown, Armstrong was granted permission to give up active command. At aged sixty, his health was declining, and old wounds were troubling him. Returning home to Carlisle, he was elected to the Continental Congress by the Pennsylvania Assembly. As a delegate from 1777 to 1780 he was a strong supporter of Washington Throughout his life Armstrong served in a number of local or civic offices. One of these, the Carlisle school board, led him to originally oppose Dr. Benjamin Rush's proposal to start a college in the town. He later relented, and became a member of the first Board of Trustees for Dickinson College. John died at home in Carlisle, Pennsylvania, on March 9, 1795, and is buried in the Old Carlisle Cemetery. In 1800, when Pennsylvania created a new county at Kittanning, it was named Armstrong County in his honor.(From Wikipedia)

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BENEDICT ARNOLD, III Signed Doc, Father Rev. War Traitor Gen. Benedict Arnold V

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Description: AutographsBenedict Arnold III 1752 Signed Document - Father Of The American General and Historic Traitor Settles His Store Business & Merchandise Accounts with the Future Governor of Connecticut "Jonathan Trumble"BENEDICT ARNOLD, III, The Father of American Revolutionary War General and Famous Traitor, Benedict Arnold V. Along with... Jonathan Trumble, Sr. (1710-1785), (Originally spelled: Jonathan Trumble), one of the few men who served as Governor in Both a Pre-Revolutionary "Colony" and the Post-Revolutionary "State" of Connecticut.January 31, 1752-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed, "Bened(ick) Arnold," 4 pages, about 8.25" x 6.25" on laid period paper, being an accounting and payment receipt for purchased items and other expenses on account with Jon(athan) Trumble, over two years, from 1750 until payment in 1752, Choice Very Fine.Of particular interest is a specific reference made to this account on November 14th, "by L (pound) raisins for my son." That reference would have been for his son, either Joseph Trumbull (1737-1778), first Commissary General of the Continental Army and an early member of the Board of War, or for Jonathan Trumbull, Jr. (1740-1809), Aide-de-camp to General George Washington from 1781 to the end of the war; Governor of Connecticut 1798-1809 at this time receiving this special "raisin" sweet treat.There are several lists of accounting and balances of merchandise and transactions of the period between Arnold and Jonathan Trumble. Near the bottom of the final page is the statement, in full:"1752 January 31st - Then Settled with Jon. Trumble & Declare That I have Answered the Several Orders That are mentioned on the other side & balanced his Account, & given Bread for the Remaining Balance - As Witness my Hand - Bened Arnold"Overall, this remarkable document is Signed by Benedict Arnold three times within the body and the text. It is well written in rich brown ink and very clear, being easy to read. There are folds and some deft archival sealed fold splits and a few trivial wear holes at the intersections. The quality, handmade "GR" and British Crown laid period paper has held up very well. Other important and historic names that we note being written upon this account include; Sam(uel) Huntington and Abel Buel.Collectors and historians can imagine how the intercourse of commerce has brought these two important figures from early Connecticut history together. Each of them will be part of history in their own right. However, the acts and actions of their respective sons will each ultimately leave their marks on the course of American history forever!General Benedict Arnold was born the last of six children to Benedict Arnold III (1683-1761) and Hannah Waterman King in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1741. He was named after his great-grandfather Benedict Arnold, an early governor of the Colony of Rhode Island, and his brother Benedict IV, who died in infancy before (the famous Traitor) Benedict Arnold V was born. Only Benedict and his sister Hannah survived to adulthood; his other siblings succumbed to yellow fever in childhood.Through his maternal grandmother, Arnold was a descendant of John Lothropp, an ancestor of at least four U.S. presidents.The Arnold family was well off until the future general's father made several bad business deals that plunged the family into debt, and became an alcoholic, forcing his son to withdraw from school at 14 because the family could not afford the expense.His father's alcoholism and ill-health prevented him from training Arnold in the family mercantile business, but his mother's family connections secured an apprenticeship for Arnold with two of her cousins, brothers Daniel and Joshua Lathrop, who operated a successful apothecary and general merchandise trade in Norwich.

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IRVING BERLIN American Composer Sheet Page Signed Irving Berlin with sentiment

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Description: Autographs"Irving Berlin" Signed Sheet Famous American ComposerIRVING BERLIN (1888-1990). Historic and Famous American Composer.This is an original Autograph Sheet Page Signed, "Irving Berlin," with added ink sentiment inscription "To Mrs Horak and Kiddia - Best Wishes," 3" x 5" being blank on the reverse on light yellow paper, clean and Choice Very Fine. A very nice example of Berlin's scarce and popular signature, written in fine dark pen.

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SIR FRANCIS BERNARD, 1766 Signed French and Indian War Military Commission

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Description: Autographs1766 Signed French and Indian War Military Commission of Samuel Barton: Pioneer & American Revolution Patriot SIR FRANCIS BERNARD, 1st Baronet (1712 - 1779). British Colonial Administrator who served as Governor of the Provinces of New Jersey and Massachusetts Bay. His policies and tactics in the governance of Massachusetts were instrumental in the building opposition to the rule of Parliament, leading towards the American Revolution. Including: Issuing Writs of Assistance; the Townshend Acts and requesting the presence of the British Army Troops in response to protests in 1768January 8th, 1766-Dated French and Indian War Period, Partially-Printed Military Appointment Signed, "Fra.(ncis) Bernard," as "Captain General and Governor in Chief, in and over His Majesty's Province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New England, and Vice-Admiral of the Same," Very Fine. This original Military Commission measures 12.5" x 14.75" is 1 page, very clean, even in tone with some folds with archival tape reinfocement on the reverse, ink smudges from when issued. This impressive, ornately designed Document is printed in black upon laid period paper and completed and signed in dark brown. Also Signed by "Jno. Cotton" as Deputy Secretary.It provides: "... His Majesty's Royal Commission ... To Samuel Barton ... to be Captain of the Third Military Company of Foot in Salem, in the First Regiment of Militia, in the County of Essex, whereof Benjamin Pickmam Esquire is Colonel." The blank reverse has an added manuscript statement as follows, in full: "Province of Massach. Bay --- Salem, Feby 4th, 1766 --- Hon. Captn Samuel Barton Esq took the Oath appointed by the Act of Parliament to be taken instead of the (oath) of Allegiance & Supremacy repeated & Subscribed to Declaration together with the Oath of a byie-- also the Oaths relative to the Bills of the other Go(vern)ments --- Cosign - John Higgman, Peter Frye - impow(ered) by Decl(aration)."Colonel Samuel Barton (1749 - 1810). Early Pioneer and Patriot Soldier of the American Revolution (1775-1783) and is remembered more for the Exploration and Settlement of what was to become Nashville, Tennessee. Outstanding, sharp and distinct official wax and paper embossed Seal is located at the upper right corner, below which is the deep bold brown signatures "Fra. Bernard" measuring fully 2.75" long. A very rare 1766 French and Indian War Military Commission.Colonel Samuel Barton (May 1749 - January 1810) was a Pioneer and Patriot of the American Revolution (1775-1783) but is remembered more for the Exploration and Settlement of what was to become Nashville, Tennessee. Little is known of his early youth.Family tradition holds that Samuel, born in Virginia, was left bound as an apprentice while his father returned to England for business only to be lost at sea. Recent y-DNA testing of a male descendent of Samuel Barton has shown that this branch of Barton's are part of a lineage whose earliest known member in America was Lewis Barton of Maryland.Barton may have first explored the Cumberland region as a teenager with the Scraggins Party of 1765. This is supported by the fact that biographical sources put him in Nashville "...when there were but four families residing in the place, and when it was necessary to take every precaution to guard against the Indians". Regardless of the chronology it is evident that he vacillated between his native Virginia and the wilds of Tennessee.In 1774 he fought as a ranger against Native Americans in Lord Dunmore's War. With the onset of the American Revolution he mustered in Virginia in June 1775. He served as Sergeant in Morgan's Rifles of the 7th Virginia Regiment, the acclaimed snipers. As an explorer, hunter and frontiersman Barton proved an ideal soldier. Botetourt County, Virginia court records log his marriage to Martha Robertson on March 10, 1778.With the advantages of military training and leadership he returned to Tennessee, then part of North Carolina, and contributed to the settling and development of Fort Nashborough, what was to become Nashville. His original home was called BARTON STATION and was located on Browns Creek where the Lipscomb University now stands. Samuel was a land trader. He bought and sold land grants given for military service in the Revolution.As a testament to the American faith in written law Barton, General James Robertson and other prominent men of the area drafted and signed the Cumberland Compact in May 1780. This document served as an informal "constitution" until Tennessee became the 16th State of the Union in 1796. In 1846, historian Albigence Waldo Putnam found the original document in a truck that had belonged to Barton. The settlement was governed by the "Tribunal of Notables," Barton being one of the twelve. In April 1781, a few days before the "Battle of the Bluffs" he suffered a shot in the wrist defending pioneers from Indians.On January 7, 1783, a second Cumberland Compact was created and Signed by Barton and nine other founders. Upon the creation of Davidson County in April of that year Barton was appointed as Justice of the Peace and Judge of the County Court. In October 1783 he was elected as Court Entry-Taker and was sworn in as 2nd Major of the Militia. In 1784 Samuel Barton was designated as one of the five Directors as well as Treasurer of the fledgling city. He was later selected as a Colonel of the Militia.In 1798, not yet 50 years of age, Samuel Barton resigned from civic life and moved his large family to what would the next year become Wilson County, Tennessee. For the last 12 years of life he farmed his extensive land holdings, having been granted more than 1,000 acres (4.0 km). His large plantation was on Jenning's Fork of Round Lick Creek. He took up the vocation of surveying and appraising land. His burial site is unknown. (From Wikipedia).Sir Francis Bernard, 1st Baronet (1712 - June, 16 1779) was a British Colonial Administrator who served as Governor of the Provinces of New Jersey and Massachusetts Bay. His policies and tactics in the governance of Massachusetts were instrumental in the building of broad-based opposition within the province to the rule of Parliament in the early years of the American Revolution.Appointed governor of New Jersey in 1758, he oversaw the province's participation in the later years of the French and Indian War, and had a generally positive relationship with the colonial legislature. In 1760 he was given the governorship of Massachusetts, where he had a stormy relationship with the assembly. He issued writs of assistance (essentially openended search warrants) early in his term, and handled poorly the popular outrage to first the Stamp Act and later the Townshend Acts, requesting the presence of British Army troops in response to protests in 1768. He was recalled after the publication of letters in which he was critical of the colony.After returning to England, he continued to advise the British government on colonial matters, calling for hardline responses to ongoing difficulties in Massachusetts that culminated in the 1773 Boston Tea Party. He suffered a stroke in 1771 and died in 1779, leaving a large family.Governor of New Jersey: Bernard's wife was cousin to Lord Barrington, who became a Privy Councillor in 1755. Probably through his connections to Barrington and the Pownalls, he secured an appointment as governor of the Province of New Jersey on 27 January 1758, a post that became available upon the death of Jonathan Belcher. Leaving some of his children with relatives, the couple sailed for North America with four of their children, arriving at Perth Amboy on 14 June.The colonies were in the middle of the French and Indian War at the time of Bernard's arrival. He established a good working relationship with New Jersey's assembly, and was able to convince the province to raise troops and funds for the ongoing war effort. He signed the Treaty of Easton, an agreement between New Jersey and Pennsylvania on one side, and a group of Indian tribes (the Lenape being of principal concern to New Jersey) fixing boundaries between colonial and Indian lands. This effort was important, for it reduced raiding on the frontiers and made possible to reallocation of provincial military strength to the war with New France.On behalf of King George II, Bernard established through a patent charter on 24 May 1760, the founding of Bernardston, New Jersey, later renamed Bernards Township and Bernardsville. His service as Royal Governor of New Jersey ended on 4 July 1760.Governor of Massachusetts: Through the influence of his connections in the colonial office, Bernard was appointed Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay in late 1759. Delays in communications and travel were such that he did not arrive in Boston until 2 August 1760. Although initially well received, his tenure in Massachusetts was difficult, because he was responsible for enforcing unpopular laws and taxes, and his tactics in attempting to do so made him many enemies. His difficulties started when he issued Writs of Assistance in 1760 to customs tax collectors. These writs, which were essentially open-ended search warrants, were judicially controversial and so unpopular that their issuance was explicitly disallowed by the United States Constitution. His difficulties continued through other tax measures, including the Stamp Act, which united many factions in the province against him.O B[ernard]! Great thy Villainy has been!Schem'd to destroy our Liberty and Peace:The publick Eye attentively has seenThy base Endeavours, and has watch'd our Ease- Anonymous pamphlet, 1769In 1767 the passage by Parliament of the Townshend Acts again raised a storm of protest in the colonies. In Massachusetts the provincial assembly issued a circular letter, calling on the other colonies to join it in a boycott of the goods subject to the Townshend taxes. Bernard was ordered in April 1768 by Lord Hillsborough, who had recently been appointed to the newly created office of Colonial Secretary, to dissolve the assembly if it failed to retract the letter. The assembly refused, and Bernard prorogued it in July. Bernard and local customs officials also made repeated requests for military support, due to the hostility exhibited, especially to the latter, who were charged with collecting the taxes. British Army troops arrived in Boston in October 1768, further heightening tensions. B ernard was vilified in the local press, and accused of writing letters to the ministry that mischaracterized the situation. Although he was challenged to release those letters he refused. Opposition agents in London were eventually able to acquire some of his letters, which reached members of the Sons of Liberty in April 1769. They were promptly published by the radical Boston Gazette, along with deliberations of the governor's council. One letter in particular, in which Bernard called for changes to the Massachusetts Charter to increase the governor's power by increasing the council's dependence on him, was the subject of particularly harsh treatment, and prompted the assembly to formally request that "he might be forever removed from the Government of the Province." He was recalled to England, and Lieutenant Governor Thomas Hutchinson became acting governor. When he left Boston on 1 August, the town held an impromptu celebration, decorated the Liberty Tree, and rang church bells.Among his accomplishments in Massachusetts was the design of Harvard Hall at Harvard University, and the completion of a governor's mansion in present day Jamaica Plain near Jamaica Pond in Boston. The plan for Bernardstown, Massachusetts was laid out during his administration and is named for him. Bernard also named the Berkshires and Pittsfield, Massachusetts. (From Wikipedia)

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Abolitionist JOHN BROWN, 1851 Partial Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsRare Abolitionist "John Brown" Plus His Son John Brown Jr. Signed Letter "Your Affectionate Father, John Brown" JOHN BROWN (1800-1859). Abolitionist Leader who sought to start an Armed Slave Rebellion, culminating in the historic Raid on Harper's Ferry for which he was Executed by Hanging in 1859.March 24, 1851-Dated Pre Civil War Era, Portion of an Autograph Letter Signed, "Your Affectionate Father, John Brown," measuring 3.5" x 3.5" with notation below "Autograph of John Brown from letter addressed to John Brown Jr. March 24th, 1851 (Signed) - J. B. Jr.," Choice Near Mint. An impressive association piece, with Brown's signature and his son's signature on the bottom corner of a letter from father to son, which has been pasted to the blank front flyleaf of a First Edition of Stephen Vincent Benet's novel in verse, "John Brown's Body."This letter fragment has been neatly trimmed, having the original letter folds, and some light glue stains in the corners, and otherwise is in excellent condition, no doubt protected for many decades by the book. The 377 page book, with black, cloth boards, measuring 8.5" x 6," was published by Doubleday, Doran and Company, New York in 1928, and is marked "First Edition." The bookplate of Otto Orren Fisher is attached inside the front cover, and there is a short pencil notation above it noting that this is a first edition and has the Brown autographs. Protected by a mylar covering, this book has bumps to the top and bottom of the spine, and otherwise in is in perfect condition, though lacking a dust jacket.John Brown (1800-1859) was one of the most defining figures in American history. Brown's activities - culminating in the raid on Harper's Ferry - have long been debated as either the butchery of a madman or the zealous labors of a passionate abolitionist. While credited or blamed for being one of the dominoes that tumbled to start the Civil War, few remember that his capture was orchestrated by Col. Robert E. Lee. Like his other brothers, John Brown Jr., though supportive of his father's anti-slavery activities, refused to take part in the Harper's Ferry Raid. Following his father's execution, John Jr., worked tirelessly to defend his father's character against public criticism.

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SARAH BERNHARDT, Huge Panel Signed Photograph Card The Divine Sarah.

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Description: Autographs1890 "Divine" Sarah Bernhardt Signed Photograph Card SARAH BERNHARDT (1844 - 1923). French stage and early film actress, "the most famous actress the world has ever known," earning the nickname "The Divine Sarah."Original, vintage Huge size 11.5" x 7.25" (sight) Sepia-toned Photograph Panel Card Signed, "Sarah Bernhardt - 1890," Matted and Framed to about 18" x 14" in Choice Very Fine. Includes a personal inscription, in French, to Henriette Dardelein. Here, the Divine Sarah poses in costume beside a spinning wheel. The image shows some light fading but is in otherwise good condition, and the inscription is bold. Ms. Bernhardt's pen appears to have partially run out of ink as she signed her name, as she has retraced the second half of her last name.Professionally double matted, inset and framed under glass in a modern, gilt wood frame. Panel Cards, because of their large size and expense, are the rarest Photographic images of the period. This example being far more valuable and much more rare than a typical, standard signed photo. It would have been a token of the highest esteem to have received such an Inscribed and Signed photo from this incredibly popular actress!

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GEORGE M. COHAN, American Actor, Playwright, Composer Signed Letter & Card

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Description: Autographs"George M. Cohan" Signed Letter & Card Composer of "Give My Regards to Broadway" & "Yankee Doodle Dandy"GEORGE M. COHAN (1878-1942). Famous American Actor, Playwright, Composer and Producer. On June 29, 1936, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt presented him with The Congressional Gold Medal for his contributions to World War I morale, in particular the songs "You're a Grand Old Flag" and "Over There."July 30, 1942-Dated, Nice Content Typed Letter Signed, "G M Cohan," in green ink on his personal, engraved stationery, New York, 9.5" x 6.5", Choice Near Mint. Nicely matted and handsomely framed to an overall size of 16.25" x 11.25" for display. The letter is To Messrs. O'Brien, Driscoll & Raftery in New York, enclosing a check (not present) for $937.50 as a percentage of a payment collected for him from Warner Bros. Pictures, Inc. There is a New York County "Surrogates Court" stamp is to the left of the date. Plus, also displayed under glass at the lower right, a 3.25" x 2.25" Card boldly and vividly Signed, "Yankee Doodlefully Yours - Geo. M. Cohan" inside the frame. The card appears quite fancy and early with wonderful eye appeal. (2 Signatures).Songwriter, dancer, actor, playwright, producer, theatre owner; among the songs he wrote were "Yankee Doodle Dandy," "Over There," and "Give My Regards to Broadway."

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GEORGE M. COHEN, Historic American Composer Choice Signed Sepia Photograph

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Description: AutographsHe's A "Yankee Doodle Dandy" George M. CohanGEORGE M. COHAN (1878-1942). Historic American Composer of such classic hits as "Yankee Doodle Dandy," "Give My Regards to Broadway" and "Over There."Original early vintage Sepia Photograph, beautifully Inscribed and Signed, "To Kid Carmine with best wishes Geo M. Cohan," measuring 6.5" x 8.5" with mat, Choice Extremely Fine. a handsome youthful image by Bushnell of San Francisco. Boldly inscribed on verso in rich deep brown ink having a wonderful, ornate flourish and flow, the signature being nearly 3" long. A very handsome, excellent contrast image for display.

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PETER COLT. American Revolutionary War Patriot Connecticut Colonel

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Description: AutographsGem 1780 Payment Document For "The Connecticut Line"PETER COLT. American Revolutionary War Patriot Connecticut Colonel, Friend of Secretary of State Alexander Hamilton, Governor of the "Society for Establishing Useful Manufactures," relative of the Colt Firearms Family, Commanded one of Arron Burr's expeditions to Canada and also served as an aide to General Worcester. Alexander Hamilton Appointed Peter Colt in 1793 to engineer and supervise layout of Paterson, New Jersey. June 1, 1780-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Partially-Printed Pay Order Document Signed, "PETER COLT." This 1780 State of Connecticut Treasury-Office Document is magnificently Signed in deep bold brown ink, "Peter Colt" as Treasurer, No Cancel. Gem Crisp Mint. Form, "For The Payment Of The Connecticut Line" of the Continental Army. Payment to include interest thru the redemption date of 1785. A gorgeous, full complete specimen.Peter Colt was born at Lyme, Connecticut, in 1744. He entered Yale College but was compelled to leave in his junior year through failing health. In 1774 he was appointed one of the New Haven Town Committee of Correspondence. In 1775 he became military secretary to General Wooster. In 1777 Congress appointed him Deputy Commissary General of Purchases for the Eastern Department, which included New England and a part of New York, and this gave him the rank of Colonel; he was subsequently an active assistant to Colonel Jeremiah Wadsworth in furnishing supplies to the French Troops under Rochambeau. From 1789 to 1793 he was Treasurer of Connecticut, but in the spring of the latter year he resigned and removed to Paterson, New Jersey, to take charge of the "Society for Establishing useful Manufactures." In 1796 he went to Rome, New York, to superintend the works of the Western Inland Lock Navigation Company, the forerunner of the Erie Canal. He died in 1824. By 1836, Peter Colts relative, firearms maufacturer Samuel Colt, had patents in England, France and the US for his revolving pistol.

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JOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE, 30th President  Signed Presidential Appointment

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Description: AutographsChoice "Calvin Coolidge" Signed Presidential AppointmentJOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE (July 4, 1872 - January 5, 1933). 30th President of the United States (1923-1929) a Republican, born on the 4th of July.February 24, 1925-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Calvin Coolidge" as President, 1 page, measuring 23" x 19" at Washington, DC, Choice Crisp Near Mint. This is an official Presidential Appointment for "Walter F. Boyle, of Georgia" to serve as a "Foreign Service Officer of Class five." Countersigned by "Charles E. Hughes" as Secretary of State. Magnificent Federal Embossed White Paper Seal being distinct and fully intact. There is one small corner handling crease in the bottom left and a vertical crease at left that should hardly be noticed once properly matted and framed for display. A lovely quality, fresh Document boasting a huge crisp 3.75" long "Calvin Coolidge" signature.

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Extraordinary Union Spy PAULINE CUSHMAN Signed Carte de Visite

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Description: AutographsExtraordinary Union Spy Pauline Cushman Signed Carte de Visite "Maj Pauline Cushman Spy & Scout"PAULINE CUSHMAN (Born Harriet Wood) (1833 - 1897). American Actress and a Spy for the Union Army during the American Civil War. Major Cushman's remains now rest in the Officer's Circle at the Presidio's National Cemetery in San Francisco. Her simple gravestone reads, "Pauline C. Fryer, Union Spy."c. 1865 Civil War Period, Carte de Visite Photograph Image of Union Spy Pauline Cushman Signed, "Maj Pauline Cushman / Spy & Scout," Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery by A Bogardus, issued by E. & H.T. Anthony, New York, Choice Very Fine+. This remarkable, original Carte de Visite Photograph is mounted on heavy stock measuring 4" x 2 3/8" Autographed, "Maj Pauline Cushman / Spy & Scout" directly beneath a seated portrait of her on the obverse. The signature and inscription is written in deep bold brown ink and is very clear and easy to read. The reverse carries an "E. & H. T. Anthony, 501 Broadway, New York. From Photographic Negative in Brady's National Portrait Gallery Negative by A Bogardus" maker's backmark. Plus, an imprint reading:"Miss Major Pauline Cushman, The Union Spy and Scout, who was captured and sentenced to death as a Federal Spy, and was rescued at Shelbyville by the Union Army under Gen. Rosecrans."Cushman, a popular actress, easily adapted the cloak and dagger world of spycraft. She later capitalized on her war experiences in association with P. T. Barnum. In excellent condition with sharp contrast and nice tonality to the image. Gold gilt outer decorative borders show perfect centering and full margins all around. Very Rare.From: Civil War Women Blog - Women of the Civil War and Reconstruction Eras 1849-1877Pauline Cushman, a Union spy, was born Harriet Wood on June 10, 1833, in New Orleans and spent some of her early childhood there. Her father then moved the family to Grand Rapids, Michigan. She did not like it there, and at seventeen she ran away to New York to become an actress. She landed some small parts and caught the attention of a theatre owner from New Orleans, who hired her on the spot.While Pauline was in New York, she married Charles Dickinson, a musician, on February 7, 1853. Sometime after their wedding, Charles and Pauline moved to his hometown of Cleveland, Ohio, where he found work as a music teacher. In Cleveland, they frequently lived in the same house with his parents until their children were born. Pauline's oldest child, Charles, was born in March of 1858, followed by a daughter, Ida, in 1860. On October 22, 1861, Charles Dickinson enrolled as a musician in the band of the 41st Ohio Infantry. Suffering from chronic dysentery during the Shiloh campaign, Charles was discharged on June 9, 1862, and sent home to Cleveland. One of the band members later recalled: We were camped on the battlefield of Shiloh for about a month after the battle, and we had nothing but the filthy surface water to drink and the food was not of the best, consisting mostly of raw pork, as we were not allowed to build fires most of the time. [We] had no tents, no cooking utensils, nothing to eat only raw pork and crackers, coffee beans we had to grind with our teeth and rain nearly every night.When Dickinson arrived home, he weighed only 120 pounds. Pauline wrote:When my husband came home from the Army, he was in very poor health, in fact a complete wreck... I had two small children to take care of and was unable to take care of both them and him, and as his father had a very large house with plenty of room and he had two brothers and three sisters at home besides his father and mother, he went there to be taken care of... I heard his condition every day and frequently saw him. We never expected him to get any better but regarded him beyond the hope of recovery.Charles Dickinson died December 8, 1862, from head injuries suffered in a fall related to his ill health and feeble condition. Pauline wrote: "He died a few minutes after midnight and was buried late in the afternoon of the same day. I was not present when he died as he died very suddenly, but I was in Cleveland at the time and attended his funeral." Following her husband's death, Pauline left her children over to the care of her sister-in-law in Ohio, and returned to acting. Hard feelings between Pauline and her in-laws existed for the rest of her life. She eventually wound up in Union-controlled Louisville, Kentucky. Within a month or two she was performing on stage for a theater company, and landed a role in The Seven Sisters.In March 1863, she was approached by two paroled Confederate officers who offered her a $300 bribe if she would propose a toast to the Confederacy while she was on stage. She readily accepted the money, and promised to fulfill her promise at the next evening's performance.She immediately reported the Confederate offer to the Union provost marshal. He recognized that an expression of loyalty to the South would help her gain entry to Confederate circles. He recruited her to act as a spy, and told her to go ahead and make the toast. Pauline interrupted one of her performances to address the audience. "Here's to Jeff Davis and the Southern Confederacy," she said. "May the South always maintain her honor and her rights." The gesture had the desired effect. She was fired from the theater company, but became an instant celebrity with the Southerners. After her initial success she was instructed to proceed to Nashville to get specific instructions from Colonel Truesdail, chief of the Union Army Police. After the initial formalities were exchanged, Colonel Truesdail said: Miss Cushman, all that you have yet done is as nothing compared with the service which it is now in your power to render your country. I have heard much of your courage, your devotion, and ready expedients; but what I want you to do now will demand a quickness of intellect and a powerful constitution, a ready wit and the courage of a soldier tried in a thousand fields.Truesdail proposed that Pauline go south, and report back on the state of Confederate defenses in central Tennessee. He warned her that the mission was hazardous and could result in her death if she were to be caught, but she readily accepted the challenge. She was then publicly evicted from the Union lines on the pretext that she was a Southern sympathizer. As a cover, she pretended to be looking for her brother, whom she claimed was a rebel officer. Cushman quickly became the darling of the Southern troops. Her good looks and her feigned interest gained her numerous invitations from Confederate officers to accompany them along their lines. In this process, she gathered important information on rebel troop strength and positions. Colonel Truesdail told her not to make written notes or drawings of the fortifications of the enemy, but to commit it to memory. Pauline ignored his warnings, and made careful drawings of the Rebel fortifications at Shelbyville and Tullahoma, Tennessee, then concealed them in her boot. While attempting to make her way back to the Union lines, Pauline came under suspicion and was arrested. She was escorted under guard by the Confederate cavalry raider, General John Hunt Morgan, who was to deliver her to General Nathan Bedford Forrest. Gripped by panic, Pauline made an unsuccessful escape attempt.When she was recaptured and searched, the incriminating notes were found. Though both Morgan and Forrest treated her with the utmost polite deference, it was made abundantly clear to her that she must not attempt to escape again. General Forrest told Pauline:I have no time now to investigate your case. It is a complicated and difficult one. I will, therefore, send you to General [Braxton] Bragg's headquarters, at Shelbyville, and if you should be so fortunate as to prove your loyalty to the South, you may always depend upon General Forrest for protection. But this, I am sorry to say, I do not believe possible, and therefore say, prepare for the worst, for hanging is not pleasant.Under questioning by General Bragg, Pauline related her cover story of being sent beyond federal lines as a result of her outspoken support for the Confederacy. Bragg did not believe her, and ordered her to be tried as a spy. For ten days, she awaited the verdict, and she was found guilty. Because of prison conditions and the strain of waiting for the court to decide her future, Pauline became ill. Though truly sick, she presented an image of being worse off than she really was. The Union Army of the Cumberland under General William Rosecrans was just beginning its advance, hoping to keep the Confederates from aiding the Rebel army at Vicksburg, Mississippi, which was under siege by General Ulysses S. Grant. They forced the Rebels to abandon Shelbyville on June 27, 1863, after two days of fighting. There was some debate among the southern physicians as to whether Pauline was well enough to bring with them until she could be executed. A Confederate surgeon finally put his foot down and declared that she was not well enough to travel. When the Southerners pulled out, Pauline was left behind at the home of a civilian doctor. She was rescued by the advancing Federals just three days before her scheduled execution. Pauline was transported as far as Murfreesboro in the personal ambulance of General Gordon Granger. From there, she was sent by rail to Nashville. With her cover blown, Pauline's days as a spy were over. In recognition of her valuable services General Granger and General James A. Garfield (future president of the United States, but then chief of staff for the Army of the Cumberland under General Rosecrans) awarded her the honorary rank of major of cavalry. She traveled north to public acclaim and went on the lecture circuit under the guidance of P. T. Barnum. Dressed in the uniform of an army major, she told paying audiences embellished stories of her adventures. In November 1864, Pauline was away when her oldest child, six-year-old Charles Dickinson, died at Saxtons River, Vermont. Pauline had him buried next to his father in Cleveland. Her other child, Ida Dickinson, also died in childhood. After the war, Pauline teamed up with the Irish comedian James M. Ward. The duo traveled together in the American west from 1865 to 1867, but Pauline eventually split with Ward and worked on her own at theaters across the country. By 1872, she no longer held the public's attention in the East, so she traveled to San Francisco. There she met and married August Fichtner in December 1872. Within a year she was widowed again. She spent the next five years working among the redwood logging camps near Santa Cruz. She was again married on January 29, 1879 to Jeremiah Fryer in Florence, Arizona Territory. For a while, he and Pauline ran a hotel and stagecoach stop and livery stable in Casa Grande, Arizona. Fryer was elected sheriff of Pinal County, Arizona, for a number of years.Pauline's attempts at domesticity ended with the death of an adopted daughter. Grief over the death led the couple to separate in 1890. She returned to San Francisco for a short while, but her fortunes declined due to age and an opiate addiction. By the end of 1892 she was living at El Paso, Texas. Her health gone, she did a little sewing in exchange for food and a place to sleep - on a cot in the corner of a kitchen. Destitute, Pauline applied for a Federal pension based on her first husband's military service. On February 4, 1893, the Pension Bureau awarded her a retroactive pension of $8 per month beginning December 8, 1862, the day her husband died, and terminating December 19, 1872, the day she remarried. The total award amounted to less than $1,000. Her youthful beauty gone and her stage career over, she was a depressed, lonely woman who had outlived two husbands and both her children, and was then estranged from a third husband. Pauline returned to San Francisco, and spent her last days in a boarding house there, working as a seamstress and a charwoman. During the night of December 1, 1893, Pauline Cushman Dickinson Fichtner Fryer, amid rumors of suicide, died from an overdose of narcotics at the age of 60. Pauline's final moment of fame came when the California division of the Grand Army of the Republic and the Women's Relief Corps held a huge funeral for her. Major Cushman's remains now rest in the Officer's Circle at the Presidio's National Cemetery in San Francisco. Her simple gravestone reads, "Pauline C. Fryer, Union Spy."

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JOHN A. DAHLGREN Signed Document On Rocket Tubes The Father of Naval Ordnance

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Description: AutographsThe Historic "Father of American Naval Ordnance" Signed Document by "John Dahlgren" Regarding "Rocket Tubes"JOHN A. DAHLGREN (1809-1870). Rear Admiral, Naval Ordnance Innovator and Commander of the South Atlantic Blockading Squadron during the Civil War, called the "Father of American Naval Ordnance."April 13, 1847-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed, "Jno A. Dahlgren - A. Tester. Ordinance," three pages, measuring 9.75" x 8", at the Ordnance Office, Navy Yard, Washington (D.C.), Choice Extremely Fine. This impressive, beautifully written ordinance report is to Commodore Warrington, regarding the testing of 2.5" Rocket tubes provided by Mr. Prosser. It has excellent content and reads, in part:"... as in the first trials, they have failed to meet a principal condition of the contract...tubes should equal in strength, Bar Iron of one inch square, broken by a strain of 50,000 Lbs." Then John Dahlgren recommends that the, "2 1/2 inch tube be replaced by 4 inch of equal cost."Overall, this is an impressive and extremely clean, crisp looking handwritten document with excellent eye appeal. It is very well written upon period wove paper that have just the slightest hint of tone along the left margin.

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Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS Signed + Inscribed CDV Photograph

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Description: Autographs"Jefferson Davis" Signed & Inscribed Carte-de-Visite PhotographJEFFERSON "JEFF" DAVIS (1808-1889). Leader of the Confederate States of America, serving as its President, during the American Civil War, serving as President for its entire history. Previously a Senator and United States Secretary of War under Democratic President Franklin Pierce.This very rare, original "Jefferson Davis" Signed Carte-de-Visite photograph is also inscribed, reading in full: "Your friend - Jefferson Davis," Very Fine. It is and early image, showing his head and face in profile, undated, produced by Tanner & Van Ness, Lynchburg, Virginia, measuring 3.5" x 2.5" the top edge slightly trimmed to the top of the photograph. The inscription and signature are well written in brown and are very clear within the lower open area of the photograph. A prior owners notation "Jeff Davis" in pencil on the reverse and a central notation above the makers black imprint. Signed images of Jefferson Davis are very rare and highly valued by collectors.

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1876 Ex: Confererate President JEFFERSON DAVIS Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: Autographs1876 Centennial "Jefferson Davis" Autograph Letter SignedJEFFERSON "JEFF" DAVIS (1808-1889). American Statesman and Leader of the Confederacy during the American Civil War, serving as the CSA President for its entire history.March 19, 1876-Dated United States Centennial Period, Autograph Letter Signed, "Jefferson Davis" on very clean light blue ruled wove period paper, 4 pages, measuring 8" x 5", Choice Very Fine. This letter is written to General William Montague Browne, who had been on the personal staff of Davis during the Civil War, regarding a failed business venture. Davis became president of the Carolina Insurance Company in 1870. In this finely and well written letter, two small file pinholes in the top blank margin. Davis denies his responsibility for a company's failure. It reads, in part:"...I lost enough of money by that loosely conducted injudicious transaction to be quite unwilling to bear the responsibility of the failure of that company which I believe only lasted thus long by the means it derived from the Carolina. Had my proposition to examine into its affairs been adopted its unsoundness would have been revealed soon after examination commenced...Our babes in the woods went into a den of wolves. Not knowing even the meaning of the terms employed they bargained with two of the sharpest and least accomplished men in the town and relied on their oral appearances and on their 'honor'..."Jefferson Davis goes on to relate payouts from the liquidation of the company by Carolina Insurance in Virginia and South Carolina. A scarce and beautifully written letter having a very large 3.75" long full signature "Jefferson Davis." Also accompanied by a separate letter from 1979 of authenticity by noted Autograph dealer Joseph Rubinfine. The current Sanders Autograph price guide lists his ALS at $4,000 in value. This Letter is a particularly lovely, clean example.

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1933 VICTOR EMMANUEL III, Last King of Italy Signed Document at Rome

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Description: AutographsDocument Signed "Vittorio Emanuele" at Rome, ItalyVICTOR EMMANUEL III, Last King of Italy.1933-Dated, Document Signed "Vittorio Emanuele," Rome, 14.5" x 9.5," Very Fine. An official government document taken from a bound volume. Some pencil notations, otherwise quite clean. Contains the usual official stamps and markings. A nice, 6" long signature. Surprisingly, Victor Emmanuel's signature alone is rarer than when combined with that of Mussolini!

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Rare 1818 Benjamin Owen Tyler DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE Display Broadside

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Description: AutographsRarely Encountered 1818 Benjamin Owen Tyler Broadside of the DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE The First Historical "Artistic Engraving" Using Facsimile Signatures(DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE), 1818 Copper-Plate Engraved Printing by Benjamin Owen Tyler, Printed Upon Heavy Paper with Linen Backing, Period Mounted with Original Wooden Scrolls for Wall Display Presentation.Exceedingly Rare, original Copper-Plate Engraved Printed Broadside and headed, "In Congress, July 4th 1776, The Unanimous Declaration of the thirteen United States of America," the print measuring 23" wide x 29.5" tall (by sight) having its full outer margins and selvage intact to 25.25" x 31.5" now still ready to hang upon display, Very Fine.This is the First "Artistic Engraving" of the Declaration of Independence using facsimile signatures, being released by Tyler in April of 1818. Benjamin Owen Tyler's engraving of the Declaration employed exceptional decorative ornamental script supplemented with facsimile signatures below, directly copied from the original "Engrossed" Hand-Signed Original copy of the Declaration. Tyler maintained every small detail and nuance of the original signatures, preserving their various proportions, stress and weight as made by the original Signers. Tyler's facsimile signatures were so exact that in fact they were often mistaken for the originals!Attesting to the accuracy is the printed statement of Richard Rush, Secretary of State, which reads, in part: "I myself have examined the signatures... Those executed by Mr. Tyler are curiously exact imitations, so much so that it would be difficult if not impossible for the closest scrutiny to distinguish them."In the upper left-right margins is found Tyler's dedication to Thomas Jefferson, "To Thomas Jefferson, Patron of the Arts, the firm Supporter of American Independence, and the Rights of Man, this Charter of Freedom is, with the highest esteem, most Respectfully Inscribed by his much Obliged and very Humble Servant Benjamin Owen Tyler." At the bottom, Tyler adds, "The publisher designed and executed the ornamental writing... and has also observed the same punctuation, and copied every Capital as in the original."This extremely rare Broadside example of the First Artistic printing of the Declaration of Independence has a very clean, even appearing printed face, easily grading Choice Very Fine. Benjamin Owen Tyler was a self-taught calligrapher and penmanship instructor. When he asked Thomas Jefferson for permission to dedicate the engraving to him, Jefferson consented. Tyler later sent Jefferson a copy of his work printed upon Parchment. Sometime after May of 1818, he paid a personal visit to Jefferson's home at Monticello where he spent the day teaching penmanship to Jefferson's family! Jefferson was also Listed as the Very First "Subscriber."We previously offered a similar Hanging Scroll format example of this Broadside, which sold in our EAHA Auction of April 23, 2005, Lot 51, also upon linen cloth backing, in slightly lower quality being graded Fine, for $8,338. Another example printed on paper, lacking the special display scroll mounting, was offered by Christie's in their Sale 2514, May 19, 2011, in about the same condition but with some fold holes, sold for $13,750. Finally, a framed example printed upon heavy wove paper, graded Choice Very Fine, sold in our EAHA Auction of August 25, 2012, Lot 26, sold for $21,240. As one can clearly see, these have been steadily increasing in popularity with collectors and in market value.This current Printed Broadside, Large Folio, 31" x 25.25" is presented being specially mounted to it's original wooden display scrolls for hanging, one page, linen backing, dated 1818. Inscribed along the lower margin: "Copied from the original Declaration of Independence in the Department of State and published by Benjamin Owen Tyler, Professor of penmanship, City of Washington 1818. The Publisher designed and executed the ornamental writing and has been particular to copy the facilitates exact, and has also observed the same punctuation and copied every Capital as in the original. Engraved by Peter Maverick, Newark, N.J."Original in every respect, evenly toned, and having specially mounted on custom turned black wooden scroll mounts at bottom with one decorative design at top, for ease of hanging on display. It has expected minor dampstaining tone, some wrinkling, a few short closed tears, one crossing through dedication in upper left. The nicely prepared, attractive outer edges have red reinforcement for rolling and unrolling as designed, being edged in Hand-Stitched red linen attached with red thread, measuring side to side about 25.25" wide (retaining its nice large one-inch outer margins) by 31" tall by sight, plus add about another inch tall to be fully inclusive of its wooden display mounts. Also, its small Brass ring hanger is attached at center top, as made. This superior quality 1818 Benjamin Owen Tyler Broadside is ready for hanging upon display, as originally prepared back in 1818. It is the very finest original Paper specimen of the famous 1818 Benjamin Owen Tyler Printed Declaration of Independence Broadside Mounted upon its Original Wooden Scrolls for Wall Display Presentation we have offered.The first broadside Declaration of Independence to include facsimile signatures. Tyler's rival, John Binns, was the first to announce such an undertaking and collect subscriptions, but he took more than three years to complete the work. In the meantime, Tyler completed this broadside, even securing a endorsement from the acting Secretary of State Richard Rush, whose departmental seal is engraved into the lower left, along with his note describing the signatures as "curiously exact imitations." The broadside is dedicated to Thomas Jefferson above the title.Tyler made no effort to match the handwriting in the body of the Declaration. He was a writing master by trade who published other examples of his calligraphy; the text is intended to showcase his craft, with selected key words emphasized with ornamental script. He spared no expense on the printing, boasting that he paid $200 per ream for the paper and $1500 for the copperplate, which was engraved by Peter Maverick of Newark, NJ. Bidwell, American History in Image and Text 2, and pages 250-262.The Christie's description adds the following historic information for collectors, as follows:BENJAMIN OWEN TYLER'S CAREFUL 1818 FACIMILE OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, DEDICATED TO THOMAS JEFFERSONThe publication of an expensive engraved reproduction of Jonathan Trumbull's famous painting "The Declaration of Independence" coincided with publication of two competing engraved facsimiles of the Declaration of Independence itself, one by John Binns (embellished with portraits of principal patriots), the other by Massachusetts engraver and entrepreneur Benjamin Owen Tyler. The simultaneous appearance of the three engravings reflects the American public's heightened reverence for the nation's fundamental charter as it approached its 50-year anniversary, marking a time when "Americans discovered the noble sentiments in the Declaration," and began to view it "not as a mere instrument of diplomacy but as the birthright of a nation, as a manifesto of human dignity and personal rights" (Bidwell).Engraved in delicate cursive at the top left is Tyler's dedication: "To Thomas Jefferson, Patron of the Arts, the firm Supporter of American Independence, and the Rights of Man, this Charter of Freedom is, with the highest esteem, most Respectfully Inscribed by his much Obliged and very Humble Servant Benjamin Owen Tyler." In the bottom left corner is an engraved testimonial note signed by Richard Rush, Secretary of State, certifying the accuracy of the text and the original signatures: "I myself have examined the signatures... Those executed by Mr. Tyler are curiously exact imitations, so much so that it would be difficult if not impossible for the closest scrutiny to distinguish them."Tyler adds a note in small characters in the bottom margin: "The publisher designed and executed the ornamental writing... and has also observed the same punctuation, and copied every Capital as in the original." Copies of the Tyler facsimile on paper were sold for five dollars, while copies on parchment cost seven dollars (a very few copies, evidently, were also printed on silk). Tyler brashly claimed to have received orders for 3,000 copies but it is doubtful that his copperplate could have produced so many impressions and Tyler's original subscription book (in the Albert Small Collection at the University of Virginia) records just over 1,000 names. (The first subscriber listed is Thomas Jefferson; most customers evidently purchased the less expensive form, printed on paper.)For an account of the competition between Binns, Tyler and the printmaker Jonathan Trumbull, see John Bidwell, "American History in Image and Text," in Proceedings of the American Antiquarian Society, Vol. 98, part 2 (October 1988), no.2.

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JOHN ERICSSON 1860 Autograph Letter Signed Built the Union Ironclad Ship Monitor

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Description: AutographsHistoric Civil War Union Ironclad Ship "Monitor" DesignerJOHN ERICSSON (1803-1889). Swedish-American Engineer and Designer who built the Civil War Union's Ironclad Ship "Monitor," the first screw propeller-powered vessel and made improvements in locomotives.January 22, 1860-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "J. Ericsson," 1 page, measuring about 7.75" x 9.75" having excellent Railway engineering content, Choice Very Fine. This letter is very clean and well written in deep brown ink, one blue check mark at the top edge, having a wonderful very large 3.5" long flowing signature of John Ericsson. It reads, in part:"... The second accident with the 18 in. is easily accounted for as poor Linnan was trying to make the engine do by excessive heat what it lacked in legitimate power... I cannot tender specific advise... the 18 inch... has the power to do the pumping at a Railway Station which sends off twenty trains a day...".John Ericsson (1803-1889). Swedish-American naval inventor and engineer, he invented the screw propeller and made improvements in locomotives and naval guns. He is best remembered for building the famed Civil War Ironclad boat Monitor, which had one of the first moving turrets.

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CYRUS W. FIELD, Signature On Letter Dated 1849, First Atlantic telegraph Cable

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Description: AutographsCyrus W. Field Signed Letter Atlantic Telegraph Company Laid the First Telegraph Cable Across the Atlantic in 1858CYRUS WEST FIELD (1819 - 1892), Famous American Industrialist, who created the Atlantic Telegraph Company and laid the first successful telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean in 1858.November 28, 1849-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Cyrus W. Field & Co.," 1 page, Choice Very Fine. Measuring 10" x 8" this Letter is tipped into a modern paper folder. This is a commercial letter with the company name is regarding the shipment of rope and the payment of the shipping charges. Unlike his later signatures which are large and bold, this early letter is signed with a distinctly more modest flair.

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JOHN FITCH Signed 1778 Revolutionary War Bond Relative of the Steamship Inventor

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Description: Autographs"John Fitch" Signed 1778 Revolutionary War Bond Relative of the Man Granted The First U.S. Patent for the SteamboatJOHN FITCH, Relative of the Famous Clock Maker, Brass Worker, Silversmith, and Inventor of the Steamship in the United States.October 20, 1778-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Manuscript Document Signed, "John Fitch," as a witness to a transaction, being a Bond executed and signed by "John Martin" as Assistant Commissary in the American Army, Charles City County, Fredericksburg, VA, measuring 13.5" x 8.25", Choice Very Fine. There is an original red Wax Seal at bottom right edge, below Martin's signature. This rare 1778 Revolutionary War bond reads, in full:"Know all Men by there (sic) presents that I John Martin of Charles City County in the State of Virginia am holden and stand bound unto the honorable Henry Laurens Esquire President of the Continental Congress or his successor in office, in the sum of five thousand dollars, to which payment well and truly to be made and done, I the said John Martin do bind myself my Heirs, Executors and administrators firmly by these presents, signed with my hand and sealed with my seal, dated Fredericksburg...The Condition of this obligation is such that if the above bounden John Martin shall well and truly execute the office and trust of an Assistant Commissary of ...in the American Army according to the resolutions of Congress regulating that Department; then this present obligation to be void and of none effect, but in default thereof shall remain and abide in full force, strength, Power and Virtue... Signed sealed and Delivered in the present off - John Fitch - Sil Mather".Very clear and distinct brown-ink manuscript. Document with normal folds, minor dampstains along the margins; large, clear signatures of both Martin and Fitch. A superb Revolutionary War bond that mentions the president of the Continental Congress and contains the signature of John Fitch.On August 26, 1791, John Fitch was granted a United States patent for the steamboat. Four years earlier, on August 22, 1787, John Fitch demonstrated the first successful steamboat, launching a forty-five-foot craft on the Delaware River in the presence of delegates from the Constitutional Convention.In 1786 Fitch (1743-98) built the first recorded steam-powered ship in the United States. The first successful trial run of his steamboat was made on the Delaware River on August 22, 1787, in the presence of delegates from the Constitutional Convention. Fitch was granted a patent on August 26, 1791, after a battle with James Rumsey, who had created a similar invention. Fitch's idea would be turned profitable by Robert Fulton, decades later. In the autumn of 1777, Fitch sold beer and tobacco to the British- George Washington greatly despised him for this. According to the Fitch family, this document is made to his son John, who lived in Windham.

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GERALD FORD + BETTY FORD Lot of Two Letters Signed, One mentions Jimmy Carter!

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Description: AutographsTwo Letters "Jerry Ford" and First Lady "Betty Ford" Who Laments Her Husband's Loss to Jimmy Carter !GERALD FORD & BETTY FORD.1. May 2, 1963-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "Jerry Ford" as Congressman, in blue fountain-pen ink on Congress of the United States letterhead, Washington, DC, 10.5" x 8", 2 pages, addressed to a constituent interested in mental health legislation, Choice Near Mint. Letter has staple holes in the top margin, not affecting the signature. 2. Accompanied by a December 1, 1976-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "Betty Ford", in bright blue ink on "The White House" stationery measuring 9.25" x 6.25", Choice Near Mint. Outstanding content! Addressed to well-wisher who laments President Ford's recent Presidential Campaign loss to Jimmy Carter: "While I am disappointed at the results of the election, my pride in the President's achievements and the support and faith millions of Americans gave him make the defeat easier to bear." Includes the original stamped, "White House" envelope of transmittal, canceled December 2, 1976.(3 items).

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HENRY FORD, LEE IACOCCA + ASSORTED AUTOGRAPHS, 9 Cards, Envelopes and Letters

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Description: Autographs"Henry Ford" Commemorates The Automotive Industry HENRY FORD, LEE IACOCCA, & ASSORTED AUTOGRAPHS.Lot of 9 Items, Signed Cards, Envelopes and Letters, from assorted celebrities from around the world, Extremely Fine. Includes a First Day of Issue Cover, Commemorating the "Automotive Industry," Signed "Henry Ford," "Lee Iacocca," and "Leonard Woodcock," (October 15, 1960, Detroit, Michigan). Other autographs from Cecil Day-Lewis (Poet Laureate of England); Bernard Buffet, and Korczak Ziolkowski, artists; and Sir Bernard Lovell, of the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories, England. (9 items)

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JAMES A. GARFIELD, Signed $300 Civil War Soldier's Commutation Letter 1865

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Description: AutographsVery Rare $300 Civil War Soldier's "Commutation" Letter To Purchase His Way Out of Army Service and Signed By The Future President of the United States James A. Garfield !JAMES A. GARFIELD (1831 - 1881). 20th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1881 until his death by assassination, a brief 200 days in office.March 27, 1865-Dated Civil War Period, remarkable "Commutation Money" related, Civil War Autograph Letter is Signed, "J.A. Garfield," 2 pages, 10" x 7.75", Hiram, [Ohio], Very Fine. This original written letter is addressed to a Captain D. Caldwell, on the behalf of Nelson Raymond. Garfield writes, in full:"Capt. D. Cadwell - Pro.(vost) Mar.(shall) 19th Dist.(rict) - Dear Sir, The bearer of this, Nelson F. Raymond of this township - was drafted in May last and paid his $300 Commutation. He is again drafted. I believe the Provost Marshal has in some instances or rather in a certain class of cases allowed the payment of Commutation to have weight in the subsequent draft. - In a telegram received from him by me on the 25th in it he says: 'When men are drafted who previously paid Commutation - the board of Enrollment is instructed to report the facts to this office with a view his release' - It is to avail himself of whatever relief the law and the rules of the Department may afford when Mr. Raymond calls on you. He is a worthy and reliable citizen. - Very Truly Yours, J.A. Garfield."Aside from a bit of light toning at the top of the letter and being slightly light, this document is in overall great condition. Garfiled's signature measures a huge 3.5" across and the letter is written upon paper having a wonderful "Union Shield with Stars" central watermark. A very historic letter directly mentioning and relating to the highly controversial practice of payments of $300 to get out of the Union Army during the Civil War, written by a current Union officer and future President of the United States!With the payment of a $300 "Commutation" fee, a drafted Union soldier was able to buy his way out of military service during the Civil War.

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J. PAUL GETTY + His Father GEORGE F. GETTY Dual Signed Check

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Description: AutographsJ. Paul Getty & George F. Getty Signed On One Document Father and Son Exceedingly Rare Signature CombinationJ. PAUL GETTY & GEORGE F. GETTY. Jean Paul Getty (1892-1976) was an Anglo-American industrialist. He founded the Getty Oil Company, and in 1957 Fortune magazine named him the richest living American. George Franklin Getty (1855-1930), American lawyer, father of industrialist J. Paul Getty and patriarch of the Getty family.August 1, 1917-Dated, Check Signed, "J. Paul Getty" Endorsement, on the back of a Check Signed, "Geo. F. Getty," dated at Los Angeles, CA, Choice Extremely Fine. This check is drawn on the Security Trust & Savings k for $250.00 and paid to J. Paul Getty. The perforated cancellation does not affect either signature. J. Paul Getty's signature is scarce and locating both signatures of the father and son, together upon one single document is an extremely rare opportunity. The consignor informs us that this check was sold to him nearly a decade ago by check specialist Ray Anthony. Ray had not seen another in his decades in this field, having this Father and Son combination on one document. Indeed, we have not had another bearing both historic signatures!

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MARY LORD HARRISON, 1940 Autograph Letter Pair With Excellent Political Content

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Description: Autographs"Mary Lord Harrison" Autograph Letter Signed Twice With Excellent Political Content About FDR & Wendell WilkieMARY LORD HARRISON (1858-1948). Second Wife of President Benjamin Harrison.August 10, 1940-Dated, Pair of Mated Autograph Letters, Each Signed, "Mary Lord Harrison," total of 4 pages (back to back), 6.75" x 5.75", New York, Choice Extremely Fine. Both are beautifully handwritten upon "Mrs. Benjamin Harrison" personal stationary. The first to Theodore K. Pitt of Hamden, Connecticut. These first two pages congratulate him on his newspaper and "... I enclose my Autograph for your collection," signed at its conclusion with a huge, 4.75" long signature.The second two page letter, is also fully Signed at its conclusion with her huge, 4.75" long signature, where she expresses her sentiment about being a good citizen, and her opposition to a third term for a President. Noted at top left "You may pub(lish) this in your paper if you wish to -". This great content letter reads, in full:"Every man and woman should show a vital interest in the goverment. Should always cast their vote Thoughtfully, and what he feels is best for their country. If he is a good Citizen he will not miss voting. I personally do not believe in a Third Term President. In the United States, Wendell Wilkie is a fine man - and I believe will give a great Administration - I will voting for him, Are You? - "Mary Lord Harrison."In this fine content, and highly Political, Autographed Letter, Franklin D. Roosevelt himself is not specifically named. She does however state that, "Wendel Willkie is a fine man--and I believe will give a great Administration. I am voting for him..." (2 letters).

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Major General WILLIAM HEATH 1778 Revolutionary War Dated Document Signed

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Description: Autographs1778 Revolutionary War Date Document Signed William Heath as American Major General - Back Pay In CaptivityWILLIAM HEATH (1737-1814). American farmer, soldier, and political leader from Massachusetts who served as a Major General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.1. July 29, 1778-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Manuscript Document Signed, "W Heath, M G" (Major General), 1 page, measuring 12" x 7.5" at Boston, Choice Very Fine. This Document being his orders to Ebenezer Hancock to pay Lt. John Blunt $144 due him from the United States of America for the time he was in captivity, from October 1776 to January 1, 1778. Just below General Heath's signature, Lt. Blunt himself actually signs, "Boston October 6, 1778 Received the above." Two other official statements about Blunt's service are further documented on the verso by Blunt and Justice John Greenleaf, as to his previously taking the Oath as the the truth of the statements. A wonderful, historic Revolutionary War Date Document signed by William Heath, Major General.2. Also attached with a spot of red wax to the verso is a 1 page, 4.5" x 7" Manuscript Contemporary period "True Copy" of a notarized statement from American Brigadier General John Nixon, certifying that Blunt was in Col. Hitchcock's Regt, in Nixon's Brigade in 1776 "and was taken prisoner on Long Island 27th Aug.t 1776." Minor edge tone.William Heath (March 7, 1737 - January 24, 1814) was an American farmer, soldier, and political leader from Massachusetts who served as a Major General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.Heath made his home for his entire life at his family's farm in Roxbury, Massachusetts (present day Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, part of the city of Boston). He was born on a farm that had been settled in 1636 by his ancestors. He became active in the militia, and was a captain in the Suffolk County militia in 1760. By 1770 he was a colonel and its leader.In December 1774 the revolutionary government in Massachusetts named him a Brigadier General. He commanded Massachusetts forces during the last stage of the Battle of Lexington and Concord in April 1775. As the siege of Boston began, Heath devoted himself to training the militia involved in the siege. In June of that year, Massachusetts named him a Major General in the state troops, and the Continental Congress made him a brigadier general in the new national army, the Continental Army.In 1776 Heath participated in the defence of New York City, and was one of those who urged General Washington not to abandon the city. He saw action at Long Island, Harlem Heights, and White Plains. In August 1776 he was promoted to major general in the Continental Army, but Washington had doubts about Heath's abilities and posted him where no action was expected. In November he was placed in command of forces in the Hudson River Highlands. In January 1777, Washington instructed Heath to attack Fort Independence in New York in support of Washington's actions at Trenton and Princeton, but Heath's attack was botched and his troops were routed. He was censured by Washington and thereafter was never given command of troops in action.General Heath was placed in charge of the Convention Army of John Burgoyne's surrendered troops after the Battle of Saratoga. In 1780 he returned to command the Highland Department after Benedict Arnold's treason.Heath was listed as an original member of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati.After the war, Heath was a Member of the Massachusetts Convention that Ratified the United States Constitution in 1788. He served in the state Senate 1791-1792, and as a probate court judge. In 1800 he was elected the Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, but declined the office.He died at home in Roxbury on January 24, 1814, and was buried nearby in Forest Hills Cemetery The town of Heath, Massachusetts, is named in his honor.(From Wikipedia)

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Major General WILLIAM HEATH Signed 1807 Dated Broadside Document

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Description: AutographsBroadside Signed ByRevolutionary War General William HeathWILLIAM HEATH (1737-1814). American farmer, soldier, and political leader from Massachusetts who served as a Major General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.Partly Printed Broadside Document Signed "W. Heath" as Judge of Probate, printed in black ink on fine laid paper, Choice Very Fine. 13" x 8.25." Dated December 1, 1807, appointing Elizabeth Turner of Walpole (MA) as administrator of her husband's estate. Quite bold, one very small fold hole. A nice item for framing and display.William Heath (March 7, 1737 - January 24, 1814) was an American farmer, soldier, and political leader from Massachusetts who served as a Major General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War.Heath made his home for his entire life at his family's farm in Roxbury, Massachusetts (present day Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts, part of the city of Boston). He was born on a farm that had been settled in 1636 by his ancestors. He became active in the militia, and was a captain in the Suffolk County militia in 1760. By 1770 he was a colonel and its leader.In December 1774 the revolutionary government in Massachusetts named him a Brigadier General. He commanded Massachusetts forces during the last stage of the Battle of Lexington and Concord in April 1775. As the siege of Boston began, Heath devoted himself to training the militia involved in the siege. In June of that year, Massachusetts named him a Major General in the state troops, and the Continental Congress made him a brigadier general in the new national army, the Continental Army.In 1776 Heath participated in the defence of New York City, and was one of those who urged General Washington not to abandon the city. He saw action at Long Island, Harlem Heights, and White Plains. In August 1776 he was promoted to major general in the Continental Army, but Washington had doubts about Heath's abilities and posted him where no action was expected. In November he was placed in command of forces in the Hudson River Highlands. In January 1777, Washington instructed Heath to attack Fort Independence in New York in support of Washington's actions at Trenton and Princeton, but Heath's attack was botched and his troops were routed. He was censured by Washington and thereafter was never given command of troops in action.General Heath was placed in charge of the Convention Army of John Burgoyne's surrendered troops after the Battle of Saratoga. In 1780 he returned to command the Highland Department after Benedict Arnold's treason.Heath was listed as an original member of the Massachusetts Society of the Cincinnati.After the war, Heath was a Member of the Massachusetts Convention that Ratified the United States Constitution in 1788. He served in the state Senate 1791-1792, and as a probate court judge. In 1800 he was elected the Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts, but declined the office.He died at home in Roxbury on January 24, 1814, and was buried nearby in Forest Hills Cemetery The town of Heath, Massachusetts, is named in his honor.(From Wikipedia)

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Francis Hopkinson Signed Revolutionary War Continental Congress Loan-Office Certificate

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Description: AutographsFrancis Hopkinson Signed Revolutionary War Continental Congress Loan-Office CertificateFRANCIS HOPKINSON (1737-1791). Signer of the Declaration of Independence for New Jersey and Designer of the American Flag in 1777.September 28, 1779-Dated Revolutionary War period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "F. Hopkinson," being an official Continental Congress Loan-Office Certificate made out from the Commissioners of the United States at Paris, to James Allen, $24, 4th Bill, on Massachusetts, Choice Extremely Fine. Listed by Anderson in THE PRICE OF LIBERTY. Countersigned by Nathanial Appleton for the Loan office in Massachusetts-Bay. Bold large brown signature "F. Hopkinson" measuring a huge 3 inches across as Treasurer of Loans for the United States, located at lower right. Printed in black and orange ink. Paper watermarked "UNITED STATES." A lovely example of this Francis Hopkinson Signed Continental Loan-Office Certificate. Accompanied by an original 1862 copywrite engraving of Hopkinson after the original by Chappel, with facsimile signature below, by Fry & Co., NY in near mint quality. (2 items).Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, signs this bill of exchange as Treasurer of Loans. Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 - May 9, 1791), an American author, was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey.He later served as a federal judge in Pennsylvania. His supporters believe he played a key role in the design of the first American flag. Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson. He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his masters degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes. In 1763, he was appointed customs collector for Salem, New Jersey. Hopkinson spent from May 1766 to August 1767 in England in hopes of becoming commissioner of customs for North America. Although unsuccessful, he spent time with the future Prime Minister Lord North and his half-brother, the Bishop of Worcester Brownlow North, and painter Benjamin West. After his return, Francis Hopkinson operated a dry goods business in Philadelphia and married Ann Borden on September 1, 1768. They would have five children. Hopkinson obtained a public appointment as a customs collector for New Castle, Delaware on May 1, 1772.He moved to Bordentown, New Jersey in 1774, became an assemblyman for the state's Royal Provincial Council, and was admitted to the New Jersey bar on May 8, 1775. He resigned his crown-appointed positions in 1776 and, on June 22, went on to represent New Jersey in the Second Continental Congress where he signed the Declaration of Independence.He departed the Congress on November 30, 1776 to serve on the Navy Board at Philadelphia. As part of the fledgling nation's government, he was Treasurer of the Continental Loan Office in 1778; appointed Judge of the Admiralty Court of Pennsylvania in 1779 and reappointed in 1780 and 1787; and helped ratify the Constitution during the Constitutional Convention in 1787.On September 24, 1789, he was nominated by President George Washington to the newly created position of Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Pennsylvania. He was confirmed by the United States Senate, and received his commission, on September 26, 1789.As a Federal Judge, Hopkinson died in Philadelphia at the age of 53 from a sudden epileptic seizure. He was buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. He was the father of Joseph Hopkinson, member of the United States House of Representatives and Federal Judge.

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Signer FRANCIS HOPKINSON + WILLIAM BINGHAM, Plus JOHN BENEZET

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Description: AutographsFrancis Hopkinson Signer of the Declaration of Independence from New Jersey & Other Noted AmericansFRANCIS HOPKINSON (1737-1791) & WILLIAM BINGHAM (1752-1804), Plus JOHN BENEZET (see text).Hopkinson was an American Author, was one of the Signer of the Declaration of Independence as a Continental Congress Delegate from New Jersey and helped in the design of the First American National Flag, First graduate of what is now the University of Pennsylvania.William Bingham was an American Statesman from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress from 1786 to 1788, and later served in the United States Senate from 1795 to 1801 and as President Pro Tempore of the United States Senate.December 31st, 1778-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "F. Hopkinson" as Continental Congress Treasurer of Loans, Third Bill of Exchange $30 Sight Draft, printed in Turquoise - Blue and Black, Very Choice Extremely Fine. This Continental Treasury form being beautifully printed upon watermarked "UNITED STATES 3" fine quality laid period paper. It is made to "Arthur Lefferts" on interest due on Money borrowed by the United States. This form is made:"To the Commissioner or Commissioners of the United States of America, at Paris. - Countersigned, Tho(mas) Smith - Commissioner of the Continental Loan-Office in the State of Pennsylvania -- (Signed) F(rancis) Hopkinson - Treasr. of Loans."This form is in excellent overall quality having a bold brown signature of Hopkinson measuring over 2.25" long. The blank reverse is endorsed at top by Lefferts, being signed to William Bingham, authorized by John Benezet, and then further endorsed and noted in French on July 13, 1779, Signed by "Wm. Bingham" with his bold signature with a lovely flourish below.John Benezet was a native of Philadelphia and the son of Daniel Benezet, a prominent Philadelphia merchant. Benezet briefly attended the College of Philadelphia in 1757 and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1768. In 1775, he married Hanna Bingham, and with that, his father gave him £3,000 plus £6,000 in stock to set up an import business. Benezet became active in political affairs, but only briefly. In early 1775, John Benezet served as one of the Secretaries who recorded proceedings at the Pennsylvania Provincial Congress. In August of that year, he was named to Philadelphia's Committee of Correspondence. Two years later, in 1777, the Continental Congress appointed Benezet as Commissioner of Claims in the Treasury Office, later resigned and returned to his business interests. Benezet died in the Winter of 1780-81, when his ship, the Shillelagh, was lost at sea during a voyage to France.Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, signs this Continental Congress Treasury Bill of Exchange, as Treasurer of Loans. Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 - May 9, 1791), an American author, was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey.Hopkinson later served as a Federal Judge in Pennsylvania. His supporters believe he played a key role in the design of the First American flag. Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson. He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his masters degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes. In 1763, he was appointed customs collector for Salem, New Jersey. Hopkinson spent from May 1766 to August 1767 in England in hopes of becoming commissioner of customs for North America. Although unsuccessful, he spent time with the future Prime Minister Lord North and his half-brother, the Bishop of Worcester Brownlow North, and painter Benjamin West. After his return, Francis Hopkinson operated a dry goods business in Philadelphia and married Ann Borden on September 1, 1768. They would have five children. Hopkinson obtained a public appointment as a customs collector for New Castle, Delaware on May 1, 1772.He moved to Bordentown, New Jersey in 1774, became an assemblyman for the state's Royal Provincial Council, and was admitted to the New Jersey bar on May 8, 1775. He resigned his crown-appointed positions in 1776 and, on June 22, went on to represent New Jersey in the Second Continental Congress where he signed the Declaration of Independence.He departed the Congress on November 30, 1776 to serve on the Navy Board at Philadelphia. As part of the fledgling nation's government, he was Treasurer of the Continental Loan Office in 1778; appointed Judge of the Admiralty Court of Pennsylvania in 1779 and reappointed in 1780 and 1787; and helped ratify the Constitution during the Constitutional Convention in 1787.On September 24, 1789, he was nominated by President George Washington to the newly created position of Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Pennsylvania. He was confirmed by the United States Senate, and received his commission, on September 26, 1789.As a Federal Judge, Hopkinson died in Philadelphia at the age of 53 from a sudden epileptic seizure. He was buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. He was the father of Joseph Hopkinson, member of the United States House of Representatives and Federal judge.

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FRANCIS HOPKINSON, 1780 Manuscript Document Signed, Signer of the Declaration

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Description: AutographsFrancis Hopkinson - Declaration of Independence Signer Upon Continental Congress "Bills on Spain & France"FRANCIS HOPKINSON, Signer of the Declaration of Independence for New Jersey and Designer of the American Flag in 1777.July 11, 1780-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Manuscript Document Signed, "Frans(is) Hopkinson" as Treasurer of Loans for the United States Continental Congress, Very Fine. Hopkinson's 4" long signature is in dark brown ink, this document measuring 8.25" x 6.75" being custom framed and matted along with a 8" x 6" portrait engraving and a separate typed biography, to an overall size of 16" x 28.5".Unique, highly important United States Revolutionary War Loan Office Financial Document directly mentioning Loan Certificates on Spain and France from their respective governments. It lists the number and denominations of various "Bills on Spain & France," being Loan Office Certificates made out for America's various states during the Revolutionary War period. This Document has an integral envelope on the other side and is addressed to Thomas Harwood, who was the United States Commissary of Loans for Maryland.It is also docketed on that side, "Bills on Spain & France" (the reverse is hidden by the display and this lot is accompanied by a full color copy for reference). The loan certificate denominations and the number of certificates that are listed by Hopkinson appear quite huge, being 100, 300, 500 etc. and are apparently listing certificates "No. 1" for each denomination grouping totaling to 5,000! There are a couple of minor repairs to some edges, and the wax seal tear created upon the original opening of this document is restored affecting a few notations. Overall, this historic American fiscal document is beautifully framed for display.Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, here signs this historic Bill of Exchange as United States Treasurer of Loans. Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 - May 9, 1791), an American author, was one of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey.He later served as a federal judge in Pennsylvania. His supporters believe he played a key role in the design of the first American flag. Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson. He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his masters degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes. In 1763, he was appointed customs collector for Salem, New Jersey. Hopkinson spent from May 1766 to August 1767 in England in hopes of becoming commissioner of customs for North America. Although unsuccessful, he spent time with the future Prime Minister Lord North and his half-brother, the Bishop of Worcester Brownlow North, and painter Benjamin West. After his return, Francis Hopkinson operated a dry goods business in Philadelphia and married Ann Borden on September 1, 1768. They would have five children. Hopkinson obtained a public appointment as a customs collector for New Castle, Delaware on May 1, 1772.He moved to Bordentown, New Jersey in 1774, became an assemblyman for the state's Royal Provincial Council, and was admitted to the New Jersey bar on May 8, 1775. He resigned his crown-appointed positions in 1776 and, on June 22, went on to represent New Jersey in the Second Continental Congress where he signed the Declaration of Independence.He departed the Congress on November 30, 1776 to serve on the Navy Board at Philadelphia. As part of the fledgling nation's government, he was Treasurer of the Continental Loan Office in 1778; appointed Judge of the Admiralty Court of Pennsylvania in 1779 and reappointed in 1780 and 1787; and helped ratify the Constitution during the Constitutional Convention in 1787.On September 24, 1789, he was nominated by President George Washington to the newly created position of Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Pennsylvania. He was confirmed by the United States Senate, and received his commission, on September 26, 1789.As a Federal Judge, Hopkinson died in Philadelphia at the age of 53 from a sudden epileptic seizure. He was buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. He was the father of Joseph Hopkinson, member of the United States House of Representatives and Federal Judge.

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(WILLIAM HOWE) 1783 Retained Manuscript Letter to British General Guy Carlton

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Description: AutographsGeneral William Howe's Letter to British General Guy Carlton (WILLIAM HOWE), British Revolutionary War Major General; Commander-in-Chief of British Army in North America, 1775-1778.March 25, 1783-Dated, Retained Original True Copy Manuscript Letter from General William Howe, (unsigned) written, in brown ink on fine-laid paper measuring 8.75" x 7.25", four-page integral sheet, Boston, MA, Fine. This letter is written to British General Guy Carlton, and was not signed by Howe, but has a contemporary ink annotation on the page 4 margin: from "G. Howe to Genl. Carlton." The letter commends the bearer of the letter, "Mr. Livingston" (apparently from a prominent New York Loyalist family), and refers him to General Carlton for the redress of an unspecified grievance. It reads, in part:"The bearer of this letter Mr. Livingston, seems to think that an address from a military to a military character will have its effect, however adverse those characters from a sense of duty may officially in other respects be compelled to act. In compliance therefore with the wishes of a gentleman whose family and merit give him a claim to my attention I venture to trouble your Excellency with this letter..."The letter has minor foxing and minor paper loss along folds, but is legible and interesting for its Revolutionary War date.William Howe commanded the British at Bunker Hill and succeeded Thomas Gage as commander in chief in America. He defeated the Americans on Long Island, captured New York City, defeated the Americans at White Plains and Brandywine, and occupied Philadelphia. He resigned his command in 1778. He was appointed general in 1793, and in 1799 became the 5th Viscount Howe.

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Bold General DAVID HUNTER Signed Photo Lincoln Assassination Military Commission

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Description: Autographs"Lincoln Assassination" Conspirators Trial Presiding Head DAVID HUNTER (1802-1886). President of the Abraham Lincoln Assassination Military Commission Trying the John Wilkes Booth Conspirators. Union General in the American Civil War who achieved fame by his unauthorized 1862 order (immediately rescinded) Emancipating Slaves in three Southern States!Civil War Era, Outstanding Cabinet Card Inscribed and Vividly Signed, "Compliments - D. Hunter - USA." upon its back, no date, measuring 6.5" x 4.25," with front and reverse maker imprint by Rice, Washington, D.C., Choice Very Fine. David Hunter was known as the "Old General." He was the man chosen by President Andrew Johnson to preside over the controversial nine-man Commission that tried the Conspirators in Lincoln's Assassination. Here, Hunter is shown in waist up profile, wearing his full military uniform with long white hair and a bushy white mustache. The reverse side shows some scattered tone more towards the edges and some speckled areas within the image, as made.Hunter is not very well known compared to some of the other famous figures related to the historic trial of the Abraham Lincoln Assassination Conspirators. In addition, Union General David Hunter sanctioned the organization of the first African American Regiment during the Civil War! That action caused the Confederate government to label him a "felon to be executed if captured." The massive "Compliments - D. Hunter - USA." upon its back measures fully 3.5" long. An extremely rare and historically important Signed Cabinet Card.

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Exceedingly Rare Historic LYNDON B. JOHNSON, Signed Photograph to Virgil Grissom

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Description: Autographs"To Virgil Grissom with high regard Lyndon Johnson"LYNDON BAINES JOHNSON (1908 - January 22, 1973). "LBJ" 36th President of the United States (1963-1969), one of only four people who served in all four elected Federal offices of the United States: Representative, Senator, Vice President and President.c. 1965, Exceedingly rare and historically important Signed Photograph with sentiment, "To Virgil Grissom with high regard Lyndon Johnson" Choice Mint. This black and white, 9" x 7.25" (by sight) photograph is framed to an overall size of 14.25" x 12.5", no date or place, not inspected out of its frame. This shows a group photo of Lyndon Johnson, along with 3 of the Mercury Astronauts including; Grissom, Slayton and Cooper. Johnson signs, "To Virgil Grissom with high regard Lyndon Johnson" in bold black ink. A true prize for any Presidential or Space related collection.Virgil Ivan Grissom (April 3, 1926 - January 27, 1967), (Lt Col, USAF), is better known as "Gus" Grissom, was one of the original NASA Project Mercury astronauts and a United States Air Force pilot. He was the second American to fly in space and the first NASA astronaut to fly in space twice. Grissom was killed along with fellow astronauts Ed White and Roger Chaffee during a pre-launch test for the Apollo 1 mission at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (then known as Cape Kennedy), Florida. He was the first of the Mercury Seven to die. He was also a recipient of the Distinguished Flying Cross and, posthumously, the Congressional Space Medal of Honor.

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HELEN KELLER. 1951, Typed American Foundation for Overseas Blind Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsHelen Keller Seeks Funds for The American Foundation for Overseas BlindHELEN KELLER.HELEN KELLER (1880-1968). The first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.September 27, 1951, Typed Letter Signed, "Helen Keller," in pencil on American Foundation for Overseas Blind, Inc. letterhead, New York, one page, measuring 11" x 8.5", Choice Extremely Fine. Her letter, addressed to a "Mr. Luhrs", contains an appeal for funds for her efforts to assist the blind overseas. She writes, in part: "In the world today, there are fourteen million blind people, thousands of whom were blinded by war and others even now losing their sight in the current conflict. The great majority live in India, Egypt, and China but every country has its quota of visually handicapped people... Blindness is to lie long, long days--and life is made up of days. It is to live immured, baffled, all God's world shut out. It is to sit helpless, staring into the dark with nothing but the dark staring back, while one's spirit tugs at is fetters, and one's hand aches for the tools it used to wield. Perhaps you have seen just a blind person on the street with faltering feet, offering petty wares for sale or holding out a cup for your pennies--and this was once a man with ambitions and capabilities. Since it is known that beggary ad dependence need not be the lot of any blind person, the American Foundation for Overseas Blind is laboring hard in Asia, in Europe, in Africa, and in South America to inspire leadership to guide blind people out of their well of darkness and to put equipment into their hands for schooling and tools with which to work..." Keller's signature is carefully written at the bottom of the page, measuring over 2" long. A heartfelt letter, with excellent content, that reflects Keller's writing ability and clarity of mind in pursuit of bettering the lives of deaf and blind people. The letter is offered with a self-addressed stamped envelope, directed to the American Foundation for Overseas Blind, Inc., measuring 6" x 3.5", together with the original transmittal envelope (9" x4") as well as a 7" x 4.5", 4 page printed brochure for the foundation. (4 items).Helen Adams Keller (1880 - 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, her 100th birthday.A prolific author, Keller was well-travelled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women's suffrage, labor rights, socialism, and other radical left causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1971.(From Wikipedia)

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HELEN KELLER Signed 1953 American Foundation for the Blind Letter

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Description: AutographsHelen Keller Seeks Funds for Her "deaf-blind fellows"HELEN KELLER (1880-1968). The first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.November 27, 1953, Typed Letter Signed, "Helen Keller," in pencil on watermarked, personal stationery, New York, one page, measuring 11" x 8.5", Choice Fine. Her letter, addressed to a "Mr. Finger", contains an appeal for funds for the "American Foundation for the Blind," in part: "I am indeed happy to inform you that my deaf-blind fellows are receiving constructive help for the first time in the history of America. This work, now nearly nation-wide in scope, is being carried forward as one of the many services of the American Foundation for the Blind with which I have been allied for thirty years...Try to imagine, if you can, the anguish and horror you would experience bowed down by the twofold weight of blindness and deafness... Still throbbing with natural emotions and desires, you would feel through a sense of touch the existence of a living world, and desperately but vainly would you seek an escape into its healing light. All your pleasures would vanish in a dreadful monotony of silent days... The keenest touch cannot break their immobility. More than any other physically fettered group, they need right teaching and constructive procedures to reclaim them to normal society..." Keller's signature is carefully written at the bottom of the page, measuring over 2" long. A heartfelt letter, with excellent content. The letter is offered together with the original transmittal envelope, 5.75" x 4.5" as well as 2 printed brochures for Keller's foundation bearing a portrait of her on the covers of each. Letter bears light creases, and transmittal envelope is slightly toned at margins. (4 items).Helen Adams Keller (1880 - 1968) was an American author, political activist, and lecturer. She was the first deafblind person to earn a Bachelor of Arts degree. The story of how Keller's teacher, Anne Sullivan, broke through the isolation imposed by a near complete lack of language, allowing the girl to blossom as she learned to communicate, has become widely known through the dramatic depictions of the play and film The Miracle Worker.Her birthday on June 27 is commemorated as Helen Keller Day in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania and was authorized at the federal level by presidential proclamation by President Jimmy Carter in 1980, her 100th birthday.A prolific author, Keller was well-travelled and outspoken in her convictions. A member of the Socialist Party of America and the Industrial Workers of the World, she campaigned for women's suffrage, labor rights, socialism, and other radical left causes. She was inducted into the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame in 1971.(From Wikipedia)

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Scarce American Major-General CHARLES LEE 1762 Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsScarce Colonel Charles Lee 1762 Autograph Letter Signed While Serving in Portugal War and Mentioning Burgoyne!CHARLES LEE (1731-1782). British soldier who served as an American Major-General of the Continental Army during the American War of Independence under George Washington and the Continental Congress.August 30, 1762-Dated French and Indian War period, Autograph Letter Signed, "Cha: Lee", 8.75" x 13.5", 2 pages, Nissa, Portugal, Choice Fine. An ALS written to "The Earl of Shelbourne" in London. Written during Lee's service during the Spanish invasion of Portugal, between 9 May and 24 November 1762.This was the principal military campaign of the Spanish-Portuguese War, 1761-1763, which in turn was part of the larger Seven Years' War. It initially involved the armies of Spain and Portugal, before the French and British intervened in the conflict on the side of their respective allies. This Letter contains excellent historic military content. It reads, in full:"I am in some apprehension that you have not received a letter which I wrote from A... I hope it may still come to your hands, only for this reason; that I would not be thought deficient in my respect to your Lordship and not that there was anything material in my scrawl the sum of it was only that the Portuguese were a a race of miscreants, unforgiving, more execrable and despicable than God Almighty should suffer to exist to the disgrace of his works.We are ever & more convinced of this truth; They are even too absurd to be ridicule'd and too abominable to be abord - the other part of my letter consisted of our disappointment in the treatment we expected to meet with from the Count - and of our mistake of the Man's character, (I don't mean as a Soldier for I believe him to be a very able one) but as a Man of a singular bold and independent way of thinking a Man with whom the recommendation of a Friend of approv'd worth and honour wou'd have more sway than the interposition of the whole Ministerial herd. Such I had represented to myself to be the stamp of Count La Lipe but we are undecisive by the most mortifying circumstances, not one or two, but a continued tenor of slighting carriage towards us, even this morning I requested the favour of an audience, was not admitted - but referr'd to Crawford, what is to Crawford to me or, I to Crawford & but -My Lord I will say no more on this subject it must be an ungrateful one to you, which is and, ought to be, a most indespensable reason for my stopping it - but assure yourself, My Lord that gratitude to you is as full as heart can contain and I hope you will believe, that my conduct has been irreproachably circumspect, I have confind my dissatisfaction to my own breast and to the ear of Grey, but I shall ....too long on this ... We have had some success in surprizing a Village - taken a General and three Colours. Bargoin [Burgoyne] shew'd much of a Soldier - his Regt is excellent. One Sergt and seven men attack'd a Spanish Officer and twenty five over... the Sergt kill'd three with his own hand, this is great on a little scale - I believe we shall keep Portugal this year not from any defence we can make - but from the ... by proceedings of the Enemy - adieu - My D[ea]r Lord, Yours forever - (Signed) Cha. Lee"Vividly written in very dark brown ink upon clean heavy period laid paper with some modest edge chipping. Most of the Integral Address Leaf is present. Accompanied with a copy of a detailed discussion of this war explaining the service of Lee, Burgoyne and Count de La Lippe against the Spanish army. A great, historic and personal content Charles Lee handwritten Letter.Charles Lee (February 6, 1732 - October 2, 1782) was a British soldier who served as a General of the Continental Army during the American War of Independence. Lee also served earlier in the British army during the Seven Years War.After the war he sold his commission and served for a time in the Polish army of King Stanislaus II. In 1773 Lee, who had Whig views, moved to America and bought an estate in Virginia. When the fighting broke out in the American War of Independence in 1775 he volunteered to serve with rebel forces. Lee's ambitions to become Commander in Chief of the Continental Army were thwarted by the appointment of George Washington.During 1776, forces under his command repulsed a British attempt to capture Charleston, which boosted his standing with the army and Congress. Later that year he was captured by British cavalry under Banastre Tarleton and held as a prisoner until exchanged in 1778.During the indecisive Battle of Monmouth later that year, Lee led an assault on the British which miscarried. He was subsequently court-martialed and his military service brought to an end. He died in Philadelphia in 1782.

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MICHAEL HILLEGAS + DAVID LOPEZ 1782 Revolutionary War TREASURY Office Document

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Description: AutographsMichael Hillegas 1782 Revolutionary War "TREASURY" Office Issued to Jewish Bostonian Merchant David LopezMICHAEL HILLEGAS (1729-1804) American Patriot, First Treasurer of the United States.DAVID LOPEZ, Prominent Jewish American Bostonian, Signed AS TREASURER of the United States, Revolutionary War Loan-Office Certificate, Choice Very Fine.January 22, 1782-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Partially-Printed "TREASURY" Office Document, well printed upon fine quality period official watermarked thin laid paper. This Draft is a very rare type where Michael Hillegas has crossed out the words "Loan Office" and has left only the word "Treasr." (Treasurer) of the United States. It is valued in French Livres, being money obtained by the United States in loans provided by the French government to our Ambassador Benjamin Franklin and other American Commissioners during the Revolutionary War.This is a United States of America, Fourth Bill of Exchange, for $12 or 60 Livres Tournois to be payable at Paris, measuring 4" x 8" Anderson US-94 5B, as issued to Lopez by the State of Massachusetts U.S. Loan Office. It is countersigned on the blank reverse side by David Lopez. This Loan Office Document having been made out in his name, to him. It has modest conservation to some scattered ink erosion at lower left and in the Hillegas signature. This rare Michael Hillegas form is Signed "M. Hillegas" as Treasurer of the United States and also by Nathaniel Appleton as U.S. Loan Officer for the State of Massachusetts. Issued to David Lopez, of the prominent Boston Jewish family, this rare form is printed in both black and brown with all text and designs clear and fully readable.This Document is also accompanied by two original Typed Letters regarding its attribution by both Mr. Eric P. Newman and The Massachusetts Historical Society being dated in 1982. An important historical United States Fiscal rarity that is also connected to the important Jewish American Patriot Merchant David Lopez.According to the "American Jewish Historical Society," David Lopez, was brother to Aaron Lopez and Abraham Lopez. He died in Boston in 1797, "where he had been living for some years. He left an estate of upwards of £1,300 which he distributed amongst his nephews and nieces."From his will, in part it reads: "In the name of God, Amen, I, David Lopez of Boston in the County of Suffolk, and Commonwealth of Massachusetts, being sick and weak in body, but of sound mind, memory and understanding. Praised be God for it, and considering the certainty of death and the uncertainty of the time thereof, and to the end I hereunto set my hand and seal this eighth day of December In the year of the Christian Era, One thousand seven hundred and ninety seven. David Lopez. (Seal)" His obituary read: "In this town on Sunday, the 19th ult, (December 19, 1797) David Lopez, Esq. His remains were respectfully entombed at Newport, R. I., the residence of his more immediate friends. While we mingle the tears of sympathy and affection in those of his friends and acquaintances, his social virtues will forever embalm his memory." Independent Chronicle, December 28, 1797.

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Pop Artist PETER MAX, Signed 1989 Grammy Awards Poster

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Description: AutographsPeter Max Signed-Inscribed 1989 Grammy Awards PosterPETER MAX (born Peter Max Finkelstein, October 19, 1937) is a German-born Jewish American Artist best known for his "Cosmic Brownies" Pop Art style, as it came to be known in the 1960s. Original Signed Poster for the 1989 Grammy Awards, 18" x 24" having outstanding, vibrant colors. This Poster showing a brightly colored Gramophone, painted in Max's bold style, Inscribed and Signed at bottom, "for Eileen Cove - Peter Max 1989." Trivial handling to corners, very bold vivid near mint condition. An impressive, beautiful Poster for framing and display!The 1960s [edit]In 1962 Max started a small Virgina arts studio known as "The Daly & Max Studio", with friend Tom Daly. Daly and Max were joined by friend and mentor Don Rubbo, and the three worked as a group on books and advertising for which they received industry recognition. Much of their work incorporated antique photographic images as elements of collage.Max's interest in astronomy contributed to his self described "Cosmic '60s" period which featured what became identified as psychedelic, counter culture imagery. Max's art was popularized nationally through TV commercials such as his 1968 "un cola" ad for the soft drink 7-UP which helped drive sales of his very profitable art posters and other merchandise. He reportedly appeared on the The Tonight Show in 1968.He was featured on the cover of LIFE magazine's 9-5-1969 edition under with the heading "Peter Max: Portrait of the artist as a very rich man."U.S. postage stamp, featuring artwork by Peter Max, that commemorated Expo '74. One of Peter Max's art galleries, at The Forum Shops at Caesars Continental Airline's "Peter Max", a Boeing 777-200ER In 1970, many of Max's products and posters were featured in the exhibition "The World of Peter Max" which opened at the M.H. de Young Memorial Museum in San Francisco.The US Postal Service commissioned Max to create the first 40c postage stamp to commemorate the Expo '74 World's Fair in Spokane, Washington.July 4, 1976, Max began his Statue of Liberty series leading to his efforts with Chrysler CEO Lee Iacocca to help spearhead the restoration of the statue.1976 also saw the commissioning of Peter Max Paints America by the ASEA of Sweden. The book project commemorated America's bicentennial and included the following foreword. "Peter Max Paints America is based on works of art commissioned by ASEA of Sweden on the 200th anniversary of the founding of the United States of America, in sincere recognition of the historic bonds of friendship between the people of Sweden and the people of the United States, recalling that Sweden was one of the first countries to extend its hand in friendship to the new nation."Max has been the official artist for many major events, including the 1994 World Cup and the Grammy Awards. In 2000, Max designed the paint scheme Dale Earnhardt drove at the Winston all-star race, strikingly deviating from Earnhardt's trademark black car.(From Wikipedia)

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1762 LEWIS MORRIS, Signer: Declaration of Independence, Signed Manuscript Deed

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Description: Autographs1762 "Lewis Morris" Signed New York Manuscript DeedLEWIS MORRIS (1726 - 1798), Signer of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate to the Continental Congress from New York.April 20, 1762-Dated French and Indian War period, Manuscript Document Signed, "Lewis Morris," at Westchester County, New York, measuring 16" x 13", Very Fine. Being a Deed between Lewis Morris and Daniel Devoe for a piece of land in Morisania, New York which Devoe is buying from Morris for the sum of £215 2s 4p. This is a large size document, with light overall tone and scattered paper and tape reinforcements on the verso. Remnants of wax from Morris' official seal are present. Lewis Morris was the third and last lord of the manor of Morisania. He held many important positions, in addition to signing the Declaration of Independence he was a Member of Continental Congress; member of the Committee of Ways and Means to supply the Continental Army; Commissioner of Indian Affairs; later a judge in Westchester County, New York and Member of the New York Senate. Lewis Morris (April 8, 1726 - January 22, 1798) was an American landowner and developer from Morrisania, New York. He signed the U.S. Declaration of Independence as a delegate to the Continental Congress from New York.This Morris was the third to be named Lewis Morris, and was born on the family estate of Morrisania. He was the son of Lewis and Katrintje or Catherine (Staats) Moris. His great grandfather (Richard, died 1672) had immigrated to New York through Barbados after being part of Oliver Cromwell's army in the English Civil War of 1648. He purchased the first tract of land in the Bronx that became the basis for the Morrisania manor.When Richard and his young wife died, leaving behind an infant son named Lewis, it was Richard's brother, Colonel Lewis Morris, also of Barbados, who came to Morrisania to help manage the estate formerly belonging to his late-brother and now his infant nephew. Eventually the infant Lewis Morris (1671-1746) inherited the estate of his father after the death of his uncle, Col. Lewis Morris, and his wife, who were childless. This Lewis Morris married a woman named Isabella and then expanded and patented the estate and was also Governor of New Jersey.When his father died in 1762, he inherited the bulk of the estate. A prominent land owner in colonial New York, Lewis was appointed as a judge of the Admiralty Court for the province in 1760. As the Revolution drew near, he resigned this post in 1774. He was elected to the Colonial Assembly in 1769.

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Declaration Signer ROBERT MORRIS Signed Philadelphia Fiscal 90 Day Sight Draft

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Description: AutographsRare "Robert Morris" Signed Philadelphia Fiscal DraftROBERT MORRIS, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, financier of the American Revolution, and founder of the Bank of America.May 27, 178(6)-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Robt Morris," at Philadelphia, measuring 4" x 8", Choice Very Fine. Partly-printed in black and fully accomplished and executed in manuscript upon fine quality period watermarked laid paper. Being a Third Bill of Exchange Ninety Days Sight Draft for £100 Sterling. Trimmed in slightly at the left and right margins affecting some words and date. Ink erosion has worn through in loops of some letters, prior tape reinforcement to the blank reverse and a small chip at the upper right. Roberts Morris's signature is complete and very bold, measuring 2.5" in length. Accompanied by an original c. 1880s engraved print of Robert Morris with facsimile signature below his image. (2 items).

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Outstanding ANNA MARY (GRANDMA) MOSES, Framed Signature

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Description: AutographsMagnificent "Grandma Moses" Framed Signature DisplayANNA MARY "GRANDMA" MOSES (1860-1961). Famous American Folk Artist and Painter.Outstanding, large Signature, "Grand ma Moses" on white card, 2.5" x 5" professionally matted and framed within decorative gilt wood with photograph, to 12" x 17", Choice Near Mint. Ready for display, her magnificent bold signature is a massive 4.25" long!Anna Mary Robertson Moses (1860 - 1961) is better known as "Grandma Moses." She was a renowned American folk artist. She is often cited as an example of an individual successfully beginning a career in the arts at an advanced age. Her family and friends called her either "Mother Moses" or "Grandma Moses", and although she first exhibited as "Mrs. Moses", the press eagerly dubbed her "Grandma Moses", which stuck. LIFE magazine celebrated her 100th birthday by featuring her on its September 19, 1960 cover.Grandma Moses' paintings were used to publicize numerous American holidays, including Thanksgiving, Christmas and Mother's Day. Exemplary of her status, a Mother's Day Feature in True Confessions (1947) noted how "Grandma Moses remains prouder of her preserves than of her paintings, and proudest of all of her four children, eleven grandchildren and four great-grandchildren."During the 1950s, Grandma Moses' exhibitions were so popular that they broke attendance records all over the world. "A cultural icon, the spry, productive nonagenarian was continually cited as an inspiration for housewives, widows and retirees. Her images of America's rural past were transferred to curtains, dresses, cookie jars, and dinner ware, and used to pitch cigarettes, cameras, lipstick and instant coffee."In 1950, the National Press Club cited her as one of the five most newsworthy women and the National Association of House Dress Manufacturers honored her as their 1951 Woman of the Year. At age 88, Mademoiselle magazine named Grandma Moses a "Young Woman of the Year". Philadelphia's Moore College of Art awarded her its first honorary doctorate degree. Due to a lingering cold, she received the degree in absentia, presenting her acceptance speech via a special telephone hookup.

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(ROBERT MORRIS), Rare Pennsylvania Population Company Stock Certificate Signed

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Description: Autographs"Pennsylvania Population Company" Stock Certificate To Signer of the Declaration of Independence Robert Morris(ROBERT MORRIS) (1734-1806). Signer of the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution, Patriot of the American Revolutionary War and known as the "Financier of the Revolution," United States Senator from Pennsylvania.February 6, 1793-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "John Nicholson," as President of the Pennsylvania Population Company, Stock Certificate, made to Robert Morris (his name being written twice within the text), Very Fine. This original Stock Certificate is 1 page, measures 13" x 8.25", with huge margins, and the left being Jumbo. Printed by "Francis Bailey, Printer" (at Philadelphia), boldly printed in black on white laid period paper. There is some uneven tone at bottom center and the lower left with a trivial tear at extreme upper right, with two small file spindle holes near bottom, as usual. Overall, this rare Stock Certificate is fully upon the paper, having a Jumbo left sheet margin and three other huge margins. All of the manuscript portions and signatures are well written in brown.This historic Stock Certificate is Signed, "Jno. Nicholson" President, at the lower right. John W. Nicholson, was the Comptroller General of Pennsylvania from 1782-1794. In 1792, Nicholson purchased a 202,000 acre tract of land from the government. With notables such as Aaron Burr, Robert Morris and James Wilson, Nicholson and other investors then formed the Pennsylvania Population Company to profit on the expected, coming land boom. This Stock Certificate is made out to Declaration of Independence Signer, Robert Morris. He was also one of the Pennsylvania Population Company's major investors. It reads, in part:"It Is Hereby Certified by the President and Managers of the Pennsylvania Population Company, - That Robert Morris is entitled to one Share of Stock in the said Company, Numbered Eight hundred & Fifty two, Transferable in the presence of the Treasurer by the said Robert Morris, or his Attorney; subject nevertheless to the payments due or payable thereupon, according to the terms of the Plan of the Association." - (Signed) "Jno. Nicholson" as President. It is also Docketed on verso: "Transferred to John Nicholson, January 24, 1785."This is a truly great piece of American fiscal history with a direct connection to Robert Morris. As with all original "Pennsylvania Population Company" Stock Certificates, it is Exceedingly Rare.Robert Morris, Jr. was an American Merchant, and Signer to the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution. He was elected to the Pennsylvania Assembly and became the Chairman of the Pennsylvania Committee of Safety, and a member of the Second Continental Congress where he served as the Chairman of the Secret Committee, and as a member of the Committee of Correspondence.Later Morris was known as the "Financier of the Revolution", because of his role in financing the American side in the Revolutionary War. From 1781 to 1784, he served as Superintendent of Finance, managing the economy of the fledgling United States. At the same time he was Agent of Marine, a position he took without pay, and from which he controlled the Continental Navy. He was one of Pennsylvania's original pair of US senators, serving from 1789 to 1795.

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(JOHN NICHOLSON). President of The Pennsylvania Population Company

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Description: AutographsJohn Nicholson Signed Letter Regarding Accounting Mistakes as Secretary of the Asylum Company Just Months Before Being Sent to Prison(JOHN NICHOLSON). President of "The Pennsylvania Population Company," Secretary of the "Assylum Company" and was the Pennsylvania State Comptroller General, who controlled 500,000 acres of land and in 1800, Nicholson died in debtor's prison.June 18th, 1798-Dated, Manuscript Retained Copy Letter, Secretarially Signed, "J Nicholson," regarding accounting mistakes he made as Secretary of the Asylum Company, Very Fine. This easily readable financial letter is 8" x 11" nicely written in brown ink on period laid paper, being written just months before Nicholson would find himself sent to debtors prison. Some sealed splitting along some folds, boldly and well written in rich brown ink. It reads, in full:"June 18th, 1798 --- D[ear] Sir, --- From the aggregate of the foregoing acct. which I take to be right you see how inadequate the sum named between us was at the time of my transfer of my right in certain assylum shares to you was*. I have his day credited you in my books with this acct. save the first 5 items which were formerly entered. I have omitted to make entry of the last $150 a balance of $300 for the Commonwealth new loan *cause in the civil suit because you have my note therefor. If I have omitted aught in the preceding acct. impute it to my want of law knowledge and be so kind as to suggest it. Some payments were made you ment[ione]d on acct. of salary as Sec. of the Assylum Co. If you approve we will carry them to acct. with me. That company are perhaps better security than you friend. Copy --- (Signed) ---- J. Nicholson".An extraordinary letter by John Nicholson, admitting to significant financial improprieties as mistakes and hoping to correct the shortchanged account. The final sentence warns of his lack of funds and financial problems going forward that ultimately led to his being sent to prison.John Nicholson was born in Wales, and emigrated to Philadelphia prior to the American Revolution. He engaged in a variety of business enterprises, including button, iron, and glass manufacturing, and real estate developments. In 1778 he became clerk to the Board of Treasury of the Continental Congress. Congress accepted his resignation on March 12, 1781, when he entered the service of Commonwealth as one of the auditors for settling the accounts of the Pennsylvania Line. A year later, on April 13, 1782, the legislature appointed him to the newly-created Office of Comptroller General, which had broad powers to manage the financial affairs of the state. These powers were further increased as other duties and offices were conferred upon him; in 1785 he was authorized to collect and receive taxes, and in 1787 he was also made escheator general, to liquidate the estates of those attainted of treason. Under the reopened Federal Loan of 1792, Nicholson exchanged some $60,000 in "New Loan" certificates for federal securities. Not only had the comptroller general picked up these certificates for next to nothing, but they were not regarded as state debt to be redeemed. It was this state of affairs that caused the State House of Representatives to resolve on April 5, 1793, to impeach John Nicholson, to institute a suit against him for the recovery of funds which he had allegedly diverted, and to appoint a committee to examine his accounts and make a report. The committee, which was made up of Benjamin R. Morgan, Albert Gallatin, and Cadwallader Evans, reported him a public defaulter to a large amount. The trial in the State Senate was protracted and confusing. The House prosecutors were unable to muster a two-thirds vote against him on any of seven counts. In fact, a majority voted in his favor on all but two charges. Nicholson was acquitted but in 1794 resigned all his public offices. He then became the partner of Robert Morris in land speculation and development. With Morris he promoted the development of Washington, D.C. and formed the Asylum Company involving hundreds of thousands of acres on the Susquehanna as a haven for French refugees. With James Greenleaf and Morris, he created in 1795 the North American Land Company, which claimed to have as its capital six million acres of land in Pennsylvania, Virginia, North Carolina , South Carolina, Georgia, and Kentucky. Nicholson was also involved in the formation of the Pennsylvania Population Land Company, the Pennsylvania Land Company, the Territorial Land Company, the North Carolina Land Company, the South Carolina Land Company, the "Kentucky" Land Company, and the Georgia Land Company. Early in the winter of 1799-1800, Nicholson was imprisoned for debt. He died on December 5, 1800, leaving a wife, eight children, and more than four million dollars in debts.

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CHESTER W. NIMITZ. Fleet Admiral, United States Navy Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsFleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz United States NavyCHESTER W. NIMITZ. Fleet Admiral, United States Navy.November 30, 1962-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "C.W. Nimitz", on his Berkeley, California letterhead, 10.5" x 8", Very Fine. Letter reads, "Dear Palin, I do indeed remember you as being in the office of Senator David I. Walsh (of Massachusetts) - during those days when I used to appear before the Senator's Committee. I am pleased to learn that you have such a fine boy - now." Includes, a photograph portrait of Admiral Nimitz in uniform, inscribed in ink in upper left, "To Don J. Palen, U.S.N. Ret. With best wishes from an old friend, C.W. Nimitz, Fleet Admiral, U.S.N.", 10" x 8". Also 2 other photographs, one of a Senate committee meeting, with Walsh and Palen present, 9" x 7", and Walsh with two other politicians, and three naval officers on flag-draped parade stand, 10" x 8". Mild creasing to letter and portrait photo. (4 items).

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Commodore MATTHEW C. PERRY, Autograph Navy Letter Signed 1832

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Description: AutographsCommodore Matthew C. Perry Autograph Letter SignedMATTHEW C. PERRY (1794-1858). Commodore and "Father" of the U.S. Steam Navy, who compelled the "Opening of Japan" to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854.December 10, 1832-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "M. C. Perry", one page, 10" x 7.75", aboard the U.S. Ship Concord, Portsmouth Lower Road, Choice Extremely Fine. To Commander William Crane, Commander of the Naval Station at Portsmouth, N.H., it reads in full:"Sir I have the honor to transmit under cover to you two reports (not present) addressed to the President of the Board of Navy Commissioners - I am Sir Very Respectfully - Your Obi. Serv. - M. C. Perry."There is also a Docket on the Integral Leaf. The finely written ink appears slightly light yet it is easily and clearly readable. The paper is fresh, bright and clean with a superior appearance. A very scarce Commodore Matthew C. Perry Autograph Letter Signed.Matthew C. Perry was born on April 10, 1794 in South Kingston, Rhode Island. He commanded the first U.S. navy steamship, the Fulton and led naval forces in the Mexican War. President Millard Fillmore sent Perry to head a naval expedition to Japan. Perry's efforts concluded the first treaty between Japan and the U.S. and opened the Far East to U.S. influence. He followed his brother Oliver Perry into the navy and commanded the first U.S. navy steamship, the Fulton (1837-40). He led naval forces in the Mexican War and assisted Winfield Scott at Veracruz.In 1852 Pres. Millard Fillmore sent Perry to head a naval expedition to induce Japan to establish diplomatic relations with the U.S. Concluding that the country's centuries-old policy of isolation would be ended only by a show of force, Perry led four ships into the fortified harbour of Uraga (1853) and convinced the Japanese to accept his message. In 1854 he entered Edo (now Tokyo) Bay with nine ships and concluded the first treaty between Japan and the U.S., which granted the U.S. trading privileges and opened the Far East to U.S. influence.

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Commodore MATTHEW C. PERRY 1847 Manuscript Document Signed

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Description: AutographsHistoric Voyage to San Diego by Matthew C. Perry as Commander of the Home Squadron's Flag Ship MississippiMATTHEW C. PERRY (1794-1858). Commodore and "Father" of the U.S. Steam Navy, who compelled the "Opening of Japan" to the West with the Convention of Kanagawa in 1854.April 9, 1847-Dated, Mexican-American War Period, Manuscript Document Signed, "M C Perry" as Commander of the Home Squadron's Flag Ship "Mississippi," 1 page, measuring 12.25" x 8", Choice Very Fine or better. Perry orders the purser to pay $24 to Juan Diaz for vegetables furnished the crew of this vessel. Boldly written upon clean light blue period wove paper, having a large 2.75" long signature "M C Perry - Com's Home Squadron." Receipted by Diaz at bottom of page. Docket on reverse reads in full; "No 12 - San Diego / Vegtables $24:00 / April 9, 1847". This purchase is taking place during the height of the Mexican-American War, while California is still a part of Mexico and Perry's "Home Squadron" and his Flag Ship USS Mississippi are at San Diego! As such, a remarkable, historic Signed Document.In 1845, Commodore David Connor's length of service in command of the Home Squadron had come to an end. However, the coming of the Mexican-American War persuaded the authorities not to change commanders in the face of the war. Perry, who would eventually succeed Connor, was made second-in-command and captained the USS Mississippi. Perry captured the Mexican city of Frontera, demonstrated against Tabasco and took part in the Tampico Expedition. He had to return to Norfolk, Virginia to make repairs and was still there when the amphibious landings at Veracruz took place. His return to the U.S. gave his superiors the chance to finally give him orders to succeed Commodore Connor in command of the Home Squadron. Perry returned to the fleet during the siege of Veracruz and his ship supported the siege from the sea. After the fall of Veracruz Winfield Scott moved inland and Perry moved against the remaining Mexican port cities. Perry assembled the Mosquito Fleet and captured Tuxpan in April, 1847. In July 1847 he attacked Tabasco personally, leading a 1,173-man landing force ashore and attacking the city from land.

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President FRANKLIN PIERCE + JEFFERSON DAVIS, Document Signed 1854

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Description: AutographsPresident "Franklin Pierce" and Secretary of War Jefferson Davis Signed 1854 Ornate Military Appointment For Future Civil War Union Brigadier General Henry Moses JudahFRANKLIN PIERCE & JEFFERSON DAVIS. 14th President of the United States. Also Signed by Jefferson Davis, U.S. Secretary of War and the future President of the Confederate States of America, during the Civil War Era.February 9, 1854-Dated, Partly-Printed Document, Signed by President Franklin Pierce and Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, being an Ornate Vellum Military Appointment, Choice Very Fine. The huge 4.5" long signature "Franklin Pierce" is with that of the future Confederate States of America President, "Jeffer(son) Davis" which measures 2.75" long. He signs here in his earlier capacity as President Franklin Pierce's Secretary of War, being rare on these impressive Appointment Certificates. This nice quality, vellum Military Commission Document, displays Davis' large brown signature beside the even larger signature of President Franklin Pierce.The text announces the appointing and elevation of Henry M. Judah, "Captain in the Fourth Regiment of Infantry." Henry Moses Judah (1821-1866), was a career officer in the United States Army, serving during the Mexican-American War and American Civil War. He is most remembered for his role in helping thwart Morgan's Civil War Raid in 1863, and for then leading a disastrous attack during the Battle of Resaca. He later rose to the lofty rank of Union Civil War Brigadier General.There are engraved ornate Militaria images at bottom, bold printed text, and an intact raised large 2.25" diameter Seal of the War Office fully intact at the upper left, all of which add to the eye appeal of this 13.5" x 17.25" vellum Appointment. Its has typical folds, the display quality is excellent and this is one of the finer examples of this rare signature combination we have offered. The combination of these two signatures is very rare and highly prized by collectors. This quality example is worthy of strong consideration. It would be a nice addition for any historic, Presidential, and/or Civil War era display. (Much more information about Henry Moses Judah in our online version at: www.EarlyAmerican.com.)Judah was born at Snow Hill on the Eastern Shore of Maryland to Henry Raymond Judah and Mary Jane (Reece) Judah. His father, a native of Connecticut, was serving as a parish minister in an Episcopal church. One of his brothers, Theodore Judah, later was Chief Engineer of the Central Pacific Railroad and was instrumental in constructing the first Transcontinental railroad.Judah received an appointment to the United States Military Academy, graduating 35th of 39 students in the Class of 1843. He was a classmate of Ulysses S. Grant. Commissioned as a second lieutenant in the U.S. 8th Infantry Regiment, he served on the frontier. He served with distinction during the Mexican-American War and was promoted to first lieutenant on September 26, 1847. He was commended for bravery during the storming of Monterrey, and again at the Battle of Molino del Rey and the Battle for Mexico City.He was promoted to captain in the U.S. 4th Infantry Regiment and served in a variety of posts in the Pacific Northwest in the Washington Territory before being assigned to duty in California. His Company E was stationed at Fort Jones in Siskiyou County, where he joined the Freemasons.In 1854, Judah participated in an expedition against local Native Americans, but was too inebriated to lead his company in an attack on a group of Indians who were hiding in a cave. Instead, he stayed with the pack train and straggled far behind the column. The commissary officer, Lt. George Crook (a future Civil War general) later wrote, "It seemed that the rear guard had gotten some whiskey, and were all drunk, and scattered for at least 10 miles back. Judah was so drunk that be had to be lifted from his horse when the rear guard straggled into camp. The next day he was sick all day with the delirium tremens." Crook and other officers discussed pressing charges against Judah, but the matter was dropped when Judah promised to arrange a transfer to a new post. He then served in Placerville, California, in El Dorado County. However, Judah's reputation for bouts with alcohol would carry over into the Civil War.With the outbreak of the Civil War in 1861, Judah was colonel of the 4th California Volunteers at Fort Yuma, a post on the Colorado River opposite the Arizona Territory. He commanded troops at Camp McClellan near Auburn, California, until November, when he resigned his command and returned to the East. He served in the defenses of Washington, D.C. for several months. He was appointed a Brigadier General of Volunteers on March 21, 1862, and served as Grant's inspector general during the Shiloh.Given field command of a division under Henry W. Halleck, Judah participated in the siege of Corinth. He received a promotion in the Regular Army in June 1862 to Major (United States) of the 4th Infantry. By autumn, he was performing administrative duties in Cincinnati, Ohio before being ordered in October to join the Army of Kentucky under Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger at Covington, Kentucky. Judah returned to a staff position during the winter of 1862-63, when he served as acting inspector general of the Army of the Ohio.In June 1863, Judah was assigned to command the 3rd Division of the XXIII Corps, stationed in Cincinnati, Ohio. During Morgan's Raid, Maj. Gen. Ambrose Burnside ordered Judah to pursue the Confederate raider John Hunt Morgan. Judah's Indiana and Illinois cavalry under Edward H. Hobson defeated Morgan at the Battle of Buffington Island, but failed to capture the general (who finally surrendered to other Federal troops on July 26). Judah was criticized for missing an opportunity earlier in the week to snare Morgan near Pomeroy, Ohio, where his slowness in flanking Morgan allowed the Confederates to escape. He then led his command back to Tennessee to rejoin the army of William S. Rosecrans.In 1864, Judah led an infantry division under Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield during the Atlanta Campaign. Having been previously disciplined for poor performance and alcoholism by Schofield, Judah was given one last chance to redeem himself at the Battle of Resaca. In his haste to seize victory, he did not properly reconnoiter the battlefield terrain beforehand or use his artillery in the fight. It would be his last field command, as Schofield soon removed him from duty.Judah was placed on routine administrative duty in the Department of the Cumberland until the end of the war, stationed in Marietta, Georgia. He was appointed a brevet lieutenant colonel and colonel in the Regular Army on March 13, 1865. On May 12, he received the surrender of Brig. Gen. William T. Wofford's estimated 3,000 to 4,000 Confederate soldiers. Since no crops had been grown here on the battlefields in 1864 and, as the surrender had paralyzed the local economy and government, the citizens and former soldiers lacked food, funds and employment. Judah, seeing that aid was needed to prevent suffering, issued corn and bacon to the needy until a crop could be harvested. The rations helped put the Georgians and their economy back on a sound basis, and served as a humanitarian gesture.After the war, Judah mustered out of the volunteer army in August 1865 and reverted to his Regular Army rank of major. He served on garrison duty in Plattsburg, New York, where he died a year later. He was entombed at Kings Highway Cemetery in Westport, Connecticut. (From Wikipedia).

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DAVID RITTENHOUSE, 1787 Autograph Document Signed

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Description: AutographsDavid Rittenhouse Document as Treasurer of PennsylvaniaDAVID RITTENHOUSE (1732-1796). Historic Early American Astronomer, First Director of the United States Mint and succeeded Benjamin Franklin as President of the American Philosophical Society (1791-1796).March 6th, 1787-Dated, Autograph Document Signed, "Dav'd. Rittenhouse, Treasr." as the Treasurer of Pennsylvania, 1 page, measuring 2.75" x 8," Choice Very Fine. This early American financial document, handwritten by David Rittenhouse, is a receipt for £140 received from duties collected in Southwark District of Pennsylvania. Rittenhouse's bold signature, including his title, is 4" in length. Aside from a small bit missing from the upper left corner, a .5" archivally repaired tear on the top edge, and a small stain after the date, this document is in great condition.Also, with this Document there is an engraved page measuring 9.25" x 5.75" with a half length portrait of Rittenhouse, with his telescope, consulting a document at his desk by James B. Longacre after a painting by Charles W. Peale. His name is printed below the portrait with his Facsimile signature, Choice Extremely Fine. Longacre (1794-1869) was the fourth Chief Engraver of the United States Mint from 1844 to 1869. This Signed Document together with the Engraved portrait will enhance any collection relating to the United States Mint and/or American Astronomy. (2 items).David Rittenhouse (1732-1796), American astronomer and instrument maker, born near Germantown, Pennsylvania. He was self-educated, a clockmaker by trade, and developed great skill in the making of mathematical instruments. He was called upon to determine, with his own instruments, the boundary lines of several states and also part of the boundary known as the Mason-Dixon Line.In 1769 he was asked by the American Philosophical Society to observe the transit of Venus. His contributions include the use of measured grating intervals and spider threads on the focus of the telescope. Active in public affairs, he was a member of the convention that framed Pennsylvania's Constitution and served as the State Treasurer (1777-1789) and First Director of the U.S. Mint (1792-1795). After the American Revolutionary War he was an Anti-Federalist. He succeeded Benjamin Franklin as President of the American Philosophical Society (1791-1796).

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FREDERIC REMINGTON, Bold Signature On Card

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Description: AutographsBold "Frederic Remington" Signature On CardFREDERIC REMINGTON (1861-1909). American Painter, Illustrator, Sculptor and Author whose most famous work centered around images of the Old West.Bold Signature, "Frederic Remington" upon 3.75" x 2.5" White Card, no date or place, beautiful Choice Near Mint. An example of Remington's most lovely and "Formal" signature style, as he used a more informal version in his regular correspondence. A gorgeous example.

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