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Auction Description for University Archives: A Fine Selection of Autographed Documents, Manuscripts & Books

A Fine Selection of Autographed Documents, Manuscripts & Books (205 Lots)

by University Archives


205 lots with images

January 24, 2017

Live Auction

Westport, CT, USA

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Ansel Adams signed photographic postcard

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Description: Adams Ansel 1902 - 1984 Ansel Adams signed photographic postcard Photographic Postcard signed, "Ansel Adams" on verso. Black and white, 4.25" x 6". Photograph taken by Adams in 1962. Photolithographic image of "Sierra Nevada, Evening Clouds and Pool / From Owens Valley, California," taken by Ansel Adams. Minor flaws. Published by 5 Associates, Redwood City, California. Very Good condition.In 1952, Ansel and his wife, Virginia, formed a publishing business named 5 Associates. Its original purpose was to print postcards and souvenir items for sale in Yosemite National Park. Over the years the line was expanded to include high quality photographic books, notecards, postcards, Christmas cards, and matted reproductions.

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John Adams signed legal document as lawyer for Ben Franklin

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Description: Adams John 1735 - 1826 John Adams signed legal document as lawyer for Ben Franklin: an order to arrest Samuel Hall, of Franklin and Hall, with about 170 words in Adams hand! Partly Printed Autograph Document Signed "Adams" on verso, 1 page, 8" x 6.25". Boston, June 9, 1772. To the Sheriff of Essex County. Also signed "Ezekl Goldthwait Clerk." Also on verso is an ADS "Nathan Brown under Sheriff." Expertly restored. Fine condition.Completed and signed by John Adams: 169 words in his hand! In full, "Suffolk, ss. GEORGE the Third, by the Grace of GOD, of Great-Britain, France and Ireland, KING, Defender of the Faith, &c."To the Sheriff of our County of Essex his Under Sherriff, or Deputy, Greeting. We Command you to Attach the Goods or Estate of Samuel Hall of Salem in our Said County of Essex, Printer to the Value of Two hundred Pounds, and for want thereof to take the Body of the said Samuel (if he may be found in your Precinct) and him safely keep, so that you have him before our Justices of Our Inferiour Court of Common Pleas next to be holden at Boston, within and for Our said County of Suffolk, on the Second Tuesday of July next:"Then and there in Our said Court to answer unto Benjamin Franklin. Now residing in our City of London, in our County of Middlesex in our Kingdom of Great Britain Esqr in a Plea of Debt, for that the Said Samuel at Said Boston, on the fifteenth Day of February Anno Domini 1764, by his Bond under his Hand and Seal duly executed and in Court to be produced, bound himself by the Name and Additions of Samuel Hall Printer, of Newport in the Colony of Rhode Island, to the Said Benjamin by the Name and Additions of Benjamin Franklin in the City of Philadelphia in the Province of Pensylvania Esqr in the Sum of Two hundred and Seventy one Pounds, Three Shillings and Five Pence of lawfull Money of Great Britain, to be pad upon Demand, Yet the Said Samuel, tho regretful has never paid it, but detaind it.To the Damage of the said Benjamin as he saith the Sum of Five hundred Pounds which shall then and there be made to appear, with other due Damages: And have you there this Writ, with your Doings therein Witness Eliakim Hutchinson, Esq; at Boston, this Ninth Day of June in the Twelfth Year of Our Reign, Annoque Domini, 1772."ADS "Nathan Brown under Sheriff" on verso. In full, "Essex ss June ye 22d 1772. I have taken the Body of the within Named Samuel Hall and have taken Bail for his appearance."BackgroundAnn Smith Franklin (1696-1763) was an American colonial newspaper printer and publisher. She inherited the business from her husband, James Franklin (1697-1735), brother of Benjamin Franklin (1706-1790). In 1741, she began selling her brother-in-law Benjamin's almanac, Poor Richard's Almanack. She took on the printer Samuel Hall (1740-1807), widower of her daughter Sarah, as her business partner in 1761, publishing The Newport Mercury, and forming "Franklin & Hall" which lasted until her death in Newport, R.I., in 1763. A year later, Hall borrowed money from his late wife's uncle and fellow printer, Benjamin Franklin. Hall sold The Mercury in 1768 in order to establish the first printing shop in Salem, Massachusetts. Even though he acquired money from the sale, he did not pay his debt to Franklin.Tired of waiting for the sum owed to him, Franklin took legal action from London and hired Boston lawyer John Adams to obtain money from Hall. Sheriff Nathan Brown arrested Hall on June 22, 1772, but he posted bail. In February 1773, Franklin received word from his cousin Jonathan Williams that a settlement had been brought about by "a proposal made by Hall or rather Hall's friends." From papers at the American Philosophical Society, we learn that the first installment of "Hall's Money" was •£100 sterling (•£133.6.6 lawful money of Massachusetts) and had been paid in January 1773. The remainder in four installments brought the total amount received to •£152.1.6 (•£202.15.4 Mass. Lawful money). The account also shows a payment of •£5.0.6 to John Adams for bringing suit against Hall for the recovery of the money. In March 1773, Franklin wrote his youngest sister, Jane (1712-1794), in part, "I have desired Cousin Williams to give you the Money he may recover from Hall." Recalling an old unpaid debt of their father's to "an old Man whose Name I have forgotten," Franklin tells his sister, "If you know that Person, I wish you would now out of Hall's Money pay that Debt..."

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John Adams scripts a letter entirely in his own hand regarding care of his land

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Description: Adams John 1735 - 1826 Gentleman Farmer John Adams scripts a long letter entirely in his own hand regarding the care of his land Single page letter on laid paper stock , 8" x 9". Inlaid onto an original sheet as it existed in the album. Small stain along left edge in outer margin not affecting script. Dated "October 14, 1791", and signed "John Adams"John Adams, while in East Chester, "20 miles from New York", writes to "Cotton Tufts Esq" his cousin, asking him to relay his detailed wishes for the caring and maintenance of his farm and to pass his thoughts on to Mr. Porter and Mr. Billings. In the letter he even references "Penns Hill', the infamous location on his property where his family observed the smoke and fire of the Battle Of Bunker Hill! As one read his letter, one is left with a heart warming acknowledgement that even our Founding Fathers needed to tend to mundane affairs and here a very busy Vice President and President Pro Tempore of the Senate John Adams makes plans to winterize his estate. Like his President, Washington, and chief rival, Jefferson, the landed gentry of the United States moved back and forth between high ideals of liberty and the need to plough fields, taking in crops, kill weeds, and gather seaweed for the hogs. John Adams' childhood was spent hunting, fishing, and exploring the wilds He loved his family's farm. Early in his working life he wrote for the Boston Gazette and the Boston Evening Post as "Humphrey Ploughjogger" extolling the virtues of family farming. As a farmer, Adams naturally was interested in increasing the fertility of his land, an endeavor which he still portrayed in his later years at the time of the writing of this letter.Life would be an interesting dichotomy for Adams, flowing from a persona of major political importance to John Adams, the 'farmer' at heart, longing to be back to his 'roots' having been known to have said in 1794, "I begin now to think all the time lost that is not employed in farming, innocent, healthy, gay, elegant amusement! Enchanting employment! How my imagination roves over my rocky mountains, and through my brushy meadows." He wrote this letter while in Eastchester waiting for the opening of the First Session of the Second Congress. (The body had met in a one-day special session following Washington's Second Inauguration on March 4, 1791, to admit Vermont into the Union and needed to settle unfinished appointments that were mostly housekeeping matters). The actual First Session of the Second Congress began on October 24, ten days after Adams wrote this letter. And little did John Adams know that within but a few years his wistful thoughts of farming would need to be shelved once again, as he would become President of the United States.His letter is in full:"East Chester 20 miles from New York/October 14, 1791Dear SirWe arrived here on the 11th at night and here and at New York shall remain till the meeting of Congress.I came off without communicating my thoughts to Mr. Porter and Mr. Billings so fully as I intended. I wish to have the Meadow below my garden ploughed this fall if possible, after the corn shall be got in, and the Lott next to Mr. Bass broke up and the hills split, at least upon the top of Stony Field Hill. This is the only way to kill the seeds of weeds beside putting the ground in a better state to ameliorate and mellow. The wall at the foot of Penns Hill is to be completed[sic], and as much Seaweed carted up from the Beach as possible. I must pray you to pay the necessary Bills. Will you pray Mr. Porter not to forget to plough his Barnyard often and fill If you can give me a summary now and then in a few Line, they will give me much pleasure.My children and family are well and desire to send their respects with mine to you and yours.With the strictest friendship I am ever yoursJohn Adams"Hon Cotton Tufts EsqA wonderful revealing lengthy letter written entirely in the hand of John AdamsFrom the library of John Augustin Daly (1838-1899). Daly, one of the most important figures in nineteenth-century American theater, worked as a critic, manager, playwright and stage director. At the time of his death, he owned two major theaters, one in New York and the other in London. Daly is considered personally responsible for the careers of such acting greats as John Drew Jr. Maurice Barrymore, Fanny Davenport, Maude Adams, Sara Jewett, Isadora Duncan, Tyrone Power, Sr. and many others. Daly was also an avid book lover and collector, amassing an enormous library of books and original manuscripts. That collection was dispersed in an epic, two-week auction at the American Art Association in New York in March 1900. The present letter was part of an extra-illustrated volume, described in the catalog as a "Unique copy, with autograph letters of all the Presidents inserted..." Walter Benjamin, writing in The Collector, described the sale as a "blaze of glory, due to the total having reached nearly $200,000." Benjamin attributed the sale's incredible success to "a small bookseller on 42d street, who appeared at the sale with apparently unlimited cash, and was soon the master of the situation." That "small bookseller," was George D. Smith (d. 1920), who, up until that time, had been an obscure and unsuccessful book dealer who began his career in 1883 with Dodd & Mead. Smith would dominate the market for the next two decades, working as an agent for some of the wealthiest collectors in the country_Üîmost notably Henry E. Huntington, for whom Smith purchased a portion of the Duke of Devonshire Library in 1914 for $1.5 million (American Art Association, Catalogue of the Valuable Literary and Art Property Gathered by the Late Augustin Daly, New York, 1900; The Collector, New York, May 1900, 1-2; Publisher's Weekly, March 13, 1920, 801; Ibid, March 21, 1914, 1008; "Geo. D. Smith Dies in HIs Book Store, New York Times, March 5, 1928, 13). Provenance: John Augustin Daly; American Art Association, New York, March 19, 1900, Lot 3122; George D. Smith, New York.

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Sec of State John Q. Adams sends letter stating yellow fever was not contagious

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Description: Adams John Quincy 1767 - 1848 Secretary of State John Quincy Adams has sent "to the several Consuls of the United States" copies of Dr. Nathaniel Potter's Memoir stating that yellow fever was not contagious - 80 years later, Dr. Potter's belief was proven to be true Manuscript Letter Signed "John Quincy Adams," as Monroe's Secretary of State, 1 page, 8" x 9.75". Washington, September 28, 1820. To "E. J. Coale Esquire Baltimore." Toned at edges. Very Good condition.In full, "I have had the pleasure of receiving your favor of yesterday and two packages to which it refers, for which please to accept my thanks. Will you have the goodness to inform Dr. [Thomas P.] Hall, that the fifty copies of Dr. Potter's Memoir were duly received, and have already been despatched to the several Consuls of the United States, as was requested. I am with great Respect, Dear Sir, your very humble and obedient Servant..."From Calendar of the Miscellaneous Letters Received by the Department of State. From the Organization of the Government to 1820 (Washington: Government Printing Office, 1897): "Hall, Thomas P. July 17, 1820. Quarantine laws and intercourse of foreign powers with the United States; transmits fifty copies of Dr. Potter's 'Memoir on Contagion,' to be forwarded to United States consuls, with a view of producing a favorable change."In 1793, Dr. Nathaniel Potter, a former pupil of Signer of the Declaration of Independence Dr. Benjamin Rush, and afterwards the first Professor of Theory and Practice of Medicine in the University of Maryland, held that yellow fever was not contagious, and he communicated this opinion to Dr. Rush in writing. Dr. Rush disagreed. Dr. Potter published his "Memoir on Contagion" in 1818. Yellow fever swept through Baltimore every summer. During an 1820 epidemic, 300 people perished. Dr. Potter was convinced the disease was not contagious and attempted to contaminate himself to prove his point. Never was the mosquito suspected of being the disease's carrier. We know today that yellow fever is not contagious, that it is transmitted to humans by a bite from an infected mosquito and that it cannot spread from person to person by close contact with someone who is infected with yellow fever. In 1820, it was "Resolved, by the Medical and Surgical Society of Maryland, that the Corresponding Secretary be requested to forward to the Secretary of State of the United States, fifty copies of Dr. Potter's Memoir; with the respectful request, that he will furnish American consuls, residing abroad, with copies of said memoir, in such manner as, in his opinion, may produce a favourable change in the quarantine laws..." The distribution of Dr. Potter's Memoir to U.S. Consuls was to convince other countries that yellow fever was not contagious. It was not until after the Spanish - American War 80 years later that yellow fever was proven to be not contagious and was, in fact, transmitted by mosquitoes. Baltimore publisher and bookseller Edward J. Coale was the son of Anne Hopkinson Coale, a sister of Signer of the Declaration of Independence Francis Hopkinson. His wife, Mary Ann Buchanan Coale, was the daughter of Dr. George Buchanan and Laetitia McKean Buchanan, sister of Signer of the Declaration of Independence Thomas McKean.

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J.Q. Adams' free frank to a prominent resident of Weymouth, Mass

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Description: Adams John Quincy 1767 - 1848 J.Q. Adams' free frank to a prominent resident of Weymouth, Massachusetts, where his mother was born and his parents were married Address Panel Free Franked "J.Q. Adams," 5.5" x 3". Addressed by Adams to "Lemuel Humphrey Esqr / Weymouth / Masstts." No postmark. Fine condition.The Massachusetts Historical Society records two letters sent to Lemuel Humphrey (1784-1857) by John Quincy Adams, both from Washington, one on October 18, 1837, and the other on February 1, 1843, each as Congressman. John Quincy Adams represented his Massachusetts district in the House of Representatives from March 4, 1831, until his death on February 23, 1848. Adams' parents John Adams and Abigail Smith were married in Weymouth; Abigail was born in Weymouth.From The Humphreys family in America, Volume Two, by Frederick Humphreys (New York: 1885) "Esquire Lemuel Humphrey was a man of unusual ability, and of a good academic education - for many years one of the most influential men of the town. He was long a teacher there, and as such enjoyed a high reputation - the older members of the present generation well remember him as one who believed in the disciplinary rod, and did not spare its use. He held the position also of village lawyer, doing most of the local business, such as drawing up legal documents, and surveying. Probably no one was more familiar with the real estate in the 'North Parish' than he who made most of the transfers that took place in the first half of the nineteenth century. He was also highly esteemed by his townsmen for his judgment, sagacity and honesty, as evidenced by the fact that they retained him in their most responsible offices during the greater part of his life, such as Selectman, Assessor, Town Treasurer, and Representative in the State Legislature."

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John Quincy Adams signs a Land Grant in 1828 to John Brown for land in Ohio

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Description: Adams John Quincy 1767 - 1848 John Quincy Adams signs a Land Grant in 1828 to John Brown for land in Ohio Partially printed land grant on parchment. 15" x 9.25", For "One Hundred and Eighteen and fifty two hundredths of an acre" with payment made by "John Brown". Signed by President John Quincy Adams as "J.Q. Adams". And dated the "twelfth" day of May in the year of our Lord One thousand eight hundred and "twenty eight". Expected folds but in excellent condition as the piece was issued on parchment. Original seal is missing but the embossed area shows the expected left over impressment. Overall fading with pale staining, but Adams signature still maintains strong contrast.An excellent condition early Land grant issued for land in "Cincinnati Ohio" to a "John Brown". With a strong wonderful signature of President John Quincy Adams. While there is no way without significant hours of research that it can be proven, there is a possibility that his land grant is for John Brown, the infamous abolitionist whose ultimate demise was in being hung. before that period of his life, John Brown had moved back and forth, having lived, worked and bought land in Ohio on several occasions. By the age of 5, his family consisting of his parents and 7 other siblings lived in Ohio where his father acquired land and opened a Tannery. Although John Brown moved away around the age of 16, he moved back to Ohio by the age of 20, worked briefly at this father's tannery before opening a successful tannery of his own outside of town with his adopted brother and married Dianthe Lusk. In 1825, John moved again, this time to Pennsylvania, however he still operated an interstate business with a partner involving cattle and leather production also located in Ohio (again most likely requiring land ownership). And then by 1836 moved back to Ohio with his wife and children, where he borrowed money to buy land in the area, building and operating a tannery in partnership with Zenas Kent. By this time, John Brown was known as a farmer, wool merchant, tanner, and land speculator, and by the mid-1840s Brown had built a reputation as an expert in fine sheep and wool, and entered into a partnership with Col. Simon Perkins of Akron, Ohio, whose flocks and farms were managed by Brown and sons. Brown eventually moved into a home with his family across the street on Perkins Hill.One can locate more about his early life in Ohio via the following link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Brown_(abolitionist)With such a common name as "John Brown" we cannot be sure that this is the abolitionist or a namesake and thus over it priced as the garden variety document.

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Striking Buzz Aldrin signed photo, posing in his NASA spacesuit

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Description: Aldrin Edwin "Buzz" 1930 - Striking Buzz Aldrin signed photo, posing in his NASA spacesuit An 8" x 10" color photo of Buzz Aldrin, boldly signed and inscribed in black ink "To Michael/Best Wishes/Buzz Aldrin." Verso of photo states "National Aeronautics And Space Administration/"Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. was named by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as the prime crew lunar module pilot of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. He was one of the 14 astronauts selected by NASA in October, 1963." Halftone color photo depicting Aldrin posing in his spacesuit, with his helmet on a desk. Fine condition.

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Contralto Marian Anderson awaits a letter about

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Description: Anderson Marian 1902 - 1993 Contralto Marian Anderson awaits a letter about "a young singer" she had heard of in her recent stay in Nashville Autograph Letter Signed "Marian Anderson," 2 pages , 8" x 9.75", separate sheets, each depicting the Empress Hotel, British Columbia, Canada, but penned from Chicago, February 5, 1943. To Madame Gautier. Fine condition.In full, "Just about two weeks ago during my stay in Nashville, I had a hasty talk with Mrs. Myers who spoke of a young singer in whom she is interested. Her letter with some ideas on the subject, was to have been sent me to Chicago, so every day I await its arrival. I thank you so much for your interest in this matter and send you my kindest regards."

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Neil Armstrong, dressed in his NASA spacesuit, signed and inscribed color photo

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Description: Armstrong Neil 1930 - 2012 Neil Armstrong, dressed in his NASA spacesuit, signed and inscribed color photo Signed Neil Armstrong color photo, signed as "Neil Armstrong". Small paper clip indention to upper right corner.Verso of photo has the official National Aeronautics and Space Administration stamp, and typed description of "Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong was named by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. He was one of nine astronauts selected by NASA in September, 1962". Verso also contains a note by Ronald Wade "First Man On the Moon/Received 10-17-79". 8" x 10". From the spectacular, unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis Wade. Near fineA wonderful inscribed color photo of Neil Armstrong in his Nasa spacesuit holding his helmet with an image of the moon in the background. Signed and inscribed to Ron Wade, who once served as a White House page for President Nixon. Inscribed as "To Ron Wade/With All Good Wishes/Neil Armstrong" Below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia _Üî it's really a replica of the Oval Office."Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 _Üî that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year.The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old."My first memory in life is wearing an _ÜÛI Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.The retired Texas Department of Human Services supervisor says he counts former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush as friends. His most prized item in the collection is from the 41st commander in chief's failed 1964 Senate bid."He had a group of young ladies that campaigned for him, the Bush Belles," Wade says in his heavy Lone Star State twang, "So I have the only known Bush Belles outfit that's around. Even the Bush Library doesn't have one.""George W. has been to my house, and seen my collection, and was quite impressed," boasts Wade, who has also donated several pieces from his massive memorabilia stockpile to the George W. Bush Presidential Library outside Dallas.The collector extraordinaire says he "pays for his habit" by selling extra collectibles he's acquired over the years, but he never hawks anything that he "loves."While much of the public might be disillusioned with warring politicians, Wade _Üî who once served as a White House page for then-President Nixon _Üî says talk of partisan bickering in Washington is overblown: "The friction between parties has been here as long as America has been here."

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Neil Armstrong's 60th High School Reunion, letter with signed invitation!

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Description: Armstrong Neil 1930 - 2012 Neil Armstrong's 60th High School Reunion! "Thank you for your letter breaking the news that we are 60 years older than when we graduated... 60? Really?" - His reunion will be scheduled so he can attend! - with his signed reunion dinner reservation. (1) Typed Letter Signed"Neil"1p, 8.5" x 11". Lebanon, Ohio, February 3 [2007]. With original envelope, 9.5" x 4", postmarked Cincinnati. Ohio, February 5, 2007. To Doris Weber. Fine condition.In full,"Dear Punky, Thank you for your letter breaking the news that we are 60 years older than when we graduated. I remember when my Uncle Ray came back to St. Marys for his 40th and visited us. I thought I would never get old enough to get to a 40th anniversary of graduation. My calendar currently has the June and August dates available, but not July 28th. I have no preference between June and August. I, of course, will be there is at all possible. I look forward to seeing you and the rest of the gang. 60? Really? My best, Neil."The envelope is addressed by to "Doris Weber / 106 Willipie St., Apt. 2 / Wapakoneta, OH 45895." His return address is printed in the upper left: "P.O. Box 436 / Lebanon, Ohio 45036." Postmarked Cincinnati, Ohio, February 5, 2007. Noted by Doris,"Neil's letter / to me."(2) Printed Reservation Form Signed"M/M N.A. Armstrong,"1p, 8.5" x 3.5". With original envelope, 6.5" x 3.5". Return address and addressee handwritten by Armstrong. Fine condition.Printed form filled in by Armstrong in ink: "Enclosed please find reservation money for dinner & photo. / Please [sic] make checks payable to Doris Weber. / Name M/M N.A. Armstrong/ (Please circle) $25.00 (1) $50.00 (2). / Please send to: Doris Weber / 106 Willipie St., Apt. 2 / Wapakoneta, OH 45895 / (419) 738-3102." Armstrong circled"$50.00 / (2)."The envelope is hand addressed by Armstrong to"Doris Weber / 106 Willipie St., #2 / Wapakoneta, OH 45895."He has handwritten his address in the upper left:"P.O. Box 436 / Lebanon, OH / 45036."Postmarked Cincinnati, Ohio, March 21, 2007. Noted, probably by Doris,"Neil / 2 / [happy face]."All of Neil Armstrong's handwriting is in the block letters he always used when handwriting letters, including his name. Neil Armstrong attended Blume High School in Wapakoneta, Ohio, graduating in 1947.

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Rare ALS as Pres Chester Arthur apologizes to a wealthy & eccentric NY widow

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Description: Arthur Chester 1829 - 1886 In a rare ALS as President, Chester Arthur apologizes to a wealthy and eccentric New York widow for not writing sooner, "having been out sailing & driving all the afternoon..." Autograph Letter Signed, "Chester A Arthur," as President, 2 pages, 4.5"x 6.75" , [Newport], "Friday Evening," September 21, [1883?] to "Mrs Paran Stevens." Expertly laid into a larger sheet, a few contemporary ink smudges, else fine.Arthur, summering at Newport, responds to a dinner invitation from Mrs. Paran Stevens, a noted New York socialite: "It will give me much pleasure to dine with you tomorrow evening, at 8 o'clock[.] I did not get your note until late this evening _Ü_ having been out sailing & driving all the afternoon; _Üî or I would have sent you an earlier answer." Arthur had been sailing that afternoon with Cornelius Vanderbilt aboard his yacht, TheTidal Wave. The next day, after enjoying a luncheon hosted by Vanderbilt (with Mrs. Paran Stevens in attendance), he took dinner with Mrs. Stevens, but not before spending the afternoon with Washington Robeling and his wife. (Truth, New York, September 22, 1883, 2; St. Albans Daily Messenger, Vermont, September 21, 1883, 1)The recipient, Henrietta (nee Reed) Stevens (d. 1895), was the widow of Paran Stevens (d. 1872), a successful cotton manufacturer who switched to the hotel business in the 1860s. He was best remembered for the hugely successful Fifth Avenue Hotel in New York, as well as the spectacular failure of the Victoria Hotel. Formerly New England shop girl, she was extremely prominent in New York social circles and well-known for her eccentricities, and was often politely ridiculed in the press for her "pretensions."From the library of John Augustin Daly (1838-1899). Daly, one of the most important figures in nineteenth-century American theater, worked as a critic, manager, playwright and stage director. At the time of his death, he owned two major theaters, one in New York and the other in London. Daly is considered personally responsible for the careers of such acting greats as John Drew Jr. Maurice Barrymore, Fanny Davenport, Maude Adams, Sara Jewett, Isadora Duncan, Tyrone Power, Sr. and many others. Daly was also an avid book lover and collector, amassing an enormous library of books and original manuscripts. That collection was dispersed in an epic, two-week auction at the American Art Association in New York in March 1900. The present letter was part of an extra-illustrated volume, described in the catalog as a "Unique copy, with autograph letters of all the Presidents inserted..." Walter Benjamin, writing in The Collector, described the sale as a "blaze of glory, due to the total having reached nearly $200,000." Benjamin attributed the sale's incredible success to "a small bookseller on 42d street, who appeared at the sale with apparently unlimited cash, and was soon the master of the situation." That "small bookseller," was George D. Smith (d. 1920), who, up until that time, had been an obscure and unsuccessful book dealer who began his career in 1883 with Dodd & Mead. Smith would dominate the market for the next two decades, working as an agent for some of the wealthiest collectors in the country_Üîmost notably Henry E. Huntington, for whom Smith purchased a portion of the Duke of Devonshire Library in 1914 for $1.5 million (American Art Association, Catalogue of the Valuable Literary and Art Property Gathered by the Late Augustin Daly, New York, 1900; The Collector, New York, May 1900, 1-2; Publisher's Weekly, March 13, 1920, 801; Ibid, March 21, 1914, 1008; "Geo. D. Smith Dies in HIs Book Store, New York Times, March 5, 1928, 13). The extra-illustrated volume of presidents from which this piece derives fetched $850, nearly four times above the going rate for presidential sets at the time. According to Walter Benjamin, Smith quickly resold the volume for $1,000. The collection did not surface again until it appeared in a minor auction in early 2016. (The Collector, New York, May 1900, 1-2)Provenance: John Augustin Daly; American Art Association, New York, March 19, 1900, Lot 3122; George D. Smith, New York.

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Chester Arthur early 1861 signed letter, as asst Quarter Master General of NY

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Description: Arthur Chester 1829 - 1886 Chester Arthur early 1861 signed letter, as assistant Quarter Master General of New York Single page lengthy manuscript letter written on both recto and verso. 7.5" x 9.75". On State of New York, Quarter-Master Generals Department letterhead. Signed by Chester A. Arthur as "C.A. Arthur", and dated "New York/May 31st, 1861"Expected folds with very slight separation, ink smudge to verso, docket with name and date to verso obscuring some of the text. Tiny burn mark. Else near fineA lovely early letter drafted by a future President early in his career. Arthur passionately wrote about securing shoes for a New York regiment. In his response he mentioned "A requisition had been made by the Col for shoes which the men needed badly, many of them being almost barefooted _Ü_but this had not been filled _Ü_ I therefore went personally _Ü_ and purchased the shoes _Ü_ inspecting the same myself _Ü_ " It was apparent in this letter that Chester Arthur was a highly compassionate individual with a take charge personality.In 1881, Chester Arthur became the Vice President to President James Garfield. Just several months after the inauguration, Arthur reluctantly became the 21st President after the assassination attempt on President James A. Garfield ultimately resulted in his death 80 days later.

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Portion of statement by Confed spy Thos. Jordan docketed by P.G.T. Beauregard

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Description: Beauregard Pierre 1818 - 1893 Portion of a statement by Confederate spy Thomas Jordan on General Johnston's actions at the Battle of Shiloh, docketed by P.G.T. Beauregard The final page of an apparently longer manuscript statement signed by Thomas Jordan, one page, 8" x 10", no place or date, addressed to General G.T. Beauregard in New Orleans, Louisiana. Beauregard dockets the verso on October 10, 1877 at New York "Gen'l Thos. Jordan relative to Col. W. Preston's note of Oct 10/77 denying certain facts or statements thereof contained in Gen'l J[ohnston]s narrative of events referring to the Shiloh Campaign of April 1862". Worn, with grease marks, fold splits. Easily read. Jordan (1819-1895) was a Confederate spy and later a general in the CSA army during the American Civil War. A career soldier in the armies of three nations, he fought in numerous wars and rebellions in the United States, Mexico, and Cuba. Jordan was also a newspaper editor and author. "... neither in my memoir nor now have I sought to criticize the actions of General Johnston. He doubtless had his own reasons for the delay in deciding upon the point at which to assemble the Confederate forces under his direction. Doubtless, he desired meanwhile to be a little more certain than he was as to the ultimate plan of operations of the enemy upon that theatre of war. What happened however, is a part of the history of affairs in that quarter at that time, and I could not narrate them as they happened within my knowledge when called upon by you for a memoir of them." The Battle of Shiloh, also known as the Battle of Pittsburg Landing, was a major battle in the Western Theater of the American Civil War, fought on April 6 and April 7, 1862, in southwestern Tennessee. Confederate forces under Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard launched a surprise attack against the Union army of Maj. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and came close to defeating his army. Pierre Gustave Toutant de Beauregard (1818-1893), best known as a general for the Confederate Army during the American Civil War, was also a writer, civil servant, and inventor. He was the first prominent Confederate general, commanding the defenses of Charleston, South Carolina, for the Battle of Fort Sumter, and was the victor at the First Battle of Bull Run. He commanded armies in the Western Theater for the Battle of Shiloh and Siege of Corinth.

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Moe Berg refuses to accept the Medal of Honor - signed portion of draft letter

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Description: Berg Moe 1902 - 1972 The Catcher Was A Spy! Moe Berg refuses to accept the Medal of Honor - signed portion of his draft letter! Accompanied by his copiously underscored copy of "Towards a Russian Policy" published the year he began working for the CIA. Comprises:(1)The Letter Moe Berg wrote rejecting his Medal of HonorPart of Moe Berg's draft of his letter, most probably torn with great emotion by him. Partial Autograph Letter Signed "M. Berg" in pencil, 1.5 pages, 3.5" x 5.5", front and verso. Portion torn from a larger letter. [156 Roseville Avenue, Newark, New Jersey, December 12, 1946] To "Mr. Skinner" in "Washington, D.C." Folds, creases. Very Good condition. Berg's handwriting is in bold italics. In full, "I have you[r letter of 26 November] I regret [that I must refuse to] accept, and I rejec[t the medal] awarded me, I do [this with the] appreciation and [respect for the] spirit in which [it is offered.]" The second paragraph, also handwritten by Berg, refers to "an accounting of the sum of $21,439.14 which is outstanding against you on the Special Funds' books" also mentioned in Skinner's November 26, 1946 letter (see photocopy). Moe Berg handwrites: "I acknow _Ü_ the full amount stat _Ü_ in the enclosure att _Ü_ I did in our conversati _Ü_ Europe _Ü_ [on verso] a year before _Ü_ and Siberia extended _Ü_ Sincerely yours M. Berg."(2)Book "Towards a Russian Policy" owned by Moe BergBook copiously underlined and highlighted in pencil (every page!) by Moe Berg, Towards a Russian Policy - A second look at some popular beliefs about Russia and the Soviet Regime by R. Gordon Wasson, 25 pages 4.25" x 6.5". On the colophon page: "One thousand copies of this address delivered before the Practising Law Institute on February 17, 1951, have been printed at The Overbrook Press, Stamford, Connecticut April, 1951." Very Good condition.Moe Berg worked for the CIA from 1951 to 1953. This was Moe Berg's copy of Towards a Russian Policy published in 1951. Berg has underlined sentences, bracketed paragraphs, and starred what he felt was especially important throughout this book. Starred phrases include "we are tragically ignorant about Russia, about Russians, and about their rulers," "In world affairs, as at the Bar, it is well to know your foe," "the question whether Russia is the riddle or whether we are," "Our gyrations must often seem strange and unpredictable to the Kremlin," "it is a mistake to say the Russian people have always distrusted and disliked foreigners." BackgroundIn 1932, Morris "Moe" Berg, a catcher, and pitchers Ted Lyons and Lefty O'Doul, began a tour of Japan to teach baseball seminars at Japanese universities. Berg returned to Japan in 1934 with a group of All Stars, including Ruth and Gehrig, to play against a Japanese all star team. Unbeknownst to his teammates, Moe Berg sneaked onto the roof of one of the tallest buildings in Tokyo and filmed the city and harbor with his movie camera. During the summer of 1942, just months after Pearl Harbor, Berg screened the footage he shot of Tokyo Bay for U.S. Army intelligence officers. He worked with the OSS (Office of Strategic Services),forerunner of the CIA, in World War II. After President Truman's dissolution of the OSS in October 1945, the Strategic Services Unit (SSU) was established within the War Department.On November 26, 1946, Lt. Col. Selby M. Skinner, the SSU's liaison officer, wrote to Moe Berg. In part, "Four items need to be mentioned at the present time. The first is thatyou have been awarded the 'Medal of Freedom'; while in my letter the details of your work were given quite fully under the TS classification, the commendation writeup has been so worded that it is a very commendatory description of your work in general terms and which can be released without loss of security. We need to know whether you wish to come here for the ceremony of presentation and, if so when_Ü_" Photocopy of the retained letter from the "Moe Berg OSS Personnel File" is present.On December 12, 1946, from Newark, New Jersey, Moe Berg wrote to William W. Quinn, Colonel, Infantry, Director. In full, "I have your letter of 6 December. On 2 December, on being notified of the award,I wrote your Colonel Skinner:'I regret that I must refuse to accept and I reject the medal awarded me. I do this with the respect for the spirit with which it is offered.'I am grateful to those War Department officials who were kind enough, under the circumstances, to offer this award for my very modest contribution. But I cannot accept it." Photocopy of Berg's letter to Quinn from the "Moe Berg OSS Personnel File" is present. , Moe Berg's sister accepted the Medal of Freedom after her brother's death in 1972. It is now on display at the Baseball Hall of Fame. His baseball card is on display at CIA headquarters.

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Leonard Bernstein boldly signed TLS

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Description: Bernstein Leonard 1918 - 1990 Leonard Bernstein boldly signed TLS Single page 7" x 10.5", TLS boldly signed by Leonard Bernstein in blue ink as "Leonard Bernstein", and dated "February 20, 1946". Expected folds, near fineA clean crisp TLS by Leonard Bernstein complying to a fans request for his autograph. Nicely signed by Bernstein.

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Johannes Brahms pens a note of gratitude to his peer and friend, Max Kalbeck

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Description: Brahms Johannes 1833 - 1897 Johannes Brahms pens a note of gratitude to his peer and friend, Max Kalbeck, thanking him for "…most gratifying material in both verse and prose" written close when he was composing his last work, "Eleven Chorale Preludes" Autographed postcard, on tan cardstock, 5.5" x 3.5", dated and signed by Johannes Brahms as "J Brahms". Written entirely in the hand of Brahms in his native German, Johannes reached out to his close friend, Max Kalbeck who was near Merau, in Tyrol. Written with strong contrast in black ink, the postcard is accompanied fully translated into English, which states in full: "To Herr Max Kalbeck In Schloss Labers Near Merau, Tyrol But, my dear friend, if the 11th of September was the occasion of your letter, then it should have come rather earlier! We are at/ Aichholz in Gmundt and I am letting you know that quickly so that your enthusiasm can at least express itself by telegramme. Apart from that I have to thank you for a great deal of most gratifying material in both verse and prose. If only notepaper and writing paper had not been abolished in such a thoroughgoing manner by your J. Brahms, who sends you all his warmest greetings! J Brahms" The two were close friends to the point that Kalbeck's principal achievement was his eight volume biography of Brahms published from 1904 to 1914. Kalbeck also edited several volumes of Brahm's correspondence, as well as publishing two collections of his own music reviews. Kalbecks musical world also included new libretti for Mozart's Bastien und Bastienne and he revised those of Don Giovanni and The Marriage of Figgro for Gustav Mahler's productions at the Vienna Hofoper. He supplied lyrics for several pieces by Johann Strauss II and wrote poetry to which Brahms set a few of his verses to music as songs. Kalbeck became one of the most influential critics in Austria and was bitterly opposed to the music of Richard Wagner, Anton Bruckner and Hugo Wolf. This would be a common thread between the two friends, Brahms and Kalbeck, during the "War of the Romantics" a term used by some music historians to describe the aesthetic schism among prominent musicians in the second half of the 19th century Musical structure, the limits of chromatic harmony, and program music versus absolute music were the principal areas of contention. The opposing parties of the "War of the Romantics" crystallized during the 1850s of which Brahms and Kalbeck (along with others) were on one side, and Wagner, Liszt and Weimar on the other side, representing the New German school. Composers from both sides looked back on Beethoven as their spiritual and artistic hero; the conservatives seeing him as an unsurpassable peak, the progressives as a new beginning in music. A lovely crisp autograph example of Johannes Brahms, with an important association on many levels.

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Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis writes to Colonel McGuire of Am. Bar Assoc.

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Description: Brandeis Louis 1856 - 1941 Just a few short years before his death, Supreme Court Justice Louis Brandeis writes to Colonel McGuire Autograph Letter Signed, "Louis D. Brandeis", on Supreme Court stationery, 1p., 4.5" x 6.75". Washington, D.C., June 1, 1938. Thin rust lines and pin holes from removed staples in blank area at top. Fine condition. In full: "Personal / June 1, 1938 / Dear Col. McGuire: / My thanks for your paper. / Cordially, / Louis D. Brandeis / (addressed to) Col. O. R. McGuire." Colonel O. R. McGuire was the chairman of the committee on administrative law of the American Bar Association, and author of "Americans on Guard", a series of addresses in defense of the conservative interpretation of our constitutional system.

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James Buchanan Presidential Free Frank to his stockbroker on Wall Street

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Description: Buchanan James 1791 - 1868 James Buchanan Presidential Free Frank to his stockbroker on Wall Street Envelope Free Franked "Free / James Buchanan" as President,5.25 inches by 3 inches, slit open at top, slight tear at top edge. Chipped red wax Seal of the President at back flap. Addressed by President Buchanan to "Messrs. Wm & Jno O'Brien / 29 Wall Street / New York." Circular "WASHINGTON CY D.C. FREE" postmark "MAY 6," indecipherable year, but 1857/1858. Light soiling. Fine condition.Circular "WASHINGTON CY D.C. FREE" postmark. According to Phillips American Stampless Cover Catalogue, this type Washington Free postmark with a "'Y'" High" in CY (City) and a straight line FREE was used from 1856-1858.The firm of "Wm & Jno O'Brien" were in the "Stock and Banking business." John O'Brien, of the firm Wm & Jno O'Brien, was admitted as a Member of the New York Stock exchange on September 4, 1849. In the Family Papers of James Buchanan in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, are letters to "Messrs. William and John O'Brien of the City of New York" re "Power of Attorney granted to transfer a certificate in Virginia" (August 16, 1861), and an April 21, 1864 "Letter from W. Jonah O'Brien [sic, Wm & Jno O'Brien] confirming the purchase of 50 shares of New York Central Railroad Company."

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Five typed letters signed by retired Chief Justice Warren Burger

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Description: Burger Warren 1907 - 1995 Five typed letters signed by retired Chief Justice Warren Burger Typed letters signed "Warren E Burger" and "W E B", as retired Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, five letters, one page each. Washington, D.C. 1986 through 1994. To Mr. Joseph Kingsbury-Smith. File notiations in upper portion of three letters, not affecting text. Fine condition.Five typed letters signed by retired Chief Justice Warren E. Burger to Mr. Joseph Kingsbury-Smith, spanning the years between Chief Justice Burger's retirement in 1986 and death in 1995. A calling card "from Chief Justice Burger" is included.

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President George Bush Sr. signed, and inscribed color photo

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 PresidentGeorge Bush Sr. signed, and inscribed color photo Signed George H.W. Bush color photo, signed as "George Bush". Verso of photo has the "Official White House Photograph 20 Jan89" stamp; and a scripted note by Ronald Wade with his address, establishing provenance. 8" x 10". From the spectacular, unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis WadeA wonderful inscribed color photo of the inauguration of George H.W. Bush as the 41st President of the United States held on January 20, 1989. The inauguration marked the commencement of the four-year term of George H.W. Bush as President and Dan Quayle as Vice President. Signed and inscribed to Ron Wade, (who once served as a White House page for President Nixon). Inscribed as "To Ron Wade/sincerely /George Bush" Mr. Wade then scripted a note on the verso stating "Signed as President, week of 6-1/-89". Below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia - it's really a replica of the Oval Office."Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 - that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year.The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old."My first memory in life is wearing an 'I Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.The retired Texas Department of Human Services supervisor says he counts former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush as friends. His most prized item in the collection is from the 41st commander in chief's failed 1964 Senate bid."He had a group of young ladies that campaigned for him, the Bush Belles," Wade says in his heavy Lone Star State twang, "So I have the only known Bush Belles outfit that's around. Even the Bush Library doesn't have one.""George W. has been to my house, and seen my collection, and was quite impressed," boasts Wade, who has also donated several pieces from his massive memorabilia stockpile to the George W. Bush Presidential Library outside Dallas.The collector extraordinaire says he "pays for his habit" by selling extra collectibles he's acquired over the years, but he never hawks anything that he "loves."While much of the public might be disillusioned with warring politicians, Wade - who once served as a White House page for then-President Nixon - says talk of partisan bickering in Washington is overblown: "The friction between parties has been here as long as America has been here."

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George Bush signed letter precursor to the

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 Fantastic George Bush signed letter precursor to the "Tank Ad" regarding his campaign against Dukakis Letter written while George Bush was Vice President, White House stationary with the raised gold emblem along the top header. Dated "August 8, 1988", and signed "George Bush". Single page, 6.25" x 8.25" Center fold. Fine condition. From the spectacular, unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis Wade, with the letter specifically being addressed to him.An intriguing letter typed and signed by George Bush referencing his Presidential campaign against Michael Dukakis in 1988. He notes "You are absolutely right - ideology, integrity, and values are just as important as competence. Dukakis is not stressing ideals or values because he knows that I and our Party will win if the race is fought on that ground. I assure you it will be"Little did George Bush know of the opportunity that was about to present to him the following month, that essentially assisted him to clinch the election. A series of highly effective attacks by the Bush team - most notably the famous "Tank Ride" ad kept Republicans in the White House. The "Tank Ad" origination started with poor judgement on the part of the Dukakis campaign in an effort to show Dukakis as competent. And with the purpose of showing him with ideals and values they launched an ad showing him running about in a tank:"The idea was to try to figure out an angle that would give him some credibility on national security and foreign policy." The angle turned, in pragmatic Dukakis style, on arithmetic and cost savings. "A focal point of the argument," Steinberg says, "was that he was against all these nuclear weapons (this was a direct reference made to the nuclear build up by the Reagan administration), because we didn't need them and it was taking away money from conventional weapons that we did need. Weapons like a tank, for example." (refer to images)However the Bush campaign seized the moment, and as soon as it aired, they responded by creating one of the most famous ads in political history. Known as "The Tank ad", the commercial, which was run by Vice President George H.W. Bush's 1988 campaign, featured then-Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis riding around in a tank -- with a helmet on. The ad effectively portrays Dukakis as feckless on national defense thanks to that lasting image of the governor looking just plain goofy in a helmet. (Never put a candidate in a hat!) It really needs to be seen to be believed. A link to the ad on youtube is below:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BRPZQ3UEN_QNeedless to say, Bush won with a huge margin of electoral votes, and the ad has become the stuff of legend in campaign circles! A great letter with outstanding provenance. Below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia - it's really a replica of the Oval Office."Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 - that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year.The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old."My first memory in life is wearing an 'I Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.While much of the public might be disillusioned with warring politicians, Wade - who once served as a White House page for then-President Nixon - says talk of partisan bickering in Washington is overblown: "The friction between parties has been here as long as America has been here."

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George Bush pens a note to his older brother, Prescott, to help a collector

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 George Bush pens a note to his older brother, Prescott, to help a collector Card stock on George Bush letterhead, 6.25" x 4" with blue border. Dated "1-7-02" and signed by George H.W. Bush as "George". Fine condition. From the unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis WadePresident Bush writes a quick note introducing Ron Wade to his older brother, Prescott, requesting him to assist Ron by locating additional political memorabilia for his collection.Note in full as:"Dear Pres, 1-7-02This will introduce my old friend and strong supporter Ron Wade. Ron is a leading collector of Political memorabilia. He has 2 framed displays of Dad's items (bumper sticker, buttons etc) He is looking for more.If you come help him find any items it would be great.This from your devoted brother,George Bush"Below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia _Üî it's really a replica of the Oval Office."Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 _Üî that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year.The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old."My first memory in life is wearing an _ÜÛI Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.The retired Texas Department of Human Services supervisor and Ex White House aide to President Nixon, says he counts former Presidents George H.W. Bush and George W. Bush as friends. His most prized item in the collection is from the 41st commander in chief's failed 1964 Senate bid."George W. has been to my house, and seen my collection, and was quite impressed," boasts Wade, who has also donated several pieces from his massive memorabilia stockpile to the George W. Bush Presidential Library outside Dallas.

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George & Barbara Bush write a letter to their daughter-in-law Sharon

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 George and Barbara Bush tell their daughter-in-law Sharon, four months after she and their son Neil filed for divorce, "may 2003 be a great one for you George and Barbara Bush tell their daughter-in-law Sharon, four months after she and their son Neil filed for divorce, "may 2003 be a great one for you, free of stress, free of worry, full of joy and wonder." Her mother-in law handwrites a postscript: "we pray for you all - Bar." - Sharon and Neil's divorce was finalized in April 2003.Typed Letter Signed "Gampy" and "Bar / we pray for you all - / Bar," 1p, 6.25" x 8.5". Houston, Texas, December 15, 2002. To then daughter-in-law Sharon Bush, wife of Neil Bush. With original mailed, stamped, and postmarked envelope. Fine condition.In full, "Joy to the World - Dear Sharon, It is Chicken Feed Time again. You may well recall that it was my 'Gampy' that coined that phrase when he would put quarters or dimes into the outstretched hands of his grandkids. Merry Christmas. And, Sharon, may 2003 be a great one for you, free of stress, free of worry, full of joy and wonder. Hug all three kids for me. Con Afecto." Her mother-in-law, the former First Lady, has handwritten and signed a postscript: "we pray for you all - Bar."George Bush's "Gampy" was stockbroker George Herbert Walker (1875-1953), his mother Dorothy's father. Married in 1980, Neil and Sharon Bush separated in July 2002. Each filed for divorce on the same day, August 22, 2002, Neil citing "discord or conflict of personalities." After being married for 23 years, Neil and Sharon were divorced in April 2003. They have three children (age at time of divorce): 18-year-old Lauren, 17-year-old Pierce, and 14-year-old Ashley.

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Two Kuwaiti Royal Robes Presented to President George Bush

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 Two Royal Robes Presented to President George Bush and family by the Emir of Kuwait following his actions against Saddam Hussein in the first Gulf War Comprises:Man's black cloak, a Bisht, 60 inches long and richly trimmed in gold. It is essentially a flowing outer cloak made of wool, worn over the thobe. It is usually only worn for prestige on special occasions such as weddings, or festivals such as Eid, or for the Friday prayer. Included is an ogal, the back cord that holds the traditional headdress in place.Woman's white robe is 54 inches long with a hood. The front is covered with floral motifs and silver thread crescents and stars. The robe has a rope belt.Both are in fine condition with only very minor wear.From the personal collection of Sharon Bush, married to Neil Bush, son of George Bush and brother of George W. Bush, from 1980 until their divorce in 2003. Accompanied by Letter of Authenticity "From the Sharon Bush Collection," signed and dated "Sharon Bush 10/17/07."In August 1990, Iraq invaded neighboring Kuwait to gain possession of its rich oil fields and access to the sea. In retaliation, the United States mounted Operation Desert Shield, condemning Iraq and gathering international support for economic embargoes. When Iraq's leader, Saddam Hussein, refused to budge, President Bush ordered the U.S. military into battle, launching Operation Desert Storm in January 1991. Victory came swiftly, and by the end of February, Iraqi troops were surrendering by the thousands.According to Kuwaiti custom, when a man gives you the key to his home, he is your friend for life. When a man gives you the door to his home, you are a member of his family forever.In April 1993, the Emir of Kuwait presented George Bush, during the former President's first visit to Kuwait, with a 19th century Kuwaiti door made of teak with dome-studded nails. Around the door are gold plates listing the U.S. casualties of Desert Shield and Desert Storm. The door is now on display at the Bush Library, as part of an exhibit that documents the events of the Gulf War.`

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Running for President in 1988, George Bush writes of his campaign

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 Running for President in 1988 - "I can assure you - as I did President Nixon - that my campaign will not be run on the status quo (although our record is one of which we can be proud), but will be about new ideas and approaches..." Typed Letter Signed "George" as Reagan's Vice President,1 page, 6.75" x 9". [Los Angeles], May 18, 1988. On May 18th, V.P. Bush was campaigning in Los Angeles. On his personal letterhead with gilt vice presidential seal at top center. To Ronald E. Wade, Longview, Texas. Fine condition.In full, "Thank you for your recent letter. I am glad you had a good visit with former President Nixon. I can assure you - as I did President Nixon - that my campaign will not be run on the status quo (although our record is one of which we can be proud), but will be about new ideas and approaches. I expect a close, tough race this fall; however, with our message and friends like you behind me, we are going to win this one. All the best, and I hope our paths cross soon."On November 8, 1988, Vice President Bush won in a landslide against Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis, 426-111 electoral votes, 48.9 million to 41.8 million popular votes. He was the first incumbent Vice President to be elected President since Martin Van Buren in 1836.Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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George Bush Signed Photograph as Vice President

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 George Bush Signed Photograph as Vice President Photograph Signed "To Ron Wade - / Most Sincerely, / George Bush / 3-8-81." Color, 6.5" x 8.5" image, overall 8.5" x 11" . "Photographed by Dirck Halstead" printed beneath image.Photojournalist Dirck Halstead was Time magazine's as Senior White House Photographer. He was one of the six photographers who accompanied President Nixon on his historic trip to China in 1972. His photographs have appeared on 47 Time covers, more than any other photographer. Ron Wade was a close friend of George Bush. He was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992. Ron Wade was appointed by President George Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee.

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President Richard Nixon with Congressman George Bush -  signed by Bush

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 President Richard Nixon with Congressman George Bush - inscribed and signed by Bush Photograph Signed "To / Ronnie - warm wishes, / George Bush, M.C." Black and white, 9.5" x 6.5" image, overall 10" x 8" . The ink has lightly faded in portions but is completely legible. Penned on verso by Ron Wade, "Nixon & Cong. George Bush / Autographed at Marshall Rally / for Bush for Senator, 1970." Stamped at lower edge "JUL 17 1970" and "RONALD E. WADE." A Bush for Senator Rally and Hamburger Supper was held on July 17, 1970, in Marshall, Texas. Fine condition.In 1964, George Bush was defeated by incumbent Sen. Ralph W. Yarborough in his race for the U.S. Senate. Elected as a Republican to the 90th Congress in 1966, Bush was reelected to the 91st Congress, serving from 1967-1971. He was not a candidate for reelection in 1970 to the House of Representatives, instead running unsuccessfully against Lloyd Bentsen for election to the Senate. Pres. Nixon then appointed Bush as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations (1971-1973).Ron Wade was a close friend of George Bush. He was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992. Ron Wade was appointed by President George Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee.

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Early Signed Photograph of Congressman George Bush

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 Early Signed Photograph of Congressman George Bush Photograph Signed "To Ronald Wade with Best Regards / George Bush." Black and white, 7" x 8.75" image, overall 8" x 9.75". Bush is pictured outdoors in Washington with the Capitol building in the background. Penned on verso by Wade "Congressman George Bush / Texas." Fine condition,George Bush ran unsuccessfully for the U.S. Senate in 1964 and 1970. He represented Texas in the House of Representatives from 1967-1971, having been elected in 1966 and 1968.Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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President George Bush TLS with 6 word handwritten postscript

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 President George Bush will "send a few more items" to Ron Wade for his political campaign collection - with 6 word handwritten postscript Typed Letter Signed "George B/" as President,1 page, 6.75" x 9". Washington, August 3, 1989. On pale green White House stationery with blind-embossed presidential seal at top center. To Ronald E. Wade, Longview, Texas. Never folded. Pristine condition.In full, "Got your letter with the article from the Dallas Life magazine. That is some collection! I have to admit that I didn't realize how really extensive it is. Hastily, but with best regards." Bush adds in a handwritten postscript "P.S. I'll send a few more items -" Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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President George Bush is glad his friends

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 Barely four weeks after his Inauguration, President George Bush is glad his longtime friends "could make it to the Inaugural..." Typed Letter Signed "George Bush" as President,1 page, 6.75" x 9". Washington, February 15, 1989. On pale green White House stationery with blind-embossed presidential seal at top center. To Ronald E. Wade, Longview, Texas. Never folded. Pristine condition.In full, "Many thanks for your kind message. We have been through a lot indeed since that first meeting. Barbara and I were so glad you and Catherine could make it to the Inaugural -- having friends like you there made the event all the more special. But even more, we're grateful for your steadfast friendship and support over the years. It makes all the difference. Our warmest regards to you and Catherine."Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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George HW Bush write a thank you letter for his campaign support to Ronald Wade

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Description: Bush George H. W. 1924 - 0 George HW Bush write a thank you letter for his campaign support to Ronald Wade Single page TLS on 'George Bush for Senate' letterhead, 8.5" x 10.75". Dated "August 8, 1970", and signed by George Bush as "George" with a handwritten subscript of "Sorry to miss you in D.C.-". Expected folds, else near fine. From the spectacular, unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis Wade, with the letter specifically being addressed to him.A neat thank you letter for the campaigning support by Ronald Wade for George Bush during his run for the Senate in 1970. Bush noted "_Ü_thank you for the fantastic job you did in making our visit to Gilmer such as successful one_Ü_With each passing day, I am more confident than ever about our chances for achieving victory in November."After serving two terms in the House, Bush had eyed a run for the Senate in 1970. Ralph Yarborough, who had defeated Bush in 1964, was a liberal Democrat from Texas at a time when the state was becoming increasingly conservative. Bush believed that he could defeat Yarborough in the 1970 election. But Yarborough did not win the Democratic primary. Instead, Bush ran against Lloyd Bentsen, a conservative Democrat. Since the Democratic Party was still very strong in Texas and Bush and Bentsen did not differ greatly on the issues, Bush again lost the election. In December 1970, President Richard Nixon nominated Bush as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations. Bush was not part of the Nixon administration's inner circle, which undercut his effectiveness at the United Nations. However as fate would have it, he nonetheless used his tenure to continue to make influential friends within the U.S. government and throughout the foreign policy establishment. The ambassador relished his person-to-person contacts with foreign envoys and began assembling his legendary rolodex that would serve him well in the years to come.Below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia _Üî it's really a replica of the Oval Office."Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 _Üî that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year.The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old."My first memory in life is wearing an _ÜÛI Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.While much of the public might be disillusioned with warring politicians, Wade _Üî who once served as a White House page for then-President Nixon _Üî says talk of partisan bickering in Washington is overblown: "The friction between parties has been here as long as America has been here."

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George W. Bush signed thank you letter to Ron Wade with added postscript

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Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 George W. Bush on his father's "George Bush for President" stationery, adding a 7 word handwritten postscript! Typed Letter Signed "George W / Ron - we appreciate all your hard work" as Senior Advisor, 1p, 8.5" x 11". Washington, D.C., May 3, 1988. On George Bush for President" stationery. To Ron Wade, Longview, Texas. Fine condition.In full, "Congratulations on being nominated as a Bush delegate to the Republican National Convention. We appreciate your willingness to represent George Bush in New Orleans. The Bush family knows that one can't win in politics without the steadfast support of dedicated friends. Your nomination is recognition of this fact. I hope to see you in New Orleans waving the banner of a great candidate..."Vice President George Bush was unanimously nominated for President at the Republican National Convention in the New Orleans Superdome, August 15-18, 1988. He defeated Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis in a landslide on November 8, 1988, 426-111 electoral votes, 48.9 million to 41.8 million popular votes.Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George H. W. Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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George W. Bush handwrites letter to Texas supporter & encloses campaign button!

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Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 George W. Bush handwrites a letter on "George Bush for President" stationery to a Texas supporter enclosing one of his unsuccessful 1978 campaign buttons. Signed twice, once in full! Autograph Letter Signed "George W" and "George W Bush" in text, both sides of a 6.25" x 4.5" card headed "George Bush for President." No place, no date, but 1988. George W. was officially Senior Advisor to his father's presidential campaign. To Ron [Wade, Longview, Texas]. Minor creases with two small cuts through printed "George" on top. Otherwise in fine condition.In full, "Ron - Enclosed please find a George W Bush 1978 for Congress button. Thanks for your interest and please work hard so that these buttons mean something, Yours in victory." Buttonnot present. In 1978, George W. Bush lost his race for Congress in the 19th Congressional District in West Texas.George W. Bush's only political defeat was in 1978. He was elected Governor of Texas in 1994 and 1998 and President of the United States in 2000 and 2004.Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George H. W. Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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Rare displayable pristine President George W. Bush White House letter

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Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 Rare displayable pristine President George W. Bush White House letter Rare Typed Letter Signed "George W Bush" as President, 1p, 6.75" x 9". Gilt-embossed presidential seal at top center. The White House, Washington. April 24, 2006. To Mr. and Mrs. Ronald E. Wade, Longview Texas. Begins "Dear Laura and Ron." Never folded! In pristine condition.In full, "I am pleased to congratulate you on your wedding. The commitment you made to each other on April 23rd symbolizes your enduring devotion. By taking the vows of marriage, you demonstrate the importance of love and family. May the joy you share today be a source of great inspiration and strength throughout the years. Laura and I send our best wishes for every future happiness ..."Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George H. W. Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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Bush Pres Library Dedication ID tag signed by Pres G. W. Bush, H. W. Bush, Ford

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Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 Bush Presidential Library Dedication ID tag signed by Presidents Gerald R. Ford, George H.W. Bush, and George W. Bush and by British Prime Minister John Major Identification Tag signed "George W. Bush" as Governor of Texas, "George Bush," "Gerald Ford," and "John Major," 3.5" x 5.5". John Major had served as British Prime Minister from 1990-1997 which included most of George Bush's presidency. On glossy card stock, with hole at top edge for a string to be worn around the neck. Fine condition.Imprinted "The Dedication of / The George Bush Presidential Library / College Station, Texas / November 1997." Wearer is identified as "BUSH ALUMNI." Located on a 90-acre site on the west campus of Texas A&M University in College Station, Texas, the Bush Library was dedicated on November 7, 1997.From the Collection of Ron Wade. Texan Ron Wade was appointed by President George H. W. Bush to his 1988 Presidential Inaugural Committee, was a Bush floor leader at the 1988 Republican National Convention and regional director for Bush's races in 1980, 1988 and 1992.

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George Bush signs a decorative campaign disk during his run for the Presidency

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Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 George Bush signs a decorative campaign disk in 2000, during his run for the Presidency Circular printed campaign disk, 6.5" in diameter, printed on paper stock as a baseball with a wide blue margin surrounding the image stating "Hit A Home Run For America/ Bush 2000" boldly signed and inscribed in black felt tip by George Bush to Ron Wade as "To Ron/Best Wishes/George Bush". Near fine. From the spectacular, unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis WadeA quite unique piece, as we have never seen another one, which is also accompanied with impeccable provenance. Detailed below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia _Üî it's really a replica of the Oval Office."Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 _Üî that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year.The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old."My first memory in life is wearing an _ÜÛI Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.While much of the public might be disillusioned with warring politicians, Wade _Üî who once served as a White House page for then-President Nixon _Üî says talk of partisan bickering in Washington is overblown: "The friction between parties has been here as long as America has been here."

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Circular letter notifying banks that John Campbell has been appointed U.S. Treas

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Description: Campbell John 1811 - 1889 A circular letter notifying banks that John Campbell has been appointed the United States Treasurer A circular document signed "John Campbell" and "D Ingham" as Secretary of the Treasury. The document is entitled: "Circular Instruction to the Banks employed as Depositories of the Public Moneys". This document discusses in part Campbells' appointment a United States Treasurer by President Andrew Jackson. Ingham officially notifies banks that Campbell has been appointed U.S. Treasurer as of June 1, 1829: "It is necessary that Mr. Campbell's be kept entirely separate from those of his predecessors. The Banks employed as Depositories of public moneys, will, therefore, strike the balance of Mr. (William) Clark's account at the close of the present month of May, and commence Mr. Campbell's account with the 1st of June." There are many more instructions for the bank on the sheet. This two page historic financial document has the usual creases and dark signatures.

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Benjamin Cardozo, Chief Judge of the NY Court of Appeals, advises predecessor

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Description: Cardozo Benjamin 1870 - 1938 Two years before he is appointed to the Supreme Court by President Herbert Hoover, Benjamin Cardozo, Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals, advises his predecessor as Chief Judge, Frank S. Hiscock to "hold out an olive branch to the Governor," Franklin D. Roosevelt, in an address he is to make to the annual meeting of the New York State Bar Association of which he is president. Autograph Letter Signed "B.N.C." as Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals, 2.5 pages, 5.75" x 8", separate conjoined sheets with conclusion on verso of first page. Albany [New York], January 7, 1930. Salutation "My dear Chief" [former Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals, Frank S. Hiscock].On January 17, 1930, Cardozo's predecessor as Chief Judge of the New York Court of Appeals, Frank H. Hiscock, spoke at the 53rd annual meeting of the New York State Bar Association. Hiscock, now president of the State Bar, had retired from the bench at the end of 1926 when he reached the constitutional age limit of 70 years. Hiscock had sent Judge Cardozo a copy of the address he planned to deliver.In full, "Thank you for sending me a copy of your address which I have read with interest. I see nothing of substance to be criticized. Perhaps on p. 3, it might be well to omit the statement that our court _ÜÛhas repeatedly adjourned for lack of business.' The public might think we were without there was no different cause for preserving us. You might say, _ÜÛand does not adjourn until all the cases read for argument have been heard.'"On the page before the last, (at the end of the page) you might hold out an olive branch to the Governor [Franklin D. Roosevelt] by saying that it ought not to be difficult to provide for some partial representation of laymen on the commission if such representation is thought desirable.. I cannot think of anything else. Faithfully yours."Hiscock took Cardozo's advice. "The New York Times" reported on January 18, 1930, that in his address, "Judge Hiscock outlined the movement launched by the association to make a survey of the administration of justice, and disclosed that the survey had been handicapped by the inability of the committee, headed by William C. Breed, to obtain the necessary funds. Judge Hiscock estimated that at least $75,000 would be required for the survey. He referred to the Governor's veto of an appropriation of $60,000 for the survey on the ground that laymen were not represented on the commission and suggested a new attempt to obtain the passage of a measure."On February 6, 1930, Governor Roosevelt met with a delegation from the Executive Committee of the New York Bar Association headed by former Judge Hiscock. "The New York Times" reported that a "bill sponsored by the Republicans was passed last year, but the Governor vetoed it because it provided for an investigation commission composed exclusively of lawyers, while he had insisted that there should be a liberal sprinkling of laymen on it. _ÜÛI am now very hopeful that a bill we be passed on which all hands can agree,' the Governor said after the conference today. _ÜÛI am glad the Governor said that,' Senator John Knight [President pro tempore of the N.Y. State Senate and a Republican] remarked when informed of the Governor's statement. _ÜÛIf he wants some lay members on the commission, we have no objection.'"

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Supreme Court Justice Cardozo thanks a New York lawyer for his letter

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Description: Cardozo Benjamin 1870 - 1938 Displayable ALS! Supreme Court Justice Cardozo thanks a New York lawyer for his letter - "I begin to lose my faith in the reality of progress..." Autograph Letter Signed "Benjamin N. Cardozo" as Associated Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, 1 page, 5" x 6.5". White Plains, N.Y., August 12, 1936. Cardozo served on the Supreme Court 1932-1938. To H.H. Nordlinger, Esq. Glue stains on verso of blank integral leaf. Fine condition.In full, "Many thanks for the copy of your letter to the Law Journal. I begin to lose my faith in the reality of progress..."Henry H. Nordlinger was a partner in the New York law firm of Nordlinger, Riegelman, Benetar & Charney.

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Dr. Carver writes to his first polio patient, a student at Tuskegee

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Description: Carver George 1860 - 1943 Dr. Carver writes to his first polio patient, a student at Tuskegee, "I want my young Edison to be extremely careful ... begin early to take care of your self and it will make a strong, successful business man out of you. That is just what made Edison the man that he was..." Autograph Letter Signed "G.W. Carver" as Director, Research and Experiment Station, Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, two full pages, 8.5" x 11", front and verso. Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, March 7, 1935. To Floyd Anderson, Chipley, Georgia. With original postmarked envelope, addressed by Carver. Fine condition.In full, "My, but it is fine to hear from my dear, handsome boy. I feared you were not well, hence my anexiety [sic]. I am glad that you are improving and hope you will soon be yourself again. I am so glad you agree with me about the spanking. We will have to talk it over when we get to gether. I am so glad there are no scars that will show. Dear, I want my young Edison to be extremely careful, as I want nothing to happen to him that will retard his progress. Glad you did not let your mother wory [sic] over it. Glorious, that you are planning to work your way through Ga. Tech. There is nothing that develops a person like self reliance, begin early to take care of your self and it will make a strong, successful business man out of you. That is just what made Edison the man that he was. You are right dear, if any one wants education, badly enough, there is no force that can keep him from getting it. If you go to Ga. Tech. I want to make arrangements to see you from time to time. no. I do not want my dear boy to do any manual labor when you come down, there will be so many interesting things for you to do when you come. I am so anxious to see that cured leg, it must be great to have it well again, dear. You are no happier than I am. Fine that you have a nice radio equipment. Now is the time to start building up your laboratory and some day I am sure you will have a better lab. than mine. Yes my health seems very good. My patients keep me buisy [sic] day and night, and I am getting some fine results. I shall give them your greetings. I feel so happy over my dear boy 'Floyd.' With so much love and good wishes."On August 28, 1934, Dr. Carver had written Floyd, in part, "Some time dear, I wish you write me a brief story of your case, and how the treatment has benefitted you. Dear, you are my first patient and it would be such a treasure to have it from you..." From the January 26, 1936 edition of "The Montgomery Advertiser," in article titled "Infantile Paralysis and the Oil Therapy." In part, "Dr. George W. Carver, of Tuskegee Institute ... has already proved conclusively that peanut oils offer a possibility at least of adding to a man's means of treating the after-effects of infantile paralysis..."

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Mary Cassatt triple signed declaration for one of her renown pieces of artwork

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Description: Cassatt Mary 1845 - 1926 Mary Cassatt triple signed declaration for one of her renown pieces of artwork A partially printed customs declaration for an artwork, from the U.S. Consulate General at Paris, dated July 28, 1876. One page, 4to (8" x 10"), attached to a document signed in the hand of Robert Cassatt, her father, one page, (8.5" x 6.5"). Described on the verso by the artist here as "a picture 100 metre by 70 centimetres representing a Musical repetition", and signed "Mary S. Cassatt" on the verso, counter-signed by the U.S. Vice-Consul to Paris, and signed by her twice on the recto. With attached faded docket on light purple paper.The subject matter and dimensions of the work...accounting for Cassatt's rather charming confusion of metres and centimetres... suggest that the painting this document accompanied was "A Musical Party" of 1874, now at the Mus©e Carnavalet, Paris; her father's sworn statement attached places the value of the work at $400. It was exhibited in 1874 in Paris and in Philadelphia in 1878 (see images).Although Cassatt was an American born painter from Pennsylvania, she proclaimed her independence by leaving in 1866 to paint in France. Influenced, like Degas, by Japanese woodcuts, she began to emphasize line over mass and experimented with asymmetric composition and informal, natural gestures and positions. Portrayals of mothers and children in intimate relationship and domestic settings became her theme. By 1872, after studying in the major museums of Europe, her style began to mature, and she settled in Paris. There her work attracted the attention of the French painter Edgar Degas, who invited her to exhibit with his fellow impressionists. An image of her work referred to in this customs declaration of , A Musical Party , is shown below.

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Cesar Chavez signed National Farm Workers membership card

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Description: Chavez Cesar 1927 - 1993 Cesar Chavez signed National Farm Workers membership card, origin of the United Farmworkers Union Small card 3.5" x 2.5", for the Professors Academic Membership 1966 NATIONAL FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION/Delano, California. Small red insignia to upper left and signed by Director Cesar Chavez as "Cesar Chavez"A wonderful piece of agricultural history, the National Farm Workers Association was founded in 1962 by Cesar Chavez, a migrant farm laborer. It originated from the merger of two workers' rights organizations, the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) led by organizer Larry Itliong, and the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) led by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta. They became allied and transformed from workers' rights organizations into a union as a result of a series of strikes in 1965, when the mostly Filipino farmworkers of the AWOC in Delano California initiated a grape strike, and the NFWA went on strike in support. As a result of the commonality in goals and methods, the NFWA and the AWOC formed the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee on August 22, 1966. (This organization was later accepted into the AFL-CIO in 1972 and changed its name to the United Farmworkers Union)The NFWA originated as a grassroots organization on the premise that farm workers can be organized by providing services that transform their day to day lives. Functioning somewhat like a co-op, the intent was to unify the farming communities common needs which would lower costs, save time and allow for higher quality of services. Some of the features including a discount store for tires and oil, a staff for job grievances, a newspaper, a life insurance program, a parts store and service station for the equipment where families can bring their cards to fix under the direction and supervision of a master mechanic. And ultimately even a pharmacy. The NFWA was also appealing to the assistance of the academic community with the belief that farm workers themselves were not able to raise all the capital necessary to provide these services, the intent was to solicit support from professors who would understand the need for a democratic society to eradicate social injustice. At the time Farm Workers were making only about $2000 to $3000 a year, an equivalent in todays terms of about $15,000, an absurd amount for a family to live on. This NFWA card signed by Cesar Chavez, requested a donation of $10 as a contribution to an academic membership to bring a measure of social justice in California agriculture "one step closer". A great piece of history of the grass roots beginning of the United Farmworkers Union.

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Letter signed in full by Winston S. Churchill as British Prime Minister

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Description: Churchill Winston 1874 - 1965 Displayable letter signed in full by Winston S. Churchill as British Prime Minister Typed Letter Signed "Winston S. Churchill" as British Prime Minister, 1 page, 7.5" x 9.5". On imprinted "10, Downing Street" stationery, the Seal of the Prime Minister at upper left. Whitehall, August 5, 1952. File hole in blank upper left corner. Mounting remnant on verso at right edge. Usual folds do not touch full signature. Fine condition.Just months before Churchill is knighted and is awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature, he thanks Major C. de L. Fforde "for your letter of July 17. I am grieved to hear of your Uncle's death. Pray accept my thanks for your kindness in writing tom me."

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Five page Civil War battle report by General Hamilton Prioleau Bee

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Description: Civil War - Superb contentfive page Civil War battle report by General Hamilton Prioleau Bee Heavily written 5 page MS on laid paper, 7.75" x 11.5". Dated "April 10th, 1864", addressed to "Major Hart", and signed by General Hamilton Prioleau Bee as "H.P. Bee". Signed twice, once at the bottom of the letter, and a second time in the docket located on the verso, likely clerically. The signatures are quite close to our limited reference for Bee but fall short of our conclusive identification. Bound by a hand tied ribbon along the top edge. Intact tear present to the pages, all repaired mostly with archival document tape, and a bit of scotch tape. Edges are worn, light grubbiness and handling marks throughout. Expected folds with expert reinforced repairs along several folds with final page showing archival repair to the separation along the folds, associated paper loss in several places including affecting his closing title of "Brig. Genl. Commd" located under his signature.An exceptionally rare lengthy Civil War five page letter/battle report, of General Hamilton Prioleau Bee. A nicely preserved "retained copy" from "Head Quarters, 1st Division of Cavalry/Pleasant Hill/April 10th, 1864", and addressed to "Major Hart/ Assistant Adj't Genl./Green's Cavalry Corps." The letter was written the day after the Battle of Pleasant Hill which had ended the eve of April 9th with Bee having had two different horses shot out from under him during a cavalry charge. Excellent content, the letter begins with "I have the honor to report the operations of the troops under my command during the battle of Mansfield and Pleasant Hill _Ü_" And then has excerpts as follows of "Debray's Bechels and Terrells Regiments rendezvoused at Mansfield having marched from the Colorado River in Texas. They advanced to meet the enemy now known to be approaching enforce. I at once placed the regiment in line of battle with intervals of 500 yards, who successfully met the enemy. Of the command the most of whom were under fire for the first time, were cool and deliberate behaving most satisfactory _Ü_ At 4 O'clock P.M. Genl. Walker advanced the Cavalry covering the right, being in the timber my march was slow _Ü_ unexpectedly encountered the 19th Army Corps of the enemy in position on the crest of the hill _Ü_ I received the gallant co-operation of Col. Randell and Col. E. Clark of Walker's Division and Col. Puchel of the Calvalry _Ü_ gallantly charged with his company the lines of the enemy for the purpose of drawing their fire preparatory to a charge of our Infantry losing Lieut. Willis, killed and several wounded. Major McNeel of my staff had his horse killed_Ü_ Capt. Borden of Bechels Regiment fell seriously wounded while gallantly leading his company _Ü_ The loss in my brigade consisting of Debray's, Terrells and Buchels regiment was 164 killed wounded and missing _Ü_ H.P. Bee / Brig Gen Comdg."A handsome, highly detailed revealing battle report. Letters and manuscripts relating to Bee are extremely scarce.

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Mark Twain, Samuel Clemens writes a check to Bearer for $181.40

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Description: Clemens Samuel 1835 - 1910 Mark Twain,Samuel Clemens writes a check to Bearer for $181.40 Document signed check, signed "Samuel Clemens", drawn on First National Bank of Hartford, numbered "103", and dated "May 3, 1875" and made payable to "Bearer" for "$181.40", also written as "One Hundred Eighty -One 40/00" Dollars. Measures 7.75" x 2.75". Stamped on recto "PAID MAY 4, 1875, 1ST NAT BANK"An attractive check in light purple tones with a nicely engraved portrait in orange, signed by Samuel Clemens (Mark Twain)

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Bonnie and Clyde Vintage 1934 Wanted Poster!

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Description: Clyde Barrow Bonnie Parker - 1934 Bonnie and Clyde Vintage 1934 Wanted Poster! One page small poster, 7.75" x 7.75", issued by the U.S. Department of Justice, Division of Investigation. Front with photos and description of Bonnie and Clyde listing their aliases, physical descriptions, relatives, and criminal records. The verso contains details about the Special Agents in charge and their phone numbers across the country. Near fineAmazing vintage 1934 wanted poster for the infamous Bonnie and Clyde baby-faced bank robbing duo. Details out their personal details including their relatives and criminal records. Also noting that "Clyde Champion Barrow and Bonnie Parker constantly travel together and extreme caution must be exercised by arresting officers as they are wanted in connection with assault and murder of officers."A great piece of crime memorabilia. Bonnie Parker (1910-1934) and Clyde Barrow (1909-1934) were two of the Great Depression's most infamous bank robbers, murderers and outlaws. The duo met their just end in a bloody police ambush in Bienville Parish, Louisiana, on May 23, 1934. Bonnie and Clyde were later "celebrated" in popular culture, most notably in the 1967 Arthur Penn film Bonnie and Clyde starring Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway. An original 1934 U.S. Department of Justice wanted poster for the pair sold at auction for $1,135.25 (Heritage Auction Galleries, 4/13/06).

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Early Massachusetts doc involving a Cape Cod res. buying land near Hartford, CT

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Description: Colonial Massachusetts - An early Massachusetts document involving a Cape Cod resident purchasing land near Hartford, Connecticut Manuscript Document Signed, 1 page, 16.25" x 12.75", Barnstable, October 7, 1700, with two black wax seals affixed to bottom right of document. Separated folds reinforced on verso with 19th century newspaper, else very good.An early New England signed land indenture manuscript, describing the sale ("sum of thirty and six pounds"), and land description of "one thousand acres" of a Connecticut parcel to Samuel Winslow of Harwich, province of Massachusetts Bay.

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First Lady Grace Coolidge pens a note about grief on Washington letterhead

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Description: Coolidge Grace 1879 - 1957 First Lady Grace Coolidge pens a note about grief on Washington letterhead, after the death of her son Autographed Note, signed by First Lady Grace Coolidge as "Sincerely yours / Grace Coolidge", and dated "September 29, 1954". 5" x 4" on White House card stock with raised seal. Accompanied by an autographed White House envelope postmarked 1924 with a 2 cent stamp, top edge torn open, with light note upper left scripted in graphite "_Ü_letter of sympathy at the time of the death of her son..."To Mr. Ray Harris, "Yes, I have several copies of Mr. Guests poem entitled "Grief". It contains a beautiful thought also expressed in a prayer which I love written by James Mantinean beginning "we seem to give him back to Thee, dear God, who gavest him to us."A heartfelt letter, from the period just after her son's death. Both she and President Coolidge became quite expectedly withdrawn as a result, with Coolidge even being known to have said "when he died, the power and glory of the Presidency went with him." It had only been a year prior when Calvin Coolidge most unexpectedly became the President resulting from the death of President Harding, who died in San Francisco while on a speaking tour of the western United States. Vice President Coolidge was in Vermont visiting his family home, which had neither electricity nor a telephone, when he received word by messenger of Harding's death. He dressed, said a prayer, and came downstairs to greet the reporters who had assembled. His father, a notary public, administered the oath of office in the family's parlor by the light of a kerosene lamp at 2:47 a.m. on August 3, 1923; President Coolidge then went back to bed. He returned to Washington the next day, and was sworn in again by Justice Adolph A. Hoehling, Jr. of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia, to forestall any questions about the authority of a notary public to administer the presidential oath.A poignant short letter penned during a very personal and emotional period for the Coolidge family.

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Stephen Decatur signs a receipt for his certificates before his deadly duel

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Description: Decatur Stephen 1751 - 1808 Stephen Decatur signs a receipt for his certificates before his deadly duel. With Chesapeake Affair association. Single page, 8" x 6.25" , appears as the top half of a sheet. Single fold. Thin tissue paper line across left edge on verso. Written and signed by Stephen Decatur as "Stephen Decatur" and although not dated by year, it is dated my the month of "Nov 25th". Faint handling marks, else near fineA hand written receipt scripted entirely in the hand of Decatur and signed by him. The receipt acknowledges that John Bullus, a Navy agent and surgeon had delivered Stephen Decatur with his U.S. stock certificates which he had held at the time on his behalf. The receipt states in full:"Rec'd Nov 25th of John Bullus Esq/All the certificates of U.S. Stock which he held belonging to me/ Yours/Stephen Decatur"The two party's, Decatur and Bullus, appeared to have known each other in 1807, when the British warship HMS Leopard had attacked and boarded the American frigate USS Chesapeake, which was under the command of Commodore Barron, in an attempt to capture four alleged British deserters. Twenty-one Americans were killed or wounded as the four men were brought aboard the HMS Leopard. Decatur was one of the members of the court martial that had found Barron guilty of unpreparedness in the affair, and had barred him from a command for the next five years. John Bullus was on board the Chesapeake on his way to a Consulate in the Mediterranean when the Leopard attacked, and in 1807 Bullus had hand-delivered a letter from Secretary of State James Madison to U.S. Minister James Monroe in London concerning the Chesapeake-Leopard affair. As an eyewitness, Bullus also personally related to Monroe the details of the attack which led to Barron's court martial. It is quite probably that John Bullus and Stephen Decator worked together during the court martial.After a long simmering personal and professional dispute with Commodore James Barron, Barron proceeded to resort to the common and accepted manner to resolves personal differences at the time by challenging Decator to a duel. Regretfully Decator accepted. This was a ill fated move for Decator as he did not survive the duel, ultimately resulting in his demise in 1820. Stephen Decator was the youngest man to reach the rank of captain in the history of the United States Navy.[ He served under three presidents, and played a major role in the early development of the American navy. In almost every theater of operation, Decatur's service was characterized with acts of heroism and exceptional performance.A rare autographed and signed receipt in excellent condition.

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Prince Charles and Diana sign letter to the Duchy of Cornwall for their wedding

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Description: Diana of Wales Princess 1961 - 1997 Prince Charles and Diana sign letter to the Duchy of Cornwall for their wedding gift A typed letter, on Buckingham Palace letterhead, 8" x 13". Dated, "7th October, 1981" signed by both Prince Charles and Princess Diana as "Charles", in black ink and and "Diana", in blue ink. Expected folds. Fine condition. With accompanying envelope, with the Buckingham Palace stamp on the verso. 8.5" x 4.25", opened at the top and postmarked "London/7 Oct 1981", addressed to "S. Parkyn, Esq".A wonderful letter thank you letter from Prince Charles and Princess Diana for their wedding gift from the Duchy. Dated "7th October 1981". Duchy's are "Crown bodies", regulated by acts of Parliament that have some of the powers of a corporation or trust. They invest in land, their income is payable either to the Monarch or the Monarchs eldest son. There are two Duchy's in England, however the Duchy referred to in this letter is the one from which holds the trust for Prince Charles, the Duchy of Cornwall which currently owns about 141,000 acres of land in England. It is estimated that Prince Charles receives his trust from The Duchy of Cornwall, with an annual income of nearly •£12 million from his Duchy of Cornwall estate, however he is not permitted to sell off property or use the Duchy's capital. The thank you letter from Prince Charles and Princess Diana reflects their deep affection for the Duchy which is written as follows:"Dear Mr. Parkyn,We would both like to thank you very much indeed for your most kind contribution to the wedding present which the Duchy has given us.We are delighted with the mahogany library table which will look splendid in our home at Highgrove and is exactly the right period for the house. We were also most touched to received the balance of the gift in the form of a cheque with which we shall probably buy some more furniture. As you can well imagine, with two houses to equip from scratch we have quite a difficult task ahead of us!We have been completely overwhelmed by the kindness and generosity which so many people have shown us, but as you know we will have a very special affection for the Duchy and all those who live and work in it and we therefor particularly appreciate your gift. We look forward very much to visiting the Duchy together in the future.Yours most sincerely,Charles and Diana"The Duchy of Cornwall is a well-managed private estate, which was established by Edward III in 1337. The revenues from the estate are passed to HRH The Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall, who chooses to use them to fund his public, charitable and private activities and those of his family. The Duchy consists of around 53,000 hectares of land in 23 counties, mostly in the South West of England. The principal activity of the Duchy is the sustainable, commercial management of its land and properties. The Duchy also has a financial investment portfolio., and its primary function was to provide all future Princes of Wales with an income from its assets. The Duke of Cornwall traditionally manages their estates under the charter that the long term value of the estate can not be compromised.The Duchy's 1337 charter established that The Duke of Cornwall, is the eldest surviving son of the monarch and the Heir to The Throne (currently and still Charles, Prince of Wales). When the current Prince of Wales accedes the throne, Prince William will become Duke of Cornwall.An important thank you letter written by Prince Charles and Princess Diana, to an entity that has looked after The Prince of Wales and Duke of Cornwall for almost 700 years!

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