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Auction Description for Auctionata Paddle8 AG: 702: Antiques & Porcelain
Auction Description:
  In this auction, we are pleased to once more offer you a delicate range of high quality collector’s pieces, dating from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Among the highlights are some excellent European porcelains, including a magnificent Urbino vase with mask-form handles and soft painting, as well as a large Centaur Group, after a Scheurich model from the house of KPM-Berlin. A rare Meissen tea and chocolate service is the highlight of an outstanding collection of early porcelains, which also features significant Höroldt chinoiseries. Furniture enthusiasts will be delighted with a signed and very elegant Biedermeier secretary from the major Berlin cabinet maker F. A. Voigt. Among the works in bronze, a 17th century French Venus after Barthélémy Prieur deserves special mention.
Viewing Notes:
A preview at Auctionata is only possible by prior appointment. Contact: Tel: +49 30 9832 0222, E-mail: preview@auctionata.com Auction Location: Havelstudios Havelchaussee 161, 14055 Berlin, Germany
Sale Notes:
In this auction, we are pleased to once more offer you a delicate range of high quality collector’s pieces, dating from the 17th to the 20th centuries. Among the highlights are some excellent European porcelains, including a magnificent Urbino vase with mask-form handles and soft painting, as well as a large Centaur Group, after a Scheurich model from the house of KPM-Berlin. A rare Meissen tea and chocolate service is the highlight of an outstanding collection of early porcelains, which also features significant Höroldt chinoiseries. Furniture enthusiasts will be delighted with a signed and very elegant Biedermeier secretary from the major Berlin cabinet maker F. A. Voigt. Among the works in bronze, a 17th century French Venus after Barthélémy Prieur deserves special mention.

702: Antiques & Porcelain (132 Lots)

by Auctionata Paddle8 AG


132 lots with images

December 7, 2016

Live Auction

Berlin, Berlin, Germany

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Meissen, Large Snowball Vase with Songbirds, Late 19th C. 

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Description: Porcelain with white glaze, polychrome painting and gold accentsPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, late 19th centuryModel: most likely by Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) - One of the most important modelers of the Meissen Porcelain ManufactoryUnderglaze blue crossed swords mark and impressed form number ‘20’ on the undersideSpherical body on rececced foot ring with long neck and mushroom-shaped lid with branch-shaped handle; the corpus is all over decorated with embossed blue Myosotis and 10 snow ball-shaped blossom balls, foliage, a goldfinch and another songbirdHeight, with lid: c. 51 cmProvenance: Private collection, Germany Condition:The vase is of 1st choice and in good condition, according to age. The beak tip of one of the birds is missing. The neck is somewhat bent due to the manufacturing process. The inspection under UV light reveals some touch-ups to the painted decoration.Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Factory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus, it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pair of Guelder Rose Vases with Robins, 20th. C. 

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome paintedMeissen, 1st half 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1745Each bottom with blue or underglaze blue crossed swords mark as well as the model number '2758' and modeler's numbersBaluster shape with upwards flared neckWalls revolving decorated with applied guelder roses blossoms and balls, sculptural worked leaves and branches as well as a lateral robinHeight: each c. 25 cmA great lover of such elaborately worked 'Schneeball' vases was Frederick the Great, who ordered numerous samples in 1762 for the interior equipment of the New Palace in Potsdam Condition:Both vases are in very good condition with minimal, perfectly restored parts in the area of the blossoms.  Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pair of Small Guelder Rose Vases with Birds, 19th. C. 

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome paintedMeissen, 2nd half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1745Each bottom with blue or underglaze blue crossed swords mark as well as the model number '2758' and modeler's numbersWalls revolving decorated with applied guelder roses blossoms, leaves and branches as well as one respectively two sculptural worked, yellow birdsHeight: each c. 14 cmA great lover of such elaborately worked 'Schneeball' vases  was Frederick the Great, who ordered numerous samples in 1762 for the interior equipment of the New Palace in Potsdam Condition:Both vases are in age-related, visually appealing condition with restored parts. Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Max Esser for Meissen, Rare Animal Figure ‘Eagle’, after 1931

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Description: White porcelainMeissen, after 1931Max Esser (1885-1945) - German sculptor and porcelain modeler; design around 1931, after the model no. A 1236Signed and dated ‘M. ESSER 1931’ on the plinth back right; on the rear edge of the plinth as well as in the interior of the matching pedestal underglaze blue sword mark; also, incised model number ‘A 1236’ on the insideHeight: c. 55 cm; width: c. 44 cm1st choiceProvenance: Private collection, PolandEsser was among the most talented animal sculptors and modelers in Germany during the interwar periodObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition:The figure is in very good condition, showing only minor blemishes to the glaze due to the manufacturing process. No evidence of restauration under UV light.Max Esser (1885-1945)In 1904 Max Esser was first a student, then the most important collaborator of August Gaul until 1915. He made sketches at the Berlin Zoo. From 1920 to 1926 Esser worked exclusively for Meissen; overall he has created more than 100 designs for the Meissen factory.Porcelain Factory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 'Pug' & 'Female Pug with Puppy', Late 19th. C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and partially gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Models: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) and Peter Reinicke (1711-1768), c. 1744-50Each with underglaze blue respectively blue crossed sword mark on unglazed bottom, incised model number '1254' and 'M92'Naturalistic modeled and painted figures of a pug as well as a female pug nursing her puppy, each on an oval grass baseHeight: each c. 16 cmThe pug as symbol for loyality and reliability reached in the 18th century especially as emblem of the Freemasons 'Mopsorden' a major importance and was often depicted in Meissen porcelainObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition:Both figurines are in professionally restored condition, the base of the pug shows a minimally chipped part. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Collection of 6 Pug Figures, 2nd Half of 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and partially gold paintedMeissen, 2nd half of 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Models: Franz Andreas Weger, 1806Each with underglaze blue crossed sword mark as well as incised model number and year cypher, partial painter's numbersAltogether 6 naturalistic modeled and painted figures of pugs with blue collar1 female pug with puppy, model number: 78524, height: 19 cm1 female pug on an oval grass base nursing her puppy, model number: 78584, height: 16 cm2 pugs their head directed to right, model number: 78746, height each: 10.5 cm 1 pug the head directed to right and 1 female pug the head directed to left, model numbers: 78518 and 78550, height each: 10 cmThe pug as symbol for loyality and reliability reached in the 18th century especially as emblem of the Freemasons 'Mopsorden' a major importance and was often depicted in Meissen porcelain Condition:The pugs are in very good conditon. Only one figure with minor, professionally restored part to the ribbon. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Large KPM Group Centaur with Nymph, Paul Scheurich, aft. 1941

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Description: Porcelain, white glazedBerlin, 1954Royal Porcelain Factory Berlin (KPM), established in 1763Model: Paul Scheurich (1883-1945) - German sculptor, illustrator and porcelain artist, 1940-1942Blue sceptre mark on unglazed bottom, impressed mark IS and year cypher, base signed 'Scheurich'On a flat oval base with rounded edges a centaur in dynamically moved pose with a riding nymph on his rearHeight: c. 72.5 cm; width: c. 54 cmVery rare large-size figure group Condition:The figure group is in very good, age-related condition. Only the left hand of the centaur has been restored by a specialist.  Paul Scheurich (1883-1945)Born in New York on the 24th of October 1883, the artist studied at the Berlin Academy from 1900-02. In addition to producing stage designs, prints and paintings, Scheurich also created numerous models for renowned porcelain manufacturers (KPM, Meissen, Nymphenburg). The precious formed figures in the style of rococo quickly helped him gain great fame. Royal Porcelain Factory (KPM)The first porcelain manufactory at Berlin was founded on the suggestion of Frederick the Great by Wilhelm Caspar Wegely and J. Benckgraff in 1752, yet already 5 years later production was stopped because the king was not satisfied with the porcelain. With the invasion of Meissen by the Prussian army, many modelers and porcelain painters came to Berlin, where in 1761 the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky founded a new factory. This was finally bought in 1763 by Frederick the Great, who named it ‘Royal Porcelain Factory’ and introduced the cobalt blue scepter mark. During this time, the factory began producing exquisite tableware in a late Rococo style, which was painted with flowers, birds and scenes after Watteau Boucher and Dutch masters in vivid colors. Famous porcelain painters of the manufactory were K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme and K. J. C. Klipfel; master modelers were Friedrich Elias Meyer and his brother Wilhelm Christian. Typical Berlin porcelain patterns on tableware were moldings, scale-ground borders, landscapes, birds and animals, molded basketwork patterns and pierced rims. After Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß took over as artistic director in 1798, the tableware was decorated in underglaze painting with landscapes and cityscapes in delicate colors. In 1871 the factory was moved to its present location at the Tiergarten near the Spree, so that the raw materials and finished products were finally able to be transported by ship. In 1886 the painting of porcelain tiles was added as a new line of production under the direction of Professor Alexander Kips. After the destruction of the factory during WWII, KPM was taken over in 1988 by the state of Berlin and since 2006 has been in the possession of Berlin based private banker Jörg Woltmann. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Figure Group 'Catch of Triton', Late 19th C. 

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), Carl Christoph Punct (-1765) and Johann Carl Schönheit (1730-1805), c. 1762-1769Base bottom with underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model number 'C. 35' as well as a press and painter's numberDynamically moved figure group around a Tritons' s child pulled in to land in a net by two water nymphs and a putto On a sumptuous shaped, maritime rock base with applied sea animals like fishs, crab and musselsDimensions: 32 x 24 x 14 cm Condition:The figure group is in good, age-related condition. Some parts like hands, leaves and fish tails have been restored prefessionally, one frogg leg is slightly chipped. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Allegory of Scent, 2nd H. 19th 

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Description: Porcelain with white glaze, polychrome painting and gildingPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, 2nd half 19th centuryModel: Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1696-1749), 1745Underglaze-blue swords mark (pommel period), engraved model number ‘1051’ and impressed form number ‘85’ on the undersideFrom a series ‘The Five Senses’Height: 28 cmProvenance: Private collection, Germany Condition:The figure is in very good condition, showing minor rubbing of the painting. No evidence of restauration under UV light.Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1695-1749)In February 1735 the sculptor applied for the porcelain factory in Meissen and was employed on 18th April 1735, with a salary of 12 thalers a month as an assistant to Johann Joachim Kaendler. In the following 20 years, he was his most important employee. Together with Kaendler, Eberlein worked on the most famous Meissen models, such as the Swan Service, the pope busts and the large figure of Augustus III.Porcelain Factory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus, it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Allegory of Hearing, 1934-45

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Description: Porcelain with white glaze, polychrome painting and gildingPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, after 1934-45Model: Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1696-1749), 1745Underglaze-blue crossed swords mark, engraved model number ‘1062’ and impressed form number ‘127’ on the undersideFrom a series ‘The Five Senses’Literature: Mitchel: Meissen Collector's Catalogue 1910, p. 73 (ill.)Height: 29 cmProvenance: Private collection, Germany Condition:The figure is in very good condition. The inspection under UV light reveals minor strokes of retouching to the end piece of the lute.Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1695-1749)In February 1735 the sculptor applied for the porcelain factory in Meissen and was employed on 18th April 1735, with a salary of 12 thalers a month as an assistant to Johann Joachim Kaendler. In the following 20 years, he was his most important employee. Together with Kaendler, Eberlein worked on the most famous Meissen models, such as the Swan Service, the pope busts and the large figure of Augustus III.Porcelain Factory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus, it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meisse, Allegory of Summer, Late 19th C. 

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: presumably Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1695-1749), from a series 'Four Seasons', c. 1745Base bottom with underglaze blue crossed sword mark as well as incised model number '688'A standing female figure in antique vestment with ear of corns as well as sickle in her right hand, to her left a cupid with a bunch of earsOn a square, gold accented rocaille base with scattered flowers Height: 29 cm Condition:The figure is in good, age-related condition. Minor parts like the left arm and a few ears have been restored. The painting is partially slight rubbed and repaired in places. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Allegory of Winter, 2nd H. 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain with white glaze, polychrome painting and gildingPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, second half 19th centuryModel: Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1696-1749) – German sculptor and modeler, working for Meissen since 1735Underglaze-blue swords mark (pommel period), engraved model number ‘691’ and incised number ‘73’ on the undersideFrom a ‘Seasons’ series Literature: Königlich Sächsische Porzellanmanufaktur zu Meissen, price index 1904, plate No.5 (ill.)Height: 29 cm1st choiceProvenance: Private collection, Germany Condition:The figure shows wear consistent with age. There are several firing cracks as well as chips to the base and the putto. No evidence of restauration under UV-light.Johann Friedrich Eberlein (1695-1749)In February 1735 the sculptor applied for the porcelain factory in Meissen and was employed on 18th April 1735, with a salary of 12 thalers a month as an assistant to Johann Joachim Kaendler. In the following 20 years, he was his most important employee. Together with Kaendler, Eberlein worked on the most famous Meissen models, such as the Swan Service, the pope busts and the large figure of Augustus III.Porcelain Factory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus, it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 3-Pcs. Mantel Clock Set ‘Four Seasons’, L. 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold painted, enamel, brassPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, est. in 1710, late 19th centuryCandlestick models by Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) – German sculptor and porcelain modeler in Meissen, from the year 1855-1863Movement by Japy Frère & Cie, France (est. 1773) – French clock manufactory, late 19th centuryEach with underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model numbers ‘2172’, ‘E 128’ and ‘E 129’, painter’s numbers, and repairer’s numbers; the movement embossed with the ‘Medaille d’Honneur’ coin mark of Japy Frère & Cie., as well as various numberedThree-pieces mantel clock set, comprises of one mantel clock and two suitable candlesticksCircular brass movement with spring driven, lever escapement, count wheel on bell, power reserve: 8 days, half-hour strikeWhite circular enamel dial with ornamented bezel, open-worked clockhandsCurved case body on three volute feet and a triangular socket, sculptural setted flowers and leaves surrounded by four allegorical cupids of the ‘Four Seasons’A pair four-flamed candlesticks, each with two sculptural molded allegorical cupid figures of the ‘Four Seasons’Dimensions of the clock (without socket): 46.7 x 30 x 13 cm, height of the candlesticks: 49.7 cm each Condition:The mantel clock set is in good, partial restored condition with minimal signs of wear. The gilding is partial minimal rubbed. Some restorations can be partial found at the blossoms and leaves, at the holders, at four figures as well as at the dial. The blossoms and leaves with some small losses. The candle sticks were partial new mounted, one candlestick with one cancellation mark. The pendulum and the winding key are missing. During in house testing the clock was functional. Long-term precision and regularity cannot be guaranteed.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated.Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893)The German sculptor Ernst August Leuteritz trained first as an embosser at the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. After his studies at the Dresden Art School in the class of Ernst Rietschel between 1838 and 1843, he worked as a modeler at the Meissen manufactory. From 1849 to 1886, he worked as the director of the design department in Meissen. His porcelain ware was held in the style of neo-gothic and neo-renaissance. Later he adapted several services and vessels of the 18th century. His breakfast set, decorated with lilies of the valley and fans, were particularly popular. Also, the snake handle vase, which was inspired by ancient forms, became a bestseller of the factory. Still today, the vase is produced in two sizes and with different décors. Leuteritz is considered one of the most productive modelers of the 19th century in Meissen. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A 3-Pcs. Mantel Clock Set with Marti Movement, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold painted, enamel, brassExecution by Porcelain Manufacture Meissen, est. in 1710, c. 1900Candlestick models by Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) – German sculptor and porcelain modeler in Meissen, from the year 1883Movement by S. Marti & Cie, Paris (est. 1832) – French clock manufactory, c. 1900Each with underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model numbers ‘572’, ‘2721’ and ‘G 194’, painter’s numbers, and repairer’s numbers; movement embossed with the ‘Medaille d’Oro’ coin mark of S. Marti & Cie, as well as various numberedThree-pieces mantel clock set, comprises of one mantel clock and two suitable candlesticksCircular brass movement with spring driven, lever escapement, count wheel, power reserve: 8 days, half-hour strikeWhite circular enamel dial with glazed beaded and egg-and-dart bezel, blued clockhands of steelCurved case body on four volute feet and a rectangular socket, sculptural setted flowers and leaves surrounded by cupids and a female figure, crest by a cage-shaped top with flower bouquet; the socket painted with a figural scene in a vignetteA pair suitable four-flamed candlesticks, each with three sculptural molded music playing cupid figuresDimensions of the clock (without socket): 56 x 21 x 16 cm, height of the candlesticks: 54 cm each Condition:The mantel clock set is in good, partial restored condition with minimal signs of wear and manufacturer flaws. The gilding is partial minimal rubbed. Some restorations can be partial found at the blossoms and leaves, the flower bouquet of the clock, the holders as well as at the figures and instruments. The blossoms and leaves with some minimal losses. The flower crest of the clock as well as the holders were new mounted. One violin shows a crack. The door on the rear was presumably subsequent renewed. The sword mark with one cancellation mark. The pendulum and bell are missing.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated.Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893)The German sculptor Ernst August Leuteritz trained first as an embosser at the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. After his studies at the Dresden Art School in the class of Ernst Rietschel between 1838 and 1843, he worked as a modeler at the Meissen manufactory. From 1849 to 1886, he worked as the director of the design department in Meissen. His porcelain ware was held in the style of neo-gothic and neo-renaissance. Later he adapted several services and vessels of the 18th century. His breakfast set, decorated with lilies of the valley and fans, were particularly popular. Also, the snake handle vase, which was inspired by ancient forms, became a bestseller of the factory. Still today, the vase is produced in two sizes and with different décors. Leuteritz is considered one of the most productive modelers of the 19th century in Meissen. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pendule with Exotic Birds, 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome painted, parcel-gilt, enamel, brass, parcel-giltExecution by Porcelain Manufacture Meissen, est. in 1710, 19th centuryUnderglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘686’, and painter’s numberCircular brass movement with silk suspension, count wheel mechanism, lever escapementPower reserve: 8 daysHalf-hour strike on bellWhite, circular enamel dial, faceted glass bezel with revolving acanthus friezeRectangular socket on rocaille feet, circular clock caseRich decorated with flowers and leaves, the socket with two parrots, the sides with two exotic birds, crest by a nest and two birdsDimensions: 31.5 x 27.5 x 14 cm Condition:The clock is in partial restored condition with minimal manufacturer flaws. The restorations can be found partial at the flowers and leaves, at four birds, at the branch as well as at the right foot. The case was presumably new mounted on the socket. The gilding is partial minimal rubbed. The dial shows oxidation marks´, one crack and one loss. The pendulum and the winding key are missing. During in house testing the clock was functional. Long-term precision and regularity cannot be guaranteed.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Porcelain Clock in Meissen Style, Presumably Germany, c. 1880

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Description: Auction announcements 25th November 2016 Lot 16: The new starting price is 1,500 €.br> Porcelain, polychrome painted, parcel-gilt, enamel, brassPresumably Germany, In Meissen Manner c. 1880On the bottom with underglaze blue ‘V’ each, numbered, as well as the movement numbered ‘674’Circular French brass movement with pendulum, spring driven and count wheel movementPower reserve: 8 daysHalf-hour strike on bellWhite circular enamel dial with blue Arabic and Roman numerals, open-worked gilt Louis XV clockhandsBezel with vaulted glazing, movement with frosted glass plate doorRectangular stand with volute feet, sculptural worked flowers and leaves aas well as a cartouche with a landscape in the centerCurved clock case with sculptural worked flowers, leaves and grapevines as well as volute and acanthus décor, crest of a flower basket, flanked by two approaching Putti with a flower garlandA winding key and an appraisal report are enclosedDimensions (incl. stand): 42 x 26 x 13 cmRich decorated figural porcelain clock with an intense coloration in the style of the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Condition:The clock is in good condition with minimal manufacturer flaws. Some minimal signs of wear like abrasion on the gilding and losses on the flowers and leaves are partial shown. Some small restorations can be partial found. The frosted glass plate was presumably subsequent renewed. During in house testing the clock was functional. Long-term precision and regularity cannot be guaranteed. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Very Large Neo-Rococo Mantel Clock, France, 2nd H. 19th C.

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Description: Bronze, gold-plated, brass, metal, glassFrance, 2nd half of the 19th centuryBack plate numbered ‘389’ and ‘48’; dial inscribed ‘Duplanil St. Etienne’Circular brass movement, spring driven, lever escapement8 day running durationCount wheel half-hour striking mechanism on bell, spring suspension, brass pendulumWhite enamel-dial with Arabic hour-markers, outer minute ring, steel hands, bezel with vaulted glazingSplendid Louis XC style case, profusely embellished with rocailles, floral and vegetal elements, crest in the shape of a flower vase with festoonsA winding key is includedDimenisons: 73 x 39.5 x 25 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The clock is in good condition bearing usual signs of age and wear. During in-house testing, the timepiece was fully functional; no guarantee on long term precision and regularity. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Ormolu Clock, Europa & Bull after Saint-Germain, Paris, 19th C.

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Description: Bronze, parcel-gilt and patinated, enamel, brass, glass, textileMovement by J. Lefebvre Fils, ParisThe casing after the model "Europa and the Bull" by Jean-Joseph Saint-Germain (1919-1791), Paris Master 1750On the dial illegible inscribed ‘…re Le R…‘ and ‚A Paris‘, on the movement embossed ‘J. Lefebvre Fils Paris’, as well as numbered ‘7593’Circular brass movement, pendulum with spring drivenPower reserve: 1 weekRack striking mechanism with half-hour strikeCambered white enamel dial with cambered glazed bezel, open-worked gilt clockhandsOpen-worked socket in rococo style, above a bronze Taurus flanked by two figures, on the Taurus the clock movement with dial in a rococo style case, crest of a sitting female figure with garlandsDimensions: 56 x 44 x 21,5 cmSophisticated ormolu pendule with Europa and The BullObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The pendulum clock is in good condition, consistent with age. Some minimal traces of wear like abrasions at the gilding, the patina and the dial are scattered shown. Some holes in the textile of the clock case can be found in places. The pendulum, the bell and the winding key are missing. During in house testing the clock was functional. Long-term precision and regularity cannot be guaranteed.Jean-Joseph Saint-Germain (1719-1791)The studied bronze founder Jean-Joseph Saint-Germain is well known of his figural clock cases as well as cartel clocks. Inspired by mythological themes and animal figures he made numerous high-quality clock cases between 1742 and 1776 – the time of the Rococo. Saint-Germain sets also new standards for the decorative art of the neo-classicism. His largest and most elaborated clock case was made for the King of Denmark in 1766/67 after a model by Augustin Pajou. Above this the master of Paris created also bronze mounts for furnitures. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Grande Sonnerie Pendule D'Officier, Carriage Clock, 19th C

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Description: Bronze, gold-plated, brass, metal, glassFrance, 2nd H. 19th century for the GErman MArketBack plate inscribed ‘Cohen Fils (?) Paris’ as well as numbered ‘557’Rectangular brass movement, lever escapement, balance wheel, fine adjustment4/4 strike on 2 bellsRepetition function, alarm functionStrike silent function, grande sonnerie, petite sonnerie, Engraved in German: 'Grosses Schlagwerk, kleines, Ruhepunkt' (Grande Sonnerie, Petite, Silent)White enamel dial, Roman indices, outer minute ring, Spade-hands, three additional dials for days of the week and months as well as alarmOval case with 5 glazed sides, curved handle as well as delicate floral and ornamental engravingsWith two winding keysDimensions: 15.4 x 12.4 x 10 cmProvenance: private property Stockholm Carriage clocks – small, portable, spring-driven clocks with carrying handles – are among the most popular clocks with collectors today. This type of travelling clock was developed by Abraham-Louis Breguet (1747-1823), one of the most famous French watchmakers of his time. At the turn of the 19th century, these watches were called pendules de voyage. In the early 19th and 20th main producer was France, but they were most sold in England and the United States.Condition:The carriage clock is in very good condition, consistent with age and bearing minor signs of wear. During in house testing, the timepiece was running; no guarantee on long term precision and regularity. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Large Tortoiseshell Boulle Pendule, E. Gübelin, Swiss, c 1900

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Description: Wood, tortoiseshell, bronze, gilt, brass, enamel, glassEduard Gübelin, Lucerne, c. 1900, who 1899 overtakes the business of his father in law Jacob BreitschmiedCase with an enamel cartouche ‘E. Gübelin Lucerne’, movement with coin mark ‘GÜBELIN / LUCERNE / SWISS’, and numbered ‘271 / 11.4’, as well as the dial on the rear with a further markSquare brass movement, lever escapement, spring driven, power reserve: 8 days, and count wheel half-hour strike on spiral gong, pendulumCircular brass dial with a floral structured decoration, white enamel cartouches for the black numerals, clockhands of blued steel, bezel with cambered glass, the reverse with hinged wooden door with floral Boulle decoration behind the movementHigh rectangular wooden case with tortoiseshell Boulle marquetry, glass plates at three sides on four scrolled acanthus feet with rounded gable, crest by a curved profiled top with a trumpet playing angelThe areas of the corners and edges with mounted leafage decoration, mounted floral decoration with a sculptural eagle and a shell motif below the dial, the veneer with floral brass inlaysA winding key is enclosedDimensions: 99.5 x 40.5 x 19 cm Condition:The clock is in good condition, consistent with age. Some usual signs of age & wear like abrasions at the gilding are scattered shown. During in house testing the clock was fully functional. Long-term precision and regularity cannot be guaranteed.BoulleThe technique of Boulle is a carpenter technique of refining surfaces of furniture and objets d’art. It is named after the French cabinetmaker André-Charles Boulle (1642-1732). Main feature of the Boulle-marquetry is the usage of tortoise shell in combination with brass or tin. One distinguishes between two contrasting techniques. The première-partie is the placing of the bright brass or tin inlays before the dark background of the tortoise shell. Since this was very expensive and costly due to the usage of natural products, the negative that resulted during the manufacture of the première-partie was often used. This is called contre-partie. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A 3-Pcs. Bronze Mantel Clock Set with Griffins, France, C. 1880

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Description: Bronze, gilt, enamel, brassMovement numbered ‘14379 6‘Three-pieces mantel clock set, comprises of one mantel clock and two suitable candelabrasCircular spring driven brass movement, pendulum with spring suspension, power reserve: 8 days, half-hour strike on bell by count wheelWhite circular brass dial with white enamel cartouches with Roman numerals, the center with a structured ornament, clockhands of steel, hinged cambered glass bezelArchitectural, open-worked case with two flat pilasters in Rococo style, the sides flanked by griffins with drapery, rounded top with two curved tympana with vases, volutes and leaves decoration, on a curved profiled socket with three feet and a floral friezeA pair suitable five-flamed candelabras with a stand with two griffins A winding key and an appraisal report are enclosedDimensions of the clock: 39.4 x 34.3 x 18.5 cm, height of the candelabras: 43 cm each Condition:The mantel clock set is in good condition. Some minimal usual signs of wear can be found. The gilding is partial rubbed. During in house testing the clock was fully functional. Long-term precision and regularity cannot be guaranteed. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Rococo Marquetry Chest-of-Drawers, Franconia c. 1765

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Description: Coniferous wood, walnut and maple veneer, gilt brassFranconia, c. 1765A two-drawer body with convex front on curved square legsSlightly projecting top with rounded moldingFront and top contrated with geometrical patternsFloral-shaped handles and escutcheonsTow keys are includedDimensions: 88.5 x 113.5 x 53.5 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition:The chest-of-drawers is in good condition, consistent with age. Interior, moldings and legs have been reworked. Smaller blemishes and cracks to the veneer of the top cover were professionally filled. (bde)  Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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An Empire Chest-of-Drawers with Caryatids, Germany, c. 1810

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Description: Pinewood, veneered, lacquered black, partially carved and parcel-gilt, bronze, gold-plated, marbleGermany, um 1810High-rectangular Empire chest-of-drawersBody with four drawers on conical tapered square feetIn-between two slightly projecting moldings the inserted marble slabCentral drawers flanked by two figural carved caryatidsOriginal and rare fittings with two half-length portraits facing each other, inscribed ‘Völkerdank’ in OuroborosDimensions: 95.5 x 48 x 43 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition:The chest-of-drawers is in age-related, optically appealing condition. The lacquer was supplemented, the drawers were overhauled inside. Front and sides show fine hairline and tension cracks, occasionally blemishes to the veneer as well as slight warping. The inner sides of the drawers are partially wormy (inactive). The marble slab with a crack in the upper left corner. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Boulle Style Napoleon III Cabinet, France, 1850-70

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Description: Conifer wood, black lacquer, painted in tortoiseshell-look, brass, gilt bronze, grey-veined marbleFrance, 1850-70Single door chest, curved narrow sides and front, removable marble top; structured inside with two shelvesThe body contrasted with rectangular panels, botanical fittings, caryatids and an oval leaf friezeThe front painted in tortoiseshell-look decorated with strapwork and a central flower bouquet, fittings in gilt bronze1 key is enclosedDimensions: 106 x 46.3 x 43 cm Condition: The commode is in very good restored condition. The gilding is partially slightly rubbed. The tortoiseshell painting with small age-related cracks and slight warping.Napoleon IIIThe style of Napoleon III, also called Second Empire is linked to the reign of Napoleon III (1852-1870). The revival of 18th century king styles means a return to mainly dark woods, gilt bronzes as well as mother of pearl or ivory, which contrasted the dark grounds. The resurgence of Boulle style veneer and marquetry works defining this period. The interior was dominated by luxury as well as convenience and extreme opulence. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Huge Elephant Bird Egg, Madagascar, 17th Century

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Description: Fossil egg of an elephant bird egg (Aepyornithidae) or MadagascarMadagascar, 17th century or earlierComplete and intact, no cracks, small opening to the side, inside some sandy dustDimensions: c. 30 x 22.5 cmRare specimen of an intact elephant bird egg; the eggs of the flightless bird that was already extinct in the 17th century are a popular collector's item due to their rarity and sizeAn absolute museum piece: undamaged Elephant bird eggs like this are auctioned off for six-digit sums Offered egg was laid by a giant elephant bird (Aepyornithidae). The extinct animals are the largest bird that ever existed on our planet. The elephant bird lived in Madagascar, was hunted by the natives of the island and exterminated even before the appearance of Europeans. The birds are said to have reached a height of up to 3 meters and a weight of more than half a ton. In the 19th century, the eggs were extremely popular and very expensive with collectors as historical curiosity. It is generally believed that today there exist only a few undamaged eggs.Condition:The egg is in a very good, intact condition. A small opening to the side. The size measures c. 30 x 22.5 cm. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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John Betts, Viola with 2 High Quality Viola Bows, London, 1784

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Description: Base, apron and neck of maple, cover made of softwood, stainedFingerboard, tailpiece and chin rest of ebonyLondon, England, 1784Workshop John Betts (1752-1823) - London violin maker and dealerAt the bottom maker's stamp 'T. BETTS ROYAL EXCHANGE LONDON' as well as dated label on the inside 'John Betts No 2 North Piazza Royal Exchange London 1784'Enclosed two high-quality viola bows: 1 x gold mounted with frog made of tortoiseshell, firing stamp 'Garner Wilson' as well a 1 x silver mounted with ebony frog and firing stamp 'H. Byrom', both England, 2nd half of 20th centuryWith a contemporary viola case Body length: 39 cm; overall length: 65 cmLength bows: 75 cmLength viola case: 80 cmBetts hired some of the best 18th and 19th century British craftsmen while he primarily acted as a trader Condition:The viola is in good condition with traces of usage consistent with age. The body shows a sound post crack, slight abrasion of the glaze, typical dryness cracks as well as minor scratch marks. One bow needs new hair. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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An Equestrian Statue, Prussian Cuirassier, Wood, Mid 19th C

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Description: Hardwood, carved, stained and polished; metal and cardboard, patinated; oak plinthGermany, Mid 19th centuryElaborately carved statue of a gallopping Prussian cuirassier with Tricorne, the arm raised, the saddle cloth 'Schabrunken' monogrammed 'FRW' (Friedrich Wilhelm), branding of the horse in shape of a crown, the horse tack detailed executed in metalthe rider can be taken off. Dimensions of the horse: c. 54 x 39 x 15 cm; base: 2.5 x 21.5 x 47 cmProvenance: Private collection, GermanyObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition: The equestrian statue is in good condition according to age, showing fine cracks in the wood and minor abrasion of the patination. The tail and the ears of the horse show small losses. The base is more recent and in very good condition. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Four-Way Sand Glass, Pulpit Hourglass, Germany, 17th/18th C

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Description: Wood, carved, patinated and parcel-gilt; brass, embossed, chiseled and patinated; glass, cardboard, cord, marble sandGermany, 17th/18th centuryDimensions: c. 24 x 25 cmwithin a rocaille relief a mirrored monogramm 'FJGvW' and a crowned Coat of Arms showing a stag A typical rotating baroque pulpit hourglass, or ‘Sablier en Buffet d’Orgues’ to measure the time during a preachment in church.Usually each hourglass contained different amounts of sand. The first had one-quarter hour of sand; the second with sand for half an hour ; the third, sand for three-quarters of an hour; and the fourth contained the full hour's measure of sand.The Arms and the Monogram can be ssumed to belong to a nobleman as patron Condition:The hourglass shows wear consistent with age. One of the glasses is missing. The metal is slightly bent in places and shows abrasion of the patina as well as oxidation marks. The cardboard shows some losses and the wood shows some paint flaking. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Large Teak & Iron Bound Storage Trunk, India, c. 1900

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Description: Wood, ironIndia, Rahjastan, c. 1900Standing on wooden feet with all-round iron bands, two hinges on the lid, two side handles and two locks; the front decorated with applied flowers in cassettesWedding chest Dimensions: c. 80 x 112 x 64 cm Condition:The chest is in good condition, according to age, showing scratch marks from use, especially inside, small losses and minor rust marks on the iron. The cover has been restored. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Tramp Art Cupboard, Germany, Alpine Area C. 1900

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Description: Wood, colored glass, metalHigh rectangular body on four squared feet, the lower area with a metal handle mounted drawer, above a hinged door with a diamond-patterned glass plateNumerous small rectangular carved wooden plates with notch carving décorInside a device of bars for 4 shelves and one clothes rail1 original key is enclosedDimensions: 200.5 x 102.5 x 55 cmThis presumably from a family property coming and handmade cupboard is an extremely rarely object of a large Tramp Work or Tramp Art style object Condition:The cupboard is in good condition, consistent with age. Some usual traces of wear like small bumpings and tension cracks can be found. The feet, the areas of the edges and corners, the inside door and the top with partial small losses. The glass plate was presumably subsequent renewed.Tramp ArtThe origin of the handmade art movement Tramp Art is inconclusive. Its popularity arose especially in the USA between 1870 and 1940. Primarily old, discarded cigar boxes or shipping crates whittled into layers of different geometric shapes having the outside edges of each layer notch carved. They were made by simple tools like pocketknifes. The edges were also furnished of the characterized notch carvings. Especially small objects like frames or boxes, but also large furnitures were made of those small wooden plates. The term ‘Tramp Work’ was first published in an article by Francis Lichten in the Pennsylvania Folk Life Magazine in 1959. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Very Large Senneh Rug with Floral Pattern, 2nd H. 19th C

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Description: Wool on wool, knotted, in varying shades of red and brown, as well as beige, green and deep blue Persia, Sanandaj, 2nd Half 19th CKnot density: c. 160,000 knots per qm Floral-patterned main field on a deep blue ground Main border as well as inner and outer guard stripes with stylized botanical décor and tendril friezesDimensions: 645 x 370 cm  Condition:Good condition, consistent with age. The edges are partially worn. The fringes of one side are missing. The apron of this side is slightly discolored in places. Occasional slight stains on the reverse. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Bakhtiar Palace Carpet 22m², ex Parviz Khan Esfandiari, c. 1895

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Description: Wool on cotton, knotted, in varying red, blue and brown tones, yellow and greenPersia, c. 1895Knot density: c. 160.000 knots per square meterField with high-stylized lined vase motifs and stylized plant ornamentsMain border with stylized flowers in alternating colorsGuard stripes with floral motifsA certificate from the year 1988 is enclosedDimensions: 384 x 570 cmThis palace rug was made for the palace of The Bakhtiar prince Parviz Khan Esfandiari in Isfahan, Persia and purchesed directly from there Condition:The rug is in good condition, consistent with age. The edges are worn in places. The aprons are missing, the fringes were shorten. The pile is slight thinned in places. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Splendid Blossom Karabagh Southern Caucasus, 1st Q. 18th C.

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Description: Wool on wool, in blue, yellow, red, brown, green and beigeSouthern Caucasus, 1st quarter of the 18th centuryInitialed ‘A.K.J.’ in rewoven area near the centerKnot density: c. 240,000 knots per square meterVibrant blue field with mirrored, stylized blossom décorMain border with stylized flower headsOuter guardstripe with tendrilsDimensions: 540 x 232 cmProvenance: ex private collection Aram K. JerrehianLong pile rugs of distinctive design and vibrant colors like offered one are often fragmentary so this rare example is considered of high collectable valueObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Rugs from the districts of Karabagh and Kazak in the southern and western Caucasus are characterized by long wool piles with a much lower knot density resulting in bolder, less detailed geometrical patterns. The motifs are possibly based on classical Persian and Anatolian forms. Offered rug presents stylized flower heads flanked by curling sickle leaves that dominate the design. The central medallion and the four corner ornaments are reminiscent of the so-called Eagle type from Chelabard. In 1996, the carpet was presented at the exhibition ‘Highstyle to Homestyle’ at the Woodmere Art Museum, Pennsylvania, and at ‘International Conference on Oriental Carpets’ in Washington D.C. Similar examples of blue ground blossom carpets are for example in the Vakiflar Museum in Istanbul (inventory number A-300) and in the collection of Harold Keshishian.Literature:Dennis R. Dodds and Murray L. Eiland, (eds.), Oriental Rugs from Atlantic Collections, Philadelphia, 1996, pl 84.Cf. Belkis Balpinar and Udo Hirsch, Carpets of the Vakiflar Museum Istanbul, Wesel 1988, pl 77.Cf. Charles Grant Ellis, Early Caucasian Rugs, Washington D.C. 1975, pl 22.Condition:The carpet is in an age-related condition and bears heavier signs of wear as well as reparations. A restoration is recommended. The pile is irregularly thin; the edges are worn. The apron is missing. In places the fringes are missing or have been cut. The field with some blemishes and small holes, these were partially rewoven. The narrow sides each backed with three wide textile strips. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Tabriz Rug with Central Flower Medallion, 15,4m², c. 1900

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Description: Fine wool on cotton, knotted, in red as well as varying shades of blue green, ochre, yellow, and beige Persia, c. 1900Knot density: c. 360,000 knots per qmThe red-grounded field with a central blue flower medallion and radial arranged bouquets The vase motives of the main border partially overlapping to the field, between octofoil medallions with peoniesMain border as well as outer and inner guard stripes densely filled with leaf and flower tendrilsDimensions: 443 x 348 cm Condition:Good overall condition. Partially slightly stained, the yellow of vase motives is faded. The pile is occasionally thin. The edges are worn slightly in places and re-stitched. The aprons are missing, cut fringes on both sides. The field with two small repairs. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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KPM, Porcelain Plaque Antigone after Emil Teschendorff, 19th C

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychromeRoyal Porcelain Factory Berlin (KPM), established in 1763Verso on the unglazed surface impressed scepter mark with ‘K.P.M.’ as well as further impressed and incised marks, handwritten notes and a stampDimensions: 32.9 x 19.6 cmOriginal, high-rectangular gold bronze decorative frame: 47 x 34 cm Porcelain plaque after the painting Antigone by Emil Teschendorff (1833-1894); Antigone is a main character from the tragedy by ancient Greek poet Sophocles A porcelain plate in upright format with very fine and detailed painting enclosed within an original, gold bronze decorative frame with black floral patterns. Depicted is an upright standing young woman dressed in a white top and a long black antique-like robe, her hair is black and curly. She gazes dreamily towards the left and carries a jug in her right arm. In the background a seascape with rocks can be seen.Condition:The porcelain plaque is in very good condition barely showing any sings of age and wear. The frame is well preserved and only occasionally shows blemishes and usual abrasion.Royal Porcelain Factory Berlin (KPM)The first porcelain manufactory at Berlin was founded on the suggestion of Frederick the Great by Wilhelm Caspar Wegely and J. Benckgraff in 1752, yet already 5 years later production was stopped because the king was not satisfied with the porcelain. With the invasion of Meissen by the Prussian army, many modelers and porcelain painters came to Berlin, where in 1761 the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky founded a new factory. This was finally bought in 1763 by Frederick the Great, who named it ‘Royal Porcelain Factory’ and introduced the cobalt blue scepter mark. During this time, the factory began producing exquisite tableware in a late Rococo style, which was painted with flowers, birds and scenes after Watteau Boucher and Dutch masters in vivid colors. Famous porcelain painters of the manufactory were K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme and K. J. C. Klipfel; master modelers were Friedrich Elias Meyer and his brother Wilhelm Christian. Typical Berlin porcelain patterns on tableware were moldings, scale-ground borders, landscapes, birds and animals, molded basketwork patterns and pierced rims. After Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß took over as artistic director in 1798, the tableware was decorated in underglaze painting with landscapes and cityscapes in delicate colors. In 1871 the factory was moved to its present location at the Tiergarten near the Spree, so that the raw materials and finished products were finally able to be transported by ship. In 1886 the painting of porcelain tiles was added as a new line of production under the direction of Professor Alexander Kips. After the destruction of the factory during WWII, KPM was taken over in 1988 by the state of Berlin and since 2006 has been in the possession of Berlin based private banker Jörg Woltmann. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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KPM, Porcelain Plaque with Medea, after N. Sichel, 1908

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychromeKönigliche Porzellan-Manufaktur Berlin (KPM), established 1763After Nathaniel Sichel (1843-1907) – German painter and illustratorVerso on the unglazed surface impressed scepter mark with ‘K.P.M.’ as well as further impressed and incised marks, and inscribed ‘Medea after Sichel‘Depiction of Medea, daughter of King Aeetes of Colchis and wife of Jason, in front of an antique column, behind her back she hides a daggerDimensions: 23.4 x 16.2 cmHigh-rectangular gold bronze decorative frame: 35.5 x 28 cm Condition:Porcelain plaque and frame are in very good condition, barely bearing signs of age and wear. The frame with several tension cracks. Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur BerlinDie erste Berliner Porzellanmanufaktur wurde 1752 auf Anregung Friedrichs des Großen von Wilhelm Caspar Wegely und J. Benckgraff gegründet, doch bereits 5 Jahre später wurde die Produktion eingestellt, da der König mit dem Porzellan nicht zufrieden war. Durch den Einmarsch der preußischen Armee in Meißen, kamen viele Modelleure und Porzellanmaler nach Berlin, wo 1761 der Kaufmann Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky eine neue Manufaktur gründete. Diese wurde schließlich 1763 von Friedrich dem Großen gekauft, welcher ihr den Namen „Königliche Porzellanmanufaktur“ verlieh sowie die kobaltblau Zeptermarke einführte. Während dieser Zeit begann die Fabrik mit der Produktion von vorzüglichem Tafelgeschirr im Rokokostil, das in kräftigen Farben mit Blumen, Vögeln und Szenen nach Watteau, Boucher und holländischen Meistern bemalt wurde. Berühmte Porzellanmaler der Manufaktur waren K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme und K. J. C. Klipfel; Modellmeister waren z.B. Friedrich Elias Meyer und sein Bruder Wilhelm Christian. Typische Berliner Porzellanmuster auf Tafelgeschirr waren der Neuzierrat (seit 1763), Rokokoschnörkelreliefs auf den Rändern, der Reliefzierrat (seit 1765) und der Antikzierrat (ab 1767), pfeifenartige und geriffelte Muster. Nachdem 1798 Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß die künstlerische Leitung übernommen hatte, wurde das Geschirr in Unterglasurmalerei mit Landschafts- und Stadtansichten in zarten Farben geschmückt. Im Jahre 1871 wurde die Manufaktur an ihren heutigen Standort am Tiergarten nahe der Spree verlegt, wodurch die Rohstoffe und Fertigprodukte endlich auch per Schiff transportiert werden konnten. 1886 wurde die Malerei von Porzellanfliesen unter der Leitung von Professor Alexander Kips als neuer Produktionszweig aufgenommen. Nach der Zerstörung der Manufaktur im Zweiten Weltkrieg wurde KPM 1988 vom Land Berlin übernommen; seit 2006 ist sie im Besitz des Berliner Privatbankiers Jörg Woltmann. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Louis Knoeller, Flower Girl, Porcelain Plaque, Germany, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain plaque, painted polychromePresumably Carlsbad Porcelain Manufactory Carl Knoll, established 1844Louis Knoeller – Porcelain painter, active in Dresden c. 1891After the painting ‘Venetianisches Blumenmädchen’ by Nathaniel Sichel (1843-1907) – German painter and illustratorSigned at the lower left ‘Knoeller’ as well as barely legible the Signture of N. Sichel behindVerso with black shield mark and impressed number ‘8?4’ as well as inscribed ‘Venetianisches Blumenmädchen N. Sichel’Dimensions: 21.5 x 14.5 cmCf.: W. Neuwirth. Porzellanmaler-Lexikon, Vol. 2, p 16Gilt, open-worked decorative frame: 35 x 29 cm Porcelain plaque in upright format featuring an extremely fine and detailed painting by Louis Knoeller. It is portrait of a standing young brunette woman in profile, turned to the right, wearing a blue skirt and a white top. In her left hand she holds a basket full of flowers.Condition:Plaque and frame are in very good condition barely bearing any signs of age and wear. The frame with some tension cracks. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Large Ormolu-Mounted Sèvres-Style Cobalt Vase, 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain with white glaze, cobalt-blue fond as well as polychrome painting with gold accents; bronze; giltFrance, 20th CenturySpurious Blue Sèvres mark  ‘LL’ for inside the lidThe reserves featuring a finely painted landscape resp. gallant scene; the latter inscribed ‘Lancret’After Nicolas Lancret (1690-1743) - French painter of RococoThe bronze mounting with two figurative handles and pierced decoration in the classicist styleTotal height, including lid: 76 cm Condition:The vase is in very good condition, showing minor wear to the bronze mount. No evidence of restauration under UV light. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Sèvres-Style Pair of Vases with Bronze Mountings, France. 19t

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Description: Porcelain, cobalt blue ground, partially painted polychrome, heightened with gold, bronze, gold-platedFrance, late 19th centurySceneries each signed ‘Gèrard’On bronze bases trumpet foot with disc nodeAmphora-shaped body with shell-embellished handlesSides circumferentially painted with high-quality scenic motifs Rich and elaborate gold paint with partially gilded linesHeights: each 30 cm Condition:The pair of vases is in very good condition and bears usual signs of age and wear. In places the paint is slightly rubbed. Necks of the vases each with one hairline crack. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Sèvres, Small Vase with Pâte-sur-pâte Painting, France, 1883

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Description: Porcelain, pâte-sur-pâte painting on a light roses ground, gold paintedFrance, 1883Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres - established in 1756Red manufacture mark as well as underglaze blue 'S83'Spherical body with slim neck on a short foot rimOn both sides figural and ornamental depictions in relief including a female dancer with sword and mask attended by two puttiHeight: 15 cmThe highly artistically pâte-sur-pâte painting was especially admired in the Art Nouveau period due to the possibility of highly moved and transparent depictionsObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition:The vase is in very good condition, only the golden rim is slightly rubbed consistent with age.Manufacture Royale de Porcelaine de Sèvres (since 1756)The porcelain factory of Sèvres is one of the most important European manufacturers of soft paste china. Since 1756, its headquarters have been based in Sèvres. The manufactory was founded in 1740 at the Château de Vincennes on the outskirts of Paris. Vincennes began with the imitation of Meissen porcelain in order to curb the import. In 1745, the production of soft past china was launched, which enabled a number of new shapes and colors. One of the most important clients of the factory was Madame de Pompadour (1721-1764), so that the factory gained a great importance and Louis XV decided the construction of the Sèvres manufactory. In 1760, it came into royal possession. In 1790, it was nationalized. Today's Manufacture Nationale de Sèvres has a porcelain museum, where selected pieces are on display, dating from the beginning until now. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pair of Potpourri Vases with Snake Handles, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, white camaieu painting on cobalt blue ground as well as gold paintedMeissen, c. 1900Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Footed urn body on a scquare plinth, pulled-up lateral handles in shape of sculptural worked double snakes, cylindric, open worked lid wit oak wreath as knobLid and foot with gold painted oak foliageBoth sides with white delicately painted female figures in sumptuously draped, antique vestmentsHeight: 29 cm Condition:Both vases are in very good condition, merely one handle shows a minor, professionally restored part. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Lidded Vase with Floral Pâte-sur-Pâte Decor, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome gold paintingMeissen Porcelain Factory, c. 1900Model X 58, c. 1850Décor by Julius or Rudolph Hentschel, c. 1900The base with an underglaze blue crossed swords mark and impressed numbers Ovoid body with low neck, the cylindrical cover with a ball knob The green ground contrasted with floral pâte-sur-pâte painting Height: 24 cm A vase with modified cover, but same floral décor can be found in the collection of the Bröhan-Museum, Berlin. Literature: Cf.: Johannes Just, Meissener Jugendstil-Porzellan, Leipzig, 1983, fig. 20. Cf.. :Bröhan: Porzellan Zweiter Band, Bröhan Museum, Berlin 1996, p 30 Condition: The vase is in overall very good condition. The neck has been restored. The gold décor of the knob shows slight traces of wear. (bde) Meissen Porcelain Factory Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Lidded Vase with Pâte-sur-Pâte Decor, late 19th C

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome gold paintingMeissen Porcelain Factory, late 19th centuryModel X 58, c. 1850Décor presumably by Hans Rudolf or Julius Hentschel, before 1900The base with an underglaze blue crossed swords mark, the incised model number and an impressed numberOvoid body with low neck and a flat cylindrical cover The gray ground contrasted with figural and floral pâte-sur-pâteHeight: 22.7 cm Condition:The vase is in overall very good condition. The gold décor is slightly rubbed on the rim and the cover. (bde)Meissen Porcelain FactoryPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Girl with Doll's Pram, Konrad Hentschel, c. 1910

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome onglaze and underglaze paintedMeissen, c. 1910Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Konrad Hentschel (1872-1907), one of the definitive Art Nouveau modeler of the manufactory Meissen,1905Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model number 'W124' as well as further press numberHeight: 13.5 cmOne of altogether 14 gentle portraits of playing children, the so called 'Hentschel-Kinder', created between 1904 and 1907 for the porcelain manufactory Meissen Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU Condition:The figure is in very good condition with only minimal traces of age. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Konrad Hentschel, Child with Dog, Meissen, c. 1910

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome paintedPorcelain Manufacture Meissen, est. in 1710, c. 1910Model: Konrad Hentschel (1872-1907) – German modeler, from the year 1905Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘W 123’, painter’s number, and repairer’s numberBeneath a bowl sitting little boy looking at a dog, who is drinkingDimensions: 8.5 x 15.5 x 11 cm Condition:The figure is in good condition. The bowl and areas of the dog with restorations.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Friedrich Gornik, Nude Snake Charmer, Bronze, c. 1910

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Description: Bronze, with brown patinaFriedrich Gornik (1877-1943) – Austrian sculptor and artisanSigned in the cast ‘F. Gornik’On natural base the figure of a kneeling nude woman that is playing two flutes to conjure a serpent Dimensions: 31 x 35 x 21 cm Condition:The bronze is in very good condition and only bears minor signs of age and wear as well as age patina. Occasionally manufacturing related flaws like casting seams. The flutes with newer traces of soldering, one of them is loose. Friedrich Gornik (1877-1943)Friedrich Gornik studied at the technical school in Villach, before he went to study with Theodor Charlemont in Vienna. Then he studied at the Vienna School of Applied Arts. He first created ceramic depictions of animals, as well as designs for vases and bowls. Then he made large animal figures in plaster, which were based on zoological studies at Tiergarten Schönbrunn and cast by other artists. During the First World War, he created especially human figures and animal motifs for the ‘Kunstgruppe des k.u.k. Kriegspressequartiers. At this time, he also exhibited at the Vienna Künstlerhaus. His ‘Troika’ was purchased by Emperor Franz Joseph I and is now in the Imperial Villa in Bad Ischl. In addition, his works are represented in several major museums, including the Austrian Gallery Belvedere and the Heeresgeschichtliche Museum in Vienna. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance. Auctionata charges the resale rights tax pursuant to Section 26 of the German Copyright Act (UrhG) towards the buyer in case of the sale of an original work of art or photography prior to 70 years having lapsed since the death of their creator. Therefore, Auctionata charges when purchasing a good – if a protection as an original work of art or photography is given – starting from a hammer price of EUR 400 an additional amount, which is calculated according to Section 26 (2) German Copyright Act (UrhG) and which does not exceed the amount of EUR 12,500. You can find more information about resale rights tax in Auctionata´s table of fees and T&C.

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A Bronze Venus after Barthélemy Prieur, France 17th C. 

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Description: Bronze, cast, dark brown patinatedFrance, 17th centuryAfter a model by Barthélemy Prieur (1536-1611) - Major French scupltor A small nude of a young woman sitting on a trunk covered with a cloth Her hair tied up and covered with a headdress, her left hand resting on her knee the other touching a heelHeight: 13.5 cmAnother version of this rare bronze sculpture, presumably representing a Venus after bath, can be found in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Condition:The bronze figure is in good, age-related condition with usual rubbed parts and traces of oxidation, it has been re-patinated at some point.Barthélemy Prieur (1536-1611)Prieur was born to a Huguenot family in Berzieux, Champagne. He traveled to Italy, where he worked from 1564 to 1568 for Emmanuel Philibert, Duke of Savoy in Turin. Upon his return to France, he worked principally on funerary monuments and busts, but also on small bronzes. In 1571 he began under Jean Bullant at the Palais du Louvre with various sculptural operations and was appointed as a 'Sculpteur du Roi' under king Henry IV in 1594. Numerous of his works nowadays are preserved in different worldwide musees, including a Diana with hin in the Louvre or a woman drawing out a thorn as well as other bronze figures in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Venus de Milo, A Large Bronze Figure, Pres. France, c. 1900

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Description: Cast bronze with copper-colored patinaPresumably France, around 1900Figure of Venus de Milo, Aphrodite of Melos; based on a Hellenistic model from the 2nd century BCThe semi-nude Venus stands in contrapposto on a naturalistic plinth; bared torso without arms and legs covered with a fluted clothHeight, including the plinth: c. 87 cmOne of the best known works of Hellenistic art - an ideal of female beauty Besides the Nike of Samothrace and the Laocoon Group, the Venus de Milo is one of the world's most famous Hellenistic works of art. The statue from the 2nd century BC was discovered in 1820 on the Greek island of Milos. Presented as a gift to the former French King Louis XVII, it was placed in the Louvre, where it is still today.Condition:The patinanation is somewhat stained and rubbed off in places; otherwise, the bronze is in good condition. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Jean-Baptiste Clésinger, Allegory, Bronze Bust, France c. 1860

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Description: Bronze with dark patina, parcel-giltFrance, c. 1860Design: Jean-Baptiste Clésinger (1814-1883) – French sculptor and painterExecution: Ferdinand Barbedienne (1810-1892) – French bronze founder and manufacturerLaterally inscribed in the cast ‘J. Clésinger. Rome. 1860.‘Verso inscribe din the cast ‘F. Barbedienne. Fondeur.‘ and with foundy stamp ‘Réduction Mécanique A. Collas’Antique-like, sculpturally rendered group of figures on plinthIn central position in places a woman sitting on a klismos, she is wearing a garment with rich drapery and is holding a document in her right hand, at her feet a footstoolTo the right a youth earing a tunic and a cloak, to the left a naked toddlerDimensions: c. 32 x 37 x 19.5 cmVery good conditionBreastplate and helmet might suggest Athena, which could be represented here as a teacher of people The engineer Achille Collas had invented a machine that could produce scaled bronze models of sculptures. First, the foundry ‘Collas et Barbedienne’, which was established in 1839 made bronzes of ancient statues, but later they also worked with artists such as David D'Angers, Jean-Baptiste Clesinger and Antoine-Louis Barye. Condition: The bronze is in very good condition with barely any signs of age and wear. The size measures c. 32 x 37 x 19.5 cm. Jean-Baptiste Clésinger (1814-1883) Born on the 22nd of October, 1814, Clésinger studied in Rome and trained i.a. in Bertel Thorvaldsen’s studio, where he gained skills in stone carving and modeling. In 1833 he returned to Besançon, his birthplace, and one year later got his first official commission to create a bas-relief of the Twelve Apostles for the Cathedral of St. Jean. Due to financial difficulties, Clésinger undertook military service, however, was soon allowed to enter the studio of David d'Angers due to interventions of painter Jean Gigoux. In 1840 he finally deserted from military service and fled to Switzerland, where he quickly received numerous commissions for busts and was quickly appreciated. After a brief stopover in France, Clésinger settled down in Florence in 1842 and swiftly found access to the artistic and literary circles. Finally, he returned to France in 1844 and has since been represented at the Paris Salon. In 1849 he was introduced to Prince-Président Louis Napoléon, who included him in the circle of his protégé artists. From 1850 to 1855 Clésinger was commissioned numerous official and private projects, the most prominent writers and artists huddled in his studio in Rue Marbeuf. 1856 Clésinger moved back to Italy, where he permanently lived until 1864, then until 1869 alternately in Rome and Paris. Many of his works were exhibited at the Paris foundry Barbedienne and thus becamue famous. In his last years, Clésinger primarily focused on working on national commission and organized various exhibitions. His works can be seen in numerous museums worldwide, e.g. at the Musée de Picardie in Amiens, NY Carlsberg Glyptotek in Copenhagen, the County Museum of Art in Los Angeles, the Vatican Museums in Rome or the Hermitage in St. Petersburg. Ferdinand Barbedienne (1810-1892) Ferdinand Barbedienne was one of the most important bronze foundrymen active in France in the 19th century. In 1839 he associated with the engineer Achille Collas (1795-1859) and founded the company ‘Collas et Barbedienne’. At the beginning they specialized in small-sized bronze casts that reproduced the works of contemporary artists, as well as of ancient Greek and Roman masters. After the death of his partner in 1859, Barbedienne extended his activities towards the casting of monumental bronzes. The company developed into a flourishing business that successfully produced for mainly export markets, since 1870. The outstanding quality of his production was repeatedly rewarded at the universal exhibition, including, for instance, the Grande Médaille d'Honneur in Paris, 1855. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Bronze Putto as Allegory of Spring, 2nd Half of the 19th C.

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Description: Gilt and patinated bronzePresumably France, 2nd half of the 19th centuryThree-part structurePutto with loincloth sitting on a gilt naturalistic rock base with a textured surface, holding gilt flowers in his handsHigh gilt base in the Louis XVI style; oval shape with fluted plinth adorned with bead molding and acanthus leaves; recessed body with profiled cartouches and floral decoration; fluted corniceOverall height, including pedestals: 47 cmGood conditionExpressive depiction of a putto, which probably depicts an allegory of spring This beautiful French bronze putto dates from the second half of the 19th century and has a three-part structure. The putto with shoulder-length and wavy hair sits on a gilt rock base, which is mounted on a pedestal in the Louis XVI style. He is dressed with a loincloth and a shoulder belt and holds gilt flowers in his hands. His head is slightly tilted, his face buried in thoughts. His brown patinated body contrasts nicely with the gilt flowers and bases. The figure is most likely to be understood as an allegory of spring, a common motif that appears in the art of the antiquity to the present. Condition: The bronze is in good condition, showing traces of restoration to the rock base. The garland of flowers lies loosely in the right hand of the putto. The total height, including the bases, is 47 cm. The figure is about 29 cm in height. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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