WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options
Auction Description for Artemis Gallery: DAY 1 | Classical Antiquities and Asian Art
Auction Description:
Day 1 of an important 2-day auction featuring ancient and ethnographic art from around the world.  Egypt, Greek, Roman, Viking, Russian, Near Eastern plus Asian Art from China, Japan, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma, India, more.

DAY 1 | Classical Antiquities and Asian Art (196 Lots)

by Artemis Gallery


196 lots with images

January 18, 2017

Live Auction

Louisville, CO, USA

Sort by:  
Lots with images first
Per page:  
Egyptian Polychrome Temple Fragment of Woman

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Middle Kingdom, ca. 2050 to 1640 BCE. A pottery temple fragment showing a standing woman in relief with remains of orange and red pigment especially on its lower half that give us a clue to how brightly it would have originally been painted. Size: 2.3" W x 6.3" H (5.8 cm x 16 cm)The woman is depicted facing forward with her hands at her sides. Her torso and head are well proportioned and graceful, but her feet, arms, and hands in particular are too large for her body. Middle Kingdom sculpture often emphasized hands and feet; when originally painted, this statue probably had fingernails and toenails. During the Middle Kingdom, we see statues of women who are portrayed very similarly to this one - small breasts and the symmetrical face with the large wig, all beauty standards of the time (later periods saw women with different body types). These idealized forms probably corresponded to a desire to depict people as they would like to be resurrected. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119288

Condition Report: Repaired across top of body; some small areas of remaining pigment

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Tomb Model of Bakery and Brewery

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Middle Kingdom, late 11th Dynasty to early 12th Dynasty, ca. 2060 to 1900 BCE. A wooden and plaster model made for a tomb showing two men sealing and stoppering beer jars and a third kneading bread dough. The figures are wood and their components are a hard, white plaster, painted in shades of red. They are mounted on a piece of wood that likely came from an old box or chest recycled by the artist. Size: 8.1" L x 11" W (20.6 cm x 27.9 cm)During the Sixth Dynasty, it became common to place wooden models of lifelike scenes in Egyptian tombs; by the Middle Kingdom, they were placed in the tomb chamber, around the coffin, although some very rich tombs had a separate chamber just for wooden models. Baking and brewing were frequent subjects of tomb models, symbolizing the range of food offerings that would have been described on the stelae and tomb reliefs that led to the main tomb chamber. These figures were also made to work throughout the afterlife, creating the bread and beer that the deceased would need.At recent Christie's auctions, similar examples, but less complete than these, hammered at $13,284 (Kensington, 14 April, 2011, Lot 25), $14,306 (Kensington, 14 April, 2011, Lot 15) and $15,328 (Kensington, 14 April, 2011, Lot 20). Provenance: ex-New York private collection acquired in 1969 from David Crownover All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119789

Condition Report: All wood has some age cracking and wear to paint; one of the wood figures (the one bent at the waist) has some older repair to its skirt. Model comes in separate pieces but they can be easily placed together as shown in the photos.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Pre-Dynastic Nile Silt Jar

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Naqada II, ca. 3500 BCE. A Nile silt mud molded ovoid jar with a short neck, a slight rolled rim, and a rounded base. A light layer of silicate deposits cover the exterior. This is a compact form often seen in stone vessels, and may be a pottery imitation of a more precious vessel. Size: 3.5" W x 4.1" H (8.9 cm x 10.4 cm) This culture inhabited ancient Egypt in the pre-Dynastic period, and were first described by famous archaeologist William Flinders Petrie, but relatively little is known about them except that they were focused around the site of El-Amra in central Egypt, west of the Nile. This pot is made from Nile silt and benefited from the new kilning techniques the Egyptians invented during this period, which have been described by the British Museum from their excavation at Hierakonpolis. Provenance: Ex-Private NY Collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119350

Condition Report: Surface spall marked, as shown, otherwise intact.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Schist Palette, Pre-Dynastic Period

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Pre-Dynastic Period, Gerzeran Period, ca. 3000 BCE. This is a smooth, pointed, tapered and rectangular greenish gray stone, carved. This is a very early artifact from the beginning of the Egyptian civilization. Size: 4" L x 2.4" W x .25" H (10.2 cm x 6.1 cm x 0.6 cm)These materials were used by the Egyptians to make cosmetics for eye paint and eye protection. They are found in plain geometric forms, such as this example, as well as stylized animals. Provenance: Ex-collection A.T., London, acquired before 1993 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #116211

Condition Report: Minor chips and damaged corners. Wear and deposits on surface.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian 12th Dynasty Stone Head of a Woman

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Middle Kingdom, late 12th to early 13th Dynasty, ca. 1900 to 1700 BCE. A hard, black stone head, possibly granite, expertly carved, showing a woman with a large wig swept behind her ears, a common Egyptian style. The statue is carved fully three-dimensionally, with the shape of the hair continuing down the woman's back, implying it was meant to be seen from behind. Incised lines give texture to the shape. Comes with custom stand. Size: 3" W x 3.3" H (7.6 cm x 8.4 cm)The role of the ancient Egyptian sculptor - a sanx - was to portray the dead in a lifelike way, for the express purpose of aiding the dead in the afterlife. By the time of the 12th Dynasty - indeed, from the Old Kingdom onward - sculptors carved not only the pharaohs, but also nobility, government officials, and their families who could afford the honor. A piece like this would have been made by a specialist in a workshop, but we have little evidence to believe that individual sculptors were revered the way they are today; instead, the person who created this piece probably saw it as a job rather than as a calling. The woman depicted may have been a noblewoman, someone at the Egyptian court - perhaps someone with great power - after all, the first known woman to be Pharaoh was Sobekneferu, who reigned from ca. 1806 to 1802 CE. Provenance: ex-Netherlands collection J.V. collected before 1970 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119787

Condition Report: Surface wear and scratching as shown, especially to the face.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Limestone Standing Female Figure, TL Tested

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Middle Kingdom, ca. 2050 to 1640 BCE. A white, hand carved limestone figure of a standing woman wearing a high-necked shift dress that falls to her ankles and a large wig of straight hair. Size: 2.6" W x 11.5" H (6.6 cm x 29.2 cm)She stands facing forward on a small square plinth. Her torso and head are well proportioned and graceful, but her feet, arms, and hands in particular are too large for her body. Middle Kingdom sculpture often emphasized hands and feet; when originally painted, this statue probably had fingernails and toenails. During the Middle Kingdom, we see statues of women who are portrayed very similarly to this one - small breasts and the symmetrical face with the large wig, all beauty standards of the time - and we have intepreted those as being commissioned by wealthy, private women patrons who commissioned flattering portraits of themselves.This piece has been tested using thermoluminescence (TL) and has been found to be ancient, and will be accompanied by a report confirming its age. A figure very similar in body shape but made of wood is on display at the Walters Art Museum in Baltimore. Provenance: Ex-Private FL collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #117514

Condition Report: Repaired just above knees, with signs of wear and pitting to stone over most of the surface. .

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Faience Offering Cup - Cartouche Ramesses II

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, New Kingdom, 19th Dynasty, 1279 to 1213 BCE. A blue-glazed faience cup, cylindrical and tapering in form, with a flared rim and foot, inscribed in two columns with the cartouche of Ramesses II. The function of this vessel is a funerary association as Sokar was a god of the underworld, giving the king's name and saying that he was beloved of the underworld god Sokar. Extremely rare. Compare with a parallel example in Christies, Antiquities, 5-6 December 2001, no. 324. Size: 1.5" W x 2.1" H (3.8 cm x 5.3 cm) Provenance: Ex Mass Private Collector. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119332

Condition Report: Intact with a clear hieroglyph and much color to faience remaining

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Late Period Faience Ushabti

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 to 712 BCE. This is a late period ushabti (shabti), in mummiform with the arms holding hoes. It is made of pottery and painted with green faience and black details including some hieroglyphs on the legs. Comes with custom stand. Size: 1.3" W x 4.5" H (3.3 cm x 11.4 cm)Ushabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. By the Third Intermediate period, this practice had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. Provenance: Ex-Private Florida collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119229

Condition Report: Intact, with much remaining pigment

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Late Periof Faience Ushabti

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 to 712 BCE. This is a late period ushabti (shabti), painted with a turquoise faience that turns pale brown towards the feet. It is mold-made, mummiform, with wonderfully clear display of the hoes in its hands that would be used to work the fields of Osiris. Comes with custom stand. Size: 2" W x 6.75" H (5.1 cm x 17.1 cm)Ushabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. By the Third Intermediate period, this practice had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119283

Condition Report: Intact, with a great deal of faience remaining.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ancient Egyptian Shabti for Nesa-ankhef-en-Maat

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, 22nd Dynasty (Bubastite Dynasty), ca. 945 to 720 BCE. A well-made shabti (ushabti) found in Abydos, with an inscription reading: "The Osiris , the priest of Amen, Nesa-ankhef-en-Maat , justified", and painted all over with a teal and blue faience. The inscription is written on the body in black ink. Comes with custom stand. Size: 1.95" W x 5.75" H (5 cm x 14.6 cm)Shabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. Towards the end of the Pharaonic period, they had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. Many, like this one, are inscribed with pleas to Osiris.Other examples are found in museums in Bolton (A.75.1967. 1967 & A.22 1968: Oxford (1971.1419) and Pittsburgh (CMNH 1662-7); one example is published in Glenn James, Shabtis a private view (Paris, 2002) P. 95-96 fig. 48a and 48 b Provenance: ex-A. Smith & A. Savage, Taxidermy, Antiques & Fine Objects. Before that English collection, formed before 1980 (as one can see the collection numbers in the museums have acquisition years in them Bolton 1967 and Oxford 1971) All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119784

Condition Report: Surface wear and pitting as shown; a chip on the nose has been restored but it is very difficult to tell.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Greenstone Heart Scarab

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, New Kingdom / Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1550 to 712 BCE. This is a large greenstone "heart" scarab with carved details of the head, wings, and legs. Heart scarabs are oval amulets that were used as personal protection, jewelry, and grave goods. In the Book of the Dead, they are prescribed to be made of stone, usually green stones, such as jasper, serpentine, and greenish basalt. A scarab like this one most likely would have been placed inside of a mummy's wrappings over its heart, which the ancient Egyptians believed to be the seat of the mind. After death, according to their beliefs, an individual's heart would be weighed against a feather by the jackal god Anubis before a panel of deities who waited at the gateway to the netherworld to judge the dead. If the heart was lighter than a feather, then the deceased could pass into the next life; if not, they would be devoured by a monster and cease to exist. Size: 1.8" L x 1.4" W x 1.85" H (4.6 cm x 3.6 cm x 4.7 cm). Provenance: Ex-private New Jersey collection, acquired in 1980's. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #112443

Condition Report: Intact with very little wear.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ancient Egyptian Shabti for Ankhemmaat, ex-Sotheby's

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Late Period, 26th Dynasty, ca. 672 to 525 BCE. A wonderful, large shabti (ushabti) in the classic, carefully modeled style of the 26th Dynasty. The figure stands, mummiform, holding a hoe in each crossed arm. Comes with custom stand. Size: 2.2" W x 7.7" H (5.6 cm x 19.6 cm)An inscription consisting of several lines with hieroglyphs covers the body of the shabti from its arms to the feet: "He was prophet of Herichef a ram headed god who was revered in the Heracleopolis area". Shabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. Towards the end of the Pharaonic period, they had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. Many, like this one, are inscribed with pleas to Osiris.The sarcophagus, his cartonnage, sokaris, shabti box and a large group of shabtis from Ankhemmaat were exhibited and published by the Musee Jacquemart-Andre in Le crepuscule Des Pharaohs in 2012. Provenance: ex-Private collection USA 1981 Bryan Bodner after that Sotheby's New York June 12 1993 lot 69 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119783

Condition Report: Surface wear and pitting as shown.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Pair of Egyptian Faience Ushabtis

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 to 712 BCE. A pair of green-brown faience ushabtis (shabtis), both mold made and mummiform. Size of each (approximate): 1.05" W x 3.9" H (2.7 cm x 9.9 cm)Both have their arms crossed over their chests and are holding hoes (for a clearer photo of a shabti holding hoes in the similar manner, see the Faience shabti of Sety I on the British Museum website). Shabti (or ushabti) dolls are figures shaped like adult male or female mummies wearing the traditional ancient Egyptian headdresses. The ancient Egyptians believed that after they died, their spirits would have to work in the "Field of Reeds" owned by the god of the underworld, Osiris. This meant doing agricultural labor -- and it was required by all members of society, from workers to pharaohs. Provenance: Ex-Private LA County collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119402

Condition Report: Both are intact, with much remaining faience

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Rare Egyptian Polychrome Terracotta Ushabti

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 to 712 BCE. A terracotta mummiform ushabti, painted with black and red details over an orange background. Comes with custom stand. Size: 1.95" W x 5.1" H (5 cm x 13 cm)Ushabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. By the Third Intermediate period, this practice had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. What is rare about this example is its material - most of the examples we see are faience. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119284

Condition Report: Intact with wear to design as shown

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Painted Wood Sarcophagus Panel of Nut

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Late Period, ca. 715 to 330 BCE. Painted wood panel from the back of a sarcophagus depicting the goddess Nut, with bright colors, especially the deep red. Professionally mounted in wood case with glass cover. Case includes brackets for wall mounting. Size: Panel itself measures 62" L x 16" H (157.5 cm x 40.6 cm), with case 66-3/4"H x 20-1/4"W (169.5 cm x 51.4 cm).Nut (also Nunut, Nuit) was the goddess and personification of the Sky and the celestial realm. She is regarded as the barrier separating the ordered cosmos of the world from the forces of chaos. In some depictions, Nut was portrayed as a woman arched on her toes and fingertips over the earth; her sacred body representing a star-filled sky. Nut's fingers and toes as such were believed to touch the four cardinal directions: north, south, east, and west. According to Egyptian mythology, Nut is a daughter of Shu ("he who rises up" or the personification of air) and Tefnut (goddess of moisture, dew, and rain); her husband and brother is Geb (god of the earth, father of snakes, whose laughter could bring about earthquakes and fertile crops), and she has four children: Osiris, Set, Isis, and Nephthys. Nut was also granddaughter of Ra or Atum, the creator god. The Coffin Texts describe Nut as "she of the braided hair who bore the gods". In one fascinating myth, Nut gives birth to the Sun-god each day, and he passes over her body during the day only to be swallowed at night and reborn the next morning.Provenance: Ex-H.J. Berk, Chicago, IL; Ex-B.C. Holland, Chicago, IL, late 1980’s to early 1990’s. From the John Piser Collection, Chicago, IL, early 1990’s to present. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119407

Condition Report: Expected wear, as shown.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Tall Egyptian Polychrome Clay Ushabti

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 to 712 BCE. This is a large pottery painted ushabti (shabti). Ushabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. Towards the end of the Pharaonic period, they had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. Size: 2.75" W x 7.75" H (7 cm x 19.7 cm) Provenance: Ex - Private LA County collection, acquired before 1990 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #116519

Condition Report: Some wear to paint but design is very clear.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Tall Egyptian Bronze Standing Osiris Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Late Dynastic Period, 26th to 30th Dynasty, ca. 664 to 342 BCE. A solid cast bronze votive statuette depicting Osiris, the god of the afterlife, standing mummiform, wearing his distinctive atef crown with large ostrich feathers at each side, frontal uraeus and false beard, with his arms folded on his chest, holding a symbolic crook and flail. A handsome example with dark, green patina. Custom, wood stand. Size: 8" H (20.3 cm) Size: 8.75" H (22.2 cm) with stand. Provenance: Ex - Private LA County collection, acquired before 1990 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #116518

Condition Report: Repaired from two pieces. Surface shows some roughness but nice overall.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Stone Double Crown Votive w/ Bronze Cobra

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Late Period, ca. 600 to 332 BCE. This is a small, hard, grey stone representation of the Pschent, the double crown worn by rulers of Egypt, also known as the sekhemti, the Two Powerful Ones. Size: 3" L x 2.45" W x 5.45" H (7.6 cm x 6.2 cm x 13.8 cm)It combines the Red Deshret Crown of Lower Egypt and the White Hedget Crown of Upper Egypt under one ruler. It bears a small bronze cobra, the uraeus, with incised details on its body, but there is no vulture head or second cobra, which would give us a better indication of the age of this piece. We know about the Pschent from the Palermo Stone, a year-by-year record of Egyptian kings compiled in the Fifth Dynasty, giving us evidence that the Pschent has existed since the middle of the First Dynasty. This particular example of the very ancient symbol - an enduring piece of iconography in ancient Egypt - was probably placed atop a statue, perhaps one of a god like Horus, who was often depicted wearing this crown. Provenance: Ex-French collection, purchased in the late 1980s. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119785

Condition Report: Small chips to and around the base; cobra has dark patina but details are clear.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Tall Egyptian Green Faience Ushabti

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Third Intermediate Period, ca. 1070 to 712 BCE. This is a late period ushabti (shabti), made of a green faience and mummiform, with raised details of the hands holding its tools. Size: 1.3" W x 5.6" H (3.3 cm x 14.2 cm)Ushabti were placed in tombs as grave goods, created to do manual labor for the deceased in the afterlife. As a result, they are frequently depicted with arms crossed, holding hoes and baskets. By the Third Intermediate period, this practice had become so necessary and elaborate that some tombs contained one worker for every day of the year and thirty-six overseers, each responsible for ten laborers. Workers like this one are from that period of enormous proliferation, and are some of our best surviving insights into ancient Egyptian funerary practices. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119292

Condition Report: Intact, with some age wear to form and discoloration from age.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Late Period Terracotta Scarab

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Late Period, ca. 600 to 30 BCE. A large, mold-made terracotta scarab with the rounded body form and a flat base. Size: 3.5" L x 3" W x 1.6" H (8.9 cm x 7.6 cm x 4.1 cm)The scarab was a hugely popular form for over a thousand years in ancient Egypt, a symbol with staying power similar to that of the Christian cross; they seem to have been worn and carried by the living, although by the time of the Third Intermediate Period, they had also become part of the increasingly elaborate battery of items to be placed into graves for protection of the dead. This one may have been placed inside the wrappings of a non-elite mummy to provide protection. Provenance: Ex-David Liebert, early 1980s. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119786

Condition Report: Losses in front as shown.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ancient Egyptian Late Period Wood Head of Anubis

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Late Ptolemaic to Roman Period, ca. 1st century BCE to 1st century CE. A charming, small wooden head of the jackal god Anubis with extensive remains of gesso and pigment along with traces of gilding. This may have been a furniture attachment, and is drilled through its base. His face has the classic perky ears and pointed nose of this god who was responsible for weighing the hearts of Egyptians after their deaths. Size: 2" L x 1.25" W x 2.15" H (5.1 cm x 3.2 cm x 5.5 cm) Provenance: ex-From the Harold Leeds, Wheaton Galatine collection, purchased in Egypt in the late 1940s. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119790

Condition Report: Intact.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Rare Egyptian Painted / Gesso / Wood Coffin Model

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Late Dynastic Period, 26th Dynasty, ca. 664 to 525 BCE. A wonderfully preserved example of a small model of a coffin, made from two pieces of wood, adorned with gesso over cloth, then painted. The coffin has a slot as part of its feet that is a third piece of wood, and probably indicates that it was meant to be displayed standing up, as in the Ptah-Soker-Osiris tradition. Size: 4.6" L x 4" W x 16.75" H (11.7 cm x 10.2 cm x 42.5 cm)The back of the coffin is painted with a series of hieroglyphs, though few are still legible. Their mirror image positions indicate that this was meant to be read right-to-left, and clearly we can see three "E"s at the top, and the symbol for stairs a few lines down. Many of the other hieroglyphs seem to have been deliberately destroyed - the animal ones, in particular - a sad but unfortunately prevalent practice for objects placed in burial chambers. Based on a similar example in the British Museum, these hieroglyphs represented some kind of spells for protection in the afterlife. On the other side is a better-preserved painting showing a mummiform body; the paint has faded to pale pink, blue, and cream, with black details including a goatee and crown. The facial details are well-painted and wonderfully Egyptian, with huge eyes and dark, large eyebrows. The interior of the coffin is empty; the hollowed-out chamber is only in the upper body, with the legs not cut out. This chamber would once have contained a model of a human figure, perhaps made of wax or mud. One suggestion for their purpose is that they were meant as replacements where a real body had been lost, perhaps in a fire or flood. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119285

Condition Report: Age wear, especially to the underside, with some losses to the wood along the connecting edges. Losses to the gesso and cracks to the paint/plaster are also present. Much artwork remains.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Pottery Jarlet - Protective God Bes

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Late Period, Dynasties 26 to 31, ca. 664 to 332 BCE. A fine brownware pottery molded juglet depicting the head of Bes, a protector deity, with small perforated lug or handle to the left side of his head. Bes is depicted as a dwarf with a lion's mane, his tongue extended in an open 'bearded' mouth. Size: 3.25" W x 3.75" H (8.3 cm x 9.5 cm)Bes, the bandy-legged leonine dwarf god, was an apotropaic deity, the protector of the home, children, and women in pregnancy and childbirth. In his role as protector of the home he was thought to dispel bad dreams, and by increasing virility in men and fertility in women, he was seen as a symbol of fecundity.When depicted in full form, he is generally depicted nude, wearing a lion's mane, a plumed headdress, and a tail. He is also seen dancing, brandishing a sword, or frightening off evil spirits by playing music. Bes continued to be a popularly depicted protective deity well into the Graeco-Roman Period. Provenance: Ex-private Rhode Island Collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119369

Condition Report: Normal surface wear. Overall intact and excellent.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Romano Terracotta Standing Isis / Hathor

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Ptolemaic to Roman periods, ca. 332 to 30 BCE. A pretty mold made statue of the goddess Isis-Hathor, done in the style well known from excavations at Alexandria. It depicts a standing woman with her arms up, holding a basket on her head. She is nude aside from a cloak that drapes over one of her legs and stands in front of a low column. Size: 3" W x 8.9" H (7.6 cm x 22.6 cm)During the Ptolemaic period, Isis-Hathor, Serapis, and Harpocrates formed the Triad of Alexandria, and in 2011 the Egyptian office of archaeology announced that they had found the ruins of a Ptolemaic temple containing many similar figures. The British Museum exhibit on Naukratis shows the remains of terracotta molds for making models just like this one; they were made from a dark red-brown Nile silt in vast workshops. These figures were made for locals, but reflected the influence of Greek naturalistic styles in their depictions of the deities. They were bought by individuals and are found overwhelmingly in domestic contexts - unsurprising, given that Isis-Hathor was connected to beliefs about childbirth and fertility. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119290

Condition Report: Repaired in two places, with surface wear.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ptolemaic Egyptian Terracotta - Probably Serapis

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Greco-Roman/Ptolemaic period, from Alexandria, ca. 323 to 30 BCE. This is an interesting and fairly unique terracotta figure, depicting a bearded man's face in the body of what may be a knotted phallus. Atop the man's head is a modius, a flat-topped cylindrical headdress that probably represents a grain measure, symbolizing fertility. The figure is clearly mold-made from two pieces, with fine details. Size: 2.85" W x 5.2" H (7.2 cm x 13.2 cm)The cult of Serapis (Sarapis, Sarapa) arose during the Ptolemaic period as a syncretic god promoted by the monarchy to unite the city of Alexandria. The Library at Alexandria, for example, had an annex at the Temple of Serapis. Provenance: Ex-Private Orange County, CA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118243

Condition Report: Repaired in several spots with minor losses as shown

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Alexandrian Terracotta Figure of Harpocrates

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Hellenistic Period, ca. 2nd to 1st century BCE. A mold-made figure of Harpocrates, the god of silence, secrets, and confidentiality; he was adopted by the Greeks from the child god Horus. In this figure, he stands in a sensuous pose, nude aside from his characteristic pointed hat; he is leaning against a column and standing on a plinth. Size: 3.2" W x 6.95" H (8.1 cm x 17.7 cm)During the Ptolemaic period, Isis-Hathor, Serapis, and Harpocrates formed the Triad of Alexandria, and in 2011 the Egyptian office of archaeology announced that they had found the ruins of a Ptolemaic temple there containing many figures similar to this one. The British Museum exhibit on Naukratis shows the remains of terracotta molds for making models just like this one; they were made from a dark red-brown Nile silt in vast workshops. These figures were made for locals, but reflected the influence of Greek naturalistic styles in their depictions of the deities. They were bought by individuals and either kept in the home or given as offerings at temples. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119286

Condition Report: Repaired around neck and around ankles. Some encrustation and wear to details but form is clear.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Superb Romano-Egyptian Plaster Mummy Bust

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Egypt, Romano-Egyptian Period, ca. 1st century BCE to 1st century CE. A stunning large plaster bust of a young man, painted brightly; he wears a well-depicted chiton/tunica painted a dark red; above that, his face is sensitive, with the huge eyes so characteristic of Egyptian art, a long, straight nose, and a small mouth. His hair is black, with a low hairline, and pulled back in tight lines. Comes with custom stand. Size: 14" W x 15.75" H (35.6 cm x 40 cm)This piece was created for a funerary monument, designed to be placed up against a surface (the back is neither painted nor sculpted). Made of plaster, this type of monument, similar to a mummy mask, was reserved for elites. They also represented a dramatic change, departing from centuries of tradition. For the first time in the Roman period, Egyptian mummies were buried with lifelike representations rather than the mummiform masks seen in previous periods. To the Roman viewer, this piece may also have had similarities to gods like Apollo - an idealized image of the young man in death, created at great expense to memorialize him and for those who mourned him. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private North Carolina collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119256

Condition Report: Nose has been repaired; loss to upper left ear/hair as shown. Much pigment remaining.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Egyptian Alexandrian Terracotta Figure of Nude Isis

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Alexandria, 1st century BCE to 1st century CE. An alluring terracotta figure depicting the goddess Isis, standing in the nude with arms at her sides, presenting a beautiful visage with naturalistic features and long tresses cascading past her shoulders, topped with an Isis crown comprised of a solar disk framed by cow horns, her chief attribute. Nice remains of red, white, and blue pigments. Custom stand. Size: 7.875" H (20 cm); 8.875" H (22.5 cm) on standIsis is oftentimes depicted in a sheath dress, but in this example the artist elected to depict her in the nude, revealing the ideal of Egyptian womanhood with all her feminine grace. Isis was daughter to Geb, god of the Earth, and Nut, goddess of the Sky, and wife of Osiris. Oftentimes shown as the mother of Horus, she is also known as a protector of children. In addition to being revered as the ideal mother and wife, Isis was revered as the patroness of magic and nature, a supporter of sinners, slaves, and artisans as well as a friend to rulers and the wealthy. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private NC collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119287

Condition Report: Torso/head reattached to lower body. Stable cracks on legs. Small losses to feet and headdress. Expected surface wear with pigment loss; however, nice remains of blue, white, and red pigment have survived.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Romano-Egyptian Terracotta Votive - Jupiter w/ Eagle

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Romano-Egyptian period, ca. 30 BCE to 2nd century CE. This hollow terracotta figural shows Jupiter (Zeus) seated with an eagle. This is the Aetos Dios, a giant golden eagle that served as the king of the gods' personal messenger and companion. These two together were a powerful symbol in Romanized Egypt, and indeed had been since the Ptolemies (Ptolemy III used this symbol on coinage, for example). A plaque like this was made for votive purposes, to be given as an offering in a temple. Size: 3.6" W x 5" H (9.1 cm x 12.7 cm) Provenance: Ex - Prominent LA County collector who acquired these prior to 2000 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #116329

Condition Report: Intact, with clear design

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Greek Ionian Bichrome Kylix

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Greek, Greek colonies in Asia Minor, ca. 6th century BCE. A beautiful example of a deep kylix, a cup for drinking, with twin horizontal loop handles, a small, pronounced foot, and a slightly rolled out rim. The interior is painted black and gives an appearance of great depth. The exterior is decorated with bands of brown and black pigment around the neck and shoulder; black continues down the body and covers the foot. Size: 11.85" W x 6" H (30.1 cm x 15.2 cm) Provenance: Ex-Orange County, CA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119329

Condition Report: Small chips to rim, otherwise intact. Excellent root marks, especially on interior.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Greek Attic Black-Figure Pottery Lekythos

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Greece, Athens, ca. 5th century BCE. A black-figure lekythos (oil/libation vessel) painted via the black-figure technique, depicting a male and female, the female holding a tambourine or wreath in her hand - the bearded male facing her donning a helmet, flanked by Dionysos, god of wine, riding an ass (donkey) on the right and a warrior riding backwards on another ass. (For more context about this pair of asses see below). An ornamental hanging lotus buds motif adorns the shoulder. Definitely intriguing despite its condition. Size: 4" W x 7.5" H (10.2 cm x 19 cm)Ceramic production and painting took place in the northwest corner of Athens, in Kerameikos, where artisans created everyday household pottery as well as architectural decoration, roof tiles, and figurines. These were generally made on manually turned potter's wheels, and were either the product of one or two workers -- there was no mass production. Athenian kilns were fired by wood and the temperature controlled the ultimate color of the pottery.In black-figure vase painting, an artist applied both figural and ornamental motifs with a slip that turned black during firing, while the background was left the buff color of the clay to provide contrast. As we see in this example, vase painters sometimes articulated individual forms by incising the slip. Sometimes white and purple fugitive pigment was added as well.For intriguing context linking Dionysos to the animal known as an ass, read the following passage discussing ancient astronomy from Pseudo-Hyginus, Astronomica 2. 23 (trans. Grant) (Roman mythographer C2nd A.D.) : "In one part of its figure [of the constellation Cancer] there are certain stars called Asses, pictured on the shell of the Crab by Liber [Dionysos] with two stars only. For Liber, when madness was sent upon him by Juno [Hera], is said to have fled wildly through Thesprotia intending to reach the oracle of Dodonaean Jove [Zeus] to ask how he might recover his former sanity. When he came to a certain large swamp which he couldn't cross, it is said two asses met him. He caught one of them and in this way was carried across, not touching the water at all. So when he came to the temple of Dodonaean Jove [Zeus], freed at once from his madness, he acknowledged his tanks to the asses and placed them among the constellations. Some say he [Dionysos] gave a human voice to the ass which had carried him. This ass later had a contest with Priapus on a matter of physique, but was defeated and killed by him. Pitying him because of this, Liber [Dionysos] numbered him among the stars, and so that it should be known that he did this as a god, not as a timid man fleeing from Juno [Hera], he placed him above the Crab which had been added to the stars by her kindness." Provenance: Ex-Young Collection, New Hampshire All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118748

Condition Report: Repaired from many pieces with nicks and paint losses as shown.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Greek Attic Black-Figure, White Ground Pottery Lekythos

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Greece, Athens, ca. 510 to 500 BCE. A graceful Attic, lekythos of an elegant form. This slender vessel, used to store precious olive oil or perfume, is finely decorated in black-figure technique, the central register depicting a rider in a chariot with three charioteers who are preparing two horses for a race or ride, this band on a red ground, the shoulder, neck, and lower bands on a white ground. Above is a border featuring a checkerboard pattern, and a ray band pattern adorns the shoulder. Size: 2.25" in diameter x 7.125" H (5.7 cm x 18.1 cm)Athens excelled in ceramics from the first half of the sixth century BCE, and its creations outnumbered those of all other artistic centers in the ancient world. Greek pottery became synonymous with Attic ware, the pottery created in the region around Athens, as it was regarded as the most beautiful and the most 'modern', and thus, the most widely exported. Artists used the black-figure vase painting technique, applying figural and ornamental motifs with a slip that turned black during the firing process; however the background remained the inherent color of the clay. As we see in this example, vase painters articulated individual forms by incising the slip. Sometimes additional white (and sometimes purple) slip details were added. The form of representation was still somewhat Archaic, with heads and bodies shown in strict profile; however, this example begins to demonstrate an interest in three-dimensional modelling of the figures and conveying movement and the illusion of depth. Provenance: Ex-Cathcart Collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119081

Condition Report: Repaired with visible breaklines, pigment loss, and abrasions as shown.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ancient Greek Terracotta Statue of Woman with Fruit

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Greece, ca. 5th century BCE. A hollow terracotta mold-made figure of a woman depicted in a wonderful naturalistic pose. She stands with the skirt of her chiton held in her hands, inside of it a collection of fruit that appears to be apples or pears and grapes. She has long, uncovered hair, suggesting that she is a young woman. The duties of rural Greek women included the harvesting of olives and fruit so this probably depicts a scene that would have been familiar to the average Greek. Comes with custom stand. Size: 5" W x 5.5" H (12.7 cm x 14 cm)Greek pottery figures like this one were made to be sold outside of temples for worshippers to purchase and give inside as offerings. Perhaps this figure was intended to bring a good harvest. Provenance: Ex-Private Florida collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119235

Condition Report: Small area of well done repair to base; shape and form remain clear including details of fruit.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ancient Greek Tetradrachma - Athena/ Owl in 14kt Gold

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Athens, Greece, ca. 393 to 300 BCE. A stunning ancient coin set into pendant for necklace. A lovely Greek silver tetradrachm, circa 393-300 BC., (17 grams) set into 14kt gold bezel. Coin featuring the head of Athena facing right on the obverse and owl standing right, head facing; olive spray behind on reverse. This Athenian type "owl" coin is one of the most famous coins from the ancient world. Size of coin is 25 mm (1 inch). A wonderful and unique piece of jewelry. (17g w bezel) Provenance: Ex-Private Florida collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119246

Condition Report: About VF, bezel excellent and ready to add to a chain.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Greek Apulian Pottery Lady of Fashion Plate

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Greece, Magna Graecia, southern Italy, Apulia, ca. 340 to 325 BCE. A Greek red-figure plate on a raised foot featuring a "Lady of Fashion" wearing a saccos (head scarf) with pearl strands and hair pins, a drop earring, and a pearl necklace. A third strand of white pearls borders her forehead. Her profile head is encircled by a wave motif that is bordered by a band of white laurel leaves, with tongues around the edge of the rim. Size: 9.625" in diameter x 2.25" H (24.4 cm x 5.7 cm)In addition to the skillfully rendered red-figure painting, the artist added lovely white fugitive paint. The black decoration has gained nice iridescence, particularly on the underside. Adding a human element to the creation of this piece is the red orb in the center, the end result because another plate must have been placed on top of this one during the firing process. Provenance: Ex-Private Ventura County, CA collection acquired before 1980 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118349

Condition Report: Stable firing cracks. Circle in center is a firing error where another plate sat on top during firing - original to the piece. Abraded loss to 2.5" periphery of rim. Small section or repainting to tongue motif.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Huge Apulian Red-Figure Amphora, ex-Royal Athena

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Magna Graecia, Southern Italy, Apulia, Virginia Exhibition Painter, ca. 330 to 300 BCE. A masterful Apulian red-figure amphora attributed to A.D. Trendall’s Virginia Exhibition Painter, the vase of a grand scale, presenting an elegant, sinuous form with intriguing iconography (see extended description below) and extensive decoration, all finely delineated in red-figure technique with additional fugitive white, yellow, and beige pigments. An exceptional and important work displaying superb artistry and technique. Size: 14.75" in diameter x 39" H (37.5 cm x 99.1 cm)Virtually no ancient Greek paintings have survived the tests of time. This makes the painted compositions found on ceramic vessels like this example invaluable sources of information about ancient Greek visual art. Refined vases like this amphora were not merely utilitarian pottery, but rather works of art in their own right, highly prized throughout the classical world. Red figure pieces in particular allowed for the development of more naturalistic imagery than black figure examples. This innovative technique involved creating figures by outlining them in the natural red of the vase, making it possible for the painter to then enrich the figural forms with black lines to suggest volume, perspectival depth, and movement, bringing those silhouettes and their environs to life. Beyond this, fugitive pigments made it possible for the artist to create additional layers of interest and detail.Side A of this amphora features a pair of warriors sheltered by an ionic naiskos, one on horseback wielding a spear, his horse's right front leg lifted to mirror his own attack gesture targeted at his opponent who counters with his weapon and shield. Above this dramatic depiction of the pair of rivals, on the shoulder of the vase, is a female bust emerging from a blossom, a signature of the Virginia Exhibition Painter as well as the elite White Sakkos Painter. The Virginia Exhibition Painter also included floral elements beneath the warriors as well as a pair of plume-like elements beside the rider's torso, perhaps elements of his helmet and/or armor. This compares to another Apulian artist's (the Ganymede Painter's) penchant for adding iconography beyond the figures under the naiskos. On the obverse is a pair of draped standing youths facing one another, perhaps mourners of whomever did not survive the rivalry depicted on Side A, one leaning upon a staff or walking stick, with a distinct maker's mark between their heads. In addition to the figural imagery are the extensive decorative elements which are quite characteristic of the Virginia Exhibition Painter's known oeuvre. Note the ivy leaf motif beneath the rim created via fugitive white and creamy beige pigments, the black fan palmettes and white vertical rays on the neck painted just above the female bust who emerges from a blooming, foliated blossom with elaborate spiraled tendrils on the shoulder, this underscored by a tongue pattern, all in red-figure with fugitive white and yellow. Adorning the central naiskos scene are ivy leaf vines flanking the ionic columns as well as registers of dotted, scrolled, linear, and wave motifs below the scenes and continuing around the circumference of the vessel. Finally, beneath the elegant twin handles are large, double, red-figure palmettes.A remarkable vase of the so-called Ornate Style by the Virginia Exhibition Painter of a grand scale, decorated in an elaborate manner with intriguing scenes and figures as well as a great deal of subsidiary ornament in added colors. For a comparable example at Royal Athena Galleries listed at $125,000, follow this link: http://www.masterart.com/Greek-the-Virginia-Exhibition-Painter-330-300-Apulian-large-red-figured-amphora-the-Virginia-Exhibition-Painter-PortalDefault.aspx?tabid=53&dealerID=361&objectID=502940Trendall named this artist the Virginia Exhibition Painter, because five of his vases which came from the same tomb were first featured in an exhibition of South Italic vases at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in 1982, and a few were published in the accompanying catalogue - M. E. Mayo and K. Hamma, "The Art of South Italy: Vases from Magna Graecia" (Richmond 1982). Cf. especially the naiskos scene on p. 179. No. 73, and the woman on the shoulder of no. 76 (p. 185), the latter also a neck-amphora. Provenance: Ex-Royal Athena Gallery, NYC, NY. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118744

Condition Report: Handles reattached. Drilled hole beneath one handle for thermoluminescence testing. Surface wear with expected scratches, pigment losses, and mineral deposits commensurate with age. Small chip on right column of naiskos. Painting still quite vivid and impressive.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Hellenistic Greek Core-Form Glass Amphoriskos

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Greece, Hellenistic period, ca. 3rd to 1st century BCE. A core-form glass amphoriskos of elegant form with tiny foot, ovoid body with twin handles, cylindrical neck, and an everted disk rim; and equally elegant decoration, the dark blue body wound with pale blue trails tooled into a feather pattern around the body. The golden trails continue, encircling the neck and resolving at the rim. Some areas of iridescence add to its beauty. Custom, museum-quality stand. Size: 2.15" W x 5.5" H (5.5 cm x 14 cm)The Greeks created core-formed or sandcore vessels by trailing threads of molten glass over a "core" of sand or clay to form the vessel. These threads were oftentimes feathered or dragged to create intriguing decorative patterns. The term amphoriskos literally means "little amphora" and is indeed a miniature amphora. This shape was quite popular as it was ideal to store precious oils, perfumes, or cosmetics. Provenance: Ex-Private LA County collection acquired at auction in 1978 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119403

Condition Report: Repaired from about 4 pieces

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Hellenistic 24 kt. Gold Pendant w/ Granulated Ornament

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Greece, Hellenistic period, ca. 400 to 31 BCE. 24kt. A beautiful 24k gold pendant with an even decoration of trios of granulated gold on the front and a delicate banded strap loop at the top. Further granulation gives it a small tail dangling from the bottom of the hammered disc. Granulation like this is an ancient technique, dating most likely from Sumer ca. 3000 BCE.Size: 0.95" W x 1.4" H (2.4 cm x 3.6 cm) Provenance: Ex-private east coast, USA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119166

Condition Report: Some bending to hammered sheet. Does not come with string shown in some photos.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Hellenistic Pottery Roundel - Athena or Apollo

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Greece, Hellenistic, ca. 323 to 31 CE. A mold-pressed terracotta roundel depicting the bust of a classical deity in relief, possibly Athena (Minerva), the goddess of war and wisdom surrounded by a pectoral of scale armor; however, also possibly representing the visage of the beautiful young male Apollo, god of music, poetry, art, sun, light, and knowledge surrounded by a wreath of radiating laurel leaves arranged like the glorious rays of the sun. What a beauty! Custom stand. Size: 7.25" in diameter (18.4 cm); 8.5" H (21.6 cm) on stand Provenance: Ex- Private Orange County, CA collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118882

Condition Report: Twin perforations at top for former suspension, possibly for use as a phalera (ornament for a horse's headstall). Normal surface wear with some roughness to peripheries commensurate with age.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Etrusco-Corinthian Pottery Aryballos - Hounds

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Etruria, northern Italy, ca. last quarter of 6th century BCE. A near-miniature aryballos of an elegant form with a globular body, tubular neck, and flat rim with a single strap handle. The vase is painted in black-figure technique, though some areas that failed to oxidize are still red, making for an intriguing aesthetic. The decorative program consists of a wide register of hounds in profile, two larger figures on the shoulder, with striations of varying thickness on the body, dots and striations on the rim. Size: 1.625" in diameter x 2.5" H (4.1 cm x 6.4 cm)The Orientalizing period prompted trade relations between Etruria, Greece, and the Near East, leading to various influences on Etruscan art. Etrusco-Corinthian was a universal Etruscan style of pottery that both imitated and adapted the Corinthian style (typically in the black-figure technique) between 630 and about 540 BCE Its major centers of production were located at Vulci, Caere, and Tarquinia. Provenance: Ex-Cathcart Collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119082

Condition Report: Loss to rim. Surface shows areas of encrustation/mineral deposits and expected wear. Some figures did not oxidize in original firing and because of this are red rather than black.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Villanovan Impasto Ware Kyathos

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Villanovan culture (the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy), ca. 700-750 BCE. This is a small kyathos with a round mouth and a wide attached handle. The kyathos was developed as a small dipper, and copied by the Greek workshop owner Nikosthenes in the second half of the 6th century BCE; it takes its name from the Greek verb kuein, to contain. Impasto ware means a rough unrefined clay. Size: 3.5" L x 4.25" W x 3" H (8.9 cm x 10.8 cm x 7.6 cm). Provenance: Ex- Porter collection acquired in 1964 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #112879

Condition Report: Intact and excellent; slight wear to the bottom.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Roman Greyware Pottery Jug

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Roman, Imperial Period, probably from Roman Britain, ca. 1st to 2nd century CE. A light grey burnished pottery, wheel made, with a bulbous body and a rolled out, narrow rim. A thin strap handle goes from the rim to the body. This was one of the most common types of Roman pottery, and was made in several places throughout Britain, like at the large Roman pottery manufacturing center of Castor near Peterborough. Size: 4.6" W x 4.55" H (11.7 cm x 11.6 cm) Provenance: Ex-Private German collection acquired in 1971 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118477

Condition Report: Repaired from multiple pieces with a chip out of the base.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Fine Thracian Bronze Horse & Rider

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Eastern Europe, Northern Greece, Roman period, Thrace, ca. 3rd century BCE to 3rd century CE. A finely cast bronze horse and rider. This beautiful piece depicts the two on an integral base with four peg feet. The horse stands with its right foreleg raised, head alert and turned slightly to the right. The rider gestures to one side. Both the horse and rider are nicely detailed with many cold-worked details. Size: 2.05" L x 1.4" W x 2.75" H (5.2 cm x 3.6 cm x 7 cm)This is an example of a Thracian horseman (also known as the Thracian Rider or the Thracian Heros), a recurring motif that persists from the Hellenistic period into the Roman period in the region of Thrace. These figures are often depicted on the funerary stelae of lower and middle class Roman cavalrymen; they seem to refer to a specific cult of Heros, which was based in Philippi and whose name is often accompanied by the epithets "soter" (savior) and "answerer of prayers" (epekoos). Provenance: Ex-Private Orange County, CA collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118884

Condition Report: Light patina overall but shape is excellent.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Wearable Iridescent Roman Glass Necklace

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Roman Empire, ca. 1st to 3rd century CE. Marvelous and wearable necklace comprised entirely of ancient Roman glass beads. Beads run the gamut of the color spectrum and most with lovely silvery iridescent surface. Completely restrung and ready to wear and turn heads! Size: 23" L (58.4 cm). Provenance: Ex-Private Florida collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118919

Condition Report: Excellent, restrung and ready to wear.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Roman Alexandrian Billon Tetradrachm - Emperor Nero

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Egypt, Romano-Egyptian period, Alexandria, Year 12, 65 or 66 CE. A heavy billon tetradrachm, (8.5g). Nero, 54-68AD. Radiate bust of Nero facing right./ Draped bust of Alexandria right, wearing elephant's skin headdress, before {LIB}, regnal year 12 equals 65/66 AD. VF/F+. BMC 16.21, 177. Sear, Greek Imperial Coins, #633. Size: 0.95" W (2.4 cm) Provenance: ex-private NY collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119381

Condition Report: F

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Roman Bronze Brooch - Swastika

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 1st to 2nd century CE. A brooch with a spring mechanism, the attached front in the form of a cast bronze swastika, an age old good luck symbol appropriated to darker meaning in the twentieth century. They commonly appeared in Roman and Greek art as a series of tesselations or grouped together, and are associated with symbols like the treskelion and lauburu. Size: 1.05" W x 1.25" H (2.7 cm x 3.2 cm) Provenance: ex-private New York Collection All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119380

Condition Report: Original pin broken. Green patina.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Roman Terracotta Toy Figure of a Camel, ex-Museum

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 1st to 2nd century CE. A hand-molded toy figure of a camel packed with two amphoras hanging on either side of its body. The camel's face is simple and playful; the body low and fat, with four short legs. Size: 6.5" L x 5" W x 4" H (16.5 cm x 12.7 cm x 10.2 cm)Roman children were well-loved and had a plethora of toys, made from a variety of materials, just like toys today. These toys were also detailed according to a child's age; this one was probably for a child out of toddlerhood but not much older. It is interesting to think about its iconography - were the child's parents traders? Did they live by the sea or in a trading city and see caravans arrive with camels laden with goods? What kind of imaginative games would a child have played with this toy? Provenance: Ex-Collection of Living Torah Museum, Brooklyn, NY; purchased on the Israel art market in 2005 All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119788

Condition Report: Neck has been repaired; three of the amphora arms have been replaced; losses to amphora rims and to bottom of one amphora.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Ancient Roman 22K+ Gold, Garnet & Glass Earrings

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ancient Roman Empire, ca. 1st to 3rd century CE. Stunning pair of Roman gold earrings which have been modified so that they can be worn now. Gold sheet adorned with roped edging and bird-form designs, each set with three cabochon garnets and supporting 5 dangles with colored glass beads. A modern French wire was added to the original gold wire. Gold tests at 22kt. And weight of the earrings combined is 10.5 grams. Size: 2.5" L x 1.125" W (6.4 cm x 2.9 cm) Provenance: Ex-private east coast, USA collection; Ex-Frances Artuner Collection, Belgium, acquired in the 1960's then gifted to her daughter Susan Artuner in the United States (New Jersey) in 1995. All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #118929

Condition Report: Intact and wearable

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Huge Roman Pottery Oil Lamp

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Roman, Imperial Period, ca. 1st century CE. A huge and gorgeous mold-made pottery oil lamp. It has a wide spout with small burned areas from use around it; a small discus with a simple incised and braided design; and a wonderfully decorated body with highly abstract zoomorphic designs. The handle is deeply incised into tight ridges. One a raised base. Size: 8.4" L x 4.4" W x 3.25" H (21.3 cm x 11.2 cm x 8.3 cm)Oil lamps such as these would be filled with olive oil, have a wick placed inside of them, and used to light homes, shops, holy places, and many other places throughout the Roman world. Items like these remind us of the everyday lives of the people who would have used them. Provenance: Ex-Hagar Collection, Ex-private North Carolina collection acquired in the 1980's All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119257

Condition Report: Repaired from two or three large pieces.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Roman Bronze Bucranium and Eagle

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Roman, Imperial Period, Eastern Mediterranean, ca. 1st to 2nd century CE. A beautiful bronze cast with excellent details. The eagles stands, ready to spread his wings, with a strong beak and well-rendered feathers. He stands on a bull head form. Comes with custom stand. Size: 1.75" L x 1.3" W x 1.9" H (4.4 cm x 3.3 cm x 4.8 cm) Provenance: From Bavarian private collection S. K., acquired in the 1960s All items legal to buy/sell under U.S. Statute covering cultural patrimony Code 2600, CHAPTER 14, and are guaranteed to be as described or your money back. A Certificate of Authenticity will accompany all winning bids. We ship worldwide and handle all shipping in-house for your convenience. #119378

Condition Report: Dark patina with wonderful remaining detail.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Sign in to continue
Email
Please enter your email.
Password
Please enter your password.
Forgot Your Password?
Enter Your Email
Please enter a valid email.
No user is registered with that email address.
Request Sent
Check to find your temporary password and password reset instructions.
Use your new password to Sign In.
 
Per page:
1
2
3
4