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Auction Description for Profiles in History: Historical Document Auction 52H
Viewing Notes:
Dear Collector: After 28 years of buying and selling important historical documents and rare books for our worldwide clientele, I have decided to pursue auction as the best way to bring wonderful materials on a regular basis to market as we have done in other fields of collecting. I am pleased to announce Marsha Malinowski, former Senior Vice President of Sotheby's rare book and manuscript department for the past 26 years, has joined Profiles in History to usher in this new era in our business. In addition to being Director of our Book and Manuscript auction department, Marsha will continue to work independently with clients offering appraisal, advisory and media services to private clients, corporations and institutions through Marsha Malinowski Fine Books and Manuscripts, LLC. The items in this auction cover a wide spectrum of collecting interests. With each auction, our goal is to offer significant material that is properly described with reasonable estimates. Should you have items to consign to future sales, please contact us. Enjoy the catalog and I hope you find a wonderful addition for your collection. Good Luck! Joseph Maddalena and the PIH Team
Sale Notes:
HISTORICAL DOCUMENT AUCTION: LIVE, MAIL, PHONE, FAX, INTERNET

Historical Document Auction 52H

by Profiles in History

Platinum House

172 lots with images

November 15, 2012

Live Auction

26901 Agoura Road

Suite 150

Calabasas Hills, CA, 91301 USA

Phone: 310-859-7701

Fax: 310-859-3842

Email: Info@profilesinhistory.com

172 Lots
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Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed

Lot 1: Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed

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Description: Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed, 1 page, (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) "Washington," 25 May 1820. Written to John Howard March Esq. Consul U.S. Madeira. In his letter, President Adams instructs Mr. March to bill him for goods and services just as he would any other customer. Slight toning and some edge separation. John Quincy Adams insists that he be billed for a gift of hogshead and cask of wine. Adams pens in full: " Dear sir, I have received your obliging letter of 15. March. and the Hogshead and ½ Quarter cask of wine to which it refers, for your kind attention in sending which I pray you to accept my best thanks. I must request you to have the goodness to send me a bill for them, charged at the price, which you would affix to the same articles, to your to regular commercial correspondence in this country, with information to whom it shall be paid for you. This request is founded upon a principle which I have always considered as resulting from the spirit if not the letter of the constitution of the United States. While holding an employment in the public service, I have always felt myself interdicted from the acceptance of any present of value not only from foreign sovereigns but from any other person. As the observance of this practice is necessary to the consciousness of my faithful discharge of my public duties, I shall in paying the bill, receive your compliances with my request as an obligation added to that for which I am indebted to you for this mark of your regard I am with great respect, Dear sir, your very obed.t ser.t John Quincy Adams".

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Adams, John.  Autograph document signed (

Lot 2: Adams, John. Autograph document signed ("John Adams") as Vice President

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Description: Adams, John. Autograph document signed ("John Adams") as Vice President, 1 page (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.), "Philadelphia," 4 January 1797. Beneath Adams' writing is a secretarial note stating, "The distance from Philad. to Frankfort, Ky. is 790 miles." The document is accompanied with a statement signed by Charles Bunall, Assistant Postmaster General, stating the distance from Philadelphia to Frankfort and the route taken for the delivery so the government could pay the courier. Reinforced at bottom two folds; paperclip stains at upper left. Vice President John Adams accepts the Electoral College votes of Kentucky from the Election of 1796 that saw him become the second President of the United States. Adams writes in full: "Received of Mr. Joseph Davis a packet containing the notes of the Electors of the State of Kentucky for President and Vice President of the United States. Witness my hand John Adams". The election of 1796, which saw John Adams become President and Thomas Jefferson Vice President, was the only election in the nation's history in which the President and Vice President were from two different parties. The particularly acrimonious and close election of 1796 exposed many of the potential flaws in the electoral system and prompted the first Congressional proposal that the President and Vice President be voted for separately by electors. Adams, who won by only three electoral votes, unfortunately found Kentucky's four electoral votes split between the Republican candidates, Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr. With incumbent President George Washington having refused a third term in office, incumbent Vice President John Adams became the candidate on the Federalist Party ticket with former Governor Thomas Pinckney of South Carolina as the next most popular Federalist. Their opponents were former Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson along with Senator Aaron Burr of New York on the Democratic-Republican ticket. At this point, each man from any party ran alone, as the formal position of "running mate" had not yet been established. Although Adams won the presidency, Thomas Jefferson received more electoral votes than Pinckney and was elected Vice President according to the prevailing rules of electoral balloting.

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Adams, John. Letter signed (

Lot 3: Adams, John. Letter signed ("John Adams") as President

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Description: Adams, John. Letter signed ("John Adams") as President, 1 page (7 ¾ x 8 in.; 196 x 203 mm.), "Philadelphia, PA," 19 May 1796, written to "the Inhabitants of the town of Hamilton in the State of Massachusetts". Minor foxing with uneven bottom margin. During the spring of 1798, as war with France seems inevitable, President John Adams thanks the townspeople of Hamilton, Massachusetts for their unwavering support of his administration. Adams writes in full: "Gentlemen: This affectionate address from the Inhabitants of Hamilton; their opinion of the patriotism and virtue of the supreme Executive authority of the union, from the beginning of the Government, the decided approbation, of the measures taken, during my administration, their zeal to convince the world, that we are not a divided people; their offer of their property, and lives, to support the hard earned Liberty of their Country; and their confidence, under Heaven, that we shall be able to withstand, the most powerful efforts, and machinations of foreign or domestic enemies, are as honorable to their public spirit, as their earnest prayers for me, are affecting to my feelings, and deserving of my gratitude. John Adams 2nd President of the U. S." Originally a section of Ipswich known as "The Hamlet," Hamilton was incorporated on June 21, 1793. The town was named for then Secretary of the Treasury Alexander Hamilton - whose tragic death at the hand of Aaron Burr was still another six years away at the time of this letter. Here, President Adams, under increasing pressure both at home and abroad to stop French atrocities towards American merchant ships on the high seas, thanks the townsmen of Hamilton for their support of his administration during this difficult time. In fact, just nine days after the date of this letter, Congress authorized Adams to order commanders of American naval warships to seize any French armed ships interfering with American commercial shipping. Congress also authorized Adams to raise a 10,000 man volunteer army, and passed legislation (on June 13th) suspending commerce with France and its dependencies. The fledgling U.S. seemed to be on an irreversible course towards war with France, its former ally! Through diplomacy and his endorsement of the controversial Alien and Sedition Acts, Adams skillfully averted war with France, but at a cost to both the Federalist party and his own administration: the Federalists were not returned to power in the election of 1800, and Adams was not elected to a second term as President.

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Anthony, Susan Brownell. Typed letter signed (

Lot 4: Anthony, Susan Brownell. Typed letter signed ("Susan B. Anthony")

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Description: Anthony, Susan Brownell. Typed letter signed ("Susan B. Anthony"), 1 page, (8 x 10 ¾ in.; 203 x 273 mm.) on "National-American Woman Suffrage Association" letterhead, "Rochester, New York," 10 January 1900 to an unnamed correspondent. Tipped to a larger leaf. There is minor paper loss to the bottom right edge and top right corner. Susan B. Anthony - Champion of Women's Rights. Anthony pens in full: "My Dear Sir, -- Enclosed is a petition from the national woman suffrage association of your State, duly signed by its president and secretary, which I wish to ask you to present in the Senate at the earliest opportunity. Since the right of petition is the only political means by which women can speak to Congress, I trust that you will present this appeal from disfranchised constituents with the most earnest request for its careful consideration. Hoping to hear from you favorably, I am, Very sincerely yours, Susan B. Anthony". The battle for women's suffrage lasted more than a century, though its birth as a national movement is generally acknowledged to be 1848 at the Women's Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York. Beginning with a grass-roots effort in new states, where the first legislative victories were won, the movement soon erupted onto the national scene. The debate, however, was not always civil and enlightened; opponents argued that a sweeping change in the status quo would wipe away the distinctions between the sexes, and that a strong faction of women voters would "thwart" the electoral voice of African-Americans. By 1918, President Woodrow Wilson - faced with numerous protests and hunger strikes - changed his position from a "hands-off" policy of states rights to advocacy of a Constitutional amendment. The suffrage movement culminated with the passage of the Nineteenth Amendment in 1920. A wonderful statement from the leader of the women's suffrage movement - a summation of her life's work and core conviction.

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Arthur, Chester A. Letter signed (

Lot 5: Arthur, Chester A. Letter signed ("Chester A. Arthur")

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Description: Arthur, Chester A. Letter signed ("Chester A. Arthur"), 1 page (8 x 5 in.; 203 x 127 mm.), on personal crest stationery, "Lexington Ave., Newport," 13 November 1886. The former President writes to "the Architect of the Capitol" concerning a marble bust to be commissioned of his likeness to be displayed in the Senate Chamber. Exhibits some toning and three fold lines. Included is a separate CDV of President Arthur with some edge chipping. Chester A. Arthur requests sculptor Augustus St. Gaudens be assigned to create a marble bust in his likeness for display in the Senate Chamber. Arthur writes in part: "I beg leave to recommend that this undertaking be entrusted to Mr. Augustus St. Gaudens of Newport City. I am very faithfully yours, Chester A. Arthur" This letter regards the commission of a sculptor to fashion a bust of Arthur after a Senate resolution to have likenesses of Vice Presidents installed in the niches of the Senate Chamber. Augustus Saint-Gaudens (March 1, 1848 - August 3, 1907) was the Irish-born American sculptor of the Beaux-Arts generation who most embodied the ideals of the "American Renaissance". Raised in New York City, he traveled to Europe for further training and artistic study, and then returned to major critical success in the design of monuments commemorating heroes of the American Civil War, many of which still stand.

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Buchanan, James Autograph letter signed (

Lot 6: Buchanan, James Autograph letter signed ("James Buchanan")

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Description: Buchanan, James. Autograph letter signed ("James Buchanan"), 1 page (7 ¾ x 9 ¾ in.; 196 x 247 mm.), "Wheatland, near Lancaster [Pennsylvania]," 28 March 1853 to Thomas Fitzgerald, Esq. The letter concerns incessant requests of recommendation for positions within the Pennsylvania state government. Small holes at fold intersections; mounting remnants on blank overleaf on verso. James Buchanan gets bombarded with requests of recommendation for employment positions within the Pennsylvania state government. Buchanan pens in full: "Mr. Riter writes me that a kind word from me will aid him in procuring employment in Philadelphia under the administration; but does not say what employment he desires or expects. If it be in the Custom House, & even if the gentleman whom I recommended for Collector should be appointed, I doubt whether I can interfere with his appointments from the City & County. Amid the very numerous friends there to whom I am under political obligations which I should gladly repay, how am I to select a few of them & refuse to recommend the remainder? Should I recommend all those whom I would gladly serve what would my recommendations be worth? I know that you are capable of appreciating my situation & therefore make these remarks. I have been laboring incessantly, night & day, for several weeks to serve my friends in Washington; & my present inclination is to leave the collectors appointments to the Democracy of the City & County, without my interference." By 1853, James Buchanan was a popular and experienced state politician. He represented Pennsylvania in the U.S. House of Representatives and later the Senate and served as Minister to Russia under President Andrew Jackson; Secretary of State under James K. Polk and just a few months after this letter, Franklin Pierce appointed Buchanan Minister to the United Kingdom. Being well connected can take its toll. The incessant requests for recommendations finally causes Buchanan to defer "to the Democracy of the City & County" without his interference. Four years later Buchanan was sworn in as President March 4, 1857.

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Carnegie, Andrew.  Autograph quotation signed

Lot 7: Carnegie, Andrew. Autograph quotation signed

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Description: Carnegie, Andrew. Autograph quotation signed, on (5 x 3 in.; 127 x 76 mm.) paper "New York," 9 November 1874. Two staple holes at upper left. Andrew Carnegie on surplus wealth. Carnegie pens in full: "Surplus Wealth is a sacred trust to be used by its possessor, in his life time, for the highest good of the people. Andrew Carnegie". Carnegie entered the iron and steel business in 1865, concentrating on steel after 1873. The chief owner of Homestead Steel Works (as well as controller of seven other companies), Carnegie consolidated his interests into Carnegie Steel Co. (1889), then sold his business to J.P. Morgan's United States Steel Corporation (1901) and retired. He devoted the rest of his life to the distribution of his huge fortune. His benefactions include large contributions for public libraries, public education, international peace, and he endowed the Carnegie Corporation of New York with $125,000,000 to support his benefactions after his death.

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Carter, Jimmy. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 8: Carter, Jimmy. Autograph letter signed ("Jimmy Carter") as Governor of Georgia

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Description: Carter, Jimmy. Autograph letter signed ("Jimmy Carter") as Governor of Georgia, 1 page (approx. 5 ½ x 8 ½ in.; 139 x 215 mm.), "Atlanta, Georgia," 26 November 1973, on "Office of the Governor, Atlanta, from the desk of Jimmy Carter" letterhead stationery. Small chip at top; tape remnants on verso. Governor Jimmy Carter reflects on his childhood Christmas experience. Carter pens in full: "Growing up on a farm without electricity or running water did not lessen the joy & excitement of Christmas for me. Our tree was always a cedar, chosen by us children early during the year from the hundreds growing in our woods & cut in a kind of ceremony the week before Christmas. We stood the tree in a bucket of wet sand away from the fireplace, & decorated it with paper chains, strings of popcorn, small candy canes, some tinfoil icycles [sic], & a few shiny bells. Reflections from the wood fire provided the illumination. Jimmy Carter".

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Chiang Kai-Shek. Letter signed by imperial stamp, in Chinese

Lot 9: Chiang Kai-Shek. Letter signed by imperial stamp, in Chinese

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Description: Chiang Kai-Shek. Letter signed by imperial stamp, in Chinese, 1 page (7 7/8 x 11 ¼ in.; 200 x 285 mm.), on partly printed Chinese rice paper, with Chiang Kai-Shek's imperial stamp in the center. 30 June 1944 from Chungking. The letter is written in Chinese script to Gen. Henry "Hap" Arnold, commander of the U.S. Army Air Force. Comes with an official contemporary Army translation, with War Department stamp at the lower right corner. Staple and punch holes; chipping on edges and minor paperclip stains. Chiang Kai-Shek congratulates Hap Arnold on the success of the first U.S. bombing campaign against Japan. The letter reads in full: "Dear General Arnold: the recent U.S. long-distance bombing of Japan proper heralded the coming of a new era of Allied offensive in Eastern Asia. The people of China have only done a very small part, and I want to thank you for your kind telegram of encouragement dated the 27th June. With best wishes for victory, I remain, General, Yours respectfully, Chiang Kai-Shek". Chiang Kai-Shek's modesty belies the Herculean efforts mounted by Chinese peasants and laborers to build four B-29 bases in the Min River valley near the Szechuanese capital of Chengtu. Constructed entirely by hand and without aid of any modern machinery, thousands of Chinese hauled rock and other raw material from the banks of the Min River to build the bases, each having 8,500-foot runways with a surface 1 ½ feet thick, along with 52 hardened hangars for the planes. First begun in January of 1944, the bases were completed just three months later. On June 15, 1944, the first B-29 mission took off, bound for the steelworks of Yawata, which were responsible for 24 percent of Japan's production. The China operation accomplished two important political objectives: it gave a tremendous boost to Chinese morale - certainly reflected here in Chang Kai-Shek's exuberant letter - and in Japan, it broke through the pattern of false governmental propaganda on the war's progress and brought home to many of the Japanese people their first doubts in ultimate victory.

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Churchill, Winston.  Historic Autograph statement signed

Lot 10: Churchill, Winston. Historic Autograph statement signed

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Description: Churchill, Winston. Historic Autograph statement signed, 1 page, penned in ink on a leaf (approx. 8 x 2 in.; 203 x 51 mm.) from the "War Office," 16 February 1920. Churchill pens this statement with the threat of Bolshevism looming following the Russian Revolution in 1919. Fine. Churchill on world peace and the roles to be played by Great Britain and the U. S following the Russian Revolution. Churchill pens the following in full: "The consciousness of a common purpose in great matters between Britain and the United States is the only sure guarantee of the future peace of the world. Winston S. Churchill War Office. 16. 2 20." To Churchill the entry of the U.S. into World War I was a decisive factor in a dearly bought victory. At the Versailles Conference at war's end, the Allies fell to bickering and the result of this disunity was an inadequate peace that would prove disastrous to future world stability. In response to the Russian Revolution in 1919, the Allies sent men to Russia to aid the anti-communist forces, however, their efforts were piecemeal and ineffective. It was then when Churchill became head of the War Office and, in that capacity, the threat of Bolshevism became one of his prime concerns. He foresaw its potential for trouble and strongly urged his government and the Allies to pursue a policy of ridding Russia of Bolshevik control. However, in January 1920, following Red victories, the Allies wavered. Prime Minister Lloyd George and French Premier Clemenceau refused to extend their missions and withdrew their troops; the Americans did likewise, as there was little popular support for mounting a war effort in Russia. Churchill was concerned by the inability of the Allies to work together to accomplish important goals and warned that very great evils would befall the world as a consequence of the Allies lack of coordination and purpose. This quotation, newly discovered, is of such significance that it appeared in the Churchill Centre's magazine, "Finest Hour." The policy Churchill articulates here guided his actions before and during World War II and formed the basis for the Atlantic Alliance. It also greatly impacted the Cold War, as Churchill was one of the earliest advocates of unites opposition to Communist expansion.

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Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed (

Lot 11: Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed ("Winston S. Churchill")

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Description: Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed ("Winston S. Churchill"), with "My Dear Lakin" greeting penned in his hand, 2 pages (7 ½ x 9 ½ in.; 190 x 241 mm.), "London," on "10, Downing Street, Whitehall" letterhead, 27 May 1942, written to Cyril Lakin, Esq., with original printed "Prime Minister ON HIS MAJESTY'S SERVICE" transmittal envelope. A special election for a seat in Parliament for a district in South Wales was being held, and the seat was being contested. Wanting the coalition candidate to be returned in the grim days of early 1942, Churchill intervened to influence the race. Punch hole at upper left corner. During the dark days of WWII Churchill stresses National Resolve in "cleansing the world from Hitlerism." Churchill writes in full: "The tragic death of that esteemed Member and fine sportsman, Patrick Munro, while taking part in a Home Guard exercise at the House of Commons, came as a shock to his many friends in the House and in the Llandaff and Barry Division. His place in Parliament must now be filled and I hope that all his friends and supporters in the Division will rally to your support in the forthcoming bye-election. Let there be no doubt in the minds of the electors that you are the candidate who stands for the completion and execution of plans for victory that have been developed by the National Government which it has been my duty to lead during the past two perilous years. You come before the constituency, of which you are a native, as a National Government candidate, and the political principles for which you stand are plain to all. You believe with me that the Government and nation should concentrate their life-energies on cleansing the world from Hitlerism and that when victory has been won the future of this country should be planned in harmony and combined action with other like-minded peoples in accordance with the principles of the Atlantic Charter. If you opponent is opposed to this policy, he should say so. I urge every elector, man and woman, to grasp the opportunity open to them to use their votes to further the prosecution of the war. To abstain from voting at such a time as this is to neglect the prime duty and to sacrifice the time-honoured privilege of a Briton." Churchill's task was to inspire resistance at all costs, to organize the defense of the island and to make it the bastion for an eventual return to the continent of Europe. To do this, he needed to breathe a new spirit into the government and a new resolve into the people. Churchill's magnificent oratory, his immense confidence and his stubborn refusal to accept anything but total victory rallied the nation, particularly during the dark days between 1940 and the turn of the tide in 1943. Churchill himself denied that he deserved the credit for Britain standing alone against the Nazis, saying, "I was not the lion, but it fell to me to give the lion's roar." Wartime letters of Churchill making inspiring statements similar to the words in his great speeches are exceedingly rare, especially one that mentions his arch foe Hitler or his malignant philosophy. A search of auction records for the past three decades fails to disclose a single example. Incidentally, Cyril Lakin won the election, thus affirming the confidence of the people of that district in Churchill's leadership.

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Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed (

Lot 12: Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed ("Winston S. Churchill")

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Description: Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed ("Winston S. Churchill"), with "My Dear A.P." greeting penned in his hand, 1 page (7 ½ x 9 ½ in.; 190 x 241 mm.), London on "10, Downing Street, Whitehall" Prime Minister letterhead, 17 April 1943, written to author and "Punch" magazine staff member Alan P. Herbert, Esq. In response to seeing what Churchill believed to be a satirical cartoon accomplished in poor taste Churchill writes to his longtime friend, author and "Punch" staff member Alan P. Herbert. Slight soiling around the edges. Churchill defends Montgomery and his Eighth Army in a satirical political cartoon entitled "The Desert Ferret" published by "Punch" magazine. Churchill writes in full: "I must say that I think 'Punch', in the cartoon this week, pays the Eighth Army a very back-handed compliment by representing it as a squirming little ferret. Considering that the intention was to do them honour, the shot was a very poor one. Nor is the proportion of Montgomery and his Army that between a man and a ferret, and he would be the first to resent it. As a constant reader of 'Punch' over so many years, I think I must tell you that this is the biggest flop since the cartoon of John Bull waking from his wartime nightmare on the very day the Germans marched on Prague. I am sure your colleagues will welcome criticism from their readers." "Punch" magazine, first published in 1841, was well known for its satirical cartoons. The caricature Churchill references in this letter, titled "The Desert Ferret", pictures British General Montgomery, commander of the 8th Army in the North Africa Campaign, placing a ferret labeled "8th Army" over a hole he has just dug in the ground. One of the most decisive battles of the theater, the battle at El Alamein, was fought between the British Eighth Army and the German Afrika Korps in the hot Egyptian desert in October of 1942. Though the casualties numbered in the tens of thousands, the battle served as the turning point of the war in North Africa. Montgomery was lauded for his leadership and was given the appellation "Montgomery of Alamein".

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Churchill, Winston. Document signed, (

Lot 13: Churchill, Winston. Document signed, ("Winston S. Churchill")

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Description: Churchill, Winston. Document signed, ("Winston S. Churchill"), on blue paper (11 x 27 in.; 279 x 685 mm.), "London" 27 December 1945. The large folded document is a printed "United States Declaration Form" filled out in pen by hand. Preparing for his historic trip to the U.S. aboard the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth, Churchill completes the U.S. entry customs declaration form. It appears that the responses on the form, though not the signature portion, were originally filled out by Churchill and then written over more boldly by his private secretary Nina Sturdee, who has also signed the form as witness. Slight soiling with staple holes at upper right. Winston Churchill arrives in America to give his famous "Iron Curtain" speech. Though he left office on July 27, 1945, Churchill retained huge prestige and influence on the international stage. At the encouragement of President Harry Truman and others, he determined to take his first post-war trip to the United States in early 1946, and on that trip would mix important business with pleasure. Sailing from England on January 9 onboard the luxury liner Queen Elizabeth, the Churchills arrived in New York to much applause and attention on January 14. Then as now, U. S. immigration law required all arriving international passengers to complete and present a customs declaration form. Churchill as well as other travelers liked to get this paperwork out of the way in advance, and for this memorable trip he did so. Churchill gives some very interesting responses to the questions on the form. For his occupation he lists as "Member of Parliament" and his visa "Diplomatic." For his address he offers not as Chartwell but as "28, Hyde Park Gate, London." His health is "Good," his eyes "Blue" and his hair "Grey." He affirms that he is not "a person who believes in or advocates the overthrow by force or violence of the Government of the United States." Interestingly, under the section "Whether ever before in the United States; and if so when and where? (Last residence or visit only)," he mentions his last visit to President Roosevelt, both in Washington and at his New York home: "Sept. 1944, Hyde Park, D.C., 2 days only." After arriving he renewed old friendships, painted, swam in the ocean, and visited Cuba. He also lobbied for an American reconstruction loan for Britain, began negotiations for arrangements to publish his wartime memoir, and made a series of speeches on key topics of the day. Then he traveled to Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, and spoke there on March 5. His speech was a call for closer Anglo-American cooperation in the post-war world, but because of Churchill's characterization of the threat of Soviet expansionism, eloquently captured in one of the phrases he used - "Iron Curtain" - it became one of the most significant addresses in the history of oration. He memorably stated, "From Stettin in the Baltic to Trieste in the Adriatic, an iron curtain has descended across the continent. Behind that line lie all the capitals of the ancient states of Central and Eastern Europe. Warsaw, Berlin, Prague, Vienna, Budapest, Belgrade, Bucharest and Sofia, all these famous cities and the populations around them lie in what I must call the Soviet sphere..." By crystalizing the danger presented by the Soviet Union and making it clear that the Western world was in fact already divided into conflicting spheres of influence, Churchill defined not just the threat but also the existence of the Cold War itself. After this speech, its reality could no longer be denied, and it governed international affairs for more than the 40 years to come.

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Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed (

Lot 14: Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed ("Winston Churchill") as Prime Minister

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Description: Churchill, Winston. Typed letter signed ("Winston Churchill") as Prime Minister. 2 pages (7 ½ x 9 ½ in.; 190 x 241 mm.) "Chartwell. Westerham. Kent." stationery "England," 9 October 1950. Some toning on edges and mild wrinkling. Single hole punch in upper left corner on both pages. Foxing on 2nd page does not interfere with content. British Prime Minister sends a flattering and inspirational message to Trade Unionists. Churchill writes in full: "I have the most lively and pleasant memories of last year's meeting of Conservative trade unionists at Londonderry House, which I was privileged to attend and address, and I am most sorry that I cannot be with you this year, owing to my absence from the country. Today there is a growing body of trade unionists that are becoming less satisfied with the doctrinaire approach of the Socialist Party to industrial problems. They have watched, and are watching, theories of nationalization being worked out in practice, and they view results with grave misgivings. Conservative trade unionists have a special responsibility and duty at this time to take a lead in fighting the evil forces which threaten to disrupt not only their unions but their country. I hope, therefore, that all Conservative trade unionists will be active in attending meetings of their branches and lodges, and in supporting the election to office of those who are good trade unionists, irrespective of party creed or faction. Above all, I hope they will not hesitate to stand for union office themselves, and that if elected they will rise above narrow party politics and serve the good of their colleagues who share in their heritage of this great British movement.

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Churchill, Winston. Youthful Photograph signed (

Lot 15: Churchill, Winston. Youthful Photograph signed ("Winston Churchill")

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Description: Churchill, Winston. Youthful Photograph signed ("Winston Churchill"), the image measuring (6 x 8 in.; 152 x 203 mm.) mounted to photographer's matting to overall (10 ½ x 14 in.; 266 x 355 mm.) being a black and white photograph of an early painting of Churchill. Slight silvering on photograph; not examined beneath vintage matt that has minor chip at lower right margin. Winston S. Churchill, future Prime Minister of Great Britain. The portrait depicts the future Prime Minister wearing a suit and bow tie. Signed in black ink, "Winston S. Churchill" , over the image of a writing desk covered in paperwork.  A confidence-inspiring image of the young statesman, who would go on to guide his country through the darkest days of World War II and emerge as one of the greatest leaders of our time.

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Coolidge, Calvin.  Photograph signed (

Lot 16: Coolidge, Calvin. Photograph signed ("Calvin Coolidge")

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Description: Coolidge, Calvin. Photograph signed ("Calvin Coolidge"), on (10 x 14 in.; 254 x 355 mm.) black & white heavy photograph paper, of the prim New Englander posing stoically for the camera in a three-piece suit. Coolidge inscribes a quotation on the image, a (4 x 1 in.; 101 x 25 mm.) newspaper strip cut of the transcript bearing the quotation is tipped to the lower left border of the photo. Slight silvering and slight soiling on light border. Calvin Coolidge remarks on government. This photograph is inscribed by Coolidge in black ink, "The conduct of public affairs is not a game. Responsible office does not go to the crafty. Governments are not founded upon an association for public plunder, but on the co-operation of men wherein each is seeking to do his duty. "Calvin Coolidge".

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Coolidge, Calvin. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 17: Coolidge, Calvin. Autograph letter signed ("Calvin Coolidge") as President

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Description: Coolidge, Calvin. Autograph letter signed ("Calvin Coolidge") as President, 2 pages (9 x 7 in.; 228 x 178 mm.) on "White House Washington" stationery, 29 May 1926, written to Frederick S., Pick, Providence, R.I., marked "Personal" by Coolidge at the top. Some toning from previous matting and matting remnants on verso, not affecting text or signature. President Calvin Coolidge writes to a campaign supporter. The letter reads in full: "My dear Mr. Pick, Your favor has been received. I was glad to hear from you again and renew the connection that was made in the last Presidential Campaign, when the result in your community was so satisfactory. Some time when I am in your neighborhood I hope to be able to see you personally. Yours, Calvin Coolidge"

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Coolidge, Calvin.  Typed letter signed (

Lot 18: Coolidge, Calvin. Typed letter signed ("Calvin Coolidge") as President

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Description: Coolidge, Calvin. Typed letter signed ("Calvin Coolidge") as President, 1 page (9 x 7 in.; 228 x 177 mm.), official "White House" stationery, 7 February 1929. Marked "personal". Written to Mr. and Mrs. Edwin A. Shuman. Slight soiling on upper edge; with original transmittal envelope. President Calvin Coolidge acknowledges a watch and chain received at Christmas. The letter reads in part: "My dear Mr. and Mrs. Shuman: At Christmas time the watch and chain came which was duly acknowledged. Some of our people in the office were ill at the time, so in some way it failed to be put on the list of acknowledgement. Mrs. Coolidge said that Mrs. Shuman wrote her about it, so you already know that it was received. I wish to express my sincere appreciation of the gift, which I value so much..."

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Davis, Jefferson.  Autograph letter signed (

Lot 19: Davis, Jefferson. Autograph letter signed ("Jefferson Davis")

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Description: Davis, Jefferson. Autograph letter signed ("Jefferson Davis"), 1 page (approx. 5 x 8 in.; 127 x 203 mm.) 22 January 1874, marked "Private" in Davis' hand at the heading, written to an unknown recipient. Small tape remnant at upper right, not affecting text, and some ink smudging. Former President of the Confederacy Jefferson Davis discussing a proposition to exclude him from amnesty. Davis pens in full: "My dear Sir, Within I send to you as Chair. of the Com. a letter which expresses my feeling in regard to the proposition to exclude me from amnesty. You are [at] liberty to publish my letter if you think it well to do so, or to consider it private if your judgment shall so decide. Truly yours, Jefferson Davis".

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Davis, Jefferson.  Autograph Letter signed (

Lot 20: Davis, Jefferson. Autograph Letter signed ("Jefferson Davis")

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Description: Davis, Jefferson. Autograph Letter signed ("Jefferson Davis") 2 pages (10 x 8 in.; 254 x 203 mm.), ruled paper with official embossed Congress stamp, "New Orleans, Louisiana", 22 January 1876, to "Honble Mr. Knott." Paper exhibits some soiling with very small tape remnant at upper left. Jefferson Davis asks to be taken off an amnesty bill so as to ease its passage for compatriots, but remains defiant in his political stance. Davis writes in full: "Honble Mr. Knott Chrm. Com. On amnesty Sir, As it appears from the published proceedings of Congress that the passage of a general amnesty bill is obstructed by the objection to including me in its provisions, I write to express my regret that any of my compatriots should suffer by identification with me, and to request that you will not allow the objection, to prevent others from enjoying whatever benefits may be accorded to them, on the condition of my exclusion. Further it may be proper to state that I have no claim to pardon, not having in any wise repented, or changed the connections on which my political course was founded as well as before, as during, and since the war between the States. Respectfully yours Jefferson Davis"

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Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed (

Lot 21: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein")

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Description: Einstein, Albert. Typed letter signed ("A. Einstein"), 2 pages (8 ½ x 11 in.; 279 x 215 mm.) 20 June 1950, written in English to Mr. Stringfellow Barr, President of the Foundation for World Government. In this letter, Einstein is responding to a report sent to him by the Foundation for World Government. Mild toning on edges. Ten months following the first successful Soviet nuclear test, Albert Einstein discusses the virtues of World Government to prevent "general annihilation by war." Einstein writes in full: "Thank you for your letter of June 16th. I did indeed receive the request copy of which you were kind enough to send me with you recommendation. I did nothing about at [sic] the time I received the cable simply because I did not know what to do and I feel the same today. Although one has the impression that the senders of the telegram are quite serious about their proposal the latter seems to be a 'soap-bubble'. If one advocates such romantic enterprises one is very soon not taken seriously anymore and might lose one's credit. I have read carefully your report. I could, perhaps, agree with you if it were not for the fact that we are in a situation of such immediate danger. I believe also that a realization of the minimum program for World Government must lead very soon to an expansion of its functions and duties. However, I think that it would be considerably easier to rally the support of the relevant groups of people the world over for the minimum program than for a more expansive program which would include Human Rights, elimination of starvation and maybe birth-control etc. For the danger of general annihilation by war directly and simultaneously threatens the 'strong' and the 'weak' alike - perhaps the 'strong' even more than the 'weak'. For this reason I do believe that all sensible people should back a minimum program to prevent dispersion of forces. These remarks should not be taken as an objection to your efforts insofar as only education and enlightenment are intended."

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Eisenhower, Dwight D.  Autograph letter signed (

Lot 22: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed ("Ike" and "D")

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Description: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed ("Ike" and "D"), 2 ½ pages (8 x 10 ½ in.; 203 x 266 mm.), "Versailles" 15 January 1945, to his wife Mamie Eisenhower on blue-lined paper. Minor toning on edges. Ten days before the end of the Battle of the Bulge, Supreme Allied Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower pens a heartfelt letter to his wife Mamie discussing the monumental challenges he is facing during the war. Eisenhower pens in full: "Darling: the winter that you and I spent in France was nothing like this one. For the past 2 weeks we've been blanketed in snow. It's difficult to travel by road and the low lying fog make air-plane travel almost impossible. Certainly you cannot plan a trip on the basis of using a plane. Yesterday I had a nice letter from Johnny. He had just lost a squad leader and was quite irritated with the actions of that particular sergeant. He's beginning to get his first lessons in 'administration.' But obviously he is enjoying his job. It's been more than 3 years since I came to Washington from San Antonio. In some ways it seems like only yesterday that we were making that move - but on the other hand I cannot remember the time when I was free of these continuing problems involving staggering expense, destruction of lives and wealth, and fates of whole peoples. It will be difficult, indeed, after this war is over, to get me to think of anything more important than a good fat fish worm. (None of this fancy fly fishing for me!) Not long ago I saw Everett, who is in fine health. Soon I expect to see Geo. [Patton] He has made a fine record for himself all through this campaign. Looks the same as ever. Lately my cook has been trying to make some fried mush. He's not too successful, but maybe my memory as to how the dish used to taste is at fault. This is probably the trouble. I often wonder how you're getting along; what you do - and so on. Several people that have come in here tell me you're counting some on going to visit Mike. You've said nothing of it in your letters. As a matter of fact, I've had very few letters from you this past month. That's probably because you've gone to Benning, and cannot find time to write while you're travelling. Take care of yourself. Loads of love all the time. I miss you every day. Always yours, Ike You've never said anything about the perfume I sent you or the 1000 franc note (in a wallet) I sent for John. Did you ever receive them? D" In January, 1945 the German forces were on the ropes and the Third Reich was in its death throes. Two weeks before this letter was written, Eisenhower was named TIME magazine's Man of the Year. Ike's language reflects the incredible responsibility of the war weighing heavily on his shoulders yet, somehow, he is able to maintain a positive tone for Mamie.

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Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 23: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed ("Ike")

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Description: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed ("Ike"), 2 pages (8 x 10 ¼ in.; 203 x 260 mm.), "Algiers," 12 May 1943 to his wife Mamie Eisenhower on blue-lined paper with original "Allied Force Headquarters / Office of the Commander-in-Chief" transmittal envelope bearing "Censored by: [with Eisenhower's 'Dwight D. Eisenhower' ink signature] General U.S. Army." Minor toning on edges. Writing to his wife, Mamie, General Eisenhower beams with confidence and good cheer as the Axis forces surrender at the close of the Battle of Tunisia. Eisenhower pens (in part): "Today I write to you with a lighter heart than I have carried in many a moon. As the papers tell you, we have just about completed this current job, and though my confidence has been so complete that I predicted this victory, long ago, to take place in middle of May - the fact it is all but done lifts a big load from my mind. I only wish that it was the final battle of this war and that I could be catching the next plane for home & you !! But I'm afraid that happy day is still a long way off. Beetle is home for a short visit. If you are in Washington he will bring me first hand news of you. From messages I have had from you I think you must be back, but I realize that your plans are subject to change from day to day. Work never lets up. Nevertheless I hope to get out of the office a while this afternoon. My plane is having a check up that will not be completed until tomorrow, so trips are out for the moment. I've been travelling a lot in recent days. Butch always goes with me. Had a fine letter from Johnny yesterday. I always enjoy his letters because he usually manages to get something amusing into them. I think that tomorrow (13th) is Min's birthday. I'll try sending a teletype & I hope to goodness I'm not wrong. My memory is a bit crowded!...Loads of love, sweetheart, and don't forget your Ike" With Eisenhower in charge as Supreme Commander Allied Expeditionary Force of the North African Theater of Operations, the Tunisian Campaign began with an Allied amphibious landing near Sfax in eastern Tunisia on January 5, 1943, and an attack on German positions at Gafsa in west central Tunisia on March 17. On February 4th, the British Eighth Army crossed the border from Libya into Tunisia. Squeezed between U.S. and British Commonwealth forces and cut off from his supply bases, Erwin Rommel attempted to stall the Allies with defensive operations. German and Italian troops managed to rout the U.S. Second Corps at the Kasserine Pass on February 18, but the Axis forces were vastly outnumbered and outgunned. The Allies made slow but steady progress in forcing Axis troops into a pocket along the north central Tunisian coast. On May 7, 1943, the British 7th Armored Division captured Tunis and the U.S. II Army Corps captured Bizerte, the last remaining port in Axis hands. Six days later, the Axis forces in North Africa, having sustained 40,000 casualties, in Tunisia alone, surrendered; 267,000 German and Italian soldiers became prisoners of war.

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Eisenhower, Dwight D.  Autograph letter signed (

Lot 24: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed ("Ike")

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Description: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Autograph letter signed ("Ike"), 3 pages (8 x 10 ¼ in.; 203 x 260 mm.), "Verviers, Belgium," 19 October 1944, to his wife Mamie Eisenhower on blue-lined paper. Minor toning on edges. Eisenhower writes to Mamie on October 1944: "All soldiers have one Commander-in-Chief: the President. Duty and loyalty and unity, all absolutely essential now to our future as a nation..." Eisenhower pens in part: "I came purposely very early to the office so that I'd have plenty of time to write to you. It is not 11:20, and in ten minutes I must make 2 recordings for broadcasts; one for a Victory Loan Drive, one for the British Empire Celebration of the Battle of El Alamein. But the... ... recorders can wait a while!! Recently I've written to Mike, Johnny, Mrs. Longman (and her daughter) and a number of others. I have been trying a number of people in order to find one who will answer personal mail (much of it from people of whom I've never heard) in my direct, simple style. Most people I've tried want to embellish, or be too condescending. Some are too busy with other things. You see, many people write to me (because I've had my name in the papers) for a moral pat on the back. Many letters are from children who are buying stamps or collecting scrap. Others come from people in the hospitals. Some are from very old people; only a very few are palpably self-seeking or insincere. I'd like to be able to sign the answers without looking - that way it takes only a few minutes a day. But Lee & Butch are busy; the WAC Capt. I've been using is too busy and really doesn't belong to my office - and so the job still takes too much of my time. Today I have a letter from a little 12 year old boy who sends me a piece of white heather; very rare & supposed to be even luckier than a 4 leaf clover. Another is from a 6 year old boy who says I'm his favorite soldier & who sends me his own specially blessed St. Christopher medal. Also a cross and sacred heart! He ended his letter by saying he was sending also a big hug & kiss for me. I feel d___ humble when I get such messages. I laughed recently when I saw a statement in the paper that you could not inform a reporter as to which political party I belong. Neither could I!!! We're so busy and our jobs seem so important to us that it seems almost impossible to realize that soon there will be another political campaign. Too bad they cannot be suspended until this dirty business is ended! Anyway, that's something to concern politicians - I truly hope that no soldier, no matter who he is - will be so misguided as to desert his post of duty in this war to engage in political affairs. All soldiers have one Commander-in-Chief: the President. Duty & loyalty & unity - all absolutely essential now to our future as a nation, demand that soldiers tend to their own jobs - exclusively! Well sweet - they're yelling for me. Loads & loads of love - Your Ike" Wonderful insight from the soldier who would retire from military service and later become a two-term President of the United States. Following WWII, Eisenhower would serve as Army Chief of Staff under Truman and in 1948 became president of Columbia University. In December 1950 he took a leave of absence from the university to become Supreme Commander of NATO. A "draft Eisenhower" movement in the Republican Party persuaded him to declare his candidacy in the 1952 Presidential election, but he had to first be convinced that 1) the political circumstances in the country had created a genuine duty for him to offer himself as a candidate, and 2) that there was a mandate from the populace for him to be their President.

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Eisenhower, Dwight D. Photographic print of an engraved portrait signed (

Lot 25: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Photographic print of an engraved portrait signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower'')

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Description: Eisenhower, Dwight D. Photographic print of an engraved portrait signed ("Dwight D. Eisenhower''), 11 x 14 in.; 279 x 355 mm.; image measuring 6 ½ x 8 ¼ in.; 165 x 209 mm.), reproduction of a post-war drawing of "Ike" by Schleicher inscribed and signed on lower border. Tear in the light margin at bottom center (not affecting text); some creases on the outer margins with light soiling. Signed image of Dwight D. Eisenhower. Inscribed in full: "To George Murphy, with best wishes and warm personal regards to a distinguished American - from his friend Dwight D. Eisenhower." George Murphy made 55 films with such stars as Shirley Temple, Judy Garland and Ronald Reagan (whom he mentored when he arrived in Hollywood). In the 1940s, political interests shared attention with his ongoing movie career. Twice he was elected president of the Screen Actor's Guild, and in 1950 he received a special Oscar for interpreting the motion-picture industry correctly to the country at large. He served as chairman of California's Republican state committee, and as chairman of the program committee at the Republican national conventions of both 1956 and 1960.

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Fillmore, Millard. Document signed (

Lot 26: Fillmore, Millard. Document signed ("Millard Fillmore") as President

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Description: Fillmore, Millard. Document signed ("Millard Fillmore") as President, 1 page (15 ¾ x 12 3/8 in.; 400 x 314 mm.), "Washington," 14 July 1851, being an appointment document for the Consul of Austria for the port of San Francisco. Cosigned by Secretary of State Daniel Webster. Borders trimmed; separations in vertical folds (reinforced on verso); small horizontal tears at center; some toning with chipping. President Millard Fillmore appoints the Consul of Austria for the port of San Francisco. The document reads in part: "Satisfactory evidence having been exhibited to me that Samuel John Gower has been appointed Consul of Austria for the port of San Francisco, in the State of California, I do hereby recognize him as such, and declare him free to exercise and enjoy such functions, powers and privileges as are allowed to the Consuls of the most favored Nations in the United States."

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Ford, Gerald R. Portrait of the Assassin book signed (

Lot 27: Ford, Gerald R. Portrait of the Assassin book signed ("Gerald R. Ford") as former President

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Description: Ford, Gerald R. Portrait of the Assassin book signed ("Gerald R. Ford") as former President. Simon & Schuster, 1965. First Edition, First Printing. Signed, 1 Oct. 1980. Cloth binding with gold gilt spine lettering. Signed by Ford on the front free endpaper. John R. Stiles signature card affixed to inside front cover. Very fine jacket is encased in Archival plastic cover. (7 ¾ x 9 ¾ in.; 196.85 x 247.65 mm.) The book comes in a maroon cardboard slipcase, which exhibits some signs of rubbing on edges. Gerald R. Ford defends the findings of the Warren commission on J.F.K.'s assassination. Ford pens in full: "To Steve Koschal, with appreciation for your interest in the Warren Commission and its' worth. I firmly believe the conclusions of the Commission are valid despite the many challenges. No new evidence or analysis undercut the work of the Warren Commission. The assassination was a terrible tragedy. Gerald R. Ford 1/10/80" As a member of the Warren Commission investigating the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, Gerald R. Ford wrote this book while serving as a U.S. Representative from the state of Michigan. John R. Stiles was a Grand Rapids, Michigan businessman and Republican Party campaign official. He served as Gerald Ford's first campaign manager in 1948 when Ford unseated the incumbent. He was a member of Paul Bagwell's campaign for governor in 1958, and in 1960, he served as field director of the Nixon-for-President campaign. When President Johnson appointed Congressman Ford to serve on the Warren Commission, Ford turned to Stiles to serve as his special assistant. Following the conclusion of the Warren Commission, Ford and Stiles worked jointly on their history of their work with the commission, published as Portrait of the Assassin (1965).

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Franklin, Benjamin.  Autograph letter signed, (

Lot 28: Franklin, Benjamin. Autograph letter signed, ("B. Franklin")

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Description: Franklin, Benjamin. Autograph letter signed, ("B. Franklin"), 2 pages (7¼ x 9 in.; 196 x 228 mm.) "London," 13 March 1775 to "Sir Alexander Dick / Preston Fields / Edinburgh" penned by Franklin on integral address overleaf. Minor soiling with separations at folds; address overleaf has paper loss on edge and wax seal removed. With relations between England and the American colonies quickly deteriorating, Benjamin Franklin pens a letter of recommendation just eight days before returning to Philadelphia. Franklin pens in full: "John Dalrymple the other day inform'd me that you and your dear family were lately well, which to hear gave me great pleasure. Being on the point of embarking for America, I would not leave Britain without taking leave of a friend I have so much reason to esteem and love. I pray God to bless you and yours with every kind of felicity. If at any time I can on the other side of the water render acceptable service to you or any friend of yours, it will be a pleasure to me to receive your commands. May I take the liberty of recommending to your countenance and protection an ingenious young man, son of a friend of mine at Philadelphia, now studying Physic at Edinburg[h]. Your kind advice may be of great use to him, and I am persuaded he will always retain a grateful sense of any favourable notice you may think fit to take of him. His name is Duffield, and he will have the honor of presenting this to your hands. With sincere affection & attachment, I am ever Dear Sir, Your obliged and most obedient servant B. Franklin Our friend Sir J. Pringle was well last evening." In 1774, Benjamin Franklin was serving as an agent for the Pennsylvania Colony in London when he came into possession of letters that further strained the increasingly tenuous relationship between England and her American colonies. Penned by Thomas Hutchinson, the English-appointed governor of Massachusetts, these letters called for reductions in liberties allowed to English citizens residing in America. Franklin promptly forwarded these letters to America, where they were published much to the outrage of the population. Called before the English Foreign Ministry in January of 1774, Franklin was severely berated for this act and dismissed as deputy postmaster general for North America. In spite of this affront, Franklin continued to strive for reconciliation between the English colonists and their mother country. Hoping to avert the passage of the Boston Port Bill, he went so far as to personally guarantee payment for the tea dumped during the Boston Tea Party. Even after the bill passed and Boston's port was closed, Franklin maintained his conciliatory stance. Subsequently, he began collaborating with William Pitt, earl of Chatham, hoping that this treaty might fare better than previous endeavors. Franklin was in attendance when Lord Chatham presented his bill before the House of Lords on February 1st. Chatham, supported by a small contingent in the House of Lords, was vehemently attacked by the ministers and their supporters. Lord Sandwich, one of the most vocal opponents of the bill, turned his attention towards Franklin and stated that "he fancied he had in his eye the person who drew it up, one of the bitterest and most mischievous enemies this country has ever known." This personal attack was the final straw, and Franklin emerged from the session an ardent devotee of colonial freedom. He set sail for Philadelphia on March 21, just eight days after writing this letter and only three weeks before the Revolutionary War began with the bloody battles of Lexington and Concord. Landing at Philadelphia on May 5, the talk of war and the creation of a new nation was everywhere. The next day the Pennsylvania Assembly unanimously elected Franklin as a delegate to the second Continental Congress. He quickly proved himself the Congress' most radical member, drafting articles of confederation that asserted America's sovereignty and gave greater power to the central government than the United States Constitution did in 1787. A remarkable unpublished letter from a time when the patriotic sentiment of one of America's greatest individuals attained its full potential.

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Getty, Jean Paul. Signed check

Lot 29: Getty, Jean Paul. Signed check

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Description: Getty, Jean Paul. Signed check (8 x 3 in.; 203.2 x 76.2 mm.) 2 January 1942, drawn on the billionaire's personal account at the Security-First National Bank of Los Angeles. The check is made out to " M. Munce. " in the amount of $104.00, and signed at the lower right in black ink, " J. Paul Getty. " Cancellation stamps over all but not interfering with signature. Two binder punch holes on upper edge.

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Grant, Ulysses S. Army report pamphlet signed (

Lot 30: Grant, Ulysses S. Army report pamphlet signed ("U. S. Grant")

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Description: Grant, Ulysses S. Army report pamphlet signed ("U. S. Grant") 44 pages (6 x 9 in.; 152 x 228 mm.) by the Government Printing Office, "Washington," 1865. Titled: "Report of Lieutenant General U. S. Grant, of the Armies of the United States, 1864-'65." inscribed and signed on the blue paper cover, "To Col. A.H. Markland, P.O. Dept., From U.S. Grant, Lt. Gen. U.S.A." The cover exhibits some flaking and paper loss on edges. Interior pages are generally undamaged with minimal toning. Ulysses S. Grant pamphlet describes the last year of war including correspondence with General Robert E. Lee at Appomattox relating to his surrender, inscribed to his trusted wartime courier. On July 22, 1865, less than two months after the surrender of the last Confederate army in the field, General Ulysses S. Grant issued a report on the operations of the Armies of the United States, which were all under his command. He discussed his strategy and thinking; in passages such as this: "From the first, I was firm in the conviction that no peace could be had that would be stable and conducive to the happiness of the people, both North and South, until the military power of the rebellion was entirely broken." Then he laid out the situation as he found it as the winter of 1864 turned to spring, and related the instructions he then gave his generals. Another example: "Gen. Sherman was instructed to move against Johnstons army, to break it up, and to go into the interior of the enemies country as far as he could, inflicting all the damage he could upon their war resources." What follows is a step-by-step description of the conduct of the war and Grant's ongoing assessments from April 2, 1864 when the war's final campaign commenced until Lee's surrender at Appomattox on April 9, 1865. It also includes important correspondence between Grant and Generals Butler, Sherman, etc. He describes broaching the surrender to General Robert E. Lee thusly: "Feeling now that Gen. Lee's chance of escape was utterly hopeless, I addressed him the following communication from Farmville: 'April 7, 1865. General: the result of the last week must convince you of the hopelessness of further resistance on the part of the Army of Northern Virginia in the struggle. I feel that it is so, and regarded as my duty to shift from myself the responsibility of any further infusion of blood by asking of you the surrender of that portion of the Confederate states army known as the Army of Northern Virginia.'" Col. Absalom Markland became a personal friend of Grant's when they were in their early teens. While Grant began a career in the U.S. military, Markland studied law and became a government official in the Office of Indian Affairs. During the presidential campaign of 1860 he supported Abraham Lincoln who, after his election, appointed Markland a special agent in the Post Office Department. When the war broke out, Markland was assigned to assist Grant, who used him not merely to manage and improve mail delivery to his armies, but more importantly as a trusted courier carrying letters and messages between Grant, headquarters, President Lincoln, and other generals.

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Grant, Ulysses S. Autograph letter signed, (

Lot 31: Grant, Ulysses S. Autograph letter signed, ("U. S. Grant")

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Description: Grant, Ulysses S. Autograph letter signed, ("U. S. Grant") 1 page, (7 x 9 in.; 178 x 228 mm.) from his headquarters "Cairo, Illinois," 6 November 1861 to Colonel J. Cook. Minor foxing. The letter that helped make Ulysses S. Grant's career. A battle order that was integral to his first great military victory. Grant writes in full: "In pursuance with instructions sent this morning, you will march tomorrow morning, with the Command directed, to Elliott's Mill (near Columbus), taking two days rations. Should you receive no further instructions by 2 o'clock p.m. the day after tomorrow, you will return to Fort Holt. Take with you no more transportation than is absolutely necessary to the limited amount of tents & baggage for one night." This letter was integral to Grant's battle plans, as it puts in play a major component of his strategy -a strategy to mislead opposing Confederate Gen. Leonidas Polk into thinking the main Union attack would be against Columbus, and thus prevent Polk from sending more troops across the river to reinforce Belmont during the action. In the letter, Grant instructs Colonel Cook and his forces to threaten Polk at Columbus while Grant and his men attacked Belmont. Grant's ruse using Cook's men worked. Gen. Polk saw the attack on Belmont, but also saw that there were Union forces threatening him on the eastern bank. Grant's men routed the Confederates out of Belmont cantonment and destroyed the Rebel supplies and equipment. This important letter is referenced in both Kenneth William's book, Grant Rises In The West and The Official Records of the War of the Rebellion . This attack brought Grant to the attention of the Union leadership. President Abraham Lincoln even sent Grant his "respect" because of his boldness.

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Grant, Ulysses S. Manuscript document signed (

Lot 32: Grant, Ulysses S. Manuscript document signed ("U. S. Grant")

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Description: Grant, Ulysses S. Manuscript document signed ("U. S. Grant") 1 page (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) gray paper, "Columbia Barracks, O.T. [Oregon Territory]," 1 February 1853. Minor separation at folds with tape repair and mounting remnants on verso; toning on edges from previous matting. 30-year-old Brevet Captain Ulysses S. Grant signs a document as regimental quartermaster of the 4th Infantry regiment. The document reads in part: "I certify on honor, that I shall require the following Subsistence Stores during the month of February 1853, for the use of my office as Acting Assistant Commissary of Subsistence. Viz: 5lb Sperm Candles / Columbia Barracks O.T. February 1, 1753 [signed]: U.S. Grant / 4th Inftry./ Bvt. Capt. U.S.A." On September 20, 1852, 30-year-old Brevet Captain Ulysses S. Grant arrived with the 4th Infantry regiment at Columbia Barracks, a U.S. Army base on the Columbia River. The base, later called Fort Vancouver and then Vancouver Barracks, is located next to the Hudson's Bay Company's Fort Vancouver trading post, within the present-day city of Vancouver. Grant spent the next 15 months as regimental quartermaster at the base. Situated on a fertile prairie above the river, with sweeping views of the river, forests, and mountains, the base was an agreeable posting for Grant, and he would have liked to have his family, which consisted then of his wife Julia and two sons, join him. However, the cost of living in the region was too high to maintain a family on his army salary. Like many soldiers of his day, Grant attempted to go into business for himself on the side. However, in a pattern that would be repeated throughout his life, the business ventures he entered with fellow officers proved to be failures despite his high expectations for them. In early 1854, Grant was transferred from Fort Vancouver and assigned to Fort Humboldt in northern California. Within a few months, he resigned from the army and did not serve again until the Civil War broke out.

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Hancock, John. Revolutionary War-date appointment document signed (

Lot 33: Hancock, John. Revolutionary War-date appointment document signed ("John Hancock")

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Description: Hancock, John. Revolutionary War-date appointment document signed ("John Hancock"), 1 page (11 x 8 in.; 279 x 203 mm.) "Philadelphia," 10 December 1776, just 2 weeks prior to the date of Washington's historic crossing of the Delaware River and his victory at the Battle of Trenton. The document appoints "John Hellen, Gentleman" to the rank of "Second Lieutenant in Captain Henry Hardman's Company of the Maryland Forces". Archival repair to horizontal and vertical separations (one of which bisects Hancock's signature); paper replacement on edges with toning from previous tape mends on verso (now removed). John Hancock's 1776 appointment for an officer just two weeks prior to Washington's historic crossing of the Delaware and subsequent victory at the Battle of Trenton. The Battle of Trenton - December 25-26, 1776. In December of 1776, the situation faced by Washington was becoming desperate. Winter was ominously approaching, and the contingency of Continental militia was due to disband at the first of the year, as their enlistment period would expire. His tattered troops were encamped across the Delaware River from Trenton, which was occupied by 2,000 to 3,000 Hessian mercenaries and their six field cannon. Just before midnight on Christmas Day, 1776, Washington's small force began to move north toward McKonkey's Ferry on the Delaware River. Once ashore, Washington formed up his troops and descended on Trenton. Word came within a few minutes that the Hessians in the field had surrendered. The whole affair lasted less than three-quarters of an hour. Washington collected his men, rounded up almost 900 prisoners, and arranged for immediate transportation of captured stores back across the river. The victory sent shockwaves through the rebelling colonies. Washington's troops, and they alone, had defeated a superior force of almost three German regiments. Furthermore, not one American life had been lost. Success against the British seemed now at least a distant possibility. Trenton, and the follow-up victory at Princeton on January 3, 1777, cowed the British from continuing their advanced posts in New Jersey. There is strong evidence that Hellen was present with Washington for the Crossing of the Delaware River and subsequent victory at Trenton. Hellen was previously a first lieutenant in the First Maryland battalion of the Flying Camp - a battalion that was, however, a unit of state militia responsible for civil defense. This would suggest that Hellen was a "minuteman", and not with the Continental Army during the fall of 1776. However, at the time of this appointment to second lieutenant, Hellen's commanding officer, Captain Henry Hardman (for whom the company was named) was in British captivity, having been taken prisoner at Fort Washington on November 16. Capt. Hardman's commanding officer, Lt. Col. Moses Rawlings, was in command of the Maryland rifle battalions both at Fort Washington and later at Trenton; therefore, it is possible that Hellen was with the company at both actions. At the very least, Hellen was called into Continental service with this appointment, and judging by the date and the dire military situation at hand, would certainly have hastened to Washington's encampment on the banks of the Delaware (assuming he was not already there) for the historic movement on December 25th.

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Hancock, John. Manuscript document signed (

Lot 34: Hancock, John. Manuscript document signed ("John Hancock") as Governor of Massachusetts

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Description: Hancock, John. Manuscript document signed ("John Hancock") as Governor of Massachusetts, 1 page (7 ½ x 9 in.; 190 x 228 mm.), "Commonwealth of Massachusetts," 17 November 1792. Cosigned by John Avery as Under Secretary. The document appoints Azor Orne (1731-1796) as an "Elector of President & Vice President of the United States." Document is trimmed on the left margin affecting the lower left flourish of the "J" in Hancock's signature, with minor separation at folds and overall soiling. John Hancock appoints an Elector of the President & Vice President of the United States. The document reads in full: "To the Honble. Azor Orne, Esq., I do hereby certify that you have been chosen an Elector of the President & Vice President of the United States agreeably to Law by a Resolution of the General Court of the thirtieth of June last. You are directed to meet on the first Wednesday of December next at the State House in Boston at ten o'clock in the foreroom for the purpose of executing the business of your Appointment. Given under my Hand & Seal of the Commonwealth this seventeenth day of November A.D. 1792 and in the Seventeenth year of the Independence of the United States of America. By His Excellency's Command" Azor Orne was a militia colonel before the start of the American Revolution and in 1774 was a delegate to the Essex Convention and the Provencial Congress. In January 1776, Orne was appointed by the Provencial Congress as one of three major-generals of Massachusetts militia. After the war he served in the Massachusetts state Senate and served on the committee on the ratification of the federal Constitution.

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Harding, Warren G.  Typed letter signed (

Lot 35: Harding, Warren G. Typed letter signed ("Warren G. Harding") as President

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Description: Harding, Warren G. Typed letter signed ("Warren G. Harding") as President, 1 page (9 x 7 in.; 228 x 177 mm.) "White House" stationery, 3 Jan. 1922 to Warren G. Marshman. Toning around edges and tape remnants on verso from previous display. Harding asks for reassurance of Marshman's fitness for a job he's seeking before he recommends him. Accompanied with Florence Harding typed letter signed and photograph signed (each signed "Florence King Harding") as First Lady, 1 page (8 ¼ x 5 in.; 209 x 127 mm.) "White House, Washington" stationery featuring an American Eagle gilt crest, 21 September 1921 to Charles Kling. Fading around edges and tape remnants on upper edge of verso from previous mounting. Mrs. Harding (Maiden name Kling) speaks with affection to her relative about newspaper reports about her travels and having missed Charles' visit. Signed photograph measures 5 x 7 in.; 127 x 177.8 mm., being a sepia photo of President Harding and Florence Harding in a crowd. Slight ink skipping on photo surface; tape remnants on verso with slight creasing at borders. Inscribed, "Greetings and good wishes Florence King Harding".

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Harrison, Benjamin. Letter signed (

Lot 36: Harrison, Benjamin. Letter signed ("Benj. Harrison") as President

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Description: Harrison, Benjamin. Letter signed ("Benj. Harrison") as President, 2 pages, (10 x 7 ¾ in; 254 x 196 mm.) on lined Executive Mansion stationery, "Washington" 1 October 1891 to Hon. Albion W. Tourgee, Mayville, NY. Toning with matting tape on the front edges of the letter. President Benjamin Harrison regrets he cannot meet every request for appointments. Harrison writes in part: "My dear Judge: I have your letter of the 23rd and have read it with interest...I do not know what I can do for any friend in the way of appointment until I come to take up the particular case and loom the whole thing over...I am anxious that friends who may not receive appointments shall believe that I am not purposely unkind; and especially that I do not pronounce any judgment of unworthiness upon those to whom I am not able to give what they ask and deserve." The letter is signed, "Benj. Harrison".

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Hayes, Rutherford B.  Autograph letter signed (

Lot 37: Hayes, Rutherford B. Autograph letter signed ("R.B. Hayes")

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Description: Hayes, Rutherford B. Autograph letter signed ("R.B. Hayes"), 1 page (5 ½ x 7 3/8 in.; 140 x 187 mm.), "Fremont, Ohio." 14 August 1885 to, "My Dear Sir". Hayes writes to a friend six days after attending the funeral of Ulysses S. Grant, his former Commander-in-Chief. Trimmed edges; mounting tape remnants on upper edge on verso. Rutherford B. Hayes attends President U.S. Grant's funeral. Hayes pens in full: "Thanks - thanks for your steady friendship. I attended the Grant funeral. Grant's last victory is not his least. How powerless calumny is at the last. I return if you wish it the anonymous letter if you wish it when I write again." Grant's funeral procession made its way through New York City on August 8, 1885 and the column of mourners spanned seven miles. Among those mourners were three U.S. Presidents and Grant's pallbearers were Generals William T. Sherman and Philip Sheridan, who fought for the Union, and Simon Bolivar Buckner and Joseph Johnston, who had fought for the Confederacy. Union and Confederate officers in the procession rode together in the same carriages. Crowds packed every square inch of available viewing space on the ground, and buildings were draped in black in Grant's honor. Hayes' comment about "How powerless calumny is at the last" is more than likely directed to those who criticized Grant's scandal-riddled Presidency, for the incredible public turnout at his funeral symbolized the people's admiration for the man.

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Hoover, Herbert.  Signed photograph

Lot 38: Hoover, Herbert. Signed photograph

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Description: Hoover, Herbert. Signed photograph (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) black & white, of the President standing alongside "King Tut" his beloved pet German Shepherd. Signed in black ink at the lower left margin, "Herbert Hoover". Minor bumps on corners; tape remnants from previous mounting on verso. Signed photograph of Herbert Hoover with his German Shepherd "King Tut" who helped him get elected President. A German Shepherd dog named King Tut helped to get Hoover elected. Pictured with the candidate, the dog made Hoover appear warm and friendly. The autographed image was sent to thousands of voters. Once in the White House, King Tut remained in the public eye, every night patrolling the White House fences, and became known as "the dog that worried himself to death."

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Hoover, Herbert.  Typed letter signed (

Lot 39: Hoover, Herbert. Typed letter signed ("Herbert Hoover")

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Description: Hoover, Herbert. Typed letter signed ("Herbert Hoover"), 1 page, (10 x 7 ¼ in.; 254 x 184 mm.) "Washington" 7 March 1920 to Hon. James D. Phelan, United States Senate, Washington, D.C. Letter tipped to matt; exhibits uneven toning at upper edge from adhesive on verso and toning around borders from previous display. Herbert Hoover prefers to remain neutral when asked to back a political candidate in 1920. The letter reads in full: "My Dear Senator, I am obliged for your letter of this morning and perhaps I suffer from over-conscientiousness. I feel that I should not even appear to be authorizing my name for the nomination. I don't assume that I or any other man can stop people from advocating one for this position, but when I am asked to give even indirect approval to any plan or organization, I fear that even silence might lay my sincerity open to challenge, which I fully recognize that you had not wished to allow to happen. My independence of attitude is based solely on a desire to see the great issues developed in the country, which to me so transcend political position for myself. I realize that such an attitude is not the path toward overwhelming importance of the development of these issues, I cannot pursue any other course." After Warren G. Harding's election to the Presidency, Hoover was appointed U. S. Secretary of Commerce. He would later ascend to the presidency in 1929, despite having no previous elected experience.

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Howe, William.  Letter signed (

Lot 40: Howe, William. Letter signed ("W. Howe") as Commander in Chief of British Forces

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Description: Howe, William. Letter signed ("W. Howe") as Commander in Chief of British Forces, 1 page (8 x 12 ½ in.; 203 x 317 mm.), "Headquarters in New York," 27 May 1777 to "George S. Williams, Esq., Deputy Paymaster General of His Majesty's Forces Halifax." Howe directs funds for fortifications in Nova Scotia for British forces. Minor chipping along edges. British Commander in Chief William Howe directs funds for building and maintaining fortifications at Fort Edward and Fort Cumberland in Nova Scotia during the Revolutionary War. The document reads in part: "By His Excellency The Honorable Sir William Howe, General and Commander in Chief of all His Majesty's Forces within the Colonies laying on the Atlantic Ocean from Nova Scotia to West Florida inclusive. You are hereby directed and required out of such monies as are or shall come to your hands, for the contingent or extraordinary expences of His Majesty's Forces under my Command, to pay, or cause to be paid to, Major General Eyre Massey or his Assigns without deduction the sum of Six Thousand Three Hundred and Ninety Eight Pounds Eleven Shillings and Four Pence Halifax Currency equal to Five Thousand Nine Hundred and Seventy One Pounds, Nineteen Shillings and Eleven Pence Sterling. Being expenditures in the Engineers Department within the Province of Nova Scotia, for setting up Barracks and Storehouses, and other Publick Buildings at Halifax, and for Repairing the Fortifications at Fort Edward and Fort Cumberland from 25th September to 24 December 1776 as per the annexed Accompt. The vouchers for which are lodged with Captain William Spry Commanding Engineer; and for so doing this with the acquittance of the said Major General Eyre Massey or his assigns, shall be your sufficient warrant and discharge." English General William Howe (1729-1814) was Commander-in-chief of the British forces during the American Revolution. Howe, who had first come to America during the Seven Years' War, was generally sympathetic to the American colonies, opposing the Coercive Acts and asserting to his constituents in Parliament that he would resist active duty against the Americans. When called by King George in 1775, however, Howe sailed to America, where he personally led the left wing of the attack on Bunker Hill and replaced Lieutenant General Thomas Gage as Commander-in-Chief of the British Army on October 10, 1775. Knighted that year for his earlier successes, Howe successfully defeated General George Washington in the Battle of Long Island in the summer of 1776, and he ordered the execution of Nathan Hale in September of that year. Despite successfully capturing Philadelphia (which the British held for a short time), Howe, angry over the lack of support for his efforts, resigned his command in 1778 and returned to England.

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Jackson, Andrew.  Printed document signed (

Lot 41: Jackson, Andrew. Printed document signed ("Andrew Jackson")

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Description: Jackson, Andrew. Printed document signed ("Andrew Jackson"), 1 page (10 ¾ x 14 ½ in.; 273 x 368 mm.), being a Benjamin Owen Tyler souvenir copy of a famous letter written by Thomas Jefferson and added to by Andrew Jackson, given as advise to a young man who was named in honor of Jefferson. Minor spotting and chips along the edges. Presidents Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson offer their immortal advice for America's youth. Thomas Jefferson Grotjan, the son of Peter A. Grotjan of Philadelphia and his wife, maintained a warm correspondence with Thomas Jefferson over the years. In 1824, the elderly former President wrote an eloquent letter of advice to his namesake, a facsimile copy of which is printed on this document in full: "Th: Jefferson to Th: Jefferson Grotjan Your affectionate mother requests that I would address to you, as a namesake something which might have a favorable influence on the course of life you have to run. Few words are necessary, with good dispositions on your part. Adore God, reverence and cherish your parents. Love your neighbor as yourself; and your country more than life. Be just. Be true. Murmur not at the ways of Providence, and the life into which you have entered will be the passage to one of eternal and ineffable bliss. And if to the dead it is permitted to care for the things of this world, every action of your life will be under my regards. Farewell. Monticello, Jan. 10, 24" Printed just beneath Jefferson's sage advice, President Andrew Jackson has subscribed his own words of encouragement to the young man (who was age 10 when he met the 7th President of the U.S.) in full: "Although requested by Mr. Grotjan, yet I can add nothing to the admirable advice given to his son by that virtuous patriot and enlightened statesman, Thomas Jefferson. The previous relic which he sent to the young child, contains the purest morality, and inculcates the noblest sentiments. I can only recommend a rigid adherence to them. They will carry him through life safely and respectably; and what is far better, they will carry him through death triumphantly; and we may humbly trust they will secure to all, who in principle and practice adopt them, that crown of immortality described in the Holy Scriptures. Andrew Jackson, Philadelphia, June 9, 1833". Jackson has signed the document in ink beneath his facsimile letter. To the right the document is inscribed in an unknown hand, "To George Henry Moore." Printed vertically along the left margin is the dedication by printer Benjamin Owen Tyler, and on the right margin is a companion statement reading in part: "The sentiments expressed in these letters are worthy of being impressed on the minds of every youth in our country."

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Jefferson, Thomas.  Partly-printed document signed (

Lot 42: Jefferson, Thomas. Partly-printed document signed ("Th: Jefferson") as President

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Description: Jefferson, Thomas. Partly-printed document signed ("Th: Jefferson") as President, 1 page (12 ¼ x 10 ¼ in.; 311 x 260 mm.), on vellum, "Washington," 16 February 1802, countersigned by Secretary of State James Madison. General fading of text and overall wrinkling; wafer seal missing from lower left. President Jefferson grants 327 acres of land appropriated for refugees from the British Provinces of Canada and Nova Scotia. The document states in part: "KNOW YE, That in pursuance of the act of Congress passed on the eighteenth day of February, 1801, entitled 'An Act regulating the grants of Land appropriated for the Refugees from the British Provinces of Canada and Nova Scotia,' there is granted unto Martha Walker a certain tract of land estimated to contain Three Hundred twenty seven acres & fifty six perches...surveyed and located in pursuance of the act above recited: To have and to hold the said described tract of land, with the appurtenances thereof unto the said Martha Walker and assigns forever, subject to the conditions, restrictions and provisions contained in the said recited act."

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Jefferson, Thomas.  Historic letter signed (

Lot 43: Jefferson, Thomas. Historic letter signed ("Th: Jefferson")

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Description: Jefferson, Thomas. Historic letter signed ("Th: Jefferson") 1 page (7 ½ x 9 ¼ in.; 190 x 235 mm.), "Philadelphia," 1 March 1792 to Josiah Bartlett, Governor of the State of New Hampshire, formally announcing the Bill of Rights as part of the Constitution as well as the establishment of the Post Office Department. Minor paper loss at lower corners and bottom center fold. Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson writes to New Hampshire Governor Josiah Bartlett formally announcing the final ratification of the Bill of Rights to the Constitution. Jefferson writes in full: "Sir, I have the honor to find you herein enclosed two Copies duly authenticated, of an act concerning certain fisheries of the United States, and for the regulation and government of the fishermen employed therein; also of an act to establish the Post Office and Post roads within the United States, also the ratification by three fourths of the legislatures of the several States, of certain articles in addition to, an amendment of the Constitution of the United States, proposed by Congress to the said Legislatures; and of being with sentiments of the most perfect respect." Though the U.S. Constitution was designed as an instrument to maintain the new nation as a perpetual union, it failed to guarantee personal freedom. For Americans, the Bill of Rights is a citizen's right to live in liberty and personal freedom. It is America's statement to the world that national independence, without personal liberty, is an empty prize. This letter served as Jefferson's formal announcement to Governor Bartlett of New Hampshire. According to the Papers of Thomas Jefferson at Princeton, New Jersey (Vol. 22), Jefferson reported adoption of the last ten of the proposed twelve Amendments in his circular letter to governors of the states of 1 March 1792, accompanied by the first printing of the Bill of Rights. The Postal Service Act was signed by President Washington on February 20, 1792, establishing the United States Post Office Department, to which Jefferson refers in this letter. Under the act, newspapers would be allowed in the mails at low rates to promote the spread of information across the states. To ensure the sanctity and privacy of the mails, postal officials were forbidden to open any letters in their charge unless they were undeliverable. Finally, Congress assumed responsibility for the creation of postal routes, ensuring that mail routes would help lead expansion and development instead of only serving existing communities.

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Jefferson, Thomas.  Manuscript document (unsigned)

Lot 44: Jefferson, Thomas. Manuscript document (unsigned)

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Description: Jefferson, Thomas. Manuscript document (unsigned), 1 page, (10 x 7 ¾ in. 254 x 196.85 mm.) 31 Aug. 1790 on verso in a contemporaneous hand, "Mr. Jefferson's Instructions". Professional archival reinforcement to the folds on verso. Jefferson has penned a listing of items bound for Monticello, with a ghosting of an apparently unpublished memorandum in Jefferson's hand as an ink offset on the blank portions of the note. Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson inventories his goods bound for Monticello as the new American government moves from New York to Philadelphia. Jefferson lists his property and, when necessary, includes the respective dimensions and volume (cubic feet). Jefferson pens in full: "No 1. Paper press. 26.I [nches]. Cube. 10 cubs. feet 2. Pembroke tables. 36I. 26I. 31I. 15 ½ [cubic feet] 3. Press under part. 57I. 26I. 27I. 23 ¼ [cubic feet] 4. [Press] upper part. 58I. 56I. 18I. 34 ½ [cubic feet] 5. Side board. 64I. 42I. 32I 50 [cubic feet] 6. Dining tables 58I. 33I. 26I. 31 [cubic feet] 7. Chair 56I. 29I. 29I. 25 ½ [cubic feet] 8. Working table 39I. 33I. 7I. 3 ¾ [cubic feet] 9. Cask of coffee containing about 100 lb. 10. Box earthen ware, some chine [sp.], candlesticks, four barrels/one box containing 58 bacon hams, a hogshead, about a gross of empty bottles, 10 bottles cyder [sp.], handirons &c, mattresses, Servants beadsteads, kitchen tables, 5 pr. simple chairs, mahogany in mats[?] 6. arm chairs d[itt]o, 1 green stool, 30 green chairs & 1 green stool, two boxes of Mr. Madison's." The 1790 ink date most certainly related to Jefferson's departure from New York City, the temporary seat of federal government from March 1789 to December of 1790. Following Washington's August 30 departure from Mount Vernon, Jefferson prepared for his own return to Monticello on the first of September. Accompanied by James Madison, Jefferson spent nearly two months in Virginia before establishing himself at the new seat of the federal government in Philadelphia. In light of this relocation, the inclusion of two boxes belonging to his traveling companion, James Madison, and the fact that Jefferson lists only 18 Windsor chairs in his plans for the layout of the comparatively small Philadelphia residence he rented from Thomas Leiper, our lengthy inventory found its way to Monticello after its shipment from Paris. Records at Monticello indicating that 28 Windsor chairs were found in the waiting hall of Jefferson's sprawling Virginia home add further evidence that this list is bound for that residence.

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Jefferson, Thomas. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 45: Jefferson, Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Th. Jefferson") as President

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Description: Jefferson, Thomas. Autograph letter signed ("Th. Jefferson") as President, 1 page (8 x 9 ½ in.; 203 x 241 mm.), "Monticello" 2 July 1820 to "Mr. Geo. A. Otis". Address overleaf in Jefferson's hand, "Mr. George A. Otis / Philadelphia." Minor foxing; separations at folds and paper loss on address overleaf has been expertly mended. Jefferson praises the "holy enthusiasm for liberty and independence of nations." characterizing liberty and independence as holy, the American cause in the Revolution as the "better" one, and stating the need of the U.S. to understand the new face of Europe in order to "keep clear" of entanglements. Jefferson writes in full: "I thank you for De Pradt's book on the Congress of Aix la Chappelle. It is a work I had never seen, and had much wished to see. Altho' his style has too much of amphibology [complex grammar] to be suited to the sober precision of Politics, yet we gather from him great outlines, and profound views of the new constitution of Europe, and of its probable consequences. These are things we should understand to know how to keep clear of them. I am glad to find that the excellent history of Botta is at length translated. The merit of this work has been too long unknown with us. He has had the faculty of sifting the truth of facts from our own histories, with great judgment, of suppressing details which do not make a part of the general history, and of enlivening the whole with the constant glow of his holy enthusiasm for the liberty & independence of nations. Neutral as an historian should be in the relation of facts, he is never neutral in his feelings, nor in the warm expression of them, on the triumphs and reverses of the conflicting parties, and of his honest sympathies with that engaged in the better cause. Another merit is in the accuracy of his narrative of those portions of the same war which passed in other quarters of the globe and especially on the ocean. We must thank him too for having brought within the compass of 3 vols. everything we wish to know of that war, and in a style as engaging that we cannot lay the book down. He had been so kind as to send me a copy of his work, of which I shall manifest my acknowledgment by sending him your volumes as they come out. My original being lent out, I have no means of collating it with the translation; but see no cause to doubt exactness. With my request to become a subscriber to your work be pleased to accept the assurance of my great respect." The Congress of Aix-la-Chapelle, held in the autumn of 1818, was a meeting of the four allied powers of Britain, Austria, Prussia and Russia to end the evacuation of France, make decisions about their alliance, discuss the governance of Europe, and consider the military measures, if any, to be adopted as a precaution against a fresh outburst on the part of France. The Abbe Dominique de Pradt was a chaplain and confidant of Napoleon who was well known for his political writings. His book After the Congress of Aix-la-Chapelle dealt with how the political map of Europe was constituted in the wake of the Congress. Otis sent Jefferson a copy. Jefferson's own "holy enthusiasm for the liberty & independence of nations," expressed in his engagement in the service of the "better cause" in the American Revolution, defined his life, created a nation, and brought hope to peoples everywhere that they too could be free. Liberty was Jefferson's highest value, and he dedicated his life to bringing it to his fellow-countrymen and promoting it around the world. In the Declaration of Independence, he stated liberty was so fundamental that the right to it could not be taken or given away, specifying as inalienable "Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." This letter was formerly the property of the Natick, Massachusetts Historical Society and was deaccessioned in 2004.

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Johnson, Andrew.  Letter signed (

Lot 46: Johnson, Andrew. Letter signed ("Andrew Johnson") as Military Governor of Tennessee

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Description: Johnson, Andrew. Letter signed ("Andrew Johnson") as Military Governor of Tennessee, 3 pages (8 x 9 ¾ in.; 203 x 247 mm.), on "State of Tennessee - Executive Department" letterhead, 8 November 1862 written to President Abraham Lincoln. Johnson describes the events in Tennessee, his defense of those taken from Eastern Tennessee to fight for the Union cause, and raising further forces locally. Moisture stains on the left margin with staple holes at upper left; archival reinforcement at horizontal folds. In a last ditch appeal to President Lincoln, Andrew Johnson asks that Federal troops be allowed to remain in pro-Union East Tennessee. The letter reads in full; Johnson's handwritten corrections in bold : "His Excellency Abraham Lincoln President of the Unites States Washington City. More than a week ago I inspected a former dispatch in regard to Gen'l George W. Morgan's Division being ordered to Virginia. The courier, who took it from this place has been arrested by the enemy and the inference is that he has been hung. I must again press the propriety, justice, and even humanity of sending that portion of Gen'l Morgan's command composed of the East Tennessee to Tennessee, for the purpose of redeeming the Eastern part of the state, and avenging the intolerable wrong which has been inflicted upon them by heartless and relentless traitors. It would be cruel in the extreme to have the East Tennessee Regiments away from their homes and defense of their families, when they are willing and more than anxious to restore the Government, and at the same time protect their wives and children against insult, robbery, murder and inhuman oppression. I ask in the name of all that is right, magnanimous and patriotic, that these Regiments be permitted to return. There are many things that I will advise you of in a short time since my location here. We have had numerous commandants placed at this Post - some of them have been tolerable, others intolerable, but the one now in command General Nighy, who was left here by General Buell in his disgraceful retreat from Alabama and Tennessee, has done us more harm than all others and is wholly unfitted for the place. Under all the disadvantageous circumstances, I have succeeded in raising one Regiment of Cavalry [5th Tennessee Cavalry, officially mustered into service just seven days later] under command of Col. Wm. B. Stokes, which has rendered important service, also one fine Regiment of Infantry under command of Col. Alvin C. Gillen of the Army now acting as Provost Guard of the City. Col. Gillen is an officer of the regular Army, transferred by the War Department to command the 1st Middle Tennessee Infantry. He is an intelligent and efficient officer, and will make a good Brigadier General. I recommend and ask that he be appointed at once as such. He will fight, a quality very much needed by many of our officers. There are some Brigades here without Brigadier Generals, and as soon as our army can move forward we will form a Tennessee Brigade of Middle Tennesseans. I hope you will lay this dispatch before the Secretary of War and Genl. Halleck. Thisdispatch will be sent through by Benjamin C. Truman who leaves here with it and will see you in Washn. Andrew Johnson Mil. Gov." Secession and civil war had sharply divided Tennesseans during the tumultuous war period. The split was largely regional, East Tennessee standing by the Union, while central and West Tennessee favored secession. After the firing on Fort Sumter, East Tennessee counties maneuvered to leave Tennessee and adhere to the Union, but Confederate military occupation there squelched the effort. Paradoxically, while Confederate military forces were driven from heavily pro-Confederate West and central Tennessee during the first two years of the war, Confederate military control long remained in pro-Union East Tennessee, which contributed more volunteers to Federal than to Confederate armies. By March of 1862, Federal military advances in the Western part of the state afforded President Lincoln the opportunity to appoint a military governor. Lincoln chose Andrew Johnson, who had previously served as civil governor (1853-57) and U.S. Senator (1857-62) from Tennessee. He was the logical choice. Arriving with the rank of brigadier general, Johnson's orders were to re-establish federal authority in the state and maintain peace and security pending restoration of civil government. Fully empowered to discharge executive, legislative, and judicial functions, Governor Johnson moved forcefully to rid the state of Confederate influence. He dismissed officeholders unwilling to take an oath of allegiance to the federal government, closed down anti-Union newspapers, arrested clergymen for promoting the Confederacy from the pulpit, seized the railroads, and levied taxes. He constructed and guarded from sabotage the railroad extending from Nashville to the Tennessee River, a vital link in the Union supply line. In a valiant show of resistance, Governor Johnson remained in Nashville as the capital city several times nearly fell under a determined Confederate siege.

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Johnson, Andrew.  Presidential Pardon Signed (

Lot 47: Johnson, Andrew. Presidential Pardon Signed ("Andrew Johnson")

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Description: Johnson, Andrew. Presidential Pardon Signed ("Andrew Johnson"), 1 page (8 ¼ x 10 ¾ in.; 209 x 273 mm.), "Washington," 25 October 1866. Minor foxing; small tape remnants on verso. President Andrew Johnson pardons the Confederate Secretary of the Treasury. The document reads in full: "I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to a Warrant for the pardon of George A. Trenholm. Dated this day, and signed by me and for so doing this shall be his warrant. [signed] Andrew Johnson". George Trenholm was a prominent politician in the Confederate States of America and served as the Secretary of the Treasury during its final year. Trenholm fled Richmond with the rest of the government in April 1865 and went south as far as Fort Mill, South Carolina. Due to illness he asked CSA President Jefferson Davis to accept his resignation, which Davis accepted with his thanks on April 27, 1865. He was later briefly imprisoned at Fort Pulaski in Georgia before being pardoned by President Andrew Johnson as executed by this very document.

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Johnson, Lyndon B.  Inscribed book as Vice President to President John F. Kennedy

Lot 48: Johnson, Lyndon B. Inscribed book as Vice President to President John F. Kennedy

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Description: Johnson, Lyndon B. Inscribed book as Vice President to President John F. Kennedy (Christmas, 1962). Lyndon Johnson inscribes a copy of Ranger Mosby, by Virgil Carrington Jones - a full-length biography of the great scout and cavalry leader. In original pictorial dust jacket which exhibits some mild chipping. Lyndon B. Johnson Ranger Mosby book inscribed to President John F. Kennedy Christmas, 1962. On the front free end paper, Johnson writes in full: "Mr. President May this territory which was the scene of conflict in 1863 be one of peace and repose in 1963 and onward for you and your family. Lyndon B. Johnson Christmas 1962." This is a significant item. First, there is the extraordinary association between the two men, combined with the rarity of handwritten material by Vice President / President Lyndon B. Johnson. Also, there is the association made between the Civil War (1863) and the then-current civil rights conflicts in. And finally, there is expressed Johnson's hope that 1963 will be a time "of peace and repose...and onward for you and your family". A startling statement, for 1963 would be a year of brutal death for the President and grief for his family. Ex-Evelyn Lincoln collection.

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Johnson, Lyndon B. Typed letter signed (

Lot 49: Johnson, Lyndon B. Typed letter signed ("Lyndon B. Johnson")

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Description: Johnson, Lyndon B. Typed letter signed ("Lyndon B. Johnson") 1 page (7 x 1 0 ½ in.; 177 x 266 mm.) LBJ stationery with embossed American Eagle crest, "Austin, Texas," 14 July 1970 to LBJ's grandson, Patrick Lyndon Nugent. Mounting remnants on verso. Accompanied by related (14 ½ x 11 in.; 368 x 279 mm.) color photo. Photo exhibits a crack down the center as well as cracking in the emulsion on the light border. Lyndon B. Johnson sends an affectionate letter and photo to his grandson in remembrance of a car trip to the historical dedication of Johnson's birthplace. Johnson writes in full: "Dear Lyn: When I was the age you are in this picture my father drove a car like this one. In those days it was one of man's latest inventions. Now in 1970 man's flight to the moon is the most recent transportation wonder. Still astonished as I am, I cannot imagine that voyages may be in store for you between now and the time you reach my age. This letter and these pictures, taken on June 13, 1970 at the time you went with us to attend the dedication of my birthplace as an Historical Site by the Secretary of the Interior, Mr. Walter J. Hickel, are sent to remind you when you are grown no matter how and where you travel in miles and accomplishments, it is good to remember your heritage, to appreciate the roots from which you sprang, to maintain contact with family and return from time to time to the place of your origin. Little man that you are now, you are a great joy to me, and I think you will go far. With a heart full of love from Your grandfather Lyndon B. Johnson" The accompanying color photo shows Johnson and Grandson in an antique automobile arriving at the function described in the letter.

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Jones, John Paul.  Autograph letter signed (

Lot 50: Jones, John Paul. Autograph letter signed ("J. Paul Jones")

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Description: Jones, John Paul. Autograph letter signed ("J. Paul Jones"), 2 pages, (6 ¼ x 7 ¾ in.; 158 x 196 mm.), "L'Orient, August 17, 1785" to "His Excellency Thomas Jefferson Esq.r Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States, Paris". Docketed on the second page by Thomas Jefferson "Jones. J.P. Aug. 17. 1785./recd. Aug. 21. 1785". Additional light docketing in an unknown hand. On watermarked laid paper showing uniform light foxing. Captain John Paul Jones writes to Thomas Jefferson urging him to help his crew on the Alliance receive the prize money due them - in 1779 they had fought with the Bonhomme Richard to capture the Serapis. Jones pens in full: "I am still waiting for a decision respecting the claim of Mr. Puchilberg. But I think it my duty to inform you that one or two of the common sailors that served on board the Alliance when that Frigate was under my Orders are now here in a Merchant Vessel, and, as I am this moment informed, they have been persuaded to write to Mr. Puchilberg desiring that their share in the Prizes may not be sent to America but paid to them here. This, I am told, has been urged as a reason to the Marechal to induce him to decide in favour of Mr. Puchilberg's claim. Those two Men will however sail in a day or two for Boston, and perhaps may never return to France: Besides their objection is too triffling [sic] to be admitted, as it would greatly injure the other persons both Officers and Men of that Crew, who would in all probabillity [sic] never receive any part of their Prize Money unless they should come from America to L'Orient on purpose; which would not pay their expenses. As the Post is just going, I must defer answering the Letter you did me the honor to write me on the 3d till another opportunity. [Jones added in a postscript in the left margin of the second page]: "NB. I beg you therefore to write again to the/Marechal de Castries". Following his service during the American Revolution, Captain John Paul Jones was authorized by Congress to collect from France monies owed to the United States as a direct result of his naval operations. Jones reached an impasse with M. Clouet, the Marine Minister at L'Orient, over the payment of prize money to the American members of the crew of Alliance. L'Orient is a seaport on the southern coast of Brittany in northwestern France, about 310 miles southwest of Paris. Alliance was part of the small Franco-American squadron commanded by Jones at the Battle of Flamborough Head (where the Bonhomme Richard captured Serapis), and her captain, Pierre Landais, was French-born. Capitalizing on this pretext and exploiting the impatience of the crew to collect their booty, a French merchant named Puchilberg managed, as Jones reported to Jefferson on July 29, 1785, to produce "a Letter of Attorney, which he obtained from the officers and Men of that Frigate when their Minds were unsettled, authorizing him to Receive their Share in the Prizes". In that same letter Jones requested that Jefferson write to the Marquis Charles de Castries, the French Secretary of State of the Navy "to obtain an explicit Order...to Mr. Clouet to pay into my hands the whole Mass of the Prize-Money that appears due the Alliance." Originally named "Hancock," the frigate was launched on April 28, 1778, and renamed "Alliance" on May 29, 1778 by resolution of the Continental Congress. The new frigate's first assignment was to carry Lafayette back to France to petition the French Court for increased support in the American struggle for independence. On August 17, 1785, the day Capt. John Paul Jones wrote this letter to Thomas Jefferson, Jefferson wrote to both French Secretary of State of the Navy Marquis Charles de Castries about settling the claims and then this letter to Capt. Jones: "Mine of the 13th informed you that I had written to the M. de Castries on the subject of Puchilberg's interference. Yesterday I received his answer dated the 12th. In that, he says that he is informed by the 'Ordonnateur' that he has not been able to get an authentic roll of the crew of the Alliance, and that, in the probable case of there having been some French subjects among them, it will be just that you should give security to repay their portions. I wrote to him this morning, that as you have obliged yourself to transmit the money to the treasury of the United States, it does not seem just to require you to be answerable for money which will be no longer within your power; that the repayment of such portions will be incumbent on Congress; that I will immediately solicit their orders to have all such claims paid by their banker here: and that should any be presented before I receive their orders, I will undertake to direct the banker of the United States to pay them, that there may be no delay. I trust that this will remove the difficulty, and that it is the last which will be offered. The ultimate answer shall be communicated the moment I receive it. Having pledged myself for the claims which may be offered, before I receive the orders of Congress, it is necessary to arm myself with the proper checks. Can you give me a roll of the crew, pointing out the French subjects? If not, can you recollect personally the French subjects, and name them to me, and the sums they are entitled to? If there were none such, yet the roll will be material, because I have no doubt that Puchilberg will excite claims upon me, either true or false." On August 30, 1785, Jefferson wrote to John Jay, U.S. Secretary for Foreign Affairs, about his solution to Capt. Jones' difficulties. In part, "I enclose you a correspondence which has taken place between the Marechal de Castries, minister of the Marine, and myself. It is on the subject of the prize money due to the officers and crew of the Alliance, for prizes taken in Europe, under the command of Captain Jones. That officer has been here, under the direction of Congress, near two years soliciting the liquidation and payment of that money...A Mr. Puchilberg presented powers to receive the money...The M. de Castries doubted the authority of Captain Jones to receive it, and wrote to me for information...I saw but one way to cut short these everlasting delays, which were ruining the officer soliciting the payment of the money, and keeping our seamen out of what they had hardly fought for, years ago. This was, to undertake to ask an order from Congress, for the payment of any French claimants by their banker in Paris; and, in the meantime, to undertake to order such payment, should any such claimant prove his title, before the pleasure of Congress should be made known to me."

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