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Auction Description for TimeLine Auctions: Antiquities: Day 2
Sale Notes:
www.invaluable.co.uk/timelineauctions

Antiquities: Day 2 (611 Lots)

by TimeLine Auctions


611 lots | 609 with images

December 7, 2016

Live Auction

Harwich, United Kingdom

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Egyptian Cartonnage Panel with Gilded Sandals

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Description: Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. A tongue-shaped painted cartonnage panel with a central pair of gilded sandals with interlaced design, a tall decorated lotus between them; four rows to the bottom with red, yellow and green geometric decoration, one row with white, red and pink flowers; fabric to the reverse. 61 grams, 27.7cm (11"). Acquired on the London art market prior to 1980. Cartonnage is a material consisting of several layers of linen or papyrus pasted together, covered by a thin layer of plaster and painted. It became popular from the First Intermediate Period for use in funerary decoration on mummified bodies. It was used to make masks, pectoral panels and even full sized coffins. The pieces are painted with religious scenes to aid the deceased in reaching the afterlife safely.

Condition Report: Fine condition, some cracking.

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Egyptian Cartonnage Panel with Anubis

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Description: Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. A rectangular painted cartonnage panel with an upper part depicting a mummification scene, reclining god Anubis preparing a body with four canopic jars in front of him, a pair of women wearing long red dress and headbands mourning the deceased, a standing mummified(?) figure to each side; to the lower panel with four standing mummiform figures. 153 grams, 36.5cm (14 1/4"). Acquired on the London art market prior to 1980.

Condition Report: Fine condition. Minor cracks and some repainting.

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Egyptian Oxyrhynchus Fish Statuette

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A bronze statuette of an oxyrhynchus fish on a rectangular base curved and joined at fish's mouth, wearing a crown of Hathor comprised of a coiled cobra and a sun disc between cow horns; incised decoration to fins. Accompanied by an Art Loss Register certificate. 288 grams, 13.2cm (5 1/4"). Property of a London gentleman; part of his family collection since the 1970s. Accompanied by a positive X-Ray Fluorescence metal analysis certificate. The oxyrhynchus fish was sacred to the goddess Hathor, and was often depicted wearing her crown on its head, an image that may have reproduced an actual temple cult statue. It was also connected to the myth of god Osiris, believed to have eaten his penis after god Seth had dismembered and scattered the god's body.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Pectoral with Gilded Borders

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Description: New Kingdom,19th-20th Dynasty, 1279-1077 BC. A glazed composition bifacial pectoral plaque with gilded frame; obverse with scene of Osiris and a priest facing an offering table in the form of the djed pillar within a segmented border; to the reverse, Anubis crouching beneath the eye of Horus; waisted upper edge pierced for suspension. 79 grams, 74mm (3"). Private collection, North London; acquired in the early 1990s. The pectoral would have been intended as a funerary piece due to the iconography on both sides. The standing male figure offering to Osiris wears the characteristic long pleated robes and heavy wig that were popular with the wealthy and aristocracy class during the reign of the Ramessid Pharaohs of the nineteenth and twentieth dynasties. Osiris was perceived as the Lord of the Underworld and protected those who came to him in the afterlife and, along with his wife the goddess Isis, promised resurrection for the deceased. Anubis was the guide who took the souls of the dead to the next world, as well as protect them from the dangerous supernatural creatures that tried to attack the soul on its journey. He was also the guardian of the necropolis and was invoked during the mummification process to protect the deceased. The Eye of Horus, or Wadjet, was possibly the most popular amulet in Egypt as it afforded protection to both the living and the dead and was associated with both Horus, the conquering victor of justice, and the sun god Ra, who was seen as the creator of the universe and upholder of order.

Condition Report: Very fine condition, usage wear.

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Egyptian Black Basalt Face

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Description: Third Intermediate Period, 21st-23rd Dynasty, 1075-732 BC. A black basalt head from a composite statue of a male, possibly the god Amun, showing eyebrows and cosmetic lines in raised relief, slightly flaring nose and wide mouth with fleshy lips; smooth polish to the surface; mounted on a custom-made stand. Cf. Sotheby's, Bond Street, London, sale 93672, 9 December 1993, lot 279. Accompanied by an Art Loss Register certificate. 634 grams total, 10cm including stand (4"). Property of a North American gentleman; previously in the Hartmann collection, Austria, before 1980. Amun, whose name means 'the hidden one', was an ancient deity that was possibly connected to the creation of the primordial universe. He was the chief deity of the city of Thebes in Southern Egypt which eventually became the capital during the New Kingdom. With the rise of the city as the capital and the presence of the royal family Amun, along with his wife Mut, and son Khonsu, became the chief deity of Egypt and a vast and elaborate temple complex was constructed to him, being added to by each successive Pharaoh. Amun was commonly depicted as a male wearing a kilt, long false beard and a crown composed of two tall feathers. He could also take on the form of a ram, especially in his role as a primordial creator god. It is during this period that the worship of Amun became more complex with him being identified with the fertility god Min, and the sun god Ra. Each Pharaoh was considered to be the son of Amun, thus legitimizing his rule, but also acting as a symbolic reminder that the Pharaoh represented the stability and order brought to the world through the gods. Amun enjoyed royal patronage and worship for well over a thousand years until his popularity waned in the tenth century BC, due in part to the economic collapse of the country that resulted in the lack of resources to maintain the vast temples and the costly rituals. Amun continued to be worshipped into later periods, and was identified by the Greeks with Zeus, and Jupiter by the Romans, thus still upholding his position as king of the gods. He maintained an important shrine at the oasis town of Siwah where he was worshipped in the form of a large stone, possibly a meteorite, that was famous for its oracles. The shrine was visited by Alexander the Great after he liberated Egypt from the rule of the Persians. It is here that Alexander was declared to be the son of Amun and which led him to be depicted with ram's horns on his coin portraits.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Phoenician Gold Ring with Cabochon

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Description: 6th century BC. A shallow pale gold D-section hoop pinned through a circular collar to a tapered circular cell with double corded detail containing an aqua glass cabochon. 4.92 grams, 23.46mm overall, 20.10mm internal diameter (approximate size British U 1/2, USA 10 1/4, Europe 23.15, Japan 22 1/2) (1"). Property of a London gentleman; acquired in the 1980s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold Swivel Ring with Scarab

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A gold stirrup ring with round bodied shank terminating with bands of wire to the shoulder and ball ends; wire threaded through ends and holding a composite scarab with detail to the body. 2.54 grams, 23.15mm overall, 18.93mm internal diameter (approximate ring size British R 1/2, USA 9, Europe 19.38, Japan 19) (1"). Property of a London gentleman; acquired before 1995.

Condition Report: Very fine condition. A large wearable size.

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Egyptian 'All life and stability' Scarab in Gold Ring

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Description: Early 1st millennium BC. A glazed composition scarab with hieroglyphic amuletic text to the underside; mounted in a sympathetic modern gold swivel ring. 5.66 grams, 28mm including ring (1"). Property of a lady, Wakefield, UK; part of her family collection. John H Taylor, Assistant Keeper in the Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan, British Museum writes: Thank you for the images of your scarab ring. To judge from the photos, the gold mount is modern but the scarab itself appears to be genuinely ancient. The gold mount obscures some of the design on the flat base but most of it can be made out. At the top is a vegetal-motif, probably representing papyrus plants, and below this are three hieroglyphic signs arranged vertically, side-by-side. The two at left and right are both ankh-signs, which represent the word for 'life' in the ancient Egyptian language. Between them is the djed, a stylised pillar with horizontal bars at the top. This was associated with Osiris, god of the dead, and conveyed the notion of 'stability' or 'uprightness'. Beneath these signs, but partly hidden by the mount, there seems to be a semicircular sign which could be neb, meaning 'all'. Therefore the signs below the plant could probably be translated as 'All life and stability' - a wish which would have been believed to bring good fortune to the owner. It is often difficult to date scarabs accurately, but the style of this specimen suggests that it was probably made in the early-middle first millennium BC, i.e. perhaps about 1000-500 BC.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold Serpent Ring

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Description: Roman Period, 30 BC-323 AD. A gold snake ring formed from a stout wire, the body coiled, the neck twisted into a figure-eight, the head turned out, the tail coiled into two spiral loops. 2.67 grams, 18.44mm overall diameter, 15.69mm internal diameter (approximate size British J 1/2, USA 5, Europe 9.32, Japanese 9) (3/4"). UK art market, acquired prior to 1980.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Phoenician Gold Earring Pair

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Description: 8th century BC. A matched pair of gold earrings, each a hollow crescentic bulb with coiled wire to the horns, wire hook, bands of granulation to the bulb. 3.27 grams total, 22mm (1"). Property of a European collector living in London; acquired TimeLine Auctions, 1st December 2015, lot 115; formerly in a private collection, North London, UK; acquired in the early 1980s. [2]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold Earring with Bull

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Description: Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. A gold earring with expanding shank of coiled gold wire, bulb with filigree detail and bull-head finial with loop beneath chin; with velvet-covered museum display board stating 'couche a oreille / ptolomaique / 3-400 a Chr' (earring, Ptolemaic / 300-400 years BC"). Cf. Marshall, F.H. Catalogue of the Jewellery, Greek, Etruscan and Roman, in the Department of Antiquities, British Museum, London, 1911, item 1808. 21 grams total, earring: 29mm, 79mm including stand (Earring: 1 1/4"). Ex Spencer collection, Cornwall, UK; acquired 1986 as a de-accessioned item from a museum in Paris, France. Sold with the museum display board and a letter from the owner explaining the circumstances of purchase.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold Plaque with Osiris Presentation Scene

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A gold plaque with a scene with Osiris seated on a throne wearing the atef crown, holding a crook, flail and Was sceptre; in front a tall column with lotus flowers tied to the top; an offering table in front of the column with two tiers of food, vases at the base; in front of the table a male and female, both wearing long robes and wigs, arms upraised in worship; vertical bands of hieroglyphs to the top of the scene; mounted in a custom made frame. 182 grams total, 13cm including frame (5"). From an important European collection; formerly with German Gallery in the 1970s. The scene shows the deceased and his wife entering the halls of paradise where they greet, and worship, the god Osiris, enthroned as the Lord of the Afterlife. Such scenes were common for copies of the Book of the Dead, being the ultimate goal for all Egyptians as they traversed the perilous path to the next world; representations on gold are rare and must have been made for a wealthy member of Egyptian society. Osiris, along with his brother Seth, and sisters Isis and Nepthys, were the offspring of Geb, the Earth, and Nut, goddess of the sky. Being the first born Osiris was destined to be the ruler of the world, along with his sister Isis, whom he took as a wife. Seth, in his jealousy of the power of Osiris, murdered him and dismembered his body, throwing the remains into the Nile. Isis and Nepthys search for the remains, gathering each part and eventually mummifying the body, where they mourn over the dead king. Isis, through her magical powers, brings Osiris back to life and conceives a child, Horus, whom she nurtures in the swamps of the Nile Delta to protect him from Seth. When Horus comes of age he engages his uncle in a battle and defeats him, thus becoming the rightful ruler. The story is an allegory for the triumph of good over evil, the power of the sun over darkness, a preoccupation of the Egyptians with maintaining the stability of the Universe that could be achieved by worshipping the gods.

Condition Report: Fine condition. Very rare.

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Egyptian Gold Panel with Maat before Isis

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A rectangular gold repoussé plaque with seated goddess Isis holding a staff-sceptre, wearing vulture and sun disc crown, kneeling figure of Maat with wings extended, hieroglyphs in three columns above 0.66 grams, 39mm (1 1/2"). From a private UK collection; formerly in a Munich collection formed in the 1970s. Repoussé plaques such as these would have been placed amongst the wrappings of a mummy to ensure that it was protected against the malevolent powers that could hinder the soul reaching the afterlife, and the resurrection of the body. Maat was the goddess personifying all the elements of cosmic harmony by the creator god at the beginning of time, including truth, justice and moral integrity. She is shown as a lady wearing an ostrich feather as a crown and often has wings that are spread protectively. Maat was crucial in helping the deceased reaching paradise and it is she who presides over the judgement of the dead, along with Osiris, Thoth and Anubis. In the Hall of the Two Truths, the dead person's heart is placed in a pair of scales to balance against the feather of Maat. Should the heart be lighter than the feather then the deceased can enter paradise. But if the heart is heavier than the feather, the deceased is condemned to an eternal death in the jaws of the creature called Ammit. Isis also had an important role for the deceased, being the protector of the dead and the goddess who leads the soul to paradise.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold Bird Amulet

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Description: 18th Dynasty, 1550-1292 BC. A gold figurine of a bird with bifacial hatched wings. Cf. The Baron Empain collection, Christies, 14 March 2011, for similar pieces. 0.90 grams, 11mm (1/2"). From a French private collection; 1920s, thence by descent.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Poppy Seed and Wedjat Amulet Necklace

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A restrung necklace of annular red and yellow stone beads with central wedjat amulet and sixteen poppy seed amulets; modern clasps. 23 grams, 45cm (17 3/4"). Property of a North American gentleman; previously in the Swift collection, California, USA, collected prior to 1960.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Large Osiris Figure

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A bronze figure of Osiris wearing an atef crown with uraeus serpent to the front; mummiform body with arms crossed over chest and holding a crook and flail; mounted on a custom-made stand. 332 grams total, 19cm including stand (7 1/2"). Ex property of a New York, USA, collector. Osiris is one of the most well known figures of the Egyptian pantheon. His name, (ancient Egyptian Ausar), may mean 'place of the eye'. In early dynastic times he was considered a fertility god and depictions of him with grain growing from his body were placed into tombs well into the Late Period. Osiris was killed by his jealous brother Seth, and his body dismembered, only to be brought together and mummified by his wife Isis, who would use her powerful magic to bring him back to life. As ruler of the netherworld Osiris was regarded as the night form of the sun god. It was as ruler of the next world that Osiris sat as judge for the souls entering his kingdom. He was often represented with either black skin, symbolising the rich agricultural soil, or with green skin, symbolising the growth and fertility of plants. In the Hellenistic and Roman periods he was closely associated with the god Serapis who would be identified as the consort of the goddess Isis as part of her mystery cult that enjoyed enormous popularity across the Roman Empire.

Condition Report: Fair condition.

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Egyptian Osiris Statuette

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A bronze statuette of Osiris standing with crook and flail in his crossed hands, wearing the atef feathered crown; mounted on a custom-made stand. Cf. Andrews, C. Amulets of Ancient Egypt, London, 1994, item 12(d"). 74 grams, 11.5cm including stand (4 1/2"). From an early 20th century collection.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Osiris Figure

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A bronze figure of Osiris wearing the atef crown, mummiform body and hands crossed over chest holding the crook and flail; mounted on a custom-made stand. 103 grams total, 13.5cm (5 1/4"). Ex property of a New York, USA, collector.

Condition Report: Fair condition.

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Egyptian Der-el-Bahri Shabti

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Description: 3rd Intermediate Period, circa 1000 BC. A dark blue composite shabti of the priest Amun, with details of the tripartite wig, eyes, hieroglyphs down the body and seed basket on the back in black pigment; mounted on a custom-made stand. 85.78 grams total, 11cm (4 1/4"). Property of a North American gentleman; acquired from Dr. John Winnie, Georgia, USA; collected before 1980. The Second Cache at Deir el-Bahri was a massive collective reburial of the Priests of Amun and their families found near Hatsheput’s Temple at Deir el-Bahri, on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, in 1891. The reburial was made during the 21st Dynasty presumably because the original tombs were becoming targets for tomb robbers. The cache, considered one of the great finds in Egyptology, contained one hundred and fifty three coffins and one hundred and ten shabti boxes containing perhaps twenty thousand shabtis, amongst other treasures. Many of the finds were presented to foreign governments by the then Khedive of Egypt, Abbas II Hilmy.

Condition Report: Very fine condition, repaired.

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Egyptian Deep Blue Glazed Shabti

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Description: Late Period, 30th Dynasty, 380-343 BC. A turquoise blue composite shabti with dark blue tripartite wig and false beard, finely modelled features to the face; arms crossed over the chest and holding a pick and hoe, seed basket over the left shoulder; mounted on a custom-made stand. 106 grams total, 14cm including stand (5 1/2"). Property of a North American gentleman; acquired from I. Beckmann, Holland, prior to 1980.

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Egyptian Pale Blue Hieroglyphic Shabti

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Description: Late Period, 30th Dynasty, 380-343 BC. A pale blue glazed composition shabti with tripartite wig, false beard, implements in the crossed hands, seed-bag on the left shoulder, dorsal pillar, horizontal and vertical bands of hieroglyphic text. 75 grams, 13cm (5"). Property of a private collector; formerly in a 19th century collection.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Hieroglyphic Shabti

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Description: Late Period, 30th Dynasty, 380-343 BC. A large blue-green glazed composition shabti with finely modelled facial features, tripartite wig, false beard, crook and flail in the crossed hands, seed bag over the left shoulder, dorsal pillar, horizontal bands of text from Chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead to the lower body. 144 grams, 17cm (6 3/4"). Property of a London gentleman; acquired before 1995.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Hieroglyphic Shabti

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A pale blue glazed composition shabti with tripartite wig, false beard, tools in the crossed hands and seed-bag over the left shoulder, dorsal pillar and square base, bands of hieroglyphic text to the lower body. 60 grams, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a European collector living in London; acquired before 1980.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Hieroglyphic Shabti

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. An olive green glazed composition shabti with tripartite wig, false beard, tools in the crossed hands and seed-bag over the left shoulder, dorsal pillar and square base, hieroglyphic text from Chapter 6 of the Book of the Dead to the lower body. 67 grams, 12.5cm (5"). Property of a European collector living in London; acquired before 1980.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Isis and Horus Figurine

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Description: Third Intermediate Period, 1069-702 BC. A bronze figurine depicting Isis and Horus; Isis seated preparing to suckle Horus wearing tripartite wig with uraeus, cow-horns and solar disc, feet resting on a panel; Horus naked with side-lock; mounted on a stand. Cf. Hill, M. (ed), Gifts for the Gods: Images from Egyptian Temples, New York, 2007 pp.149-150, for a similar bronze figure from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, accession number 45.4.3. 375 grams, 17cm (6 3/4"). From an early 20th century collection. The name of the goddess (Aset in ancient Egyptian) means 'throne' and she wears the hieroglyphic symbol as her crown. Isis was regarded as the symbolic mother of each reigning Pharaoh and therefore the power of authority for divine kingship. In Egyptian religion Isis sought her dead husband, Osiris, who had been murdered by their brother, Seth. Isis, who is is known as the 'Mistress of Magic', used her powers to bring Osiris back from the dead and conceive a child, Horus, who would go on to avenge his father and take his place as the rightful heir. During the time that Horus was a baby, Isis protected him against snakes, predators and other dangers and thus she would protect all mortal children. The image of Isis seated and nursing the infant Horus can be traced back to the 8th Dynasty, but became especially popular during the Late Period. It was during the rule of the Greek Ptolemies that Isis began to associated with a mystery cult and her worship began to spread across the Mediterranean. During the Roman Empire the worship of Isis became extremely popular and spread even further with temples to her being found in many cities of the provinces, including London. The image of Isis nursing Horus would go on to influence Christianity with the image of the Madonna nursing the infant Christ. Images such as this would have been used for private worship within the home, or dedicated as votive offerings in temples.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Bes Plaque Amulet

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A large yellow composite openwork plaque with the head of Bes wearing a plumed headdress, leonine ears to the side and open mouth. 10.91 grams, 45mm (1 3/4"). From an early 20th century collection.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Nefertum Amulet Fragment

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Description: Third Intermediate Period, 1069-702 BC. The upper section of a very large glazed composition amulet of Nefertum, with kilt to the hips, dorsal pillar, lotus headdress and loop to the reverse, black pigment to the tripartite wig. Cf. Andrews, C. Amulets of Ancient Egypt, London, 1994, item 12(c) for type. 24 grams, 74mm (3"). From an early 20th century collection. Nefertum was the god of the primordial lotus flower. His name has connotations of perfection and he represents the blue lotus that rose from the waters of chaos at the beginning of time to reveal the sun god Ra. He is commonly shown as an adult male with a lotus flower on his head, but later he was seen as the son of the goddess Sekhmet and the god Ptah and as such was represented as a child seated on a lotus flower.

Condition Report: Fine condition; crown absent.

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Egyptian Winged Scarab and Four Sons of Horus Set

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Description: Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC, or later. A group of glazed composition amulets consisting of a scarab with detailed carapace and legs, sides pierced for attachment, separate wings with detailing of feathers and pierced for attachment; four mummiform figures of the Sons of Horus. 53 grams total, 40-65mm (1 1/2 - 2 1/2"). From a collection formed in the early 20th century.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Eye of Horus Amuletic Bead with Ankhs

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A carved black jasper amuletic bead with bifacial decoration, to one side a finely carved wedjat, to the reverse three ankh symbols; pierced. 5.40 grams, 22mm (1"). From an early 20th century collection. The term 'Eye of Horus' is understood to refer to the moon, though this was later confused with the Eye of Ra and took on many solar connotations. The Eye of Horus fought the enemies of light and was itself seen as personifying fire. In chapter forty two of the Book of the Dead the text states that, 'I am one who is with the Sound Eye; even when closed I am in its protection'. The myth tells how the eye of Horus was lost in a battle against Seth and then recovered. It was this eye which was presented by Horus to his father Osiris, thereby helping him attain new life.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Large Eye of Horus Amulet

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Description: Third Intermediate Period, 1069-702 BC. A large glazed composition amulet of the Eye of Horus with rounded body, eyebrow formed of smaller Eye of Horus; pierced for suspension. 16.91 grams, 39mm (1 1/2"). From a collection formed in the early 20th century.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Polychrome Mask

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Description: Roman Period, 30 BC-323 AD. A moulded plaster funerary mask of a youthful female with wavy hair and row of curls to the forehead: painted detailing to the eyes, eyebrows, hair and face; mounted on a customised stand. See discussion in Taylor, J.H. Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, London, 2001, chapter 7. . Property of an Israeli gentleman; acquired from Aaron gallery, Berkeley Square, London W1, in 2011; formerly in the Issa collection, early 1980s. The plaster masks derive from Pharaonic traditions, in which the mask served as a substitute for the head of the deceased and as a means of elevating him or her to immortal status. The derivation is often reflected in paintings and texts located on the mantle surrounding the head. Like the painted mummy portraits, the masks suggest strongly individualised appearances and affect Roman fashions in hairstyle, jewellery, and dress. They follow, however, a somewhat different pattern. For example, female masks may have coiffures that combine Roman arrangements of the upper part of the hair with long corkscrew locks that were considered typically Egyptian. Despite the seeming individuality of the masks, most faces were made in a mould. Distinguishing details were worked in the plaster with a spatula or knife. The ears were added separately, and sometimes eyes were inlaid with glass or stone. The mask was then frequently painted or gilded.

Condition Report: Fine condition, some repainting.

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Phoenician Standing Idol

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Description: 3rd millennium BC. A ceramic standing female idol with applied headdress and waist-length hair, slender waist and broad thighs; traces of red pigment. 16 grams, 73mm (3"). From an important private London collection; formed in the 1970s and 1980s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Crystal Alabastron

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Description: Ptolemaic Period, 305-30 BC. A carved rock crystal miniature alabastron with waisted neck and lateral pierced lug handles. 21 grams, 62mm (2 1/2"). Property of a London gentleman; acquired before 1970. With the expulsion of the Persians from Egypt by Alexander the Great and the establishment of the Greek Ptolemaic dynasty of rulers, new art styles developed that reflected the mingling of Egyptian and Classical culture. This was done as a conscious effort by the Ptolemies to unite the Greek and native populations and was expressed through the arts, architecture and religion. Rock crystal had been used for vessels in Greece since the Archaic period, and the manufacture of them reached its peak during the Hellenistic period at such cosmopolitan urban centres as Alexandria in Egypt and Antioch, capital of the Seleucid Empire, now in modern Turkey. The Egyptians were noted for their meticulous personal hygiene and cosmetic boxes and bottles are some of the most common grave goods, and which show signs of use during the owners life. during much of the year the climate was hot and arid, and salves and oils were needed to keep the skin from drying and cracking. a wide variety of unguents, made from oils and fats scented with myrrh and frankincense from Africa, resins, or fragrant flowers, were rubbed on the body as part of the daily toilette.

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Egyptian Alabastron with Wide Lip and Handles

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Description: Late Period, after 500 BC. A carved alabaster tubular vessel with lateral lug handles, flared neck. 253 grams, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a private London collector; formerly in a 19th century collection.

Condition Report: Fine condition, repaired.

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Egyptian Alabastron with Lug Handles

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Description: Late New Kingdom, 1000-900 BC. A carved alabaster vessel with ovoid body, deep shoulder, everted rim, lateral vestigial lug handles. 139 grams, 95mm (3 3/4"). Property of a private London collector; formerly in a 19th century collection.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Amulet Head Rest

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A carved stone head-rest with rectangular base and D-section rounded pad. See Taylor, J.H. Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, London, 2001 for discussion. 199 grams, 79mm (3 1/4"). Property of a London gentleman; acquired before 1970.

Condition Report: Very fine condition, small chip to base.

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Egyptian Canaanite Scarab

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Description: 14th century BC. A haematite scarab with carinated upper face, intaglio scene to the underside of a dog leaping on a bull. 7.76 grams, 20mm (3/4"). Property of a London collector; acquired from Alexander Cotton, UK, in late 1970s. The Canaanites came into close contact with their Egyptian neighbours through trade and warfare, with the area being a part of the Egyptian Empire for many centuries until they were pushed out by the Neo-Assyrians and the Achaemenid Persians. Despite being a part of these Empires the kingdom of Canaan developed its own unique culture. One of the most obvious cultural influences from Egypt are the scarab seals that depict either purely Egyptian scenes on the underside, or a mixture of Egyptian and Levantine styles and subjects. Seals of this sort were manufactured in large numbers by Canaanite craftsmen and many were exported to Egypt.

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Phoenicio-Egyptian Carnelian Scarab Seal with Sphinx

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Description: 6th-4th century BC. A carved carnelian scarab with carinated upper face, intaglio scene to the underside of a reclining sphinx with a tall feathered crown in the company of a standing goddess with outstretched wings, a flying bird above the sphinx body. 6.51 grams, 24mm (1"). From a North London collection; formerly in the Rihani family collection, formed 1970-1980s. The sphinx is first found in ancient Egypt, where it is commonly seen with the head of a man, but also sometimes with that of an animal such as a hawk. The imagery later passed into Greek art where it is more often seen with the head of a woman. It is also present in the art and sculpture of the Mycenaean, Assyrian, Persian and Phoenician civilisations. In Egypt the sphinx is closely associated with the power of the Pharaoh, whereas in Greece it is seen more as a monster. In the Near East it has more of a guardian role and is found flanking the doorways to palaces and temples and decorating furniture.

Condition Report: Very fine condition. Important.

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Phoenician Green Jasper Scarab

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Description: 6th-4th century BC. A dark green jasper scarab with incised intaglio of a seated male holding a spear facing downwards. 2.65 grams, 16mm (3/4"). From a North London collection; formerly in the Rihani family collection, formed 1970-1980s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Carved Human-Headed Scarab Bead

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Description: Roman Period, 30 BC-323 AD. A carved carnelian scarab with human head wearing a striated wig, pierced for suspension; accompanied by a hand written note: 'Blank scarab- carnelian, with human-head type of back. See Sir William Matthew Flinders Petrie, Buttons & Design Scarabs, p.16, 303-4.' 2.79 grams, 16mm (3/4"). From an important collection formed by a Boston lady; formerly with Charles Ede Ltd, London, UK. This type of scarab began to be used in Fifteenth Dynasty.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Lotus Amulet

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Description: New Kingdom, 1550-1070 BC. A large carved lapis lazuli bifacial amuletic pendant of a lotus flower with ribbed lug above. 5.65 grams, 34mm (1 1/4"). From an early 20th century collection.

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Egyptian Hanging Poppy Amulet Necklace

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Description: Middle Kingdom, 2133-1797 BC. A restrung necklace of truncated cylinder carnelian beads and twenty-one poppy-head pendants including a flat-backed pendant at the centre, modern clasp. 28 grams, 56cm (22"). Ex Philippe Mariaud de Serres, Paris; acquired before 1980. The use of the poppy as a decorative element, and as an amulet, extends back to the end of the Old Kingdom and was favoured by all levels of society. They reached their peak in popularity during the New Kingdom, particularly during the Amarna Period, (1353-1336 BC), and are commonly made from carnelian, as well as faience. Real poppy heads, along with flowers, were strung together and worn by the living as well as decorating the mummies of the deceased. The exact purpose of the amulets is not known, but they may have a connection to the power of the sun god Ra, as well as associations with resurrection.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold, Carnelian and Lapis Bead Necklace

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Description: Roman Period, 30 BC-323 AD. A restrung necklace of lapis lazuli teardrop-shaped beads with round carnelian beads between, and to the lower end two gold beads; gold drum-shaped bead with granulated bead pattern and large faceted lozenge-shaped carnelian bead with further gold bead to the base with granulation beading. 24 grams, 50cm (19 3/4"). Property of an Essex gentleman; acquired on the UK art market.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Phoenician Bead Group

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Description: 3rd millennium BC. A mixed group of beautifully banded fusiform beads, one as a rounded cabochon layered 'eye' with lateral hole; could be from further east. 26 grams, 21-33mm (3/4 - 1 1/4"). Property of a North West London gentleman; formerly with a central London gallery in 1990. [5]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Worker Figure

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Description: Middle Kingdom, 2133-1797 BC. A carved wooden figure from a funerary diorama, standing kilted female with legs flexed, pegs for attachment of separate arms. See Taylor, J.H. Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, London, 2001. 55 grams, 23cm (9"). From an early 20th century collection. Wooden tomb models were an Egyptian funerary custom throughout the Middle Kingdom in which wooden figurines and sets were constructed to be placed in the tombs of the wealthy. These wooden models represented servants, farmers, other skilled craftsman, armies, and religious rituals. The different types of models served as symbols and were believed to perform various functions for the deceased. Each model had a different purpose in the belief of the Egyptians and was provided to perform its specific function. Model houses were included to ensure existence in the afterlife. Farmers, artisans, and craftsmen models were said to increase the material wealth of the individual. If the tomb's resident needed to perform a specific task in the afterlife, a wooden model would be included to perform that task for him. During the New Kingdom these models were replaced by the more familiar shabti figures.

Condition Report: Fair condition.

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Egyptian Worker Figure

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Description: Middle Kingdom, 2133-1797 BC. A carved wooden figure from a funerary diorama, kneeling kilted female with pegs for attachment of separate arms, stud to the underside. See Taylor, J.H. Death and the Afterlife in Ancient Egypt, London, 2001 for discussion. 48 grams, 14.5cm (5 3/4"). From an early 20th century collection. Adequate provisioning for the afterlife was a paramount concern to Egyptians of all social and occupational class. While funerary offerings and activities of everyday life were most often portrayed in relief during the Old Kingdom, small painted models placed in the tomb became increasingly prevalent during the Middle Kingdom as a more effective way of perpetually ensuring the necessities and pleasures of life.

Condition Report: Fair condition.

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Egyptian Worker Figure

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Description: Middle Kingdom, 11th-12th Dynasty, 2133-1797 BC. A wooden figure of a servant kneeling and wearing a white kilt, with hands on knees and painted detail to the eyes, mouth and hair, body with red paint. 21 grams, 11.5cm (4 1/2"). From an early 20th century collection.

Condition Report: Fair condition.

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Egyptian Worker Figure

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Description: Middle Kingdom, 11th-12th Dynasty, 2133-1797 BC. A painted wooden figure of a male seated, with legs drawn up, supporting a tall vase-shaped object, possibly making beer. 64 grams, 16cm (6 1/4"). From an early 20th century collection.

Condition Report: Fair condition.

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Egyptian Gold Hieroglyph Frog Amulet

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A gold amulet of a frog on an oval plaque, hieroglyphs to the underside. Cf. The Baron Empain collection, Christies, 14 March 2011, Lot 40, for a group of nine similar pieces. 0.58 grams, 6mm (1/4"). From a private UK collection; previously in an early 20th century continental collection. The frog was regarded as an underworld animal alluding to the forces which brought life into being. The male primeval gods of Hermopolis were often represented with frog's heads. The frog was also the sacred animal of Heket, goddess of birth. The image of a frog is found on magical knives which were used in birthing ceremonies or to protect new born children. The frog was also the companion of the Nile-god Hapi who assured fertility. The frog became the hieroglyphic symbol meaning 'to live again' and the frog amulet must therefore have had the power of regeneration. They are found as both amulets and settings for swivel rings; one such gold frog set into a swivel ring was found at Amarna in the tomb of the heretic Pharaoh Akhenaten and presumably formed part of his funerary assemblage. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Egyptian Gold Bes Amulet

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Description: Late Period, 664-332 BC. A gold foil pendant plaque with scrolled loop, repoussé facing bust of Bes, bearded and with feathered headdress. See Andrews, C. Amulets of Ancient Egypt, London, 1994 p.39-40 for discussion. 0.28 grams, 13mm (1/2"). Property of a London gentleman; acquired in the late 1970s to 1980s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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