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Auction Description for Auctionata: Tibetan Art from a Significant Private Collection
Viewing Notes:
: A preview at Auctionata on 14/15 Jan is only possible by prior appointment. Contact: Tel: +49 30 9832 0221, E-mail: sales@auctionata.com

Tibetan Art from a Significant Private Collection

(116 Lots)

by Auctionata


116 lots with images

January 17, 2014

Live Auction

Franklinstrasse 13

Berlin, 10587 Germany

Phone: +49 30 9832 0222

Fax: +49 30 20239 2169

Email: sales@auctionata.com

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Gau Amulet Box with Silver Front and Brass-Copper Body, 19th C

Lot 1: Gau Amulet Box with Silver Front and Brass-Copper Body, 19th C

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Description: Silver, brass, copper, coral Tibet, 19th century Finely floral décor in filigree work Decorative coral in the center Mountings on the side Dimensions: 9.5 x 4 cm (diameter x height) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan amulet box, called ga'u, has a round brass body, a base plate made of copper and brass as well as a front in silver filigree work. Finely floral decorations on the front are visible and a round coral insert in the center can be found. The box can be mounted with handles on the side. These prayer boxes are used to store personal amulets and other objects. The shape of a Gau depends on the gender and the wealth of the wearer. Larger, round and square boxes are worn by men. Small round, diamond or star-shaped Gau are used by women. As these amulet boxes are often set with turquoises and corals, they also served as pieces of jewellery. The Gau amulet box is in good condition with a natural patina and light traces of age and wear. Minimal loss of material as well as small nicks and dents are visible. The box measures 9.5 cm in diameter and 4 cm in height. Tibetan Gaus Tibetan Gaus, portable amulet containers or prayer boxes, are mostly made from metal. They can be worn with a chain around the neck or attached to a hair slide. Gaus usually consist of two parts: the front is made of copper or silver or gold plating, often with finely chased decorations and sometimes set with gemstones. Images of Buddha, Buddhist symbols of good fortune and other deities are often seen. Larger Gaus often have a window-like opening in the centre and have an arched shape in the upper area. The back is often made from copper and sometimes shows fine engravings, symbols or inscriptions.

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Silver-Plated „Gau

Lot 2: Silver-Plated „Gau" Amulet Box with a Coral, Tibet, around 190

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Description: Silver-plated metal, iron, coral and turquoise Tibet, around 1900 or slightly later Fine filigree on the front and a coral in the center Mountings on the side Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 1.5 cm (depth x width x height) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This amulet box is called ga'u in Tibet and dates back to around 1900 or slightly later. In his case the Gau has a rectangular body and was made from silver-plated metal with an iron back. Through the side eyelets, the amulet box can be attached and worn on a chain or a belt. The amulet box is adorned by a center coral. It is surrounded by tendrils, borders in relief and small turquoise ornate the four corners. A Gau is used to store personal amulets and other objects in it and the shape of a Gau depends on the wealth and gender of the wearer. Larger, round and square boxes are worn by men, while small round, diamond or star-shaped Gaus are worn by women. As these amulet boxes are often set with turquoises and corals, they also served as pieces of jewellery. The amulet box is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Corrosion on the back, dents on the eyes and smaller nicks here and there are visible. The depth is 9 cm, the width is 6 cm and the height is 1.5 cm. Reverse inscribed with inventory number. Tibetan Gaus Tibetan Gaus, portable amulet containers or prayer boxes, are mostly made from metal. They can be worn with a chain around the neck or attached to a hair slide. Gaus usually consist of two parts: the front is made of copper or silver or gold plating, often with finely chased decorations and sometimes with set with gemstones. Images of Buddha, Buddhist symbols of good fortune and other deities are often seen. Larger Gaus often have a window-like opening in the centre and have an arched shape in the upper area. The back is often made from copper and sometimes shows fine engravings, symbols or inscriptions.

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Yak Leather Belt Pouch with Handle and Turquoise, 19th Century

Lot 3: Yak Leather Belt Pouch with Handle and Turquoise, 19th Century

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Description: Yak leather, iron, metal, partially gilded Copper, fabric, turquoises, coral Tibet, 19th century Floral chased décor Filigree work Partly open-work Connecting link in form of two dragon heads Dimensions: 39 x 13 cm (length x width) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This decorative yak leather belt pouch was made in 19th century Tibet. The pouch comes with a long, ornate leather handle, so it can be carried or attached to a belt. With a connecting link in the form of two dragon heads the handle and the pouch are connected. Pouch and handle are ornate with filigree work in partially gilded metal and partly open work. Floral ornaments, vine patterns and different animals as well as mystical creatures can be seen. Both items are decorated with a turquoise in the center. The front of the pouch has also a small coral. At the bottom a pendant can be attached and inside the pouch a small item can be stowed. The pouch is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Leather and fabric are rubbed, traces of corrosion on iron are visible. The total length of the bag and the handle is 39 cm and the width measures 13 cm.

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Two Leather Belt Pouches with Turquoises and Corals, 19th C

Lot 4: Two Leather Belt Pouches with Turquoises and Corals, 19th C

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Description: Yak leather, silver, brass, metal, iron, turquoises and corals Tibet, 19th century Fine chasing and filigree work Floral ornaments Turquoise and coral inserts Dimensions: 24.5 x 13 und 8.5 x 12.5 cm (length x width) Good condition Provenance: from an important Austrian private collection These two yak leather pouches were made in 19th century Tibet. One pouch can be carried or attached to a belt with the leather strap. Filigree works in silver or metal are seen throughout and floral ornaments and vine patterns adorn the sides of the pouches in relief. Round turquoise and coral inserts create colourful accentuations on the front. Verso round metal knobs or round and floral silver fittings can also be found. A small item can be stored in the inside. The belt pouches are in good condition with signs of age and wear. The leather is worn, some corrosion, inclusions in the semi-precious stones, scratches and nicks are visible. The Dimensions are 24.5 x 13 x 8.5 cm and 12.5 cm (length x width).

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Yak Leather Belt Pouch with Coral in the Center, 19th Century

Lot 5: Yak Leather Belt Pouch with Coral in the Center, 19th Century

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Description: Yak leather, metal, iron, brass, copper, coral Tibet, 19th century Floral chased décor Filigree work Connecting link in the form of two dragon heads With a central coral Dimensions: 25 x 13.5 cm (length x width) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This yak leather belt pouch was made in 19th century Tibet. The pouch can be carried or attached to your belt with the leather strap and the chain. It is adorned with a copper curb chain as well as with a band with a round iron button. With a connecting link in the form of two dragon heads the handle and the pouch are joint. Filigree work in copper, brass or metal is seen throughout. Floral ornaments, vine patterns and different animals are also seen. A coral adorns the center. At the bottom leather pendant is attached.The pouch is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. The leather is rubbed and traces of corrosion on the iron elements are visible. The total length of the bag and the handle is 25 cm and the width measures 13.5 cm.

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Perak Headdress with Turquoise and Trinkets, 19th/20th Century

Lot 6: Perak Headdress with Turquoise and Trinkets, 19th/20th Century

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Description: Metal, turquoise, cornelians, cowries, fabric, felt Tibet, 19th / early 20th century Precious headdress of a Ladakh women With small turquoises decorated trinkets Dimensions: 71 x 44 cm (length x width) Good condition Provenance: from an important Austrian private collection This perak headdress was made in Tibet an dates back to the 19th / early 20th century. The headdress is worn by Tibetan Ladakh women and consists of felt and fabric. It is adorned with a range of smaller and larger turquoises as well as cornelians and cowries are fixed on it. The colour spectrum of the turquoises ranges from light blue to dark green and orange to red coloured cornelians and small ornamental 'gau' can be seen. The gau was used to store personal items or lucky charms. The end of the headdress is decorated with white cowrie shells. Tibetan jewellery has a decorative and a symbolic function; turquoises protect the psyche and the soul and silver is supposed to protect the wearer from evil. The jewellery shows the wearer's regional background and social position. Jewellery often used as symbol of rank for high officials, ministers and dignitaries. Tibetan jewellery was mostly worn as a kind or protective headdress as the Tibetan culture sees the head as focal point of consciousness and the seat of the soul. It is thus the point of possibility for enlightenment. The headdress is in good condition with age-related signs of wear. Partial soiling on the side and minimal loss of material are visible. The fabric shows wear and discolouration. The item is 71 cm long and 44 cm width.

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Khampa Nomad Pleated Ring, Silver and Coral, Tibet, 19th/20th C

Lot 7: Khampa Nomad Pleated Ring, Silver and Coral, Tibet, 19th/20th C

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Description: Silver, brass, coral, turquoise, glass Tibet, late 19th / 20th century Decorated with small silver balls on the side Total weight: 52.90 g Dimensions: 4.5 x 5.5 cm (height x length) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Khampa jewellery dates back to the late 19th / 20th century and was made in Tibet. The Khampa people live in the highlands of east Tibet and prefer to use materials with symbolic meanings. So for Tibetan, silver is supposed to protect against evil, whilst turquoise safeguards the soul and coral gemstone ensures physical health. This pleated ring is adorned in the middle with a big coral and a small round turquoise gemstone and a blue glass stone. These are also framed by small decorative silver balls. The Khampa jewellery is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Small scratches are visible. The total weight is 52.90 grams; the height is 4.5 cm and the length 5.5 cm.

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Silver Ear Pendants with Turquoise and Coral, 19th/20th C

Lot 8: Silver Ear Pendants with Turquoise and Coral, 19th/20th C

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Description: Silver, silver plated metal, bronze, turquoise and coral gemstones, glass Tibet, 19th / 20th century Traditional, Tibetan jewellery with symbolic importance Total weight: 71.50 g Length: Each 10.5 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection These ear pendants date back to the 19th / 20th century and were made in Tibet from silver, silvered metal and bronze. The top section features a round, drop-shaped turquoise and is further crowned by three smaller turquoise stones. Each lower section is adorned with two round coral gemstones and a turquoise one, as well as a pointed light blue glass stone. Between the stones floral silver mountings can be found. Tibetan jewellrey has symbolic character and a protective function. So silver is supposed to protect from evil, coral ensures physical health and a turquoise should safeguard the soul and psyche. By wearing certain items of jewellery, various dignitaries and ministers could express their status or rank. Jewellery was also an investment, used as dowry for marriage and often served as a valuable inheritance. Since Tibetans believed the soul is located within the head area, this is where they primarily wore their jewellery. The ear pendants are in good condition with usual sign of age and wear. Chips and a small missing stones as well as slight scratches and nicks are visible. The total weight is 71.50 grams and the earrings are each 10.5 cm long.

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Kampa Silver Ear Pendant with Turquoise and Coral, 19th Century

Lot 9: Kampa Silver Ear Pendant with Turquoise and Coral, 19th Century

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Description: Silver, turquoise and coral gemstones Tibet, 19th / first half of the 20th century Jewellery with symbolic importance With wooden box Total weight of the ear pendant: 67.80 g Measurement: 14 x 6 cm (length x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan ear pendant dates back to the 19th / first half of the 20th century and was made from silver. The top section features a round, drop-shaped turquoise and coral gemstones. The lower part is adorned with chased silver elements. Two round coral gemstones are arranged between. This piece of jewellery comes in a wooden box. The Tibetan jewellery has symbolic character and a protective function. Silver is supposed to protect the wearer from evil, turquoise should safeguard the soul and psyche and coral ensures physical health. By wearing certain items of jewellery a social status as well as various dignitaries and ministers could express their status or rank. Jewellery was an investment, used as dowry for marriage and often served as a valuable inheritance. Since Tibetans believed the soul is located within the head area, this is where they primarily wore their jewellery. The ear pendant is in good condition with natural patina and slight signs of age and wear. Small chips to the stones and slight scratches are visible. The total weight is 67.80 grams. The earrings are 14 cm long and have a depth of 6 cm.

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Lot 10: "Gau" Amulet Box with Figural Chased Front, around 1900

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Description: Metal, copper, fabric, leather, glass Tibet, around 1900 or slightly later Filled inside with fabric and a tsa-tsa Buddha Finely chased front with dragons Wish-fulfilling jewel Chintamani and mythical creatures Kirtimukha Mountings on the side Dimensions: 13 x 11 x 4 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This in Tibet called ga'u amulet box has a detailed chased front with a distinctive patina and a body made of copper. Two dragons in high relief are focused on the wish-fulfilling jewel Chintamani, which is located in the upper center. On the lower edge is the mythical creature Kirtimukha. A window-like opening in the centre reveals a devotional small tsa-tsa relief of Buddha. The casket is curved at the top and can be mounted with handles on the side. Gau amulet shrines like this are worn by Tibetan men across the chest or under the arms. They are used to store personal amulets and other objects. The casket is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear, such as small scratches and nicks. The depth is 13 cm, the width is 11 cm and the height is 4 cm. Tibetan Gaus Tibetan Gaus, portable amulet containers or prayer boxes, are mostly made from metal. They can be worn with a chain around the neck or attached to a hair slide. Gaus usually consist of two parts: the front is made of copper or silver or gold plating, often with finely chased decorations and sometimes with set with gemstones. Images of Buddha, Buddhist symbols of good fortune and other deities are often seen. Larger Gaus often have a window-like opening in the centre and have an arched shape in the upper area. The back is often made from copper and sometimes shows fine engravings, symbols or inscriptions.

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Silver and Copper Gau Amulet Box, Tibet, 19th Century

Lot 11: Silver and Copper Gau Amulet Box, Tibet, 19th Century

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Description: Silver, copper Tibet, late 19th century Finely chase and repoussé work Different animals and Buddhist symbols of good fortune Hinge for opening and mounting Total weight: 181.85 g Dimensions: 10 x 10.5 x 5.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan gau amulet box consist of silver and copper and has a drop-shaped body. Both sides are decorated by fine chasing and repoussé work. Different animals and Buddhist symbols of good fortune can be seen in high relief on the front. The wheel of dharma and the wish-fulfilling jewel chintamani are shown on the back. The entire wall is adorned with finely engraved floral tendrils that surround the motives. By a lateral hinge the box can be opened and attached to a chain or a belt. The shape of gaus depends on the wealth and gender of the wearer. Larger, round and square boxes are often worn by men, while small round, diamond or star-shaped gaus are worn by women. The boxes are often used as a piece of jewellery or as storage for personal amulets and other objects. The gau is in good condition with slights signs of age and wear. Both sides are light bent and minor scratches here and there are visible. The height is 10 cm, the width is 5.5 cm and the depth is 5.5 cm. The total weight amounts to 181.85 grams. Tibetan Gaus Tibetan Gaus, portable amulet containers or prayer boxes, are mostly made from metal. They can be worn with a chain around the neck or attached to a hair slide. Gaus usually consist of two parts: the front is made of copper or silver or gold plating, often with finely chased decorations and sometimes with set with gemstones. Images of Buddha, Buddhist symbols of good fortune and other deities are often seen. Larger Gaus often have a window-like opening in the centre and have an arched shape in the upper area. The back is often made from copper and sometimes shows fine engravings, symbols or inscriptions.

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Tibetan Amulet Box Gau with Chased Front, around 1900

Lot 12: Tibetan Amulet Box Gau with Chased Front, around 1900

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Description: Copper, bronze, metal Tibet, around 1900 or slightly later Chased and partly open-work front Décor with the eight Buddhist symbols of good fortune Image of Buddha Avalokiteshvara inside with Tibetan inscription on the back Mountings on the side Collectors number on the back Dimensions: 16.5 x 13.5 x 5.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This amulet box, designated in Tibetan as ga'u, was made around 1900 or slightly later. The casket is curved at the top and can be mounted with handles on the side. It has a copper back, which is adorned by a chased and partially open-work metal front. The eight Buddhist symbols of good fortune, made of bronze, are embedded in the front and surrounded by numerous lotus flowers and tendrils. The wish-fulfilling jewel chintamani can be seen in the upper center and the auspicious mythical creature Makara is found at the opposite edge. The various ornaments frame a window-like opening in the middle reveals a devotional image of Buddha Avalokiteshvara with Tibetan inscription on the back. These Gau amulet shrines are worn by Tibetan men across the chest or under the arms and used to store personal amulets and other objects. A collector's number can be found on the back. The amulet box is in good condition with natural patina and slight signs of age and wear. Dents and repair on the back as well as minor scratches and nicks are visible. The Buddha image is considerably abraded. The height is 16.5 cm, length 13.5 cm and width 5.5 cm Tibetan Gaus Tibetan Gaus, portable amulet containers or prayer boxes, are mostly made from metal. They can be worn with a chain around the neck or attached to a hair slide. Gaus usually consist of two parts: the front is made of copper or silver or gold plating, often with finely chased decorations and sometimes with set with gemstones. Images of Buddha, Buddhist symbols of good fortune and other deities are often seen. Larger Gaus often have a window-like opening in the centre and have an arched shape in the upper area. The back is often made from copper and sometimes shows fine engravings, symbols or inscriptions.

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Relief of Amoghasiddhi Meditation Buddha, Bhutan, 19th/20th C

Lot 13: Relief of Amoghasiddhi Meditation Buddha, Bhutan, 19th/20th C

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Description: Earthenware relief Bhutan, 19th/ early 20th century Remnants of red colour of a sacrifice ceremony Worked in high relief Dimensions: 15 x 10 x 5.5 cm (height x width x depth) Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This earthenware relief crafted in Bhutan, dates back into the 19th / earls 20th century. Shown is the meditation Buddha Amoghasiddhi, who is called in Tibetandon yod grub pa. This Buddha transforms envy and jealousy in the perfect wisdom. That is why this Buddha is called 'the one who completes the wisdom'. In popular belief he is regarded as a symbol of success. In this case Amoghasiddhi sits in the lotus position and is located in the middle of a shrine. The abhaya mudra, the gesture of fearlessness and thedhyana mudra, the gesture of meditation, are formed with his hands. The left hand holds also a round bowl. The head of the enlightened is covered with a crown. The tapered and open-worked roof is adorned with various ornaments that are only dimly visible. The entire relief features remnants of red colour and golden colour is visible. The relief is in appealing condition with usual signs of age and wear. Some loss of material on the roof is visible, but barely noticeable. The Dimensions are 15 x 10 x 5.5 cm (height x width x depth).

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Gilded Bronze of Vajradhara and Prajnaparamita, 20th C

Lot 14: Gilded Bronze of Vajradhara and Prajnaparamita, 20th C

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Description: Gilded bronze Tibet, 20th century Representation of the union of wisdom and method Partly open-work Finely chased details Copper base plate with double vajra symbol Dimensions: 20.5 x 14 x 11.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from an important Austrian private collection This gilded cult bronze of Vajradhara, the tantric form of the Buddha, and Prajnaparamita was made in Tibet. They represent the union of wisdom of method, the transcendence of duality and coalescence of opposites. Vajradhara embodies the male and methodic principle and is holding in his crossed hands the vajra (thunderbolt) and ghanta (bell). The deity and his consort Prajnaparamita, representing wisdom, are depicted in yab-yum. Prajnaparamita is sitting on Vajradhara's lap with her legs around his body. She is holding an oval bowl and a gri-gug, a crescent-shaped knife symbolising the severance of all material attachments, in her hands. These are stored on the waving bands of the Bodhisattva. Their faces turned to one another, their hands and feet, as well as the fine hair are presented in astonishing detail and the figures each decorated with fine jewellery. This sculpture shows lovely natural patina as well as remains of red paint and is sealed with a copper base plate with double vajra symbol. The figure is in good condition with slight sings of age and wear. Gold abrasion, small scratches here and there and minimal loss of material on the back are visible as waal as a minor hair line crack. The height is 20.5 cm, the width 14 cm and the depth 11.5 cm. Yab-yum Yab-yum literally means "father-mother", and is a symbol in Buddhist art which represents the sexual union of a male deity with his female consort. The union of the male strength and the female wisdom dissolve all contradiction and symbolize unity and the highest enlightenment.

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Copper bronze of Guru Rinpoche or Padmasambhava, Tibet, 1900

Lot 15: Copper bronze of Guru Rinpoche or Padmasambhava, Tibet, 1900

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Description: Copper bronze, hand-painted and fire gilded Tibet, around 1900 or slightly later Detailed depiction Varnished base with double vajra symbol Dimensions: 14.5 x 8.5 x 6 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This hand-painted and fire gilded Guru Rinpoche figure was made in Tibet of copper bronze. Guru Rinpoche, often called Padmasambhava sits on a lotus pedestal in the relaxed stance lalitâsana. The left leg is tucked in, whilst the right is bent outwards. Guru Rinpoche holds in his left hand an ambrosia vase filled with amrita, the elixir of life, out of which a holy Ashoka branch grows. Through an eyelet his flaming trident leans on his left shoulder. In the fingers of his right hand he holds a vajra. Guru Rinpoche has striking, painted facial features and is wearing a fine chisled robe and precious jewellery. The underside of the base is sealed and bears a double vajra symbol as well as a collector's number. The Padmasambhava figure is in good condition with natural patina and usual signs of age and wear. Colour and gold abrasion as well as minor scratches and nicks on edge of the base are visible. The height is 14.5 cm, the width 8.5 cm and the depth 6 cm. Guru Rinpoche Guru Rinpoche, also Padmasambhava, Guru Padma, Padina Sambhava or Padmakara, (literally "Lotus-Born") is viewed as being the founder of Buddhism in Tibet. Since there are hardly any facts about his life, his appearance is characterised by various legends.

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Gilded Bodhisattva Lokeśvara Bronze, Tibet, 20th C

Lot 16: Gilded Bodhisattva Lokeśvara Bronze, Tibet, 20th C

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Description: Bronze copper, gilded Tibet, 20th century Partly open-work In detail chased figure Sealed copper base with double vajra symbol Dimensions: 21.5 x 13 x 9.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This gilded bronze copper represents Bodhisattva Lokeśvara and was crafted in Tibet the 20th century. Lokeshvara means, literally translated, "ruler of the world" and is an emanation of Avalokiteśvara. The word derives from the Sanskrit ishvara (ruler) and loka (place or world). Bodhisattva sits on a pedestal, adorned with lotus in the lotus position padmâsana with upwards-facing soles of the feet. His legs are covered with his garment and tapes are put on his forearms. In curved shapes they ornate the sides of the deity and covers his shoulders. The hands clasped in front of the chest hold the Cintamani wishing jewel. The other hands held above the shoulders raise up further attributes, like a lotus and a mala, to the sky. Bodhisattva Lokeśvara wears precious, chased jewellery, as well as a five-leaf crown. Defined wisps of fine hair are falling over his shoulders and a high knot protrudes behind the crown. The face has slightly smiling expression (sânta) with half closed eyes. The base is fixed to a copper base with a double vajra symbol. The Bodhisattva is in good condition with natural patina and usual signs of age and wear. Some gold abrasion, a hole in the bottom plate as well as scratches and light nicks are visible. The figure measures 21.5 cm height, 13 cm width and 9.5 cm depth. Cintamani A Cintamani is a wish-fulfilling jewel within both Hindu and Buddhist traditions. In Buddhism, it is often held by the Bodhisattvas, Avalokiteshvaras and Ksitigarbhas. Avalokiteśvara In Mahayana Buddhism, Avalokiteśvara is known as the Bodhisattva of compassion. Literally translated his name roughly means "The Lord looking at the world with compassion". Already at a young age Avalokiteśvara resolved to support all living creatures and help them to salvation. He swore an oath never to ease his efforts, otherwise he should shatter into a thousand pieces. According to legend he then ranged the world. As he paused to look at his work, he noticed that the suffering of the people had not diminished. This moment let him doubt, so he broke into a thousand pieces. Countless Buddhas immediately came to him to put him together again. But this time they gave him a thousand arms and eleven heads, so that he could better fulfil his vow.

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Gilded Bronze Vajra with Five Spokes, Tibet, 20th Century

Lot 17: Gilded Bronze Vajra with Five Spokes, Tibet, 20th Century

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Description: Gilded bronze Tibet, 20th Century Center decorated with lotus leaves Dimensions: 16 x 3.5 cm (L x H) Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan thunderbolt, called dorje in Tibetan and vajra in Sanskrit, was made of gilded bronze. The vajra is a tantric ritual object and a symbol of spiritual clarity, the indestructibility as well as the male principle and perfection. The vajra is the most important symbol of the Vajrayana Buddhism and the meaning of vajra is 'hard' or 'powerful'. In this case it is depicted with five spokes. The four outer curved ends frames the fifth spoke in the middle. They ended in a conical tip. The spokes are set on a base consisting of lotus leaves. There is a central ball point that connects the separate pieces. The double vajra is in very good condition almost without signs of wear; minimal abrasion of gilding as well as small scratches and scuffs. The piece measures 16 cm length and 3.5 cm width. Dorje/ Vajra This is a Buddhist ritual object, called vajra in Sanskrit and dorje in Tibetan. It is the main symbol of the vajrayana, one of the three major branches of Buddhism. The meaning of the Sanskrit word is 'solid' or 'powerful' and it symbolizes the indivisible power of maleness. The vajra is rendered either as a sceptre or as a weapon with three, five or nine spokes. Five and nine-spoke vajras are commonly found in tantric Buddhism.

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Partly Gilt Bronze Double Vajra, Tibet, 20th Century

Lot 18: Partly Gilt Bronze Double Vajra, Tibet, 20th Century

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Description: Partly gilt bronze Tibet, 20th century Decorated with lotus leaves and animal heads Each with seven prongs Dimensions: 18 x 18 x 8 cm (length x width x height) Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan ornamented thunderbolt, called vajra or dorje, was made from partly gilt bronze. The vajra is a symbol of indestructibility and irresistible force. In this case it is a seven-pronged double vajra with a conical shaped tip. The prongs come from the mouths of creatures called makara, which protect against demons. Each prong rises form a lotus decorated pedestal. A sphere in the center connects the four individual parts of the vajra. The double vajra is in very good condition with natural patina and hardly any traces of age and wear. It measures 18 cm in length and width and 8 cm in height. Dorje/Vajra This item is a Buddhist ritual object, written vajra in Sanskrit and dorje in Tibetan. It is the main symbol of the Vajrayana, a stream of Mahayana Buddhism. In Sanskrit, the word means "hard" or "powerful" and in Buddhist philosophy the vajra is a symbol of indestructability, indivisibility and male principle. The vajra is used both as a sceptre and a weapon, with three, five or nine prongs. In tantric Buddhism, the versions with five or nine prongs are most common.

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Bronze Lama Set of Ghanta and Vajra, Tibet, 1900

Lot 19: Bronze Lama Set of Ghanta and Vajra, Tibet, 1900

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Description: Patinated bronze, metal, iron Tibet, around 1900 or slightly later Bell with inner Tibetan mantra and outer inscription Ornaments in clear relief Partly open worked Five-pronged vajra Length of the vajra: 11.5 cm Height of the bell: 18 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This lama set was made in Tibet and comprises a bell, named ghanta, and a thunderbolt, called vajra. Ghanta and vajra are considered the most important elements of Vajrayana Buddhism and the opposing pieces embody male and female nature, method and wisdom. Together they are the symbol that shows the path to enlightenment. The offered bell has a clear sound and a partly open worked handle. The upper part of the handle is shaped like a vajra and appears like a crown on the head of the deity below. The shoulder of the bell is decorated with Tibetan inscriptions and a mantra can be found inside. The body shows vajra images as well and is adorned with further motives in clear relief. The vajra is composed of five prongs on each side, four of them representing makaras, mythological creatures that repel evil spirits. The lama set is in good condition with natural patinas and light traces of age and wear. Some corrosion on the iron clapper as well as scratches and nicks are visible. The height of the bell is 18 cm and the length of the Vajra is 11.5 cm. Dorje/Vajra This item is a Buddhist ritual object, written vajra in Sanskrit and dorje in Tibetan. It is the main symbol of the Vajrayana, a stream of Mahayana Buddhism. In Sanskrit, the word means "hard" or "powerful" and in Buddhist philosophy the vajra is a symbol of indestructability, indivisibility and male principle. The vajra is used both as a sceptre and a weapon, with three, five or nine prongs. In tantric Buddhism, the versions with five or nine prongs are most common.

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Gilded Bronze of the Sitting Yogi Milarepa, Tibet, 19th Century

Lot 20: Gilded Bronze of the Sitting Yogi Milarepa, Tibet, 19th Century

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Description: Gilded bronze Tibet, 19th / early 20th century Yogi Milarepa (1040-1123) - Tibetan poet and yogi Finely chased figure Sealed copper bottom plate with double vajra symbol Dimensions: 15.5 x 14 x 12 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This gilded Bronze of the Yogi Milarepa (1040-1123) dates back to the 19th / early 20th century Tibet. The well-known Tibetan poet and yogi is sitting on a double pedestal. Beneath him the fur of an antelope is put over the pedestal and the edges. Milarepa is located in the maharaja-lila seat with bent right and laid down left leg. His left hand rests on the bottom of the foot and a filled oval cup is placed in it. Typical for Yogi Milarepa, his right hand is raised to the ear, which symbolizes listening to the voice of inspiration. The long, rich fold garment covers his body and is formed in light waves at the bottom. Finely chased hair, accented in black, covers the shoulders and defined facial features emphasize the appearance. The bronze figure is in very good condition with hardly any signs of age and wear. Minimal gold abrasion and small scratches can be seen. The figure is sealed with a copper bottom plate with double vajra symbol and has a height of 15.5 cm, a width of 14 cm and a depth of 12 cm Yogi Milarepa (1040-1123) Yogi Milarepa (1040-1123) was a Tibetan yogi and poet as well as a popular folk hero and saint of Tibet. He was best known for the rejection of conventional behaviour and is often depicted in a relaxed pose. His right hand is raised to his ear, which should illustrate the listening to the voice of inspiration.

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Prayer Wheel „Khor-lo

Lot 21: Prayer Wheel „Khor-lo" with Bamboo Handle, Tibet, c. 1900

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Description: Hand-painted metal, iron, bamboo Tibet, around 1900 or later Richly decorated with enamel paint Buddhist symbols of luck in relief Dimensions: 43 x 10.5 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This handheld prayer wheel, named Khor-lo" or „Kosh-kor",was crafted in Tibet and is spun using by a bamboo handle. The hand-painted body is decorated with different coloured Buddhist symbols of luck in high relief on all sides of the wheel and attached via an inner iron rod. A closed lotus bud is also found on top of the wheel and ocher coloured fittings adorn both ends of the handle. The prayer wheel is brought into motion by a weight that is attached to the round body with a chain. This prayer wheel is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Some paint abrasion, indentations, scratched and little holes in the bamboo stick are visible. The item is 43 cm tall and has a diameter of 10.5 cm. Prayer wheel The prayer wheel is often also called a Mani wheel due to its shape. In some cases it contains imprinted prayers or mantras and is also decorated with them. The use of prayer wheels in Tibetan Buddhism is connected to mental and physical activity and is supposed to create spiritual thoughts. Through this, all daily life activities should be integrated into the path to enlightenment. Good karma should be accumulated. The desire for happiness and the eradication of pain is another reason for turning the wheel.

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Leather covered prayer wheel with Bamboo, 19th Century

Lot 22: Leather covered prayer wheel with Bamboo, 19th Century

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Description: Copper, leather, bamboo Bronze, metal, a turquoise, shells, imitation coral inlays Tibet, 19th century /1st half 20th century Mountings in relief Buddhist symbols of luck Dimensions: 43.5 x 12.5 cm (length x diameter) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This prayer wheel was crafted in 19th century to first half of the 20th century in Tibet and consists of a leather covered copper body and ornaments made of different metals. The wheel has a bamboo handle through which the body can be turned. Spinning should bring about positive reactions, such as the accumulation of good karma. The body is adorned with bronze, copper and metal mountings. A lotus flower decorated in relief on the underside and the wheel of Dharma on the bottom of the item are visible. A turquoise and imitation coral inlays can be found on the side of the body, as well as a weight attached by a leather string. The wheel is crowned with a closed lotus flower and the end of the handle is coated with simple mountings. The prayer wheel is in good condition with slight signs of age and wear. Small nicks and scratches can be seen. The length is 43.5 cm and the diameter of 12.5 cm. Prayer wheel The prayer wheel is often also called a Mani wheel due to its shape. In some cases it contains imprinted prayers or mantras and is also decorated with them. The use of prayer wheels in Tibetan Buddhism is connected to mental and physical activity and is supposed to create spiritual thoughts. Through this, all daily life activities should be integrated into the path to enlightenment. Good karma should be accumulated. The desire for happiness and the eradication of pain is another reason for turning the wheel.

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Buddhist Mala Prayer Necklace of 109 Beads, Tibet, 20th Century

Lot 23: Buddhist Mala Prayer Necklace of 109 Beads, Tibet, 20th Century

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Description: Shell, metal, turquoises, coral, leather, cloth ribbon Tibet, 20th century Each side with a pendant of ten metal beads Length: 100 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Buddhist mala necklace was made in 20th century Tibet and is adorned with pendants of metal beads, turquoises and coral. The word mala comes from Sanskrit and means a prayer necklace with beads for counting mantras. This particular mala is made of 109 separate pearls. All are threaded on a cloth ribbon. The two pendants are made of small metal pearls attached to a piece of leather with a small ornament in the shape of a blossom at the end. The mala necklace is in good condition with age-related signs of wear. It has a length of 100 cm.

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Ritual Vessel with Coral Gemstones, 19th C / 1st Half 20th C

Lot 24: Ritual Vessel with Coral Gemstones, 19th C / 1st Half 20th C

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Description: Copper, brass, metal, coral, glass stones Tibet, late 19th century / 1st half 20th Century Consists of four parts Decorated with Tibetan inscription and swastika crosses Inventory number on the underside Dimensions: 15.5 x 8 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: From an important private Austrian collection This cylindrical ritual vessel was made from copper in Tibet during the late 19th century till the first half of the 20th century. The body is decorated with metal and consists of four pieces: a cover, three small containers that form the long cylindrical body. Coral inserts adorn the wall and small blue stones are the center of the three vajra on the cover. Revolving fittings with Tibetan inscriptions, swastika crosses and dragons ornate the vessel. The base is sealed with brass, where the chased dharma chakra, a Buddhist symbol representing dharma, the teachings of Buddha. The ritual vessel is in good condition with remains of red paint and light traces of age and wear. Inclusions in the corals, small dents as well as scratches and nicks can be found. The height is 15.5 and the diameter is 8 cm.

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Tantric Ritual Bronze Ladle with Vajra Symbol, Tibet, c. 1900

Lot 25: Tantric Ritual Bronze Ladle with Vajra Symbol, Tibet, c. 1900

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Description: Bronze, dark patina Tibet, around 1900 With vajra image Partially open work Length: 87 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This tantric ritual bronze ladle with dark patina was crafted in Tibet around 1900. The ladle has a long two-part stick with a rectangular formed ladle. The deepening of the ladle has downward layered geometric shapes and is decorated on the outer edge with open work vajra. Flame wreaths and vajra items are visible in the inside and at the lower end of the stick. With this ladle different substances for ritual purification were cast into the fire. The ladle is in good condition with natural patina and usual signs of age and wear. The length is 87 cm. Dorje/Vajra This item is a Buddhist ritual object, written vajra in Sanskrit and dorje in Tibetan. It is the main symbol of the Vajrayana, a stream of Mahayana Buddhism. In Sanskrit, the word means "hard" or "powerful" and in Buddhist philosophy the vajra is a symbol of indestructability, indivisibility and male principle. The vajra is used both as a sceptre and a weapon, with three, five or nine prongs. In tantric Buddhism, the versions with five or nine prongs are most common.

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Cylindrical Ritual Vessel with Metal Fittings, 19th/20th C

Lot 26: Cylindrical Ritual Vessel with Metal Fittings, 19th/20th C

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Description: Copper, coral, brass- and metal mount ornaments Tibet, late 19th / early 20th century Consists of three parts Decorated with the eight Buddhist symbols of good fortune Chased swastika borders Dimensions: 22,5 x 9 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This cylindrical ritual copper vessel was made in Tibet during the late 19th / early 20 th century. It is decorated with brass- and metal mount ornaments. The vessel consists of three pieces: a cover with three small coral inlays a low removable container and a long cylindrical body. The vessel is adorned with the eight Buddhist symbols of good fortune. Chased swastika borders can be found on the body as well as on the lid. The cover is attached to the corresponding vessel with a chain. A round knob is placed on the top and is decorated with stylised lotus leaves at the bottom. The ritual vessel is in a good condition with natural patina and slight signs of age and wear such as scratches and small dents. The dimensions are 22.5 x 9 cm (height x diameter).

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Tantric Kapala Ritual Cup with Coral, Tibet, 20th Century

Lot 27: Tantric Kapala Ritual Cup with Coral, Tibet, 20th Century

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Description: Hand-carved skullcap, metal, brass, coral Tibet, 20th century Inside with double vajra symbol On rim revolving border Dimensions: 17 x 6.5 cm (length x height) Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This tantric ritual vessel is called thod pa in Tibetan and kapala in Sanskrit. It consists of a hand-carved skullcap and is covered on the inside with metal. The inner center is decorated with a brass double vajra symbol and an oval coral. The outer edge is adorned with a revolving, accented border. The kapala is in very good condition with hardly any traces of age and wear. A few scratches and nicks are visible on the inside. The kapala measures 17 cm in length and 6.5 cm in height. Kapala / Thod pa Kapala is Sanskrit for "skull". In Tibetan, these cups are called Thod pa, which also translates to "skull". They are ritual cups and are used in both Hindu and Buddhist Tantra. Especially in Tibet, these cups are elaborately decorated with precious metals and jewels or ornately carved by hand.

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Tantric Damaru Drum with Mountings, Tibet, 20th Century

Lot 28: Tantric Damaru Drum with Mountings, Tibet, 20th Century

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Description: Skullcaps, metal, leather, silk, fabric and glass Tibet, 20th century Skulls and floral ornaments in relief Colourful silk tassels (added later) Overall Dimensions: 55 x 7,5 x cm (length x width) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan tantric two-headed drum is called damaru and made from skullcaps, metal and leather. The damaru is shaped like an hourglass and was used for different rituals. The drum is made from skullcaps with leather drum heads, which are struck by two wool beads attached to the sides. The edge of the drum is decorated with a border of skulls. The two sides of this damaru are connected by a metal mounting with floral décor in relief as well as round blue glass stones. The colourful silk tassels are attached to the drum through an eyelet. The damaru is in good condition with usual traces of age and wear. A skull and a glass stone are missing and small scratches here and there are visible. The drum measures 55 cm in overall length and 7.5 cm in width. Damaru A damaru is a two-headed drum shaped like an hourglass used in Hinduism and Tibetan Buddhism. In Tibet the drum is often made from skullcaps and connected with a piece of wood. The drum heads are made from leather; in smaller drums they are often stuck on. Two small strikers, mostly clay balls, are attached to the end of a string. The drum is a symbol of life and death, entering into Tibetan Buddhist mythology as part of the Bön religion.

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Wooden Chöd Rattle Drum with Snakeskin, Tibet, 19th Century

Lot 29: Wooden Chöd Rattle Drum with Snakeskin, Tibet, 19th Century

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Description: Wood, snakeskin, cloth ribbon Tibet, 19th century Brown, hourglass shaped body Dimensions: 15.5 x 15 cm (diameter x width) Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Chöd rattle drum dates back to 19th century Tibet. The drum has a wooden body and a snakeskin drumhead. The rattle drum was used at religious ceremonies and has a deep sound. The sound of the hourglass-shaped drum accrues by rotating the body of the drum, which in turn moves a small cloth ball contained inside and a cloth beater which is attached to middle of the body by a cord. The rattle drum shows signs of age and wear. Slight loss of material on the side of the drumhead and a restored spot on the body are visible. The item has a diameter of 15.5 cm and a width of 15 cm.Chöd The expression Chöd represents the totality of all teachings and means literally 'to cut off'. It is a ritual where the self is cut off symbolically. Chöd is a mixture of old Tibetan and Shaman traditions and the buddhistic principle of compassion and emptiness.

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'Kapala' Tantric Ritual Cup of Berg Crystal, 19th / 20th C

Lot 30: 'Kapala' Tantric Ritual Cup of Berg Crystal, 19th / 20th C

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Description: Berg crystal, copper Tibet, 19th century / early 20th century Circulating skull representations on the copper mounting Dimensions: 18 x 7 cm (length x height) Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan ritual cup is made of berg crystal and dates back to the 19th, early 20th century. The tantric vessel called Kapala in Sanskrit and Thod pa in Tibetan. A circulating copper mounting with natural patina decorates the rim. It is adorned with skulls in relief. The Kapala has the shape of a human skull, which has a special aesthetic by natural inclusions of the crystal. The kapala is in very good condition with hardly any signs of age and wear. The copper mounting is slightly lose and small scratches can be seen. The length is 18 cm and the height is 7 cm. Kapala / Thod pa Kapala is Sanskrit for "skull". In Tibetan, these cups are called Thod pa, which also translates to "skull". They are ritual cups and are used in both Hindu and Buddhist Tantra. Especially in Tibet, these cups are elaborately decorated with precious metals and jewels or ornately carved by hand.

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Two Ritual Kangling Bone Flutes, Tibet, 19th / 20th Century

Lot 31: Two Ritual Kangling Bone Flutes, Tibet, 19th / 20th Century

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Description: Bone, leather, silver, turquoise and coral gemstones Tibet, 19th / 20th century Floral décor One flute with inventory number on the reverse Dimensions: 23 x 6 cm and 29 x 7.5 cm (length x width) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection These Kangling flutes from Tibet were made out of human bones. One flute has a plain surface and is applied with dark leather in the upper area. The other flute is decorated with silver mountings, round turquoise and coral gemstones. The fittings are chased with floral ornaments and cover the mouthpiece as well as the top of the flute and the openings. An eyelet can also be found there. These Kangling flutes are used during tantric rites. The Kangling, along with other instruments used within the Bön religion, is used to call the nature spirits and gods. The flutes are in good condition with slight signs of age and wear. Scratches and nicks, a missing stone and a small tear in the leather can be seen. The length is 23 or 29 cm and the width 6 cm or 7.5 cm. Kangling Kangling is the Tibetan name for a trumpet made out of a human thighbone. This is used for various rituals in Himalayan Buddhism.

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Oracle Crown with Five Removable Skulls, Tibet, 20th C

Lot 32: Oracle Crown with Five Removable Skulls, Tibet, 20th C

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Description: Partially gilded silver, bronze, silk, turquoise and coral gemstones, Tibet, 20th Century Five removable attachments in the form of skulls Heavy relief décor and floral patterns Technique: Repoussé and fine chasing Total weight: 566 g A true rarity Dimensions: 19 x 19 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan oracle crown, once belonging to a lama, is made from silver and bronze and is fitted with round turquoise and coral gemstones. The inside of the crown is padded with yellow and orange coloured silk. When making decisions, the oracle lamas' predictions were of upmost importance. These prophecies were also necessary for the localisation of high reincarnation, "Tulkus". When the crown was placed, the medium would be thrown into a trance and the god's prophecy would be declared during the ecstatic dance that followed. The ceremony came to an end as soon as the crown was removed and the oracle collapsed from exhaustion. This oracle crown is a chased headband with five detachable skulls and a rich floral decoration. A crown like this is the symbol for an insight into the world of the gods and a world beyond. A true rarity. The oracle crown is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Slight scratches, abrasions and nicks on the reverse side are visible. The item is 19 cm tall and has a diameter of 19 cm.

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Coloured Chitipati Cham Dance Mask, Tibet, 20th Century

Lot 33: Coloured Chitipati Cham Dance Mask, Tibet, 20th Century

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Description: Hand-painted papier-mâché, fabric Tibet, 20th century Crown with a skull Coloured accentuations Collector's number inside Dimensions: 34 x 25 x 13.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan cham dance mask made of hand-painted papier-mâché and fabric represents a Chitipati. The dancing Chitipati skeletons meant to remind us of the impermanence of life. In all tantric traditions and also during the Monlam or Great Prayer Festival the death dance is practiced. The dance is meant to purify negativities. In this case this mask shows a wide grin, hollow red eyes and a third eye on the forehead. The mask has a crown with a skull and orange as well as green accentuations are seen throughout.The mask is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Some colour abrasion and superficial cracks and nicks are visible. A collector's number inside and mounting holes on the underside are visible. The mask measures 34 cm in height, 25 cm in width and 13.5 cm in depth. Cham dance Cham is a lively masked costumed dance. It can vary according to the region it is performed in and often portrays different themes. The Tibetan word cham translates literally to "border" or "wave". In pre-Buddhist times, Cham dances were formally fertility rites, used to ward off evil demons, particularly during the turn of the year. Notions of protection and defence play an important role in the Buddhist form of the dance. Protective gods and demons deemed by the laity as being forces of nature and outer enemies are embodied through spectacular masks and robes. They depict spiritual obstacles for the consecrated that must be overcome on the way to salvation.

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Hand-painted 'Dharmapala' Cham Dance Mask, Tibet, 19th / 20th C

Lot 34: Hand-painted 'Dharmapala' Cham Dance Mask, Tibet, 19th / 20th C

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Description: Hand-painted papier-mâché, fabric Tibet, 19th century / 1st half 20th century Impressive collector's item Open-work on the mouth Crown with five skulls Detailed execution Mounting holes in the edges Dimensions: 34 x 35 x 20 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Dharmapala Cham dance mask dates back to 19th to first half of the 20th century Tibet and was made out of hand-painted papier-mâché and fabric. In the Buddhist teachings Dharmapala is called the protector and protects people from various obstacles. In ritual masked dances, during which forces of nature were originally conjured, this mask was used. In this case Dharmapala has a black face, whilst his beard and eyebrows are painted gold. The mouth is open, his pointed fangs and twisted tongue can be seen and hypnotic eyes are fixed straight ahead. The crown is decorated with five skulls, which is a sign of the mastery of the five elements. The mask can be worn by fastening it with a string through the mounting holes.The mask is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Loss of material on the nose and the crown, small nicks and notches here and there as well as colour abrasion are visible. The tongue is stabilized inside and a collector's number is visible there. The mask is 34 cm high, 35 cm width and 20 cm depth. Dharmapala Dharmapala translates to "Dharma-defender" and is the name given to deities in Mahayana and Vajrayana Buddhism that protect the Buddhist teachings. The Dharmapala is supposed to protect believers from inner and outer obstacles, so that they can achieve spiritual enlightenment. There are many Dharma-defenders and they can be an emanation of a Buddha, Bodhisattva or another healing being. Cham dance Cham is a lively masked costumed dance. It can vary according to the region it is performed in and often portrays different themes. The Tibetan word cham translates literally to "border" or "wave". In pre-Buddhist times, Cham dances were formally fertility rites, used to ward off evil demons, particularly during the turn of the year. Notions of protection and defence play an important role in the Buddhist form of the dance. Protective gods and demons deemed by the laity as being forces of nature and outer enemies are embodied through spectacular masks and robes. They depict spiritual obstacles for the consecrated that must be overcome on the way to salvation.

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Wooden Cham Dance Mask of a

Lot 35: Wooden Cham Dance Mask of a "Cloud Dragon", Tibet, 19th C

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Description: Wood, polychrome painted Tibet, 19th Century / early 20th century Open-work mouth Distinct facial features Dimensions: 39 x 24 x 21 cm (height x width x depth) Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This wooden cham dance mask represents a cloud dragon and was made in Tibet during the 19th century to the early 20th century. The face of the dragon has an impressive look with distinctive traits, underlined by multicolour paint. The dragon has an open-work mouth with sharp fangs and a tongue. The lip is directed upward and in front of the broad nose. The ride of the nose is decorated by three helical circles and a teardrop-shaped metal fitting. Top cheekbones, large protruding eyes and a crown with three skulls crown his head. The mask can be worn by fastening it with a string through the mounting holes. The dance mask is in appealing condition with signs of age and wear. Colour abrasion as well as some loss of material to the ears are visible. Cracklines to the tongue are repaired. On the back there are two drying cracks. The height is 39 cm, the width 24 cm and the depth 21 cm. Cham dance Cham is a lively masked costumed dance. It can vary according to the region it is performed in and often portrays different themes. The Tibetan word cham translates literally to "border" or "wave". In pre-Buddhist times, Cham dances were formally fertility rites, used to ward off evil demons, particularly during the turn of the year. Notions of protection and defense play an important role in the Buddhist form of the dance. Protective gods and demons deemed by the laity as being forces of nature and outer enemies are embodied through spectacular masks and robes. They depict spiritual obstacles for the consecrated that must be overcome on the way to salvation.

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Bön Wooden Tibetan Handle Drum with Leather, Tibet, 19th C

Lot 36: Bön Wooden Tibetan Handle Drum with Leather, Tibet, 19th C

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Description: Carved wood Hand-painted leather with magic trident Tibet, 19th century Double-sided skins Figural carved handle Dimensions: 62 x 32 cm (length x diameter) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan bön drum has a round body and was made of wood, covered on both sides with leather. The magic trident, which is a symbol of protection, adorns both sides of the skins in reddish colour. By a hand-carved handle with triangular, tapering end, the drum can be carried. The upper area of the handle is decorated with three faces of bön deities. A pattern of different ornaments can be found below, which is carved in relief and partly open-worked. A red wax stamp can also be found on one side of the handle. The drum has also a leather handle at the top, through which it can be carried or attached. The drum is in good condition with slight age-related signs of wear. Minimum loss of material at the edges of the handle as well as scratches and nicks are visible. The length is 62 cm and the diameter is 32 cm. Bön Bön translates literally to "reality", "incantation" and "true teachings" and was the predominant religion in Tibet before the 8th century. The religion was originally strongly characterised by shamanism. This was evidenced by various incantations and sacrificial ceremonies. The Tibetans attempted to influence the unpredictable nature for their own benefit. The increasingly widespread practice of Buddhism led to a mutual influencing and coexistence of both religions.

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Polychrome Painted Cardboard Thangka Role, 19th / 20th C

Lot 37: Polychrome Painted Cardboard Thangka Role, 19th / 20th C

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Description: Hand-painted cardboard, wooden lid Tibet, 19th / 20th century Cylindrical body with a dragon Wooden lid with floral décor Dimensions: 42.5 x 6.5 cm (height x diameter) Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan Thangka role from the 19th / 20th century is crafted by hand-painted cardboard and has a round wooden lid with floral décor. The cylindrical body of the roll is decorated with a dragon in relief. It is surrounded by clouds and waves and holds different coloured miracle beads in its paws. The polychrome painting creates a colourful and detailed pattern on the wall. Thangka were kept in the role which are highly esteemed paintings in Tibet. The role is in appealing condition with usual signs of age and wear. Some colour abrasion and chipped edges are visible. The cover is restored. The height is 42.5 cm and the diameter is 6.5 cm. Thangka A Thangka (Tibetan: ka thang, thang ga) is a scroll painting of Tantric Buddhism. It is used by meditation in temples or at home shrines and processions. Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, guardian deities, Arhats, various lamas, ascetics and Pandits was portrayed in scenes of her life in various incarnations. Often there are mandalas with the wheel of life schools and traditions. Thangkas are created by well-defined iconographic rules (in terms of body shape, dress and attitude of the sitter), and are particularly common in Tibet.

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Detailed Medicinal Thangka „Bhaisajyaguru

Lot 38: Detailed Medicinal Thangka „Bhaisajyaguru", 20th Century

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Description: Painting on linen Tibet, 20th century Polychrome, detailed rendering Tibetan writing Framed in a matte Dimensions of the picture: 51.5 x 44 cm (height x width) Overall Dimensions: 102.5 x 72 cm Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This medicinal thangka was made in Tibet during the 20th century. The fine painting on canvas depicts the Medicine Buddha Bhaisajyaguru, also known as the Buddha of healing. He is located in the centre of the mandala and is surrounded by medicinal plants, animals and other Buddha deities. Tibetan inscriptions can be found at the lower edge. The images on a thangka are always based on pattern. Forms and colours follow the strict guidelines of Tibetan iconographic art, requiring particularly high quality in their execution. The medical Thangka is in very good condition with hardly any signs of age and wear. It shows minor holes at the edges. The image measures 51.5 x 44 cm (height x width). Framed and matted is the overall dimension 102.5 x 72 cm. Tibetan Medicine Tibetan medicine is closely tied to Buddhist teachings. It follows the principle that ignorance is the basis of illness. The philosophy includes three poisons of the mind: hatred, ignorance and greed. These poisons are negative manifestations of the three bodily energies Tripa, Bekan and rLung, which form the basis of illness. The energies are balanced in the healthy individual, and must be re-balanced in the ill. The vitality of the body depends on the elements: earth, water, fire, air and space - the balance provides the basis for a healthy mind and body. Thangka A Thangka (Tibetan: ka thang, thang ga) is a scroll painting of Tantric Buddhism. It is used by meditation in temples or at home shrines and processions. Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, guardian deities, Arhats, various lamas, ascetics and Pandits was portrayed in scenes of her life in various incarnations. Often there are mandalas with the wheel of life schools and traditions. Thangkas are created by well-defined iconographic rules (in terms of body shape, dress and attitude of the sitter), and are particularly common in Tibet.

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Medicinal Thangka

Lot 39: Medicinal Thangka "Energy Flows and Blood Vessels", 20th C

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Description: Painting on linen Tibet, first half of the 20th century Polychrome, detailed rendering Tibetan writing recto and verso Verso images of a stupa, Buddha and other symbols Framed in a matte Dimensions of the picture: 47.5 x 40.5 cm (height x width) Overall Dimensions: 102.5 x 72 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Tibetan medicinal thangka is a fine painting on linen and dates to the first half of the 20th century. It shows schematic depictions of energy flows, calledrtsa, and blood vessels of the human body. Different skull shapes and physiognomies are also recognizable and entitled with Tibetan inscription. Further inscriptions are found on the lower edge. Verso a stupa, Buddha figures and other symbols are shown. The images on a thangka are always based on pattern. Forms and colours follow the strict guidelines of Tibetan iconographic art, requiring particularly high quality in their execution. The Tibetan medicinal Thangka is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Minimal abrasion of colour and slight stains on the back are visible. The work is matted and measures 102.5 x 72 cm (total); 47.5 x 40.5 cm (image). Tibetan Medicine Tibetan medicine is closely tied to Buddhist teachings. It follows the principle that ignorance is the basis of illness. The philosophy includes three poisons of the mind: hatred, ignorance and greed. These poisons are negative manifestations of the three bodily energies Tripa, Bekan and rLung, which form the basis of illness. The energies are balanced in the healthy individual, and must be re-balanced in the ill. The vitality of the body depends on the elements: earth, water, fire, air and space - the balance provides the basis for a healthy mind and body. Thangka A Thangka (Tibetan: ka thang, thang ga) is a scroll painting of Tantric Buddhism. It is used by meditation in temples or at home shrines and processions. Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, guardian deities, Arhats, various lamas, ascetics and Pandits was portrayed in scenes of her life in various incarnations. Often there are mandalas with the wheel of life schools and traditions. Thangkas are created by well-defined iconographic rules (in terms of body shape, dress and attitude of the sitter), and are particularly common in Tibet.

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Thangka 'Wall Chart of Human Organs', 19th / 1st H 20th C

Lot 40: Thangka 'Wall Chart of Human Organs', 19th / 1st H 20th C

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Description: Polychrome painting on linen Tibet, 19th / 1st half 20th century Detailed rendering Tibetan writing recto and verso Verso images of a stupa, gods, mantras and other symbols Framed in a matte Dimensions of the picture: 52.5 x 37 cm (height x width) Overall Dimensions: 102.5 x 72 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This medicinal thangka dates back to the 19th or first half of the 20th century and is a fine Tibetan painting on linen. Shown are the human organs based on a wall chart. The individual points are clarified on the body of a seated man and titled with Tibetan inscription. The chart has a black frame and verso a representation of a stupa in the center, Buddha figures as well as other inscriptions and symbols on the edge are visible. The images on a thangka are always based on pattern. Forms and colours follow the strict guidelines of Tibetan iconographic art, requiring particularly high quality in their execution. The medical Thangka is in good condition with signs of age and wear. Some abrasion of colour, small spots and water stains can be seen. The image measures 52.5 x 37 cm (height x width). Framed and matted is the overall dimension 102.5 x 72 cm. Tibetan Medicine Tibetan medicine is closely tied to Buddhist teachings. It follows the principle that ignorance is the basis of illness. The philosophy includes three poisons of the mind: hatred, ignorance and greed. These poisons are negative manifestations of the three bodily energies Tripa, Bekan and rLung, which form the basis of illness. The energies are balanced in the healthy individual, and must be re-balanced in the ill. The vitality of the body depends on the elements: earth, water, fire, air and space - the balance provides the basis for a healthy mind and body. Thangka A Thangka (Tibetan: ka thang, thang ga) is a scroll painting of Tantric Buddhism. It is used by meditation in temples or at home shrines and processions. Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, guardian deities, Arhats, various lamas, ascetics and Pandits was portrayed in scenes of her life in various incarnations. Often there are mandalas with the wheel of life schools and traditions. Thangkas are created by well-defined iconographic rules (in terms of body shape, dress and attitude of the sitter), and are particularly common in Tibet.

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Medicinal Thangka „Energy Gates with Chakras

Lot 41: Medicinal Thangka „Energy Gates with Chakras", 1st Half 20th C

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Description: Painting on linen Tibet, first half of the 20th century Detailed, colourful rendering Tibetan writing recto and verso Verso images of gods, mantras and other symbols Framed in a matte Dimensions of the picture: 47.5 x 40 cm (height x width) Overall Dimensions: 102.5 x 72 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This medicinal thangka was made in Tibet and dates to the first half of the 20th century. The fine painting on linen shows schematic depictions of energy flows, calledrtsa. These energy gates are an important part of Tibetan medicine and the flows combine to form three energy centers, or chakras, which are also used in treatment. The human spine, which is shown schematically as well as blood vessels and capillaries of the human body are shown. Along the upper and lower edge various gods and Tibetan inscription can be found. Further gods, mantras and inscriptions on the reverse are also shown. The images on a thangka are always based on patters. Forms and colours follow the strict guidelines of Tibetan iconographic art, requiring particularly high quality in their execution. The thangka is in good condition with slight age-related signs of wear. Some abrasion of colour, light creases and water stains, particularly on the back and along the edge, are visible. The work is matted and measures 102.5 x 72 cm (total); 47.5 x 40 cm (image). Tibetan Medicine Tibetan medicine is closely tied to Buddhist teachings. It follows the principle that ignorance is the basis of illness. The philosophy includes three poisons of the mind: hatred, ignorance and greed. These poisons are negative manifestations of the three bodily energies Tripa, Bekan and rLung, which form the basis of illness. The energies are balanced in the healthy individual, and must be re-balanced in the ill. The vitality of the body depends on the elements: earth, water, fire, air and space - the balance provides the basis for a healthy mind and body. Thangka A Thangka (Tibetan: ka thang, thang ga) is a scroll painting of Tantric Buddhism. It is used by meditation in temples or at home shrines and processions. Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, guardian deities, Arhats, various lamas, ascetics and Pandits was portrayed in scenes of her life in various incarnations. Often there are mandalas with the wheel of life schools and traditions. Thangkas are created by well-defined iconographic rules (in terms of body shape, dress and attitude of the sitter), and are particularly common in Tibet.

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Gilded Bronze Figure of a Medicine Buddha, Tibet, 20th C

Lot 42: Gilded Bronze Figure of a Medicine Buddha, Tibet, 20th C

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Description: Gilded Bronze Tibet, 20th century Pronounced patina Peaceful facial features Garment decorated with Buddhist symbols of good fortune Sealed copper plate with double vajra symbol Tibetan inscription on the back of the base Dimensions: 10 x 7.5 x 5.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Medicine Buddha, often also called Bhaisajyaguru, was made in Tibeta in the 20th century from gilded bronze. The pedestal, adorned with engraved Tibetan inscription on the back, is decorated with a lotus relief on which Buddha is seated in lotus position padmâsana. His left hand, laid on his soles, holds a bowl filled with amrita, the nectar of immortality. An Ashoka-tree branch, the tree of life, is seen on top. He holds a myrobalan branch, Arura in Tibetan, between his thumb and index finger of the right hand. The detailed, intricately chased robe covers both shoulders whilst leaving the chest exposed and is ornate with the Buddhist symbols of good fortune. Buddha has a peaceful, meditative facial expression with half-closed eyes. By the pronounced patina, the figure has a special aesthetic appeal and is sealed with a copper plate with double vajra symbol. The Medicine Buddha is in good condition with slight signs of age and wear. Gold abrasion, scratches here and there as well as a dent on the back base are visible. The object is 10 cm tall, 7.5 cm wide and 5.5 cm deep. Medicine Buddha The Dharma, Buddha's own teachings, claim that the cause of all illnesses are mental in nature. The three mental poisons, ignorance, hate and greed, must be overcome in order to find the path to enlightenment. Buddha Shakyamuni is therefore often also called Bhaisajyaguru, the Buddha of healing. The Dharma, the teachings of Buddha, were later named Buddhism and play an especially important role in Tibet and Japan.

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Bronze Figure of a Medicine Buddha in Padmâsana, Tibet, 20th C

Lot 43: Bronze Figure of a Medicine Buddha in Padmâsana, Tibet, 20th C

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Description: Bronze with remains of red colour Tibet, 20th Century Chased garment Detailed figure Copper plate sealed with double vajra symbol Dimensions: 20.5 x 14 x 10 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This Medicine Buddha from Tibet is also called Bhaisajyaguru and was made of bronze. Buddha is sitting on a lotus pedestal in lotus position padmâsana with bound upward-pointed feet. The detailed engraved robe covers his legs and is wrapped around the shoulders. His chest and his right forearm are uncovered. The right hand forms with thumb and index finger the vitarka mudra and held a myrobalan branch, Arura in Tibetan, between it. His left hand, laid on his soles, contains a bowel filled with amrita, the nectar of immortality. An Ashoka-tree branch, the tree of life, is seen on top. Peaceful facial expression and a slight smile are seen in Buddha's face. Long earlobes, small curls and a distinctive topknot with a conical Urna emphasize the grandeur of the enlightened. Remains of red colour ornate the figure and it is sealed with a copper plate with double vajra symbol. The Medicine Buddha is in good condition with natural patina and slight signs of age and wear. Small scratches and nicks here and there are visible. The object is 20.5 cm tall, 14 m wide and 10 cm deep. Medicine Buddha The Dharma, Buddha's own teachings, claim that the cause of all illnesses are mental in nature. The three mental poisons, ignorance, hate and greed, must be overcome in order to find the path to enlightenment. Buddha Shakyamuni is therefore often also called Bhaisajyaguru, the Buddha of healing. The Dharma, the teachings of Buddha, were later named Buddhism and play an especially important role in Tibet and Japan.

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Silver Ritual Spoon and Copper Medicine Spoon, 19th /20th C

Lot 44: Silver Ritual Spoon and Copper Medicine Spoon, 19th /20th C

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Description: Silver, copper, coral Tibet, 19th / 20th century Ritual spoon with the wish-fulfilling jewel chintamani in high relief Medicine spoon with Tibetan inscription in the bowl Hammered décor with fine chased ornaments on the handle Length: 24.5 and 30 cm Total weight of the silver spoon: 81.40 g Good condition Provenance: from an important Austrian private collection This silver ritual spoon and the copper medicine spoon were made in 19th / 20th Century Tibet. The ritual spoon is adorned with a coral stone in the middle, which is framed by a vajra relief pattern. The handle is decorated with floral tendrils. The top end of the spoon is adorned with the wish-fulfilling jewel chintamani in high relief and the lower end of the spoon has a round bowl with hammered décor. The handle of the medicine spoon is ornate with a lotus flower in the middle and the top end has a curved edge. The bowl shows a silver Tibetan inscription in the center and hammered décor as well. The spoons are in good condition with slight signs of age and wear, such as small scratches and nicks. The total weight of the silver spoon is 81.40 g and the lengths of the spoons are 24.5 and 30 cm.

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Wooden Medicine Vessel in Form of a Stupa, Tibet, around 1900

Lot 45: Wooden Medicine Vessel in Form of a Stupa, Tibet, around 1900

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Description: Turned, red-lacquered wood Tibet, around 1900 or slightly later Removable lid with large knob Dimensions: 27,5 x 9,5 cm (height x diameter) Good condition This Tibetan medicine vessel was made of red lacquered, turned wood. The round lower platform carries the cylindrical body. By a cover with a large knob, adorned by a pyramid shaped tip, the medicine vessel can be closed. The plain wall is decorated with profile rings and red colour with fine craquelure, which gives the vessel an attractive appearance. The medicine vessel is in overall good condition with signs of age and wear. Minor damage to the outer wall, a drying crack to the stand, abrasion and nicks here and there are visible. The Dimensions are 27.5 x 9.5 cm (height x diameter). Stupa The stupa is deemed one of the earliest and most important Buddhist structures and is viewed as being a symbol of Buddha and dharma. In Sanskrit, the word stup means "to heap up or accumulate". Originally, this was used to denote semi-spherical mounds out of soil or stone, in which the remains of the dead were kept. The semi-sphere symbolised completeness and was used as an emblem for the universe. The stupa consists for the most part of a square-shaped platform, from which a dome with a tip extends.

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Medical Utensils and a Wooden Medical Jar, Tibet, 19th C

Lot 46: Medical Utensils and a Wooden Medical Jar, Tibet, 19th C

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Description: Copper, wood, hand-painted paper Tibet, 19th century Jar: 14 cm (height) A container for acupuncture needles: 15 cm (length) Two paper amulets against accidents and illnesses: 7.5 x 7.5 cm (height x width) A medicine spoon and a pestle: 13.5 and 15.5 cm (length) Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This lot comprises different medical utensils as well as a wooden medical jar and dates back to 19th century Tibet. The cylindrical medical jar can be closed by a matching lid with a pyramidal knob. The container for acupuncture needles was made of brass and copper. It consists of two parts, has a round wooden stick inside it and can be sealed with the rings located on the side. The two paper amulets should protect against accidents and diseases. They are hand painted and decorated with Tibetan inscription. One amulet is also held together by colourful wool threads. The medicine spoon and pestle are made of copper and have a plain surface. This lot is in generally good condition with natural patina and signs age of wear. Some loss of material on the lid and upper edge of the jar, small cracks and creases on the edges of the paper as well as scratches, dents and nicks on the metal surfaces are visible. The vessel has a height of 14 cm and the container of 15 cm. Each amulet is 7.5 cm long and wide. The spoon and the pestle are 13.5 and 15.5 cm long. Tibetan medicine Tibetan medicine is closely related to Buddhism and is based upon the following assertion: "A lack of knowledge is the source of all illness". According to this philosophy, there are three so-called mental poisons: hate, ignorance and greed. These poisons are negative manifestations within the three bodily energies, Tripa, Beken, and rLung, and create a breeding ground for illnesses. These energies are balanced within healthy people and need to be brought back into balance amongst those that are sick. According to Tibetan beliefs, the elements earth, water, fire, air and space are responsible for the vitality of the body and the equilibrium of these powers ensures a healthy body and mind.

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Chhaang Jug and Bottle made of Wood and Metal, Tibet, 19th C

Lot 47: Chhaang Jug and Bottle made of Wood and Metal, Tibet, 19th C

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Description: Brass, copper, wood Tibet, 19th century Curved sprout and large, curved handle Ridged patterns Dimensions of the jug: 18.5 x 20 cm (height x width) Height of the bottle: 26.5 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection These two Tibetan Chhaang vessels, one jug and one bottle, were made in Tibet during the 19th century. The jug has a cylindrical copper body and is decorated with brass fittings. The mouth is tapered or slight stepped. The jug has a long spout and a large, curved handle. The conical bottle consists of wood. The body is embellished with brass fittings, which are partly decorated with adornments and ridges. It can be closed by a small plug. The vessels are used for chhaang, the Tibetan barley beer, which is drunk in large quantities at every celebration due to its low alcohol percentage. It is brewed using marva millets and barley and is especially popular amongst men. Both items are in good condition with natural patina and usual signs of age and wear. Scratches and nicks are visible here and there. The jug is 18.5 cm tall and 20 cm width. The bottle measures 26.5 cm in height.

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Chhaang Drinking Horn with Brass Fittings, Tibet, 19th C

Lot 48: Chhaang Drinking Horn with Brass Fittings, Tibet, 19th C

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Description: Yak horn, brass fittings, leather strap Tibet, 19th century Floral chased fittings Length: 43 cm Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This drinking horn with floral chased brass fittings was made in 19th Century Tibet. The Yak horn has a natural curved shape and a small funnel for filling the horn at the end. The fittings are decorated with wave-and ruyi-ornaments. With large eyelets, bounded with a leather strap, the horn is used for carrying. Chhaang is a Tibetan beer brewed from barley, millet or rice grains and especially popular amongst men. It has relatively low alcohol content and is said to ease the harsh cold of the Himalayan Mountains. The drinking horn is in good condition with usual signs of age and wear. Loss of some material on the fittings and small scratches and nicks are visible. The length is 43 cm.

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Copper Barleycorn Container with Brass Mountings, 19th Century

Lot 49: Copper Barleycorn Container with Brass Mountings, 19th Century

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Description: Copper, brass mountings Tibet, 19th Century Handle and eyelets on the side Detailed lotus knob Height with lid: 33.5 cm Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This barleycorn container from 19th Century Tibet has a copper body with ornamental brass fittings. The cylindrical body of the vessel tapers slightly towards the top and can be closed by a domed lid with a lotus bud knob. On both sides there are chased handles and hanging eyelets. The brass mountings are decorated with chased floral ornaments and partially worked in relief. The leaves of the lotus bud are plastically elaborated. Originally barley was stored in the container, which was a main ingredient of the so called Tampa, the Tibetan staple food. The barleycorn container is in good condition with natural patina and slight signs of age and wear. Small dents, minor scratches and nicks are visible. A collector's number can be seen on the bottom. The height with lid is 33.5 cm.

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Copper Teapot with Figural Fittings, Tibet, 19th Century

Lot 50: Copper Teapot with Figural Fittings, Tibet, 19th Century

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Description: Dark patinated copper, brass Tibet, 19th century Reticulated décor Floral chasing and Buddhist symbols of luck Handle in form of a lion Spout in the form of the fabulous creature makara Lid attached to handle with chain Dimensions: 18 x 22 cm (length x height) Good condition Provenance: From an important Austrian private collection This teapot with a dark patinated copper body dates back to the 19th century Tibet. The bulbous body rises from a slightly flared ring stand. On the emphasized shoulder, a round, narrow neck forms the upper end of the pot. It can be closed by a lid with a lotus knob, which is attached through a chain. Handle and spout are designed figural. Thus, the handle with open work has the shape of a lion and the spout forms the head of the fabulous creature makara. Brass bronze fittings in repoussé work decorate the wall in relief. Detailed floral ornaments, double vajra symbols, the bön "Khyung" eagle, flanked by snakes, and Buddhist symbol of good luck adorn the entire body. The lid of the pot is silver coloured on the inside. The teapot is in good condition with natural patina. Slight signs of age and wear such as scratches and nicks are visible. The pot measures 18 cm (length); 22 cm (height).

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