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Auction Description for Profiles in History: Property of a Distinguished American Private Collector IV

Property of a Distinguished American Private Collector IV

(111 Lots)

by Profiles in History


111 lots with images

July 11, 2014

Live Auction

26662 Agoura Rd

Calabasas, CA, 91302 USA

Phone: 310-859-7701

Email: info@profilesinhistory.com

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Adams, John, Second President. Fine autograph letter signed (

Lot 1: Adams, John, Second President. Fine autograph letter signed ("J. Adams"), 3 pages, 12 April 1807.

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Description: 1. Adams, John, Second President. Fine autograph letter signed (“J. Adams”), 3 pages (9 x 7.25 in.; 229 x 184 mm). Quincy, 12 April 1807 to Benjamin Rush regarding the fate of Pennsylvania amid all the political turmoil of the times; with integral address leaf addressed to: “Dr. Benjamin Rush, Philadelphia” and red wax seal remnant on third page, with Adams’ free frank, docketed by Rush “Quincy, Apl. 13th. 1807  Free” and “J. Adams”. Former President John Adams worries about the fate of Pennsylvania, particularly in light of the enormous political influence of men such as Adams’ enemy, former Vice President Aaron Burr.Benjamin Rush had served as a member of the Continental Congress (1776, 1777) and was a signer of the Declaration of Independence.  At the time of this letter, he was serving as Treasurer of the U.S. Mint (1797-1813), appointed by President John Adams; it was Adams who mediated the reconciliation between Rush and Thomas Jefferson after both had retired from active politics.  A reflective Adams, now retired in Quincy after years of public service, writes freely to his close friend.  Adams writes in full: Dear Sir,  Your favour of the third is received.  I am willing to allow your Philosophers your Opinion of the universal Gravitation of Matter, if you will allow mine that there is in Some Souls a principle of absolute Levity that buoys them irres[is]tably into the Clouds.  Whether you call it etherial [sic] Spirit or inflammable air it has an uncontrollable Tendency to ascend, and has no capacity to ascertain the height at which it aims or the means by which it is to rise.  This I take to be precisely the Genius of Burr, Miranda and Hamilton, among a thousand others of less or more Note.  These Creatures have no Prudence.  If a Man is once So disarranged in his Intellect as to deliberate upon a Project of ascending to the Seven Starrs, it is natural enough that he should first attempt to Seize the two Horns of the New Moon and make her his first Stage. Burr’s project of making himself V.P. of U.S. to a reasonable Man would have appeared an high degree of Extravagance, for there were ten thousand Men in the United States, who were as well qualified for it and had merited it by much greater Services, Sufferings and Sacrifices.  Yet in this he succeeded.  Buoyed up by the flattery of the Presbyterians in Connecticutt, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and all the Southern States, from the Veneration in which they held his Father and Grandfather, the Factions of Clintons and Livingstons alternately employed him as their Instrument, till the Virginians conceived the Project of engaging him to corrupt the State of New York from the Federal Interest.  In this They and he succeeded: but all the rest of his Projects have been whimsical and without Success.  What could have inspired Burr with hopes of being an Ambassador, a Chief Justice of Pensilvania [sic] or a Governor of New York or Vice P. of U.S.? Omnia Numina Absunt, Sui absit Prudentia.  Prudence is the first of Virtues and the root of all others.  Without Prudence, there may be abstinence but not Temperance; there may be rashness but not Fortitude; there may be insensibility or obstinancy but not Patience. Without Prudence, to weigh and deliberate on the Nature and consequences of an Enterprise, and to consider his means and his End, a Man who engages in it, commits himself to Chance, and not Seldom when a thousand Chances are against him to one in his favour. I pity my old Friend, [Thomas] McKean [(1734-1817) - signer of the Declaration of Independence, Chief Justice of Pennsylvania (served 1777-99) and Governor of Pennsylvania (served 1799-1808)].  Like many others of our Antedeluvian Patriarchs he was carried away into Error by the French Revolution and delivered himself into the hands of a Party with whom he never could cordially cooperate.  In the Time of Robespierre [(1758-1794) - French revolutionary leader responsible for much of the Reign of Terror] and his bloodyest Cruelties I dined once in Company with McKean, [Albert] Gallatin [(1761-1849) - Secretary of the Treasury (served 1801-14)] and Burr and they were all very loud in praise of Robespierre.  ‘He was honest, and the Savior of France.’  Some of the Company presumed to censure their Patriot and Hero, and all three of these Gentlemen cried out Robespierre’s Crime is his Honesty.  How many Instances do We See every day which prove that Honesty is not the best Policy.  They have all of them tried a different Policy, but I believe they will all come to a sad End and find at last that Honesty would havebeen a better Policy.I now come to a Mystery in your Letter.  I have but four Grandsons; two of them are Boys under Seven Years of Age [George Washington Adams (1801-1829) and John Adams II (1803-1834)] and have been at my House and in Boston all Winter.  They are the Children of my son John [Quincy Adams (1767-1848)]; the two others are Sons of my Daughter [Abigail - or Nabby] Smith [(1765-1813)], the youngest of whom whose name is John [Adams Smith (1788-1854)] is now with me, and has not been in Philadelphia since last May; the oldest is William [Steuben Smith (1787-1850)] Now to my great grief in Trinidad.  No Letter therefore can have been left at your House from any Grandson of mine.  I cannot unriddle this Mystery but by Supposing that some adventurer has forgot a Letter: but for what End I know not.  I thank you with all my heart for your kind Intentions towards my Supposed Grandson.  They are as authentic proofs of Friendship, as if it had been my real Grandson. Pennsylvania can fall down on one broadside and then roll over to the other Broadside, and then turn Mast upwards and then right her self up again.  She is a Ship however so violently addicted to pitching and rolling that I should not wonder if she dismasted herself. To quit the figure and Speak plain English I have long thought that the first Serious civil War in America will commence in Pensilvania [sic].  The two Nations of Irish and Germans who compose the principal Part of the People, are so entirely governed by their Passions, have So little reason and less Knowledge that it will be impossible to keep them steady in any just System of Policy.  They will one day repent in Sac[k]cloth [a coarse cloth, made of goats› hair, worn as a symbol of penitence] the ascendency they have given to the Transaleganian [Trans-Alleghanian, i.e., the states containing the Allegheny Mountains - Pennsylvania, Maryland and Virginia] and Southern Atlantic States [North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia] and So will New York.  But So contagious is Folly that we in the Mass[achusetts]. are running the Same Course.  I do not believe how even that Sullivan, if he should be chosen, will harmonize long with his Party.  Not half so long as McKean has.  He is in heart and in head no more of a Democrat than McKean.  I have known him not much less than forty years.  He has never been a steady nor a [obscured by wax seal] Man.  But he is not malevolent Enough for his Party nor ignorant.  His general aim has been to be of the Strongest Side and consequently has often offended all Parties at times. I should be glad to receive your explication of the Strange Story of my Grandson.  You do not say that the Letter was from Col. Smith.  What can the Tenet be? My Family reciprocate the friendly Sentiments of yours and none of them more heartily than J. Adams The election of 1800 turned into a contentious drawn out affair and weighed upon Adam enormously. Little wonder that years after the election of 1800, Adams continued to harbor great resentment at the powers wielded by Burr in influencing the outcome of the New York elections.Provenance: Christie’s New York, 19 May 1995, lot 2. $15,000 - $20,000

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Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, Quincy, 13 and 15 October 1810, to Dr. Benjamin Rush.

Lot 2: Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, Quincy, 13 and 15 October 1810, to Dr. Benjamin Rush.

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Description: 2. Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (8.85 x 7.15 in.; 225 x 181mm), Quincy, 13 and 15 October 1810, to Dr. Benjamin Rush; red wax seal remnant on verso of third page.John Adams continues his running argument with Benjamin Rush over the need to include Greek and Latin in the curriculum of American schools and gloomily comments on American politics.Adams writes in part: Mrs Adams says she is willing you should discredit Greek and Latin, because it will destroy the foundation of all the Pretensions of the Gentlemen to Superiority over the Ladies, and restore Liberty, Equality and fraternity between the Sexes. What does Mrs Rush think of this? . . .Suppose we should agree to study the original languages especially the Arabic, instead of Greek and Latin. This would not please the Ladies so well, but it would gratify Hobbes much better. According to many present appearances in the world many useful lessons and deep maxims might be learned from the Asiatic writers. There are great Models of Heroes and Conquerors fit for the Imitation of the Emperors of Britain and France. Adams proceeds to quote from the Life of Timur-Bec, volume 1 page 202: . . . “He has been often heard to say, that it was neither agreeable or decent, that the habitable world should be governed by two Kings: according to the words of the Poet, ‘as there is but one God, there ought to be but one King, all the Earth being very small in comparison of the Ambition of a great Prince.’” Where can you find in any Greek or Roman writer a sentiment so sublime and edifying for George and Napoleon. There are some faint traces of it in the conduct of Alexander and Caesar but far less frank and noble, and these have been imprudently branded with Infamy by Greek and Roman orators and Historians. There is an abundance more of such profound Instruction in the Life of this Tamerlane as well as in that of Gengizcan [Genghis Kahn], both of which I believe Napoleon has closely studied. With Homer in one Pocket, Caesar’s Commentaries in the other Quintus Curtius under his pillow and the Lives of Mahomet Gengizcan and Tamerlane in his Port Folio . . . this Man has formed himself: but the Classics among them have damped his ardor and prevented his rising as yet to the lofty Heights of the Asiatic Emperors. Would it not be better that George and Napoleon should forget all their Classicks mount at once to all sublimities of Mahomet Gengizcan and Tamerlane? In that case one or the other must soon succumb and would it not be better that one such should govern the globe than two?Adams continues his letter with great wit to Dr. Rush on 15 October with mention of his invention, a tranquilizing chair, designed to be a replacement for a straightjacket: The Tranquilliser is a very ingenuious Mechanical Invention and I hope will be beneficial to that most deplorable Portion of our Species. But to be serious, if I were possessed of Sovereign Power over your Hospital, (provided I could do it secretly so that no Mortal should know it, but you and I), I would put you into your own Tranquilliser, till I cured you of you Fanaticism against Greek and Latin.Adams sums up Rush’s position on the Classics: My friend you will labour in vain. As the Love of Science and the Taste for the fine Arts increases in the World, the Admiration of Greek and Roman Science and Litterature [sic] will increase. Both are increasing very fast. Your Labours will be as useless as those of Tom Paine against the Bible, which are already fallen dead and almost forgotten.Adams then turns to political topics in his letter. On American finance, he succinctly states: Our Financial System and our Banks are a Species of fraudulent opposition upon the Community. But you would think me mad enough for your Tranquillising Chair if I should say there is no remedy but to return to a circulating Medium of Gold and Silver only. Commerce has in all times made wild work with elections, but it never invented so artful a scheme of corruption for that purpose as our American Banks. With more than a bit of gloom, Adams closes his letter: At times I see nothing to prevent our country both North and South America from becoming in another century if not this, a Theatre for Gengizcans, Mahomets, Tamerlanes, Charlemagnes, Napoleons, Burrs and Hamiltons. Our People are the shrewdest and most sagacious, that I know: but yet they are so easily deceived; and are in fact so universally deceived in many essential Points, that they afford no certain Resource for honest and able Men: and for what I see, they will not open their eyes till they themselves will be obliged to have recourse to the Ratio Ultima Popularum Rerum Publicarum et Regum. We know how this always ends ...An extraordinary letter that clearly reveals Adams’ candor, wit, brilliance and prescience.Provenance: Sotheby’s New York, 31 October 1985, lot 46. $12,000 - $15,000

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Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, Quincy, 12 February 1818, to I. Le Ray de Chaumont.

Lot 3: Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, Quincy, 12 February 1818, to I. Le Ray de Chaumont.

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Description: 3. Adams, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages (10 x 8 in.; 254 x 203 mm.), Quincy, 12 February 1818, to I. Le Ray de Chaumont, Esqr., President of the Agricultural Society of Jefferson County, New York; some splitting along vertical and horizontal folds, crude repair to verso not affecting any characters.President John Adams reveals his love of agriculture and contrasts the industry of agriculture with the indolent lifestyle of fellow diplomat Benjamin Franklin forty years ago.Adams writes in full:I have received and read with pleasure an Address to the Agricultural Society of Jefferson County in the State of New York, and as I know not from whom it came who should I thank for it, but its author. I rejoice in every new Society which has Agriculture for its object, and see with delight that the spirit is spreading through the United States. If I could worship any of the heathen Gods it would be old Saturn because I believe him to be only an Allegorical Personification of Agriculture, and the Children he devoured to be only his own Grapes & Figs, Apples & Pears, Wheat and Barley . I agree with you, in the main, in every Sentiment, particularly relative to Grapes and Corn. Yet we cannot have perfect Roast Beef nor perfect Roast Spareribs nor perfect Poultry without Maise. We must therefore sacrifice a little Luxury to a great deal of public good. From the style of this address I should not have suspected it to have been written by any other than a Native of this country. Thirty nine years ago, I little thought I should live to see the Heir apparent to the Princely Palaces and Gardens of Passy my Fellow Citizen in the Republican Wilderness of America laying the Foundation of more ample domains and perhaps more splendid Palaces. I observed the Motto of the Hotel de Valentinois which I had then the honor to inhabit “Se sta bene non se move” - ‘If you stand well, stand still.’ But you have proved the Maxim not to be infallible. And I rejoice in it. The Civilities I received from Your Family interest me so much in their Happiness that any Information of it would in­ crease that of your Sincere Well Wisher and most humble servant. Without calling him by name, Adams has made a snide reference to Benjamin Franklin, his companion and fellow negotiator almost four decades earlier, calling him ...the Heir apparent to the Princely Palaces and Gardens of Passy. Franklin, who stayed at the Hotel de Valentino was at Passy for nine years––from 1776-1785 and was joined there by John Adams in April, 1778. The two also served as commissioners negotiating peace with Great Britain in 1781. With his biased retrospective viewpoint, the aging Adams has contrasted the industriousness of agricultural concerns with his recollections of the indolent and lazy Franklin feasting at the dinner table at Passy. He has only praise for the new Agricultural Society, and harbors little fondness, even forty years later, for Franklin. Adams, in further mentioning Franklin as ...my Fellow Citizen in the Republican Wilderness of America laying the Foundation of more ample domains and perhaps more splendid Palaces, is probably referring to Franklin’s unrealistic hope, still voiced in 1778-79, that Congress would honor land claims of the Vandalia Company in the Ohio River territory. $8,000 - $12,000

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Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 4: Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed ("J.Q. Adams"), 1 page, Boston, 26 November 1841.

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Description: 4. Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed (“J.Q. Adams”), 1 page (10 x 7.87 in.; 254 x 200 mm.), Boston, 26 November 1841, to William Hayden, Editor of the Atlas Boston.Commenting on the current war between Great Britain and China––a conflict with elements similar to those of the American Revolutionary War, John Quincy Adams involes the hallowed words of the Declaration of Independence as he sides with the Chinese.Adams writes in full: Dear Sir I pray you to accept my thanks, for your obliging offer to publish in the Atlas, the lecture recently delivered by me, on the War between Great Britain and China. Previous engagements have taken from me the disposal of the manuscript which I should otherwise cheerfully place at yours -As to the precise grounds assumed by the Lecturer, for the cornerstone of his argument with regard to the justice of the cause, they are contained in the following words––“We hold these truths to be self evident - that all men are created equal - that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable rights - that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”- If the Lecturer has failed in showing the application of these principles to the vitals of the present issue between Great Britain and China, he has failed to accomplish his task, but the fault is neither in the premises, nor in the link of adamant between them and his conclusion. Very respectfully, your obed Serv’ J Q. Adams.First the British War with China (1841-42), erupted over the monopolistic system of maritime trade employed by the Cantonese government in an effort to stave off further British imperialism in the area, and to curtail the spread of mercantilism. The conflict began with British occupation of Chusan and the Canton River forts, followed by the seizure of several coastal ports and Chinkiang on the Grand Canal. On 29 August 1842, the Treaty of Nanking was signed, reversing the former protectionist trade policies and ceding control of Hong Kong to the British.During this time, Adams was serving as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives––the only former President to do so. As a seasoned statesman, he was in great demand as a speaker and lecturer in his native state of Massachusetts, and throughout New England as well. $5,000 - $8,000

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[American and English Literature.] A fine group of eight letters and documents.

Lot 5: [American and English Literature.] A fine group of eight letters and documents.

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Description: 5. [American and English Literature.] A fine group of eight letters and documents ranging in size by American and English authors including: Cooper, Fenimore J. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages octavo, [no place no date], to My Dear Sayd regarding personal matters of visitations; accompanied by an envelope with a thirteen-line poem to his correspondent.Collins, Wilkie. Autograph quotation signed, 1 page octavo, 5 April 1869. Collins copies a quote from Moonstone: Then I saw the raging sea, and the rollers tumbling in on the sand banks, and the driven rain sweeping over the waters like a flying garment 7 the yellow wilderness of the beach, with one solitary black figure standing on it—the figure of Sergeant Cuff! Moonstone became a sensational 19th century novel and is now generally considered to be the very first full-length mystery in the English language. Doyle, Sir Arthur Conan. Autograph letter signed (“Arthur Conan Doyle”), 1 page octavo, [no place, no date], on Old Ship Hotel, Brighton letterhead stationery to O.P. Heggie. Doyle expresses his like for his performance of Sherlock Holmes. O.P. Heggie played Holmes at London’s Strand Theater. Doyle, author of Sherlock Holmes, rarely wrote about his works.Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages octavo, Concord, Massachusetts, 30 August 1854 to Mr. Wilder. Emerson apologizing for his delay in response to the recipients’ kind note, but he has been quite busy.Kipling, Rudyard. Two autograph letters signed (“Ruddy”), 5 pages octavo, Lahore, [India] and Waite, Vermont, 2 October 1884 and 11 March 1895 to Dearest Lizzie and the editor of “Ovation”. The first concerns his first book published for general circulation, Echoes, and life in Lahore. The author writes in part: Did I tell you how my little book of poems has come to be a success—I might almost write a great success. The papers have given me some really handsome Reviews…London, Jack. Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, Oakland, California, 15 January 1900 to [Ellen] Lenore [Lake], with a postscript in London’s hand. He writes to a friend he met in high school. In part: How pleased I was to hear from you. My heart often harks back to the old high school days; but the majority of those I knew then seem to have forgotten me. Yeats, William Butler. Autograph letter signed (“W B Yeats”), 2 pages octavo, [London], 31 January [1923], on imprinted stationery of the Savile Club to Lady Gregory, Galway, Ireland. He expresses how he will write a poem and think things out in order to get away from the shots and bombs of Dublin. $5,000 - $8,000

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[American Business Leaders.] Important group of twenty documents and letters.

Lot 6: [American Business Leaders.] Important group of twenty documents and letters.

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Description: 6. [American Business Leaders.] Important group of twenty documents and letters by important figures involved in American business who held great wealth, including:Astor, John Jacob. A collection of six autograph letters signed (“J.J. Astor, as “Brevt Brigdr Genl U.S.V” and “J.J. Astor Jr.”), 9 pages various sizes, London and New York, 19 July 1795 to 9 October 1884. The letters discuss business transactions and confirmations of personal engagements from the man that lost his life on the Titanic disaster.Carnegie, Andrew. A series of four autograph letters signed and an original photograph signed with autograph inscription, 8 pages various sizes, New York, 20 May 1890 to 3 July 1916 to various recipients. The letters discuss matters of personal engagements. Corning, Erastus. Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, Albany, New York, 31 January 1865 to an unknown recipient. Corning explains his visit to St. Louis is to establish an agent for other companies. Frick, Henry Clay. Two autograph letters signed (“H.C. Frick”), 2 pages quarto, [New York], [9 September 1903] and 27 March 1906 to various recipients. Replying to yours of the twenty-sixth:-Have no doubt great good could be accomplished by what you suggest; but I could not become interested in the matter at this time. Girard, Stephen. Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, Philadelphia, 9 March 1803, to John G. Wachsnuth. The American businessman suggests a meeting for the purpose of finishing their business. Goodyear, Charles. Two autograph letters signed, 3 pages octavo, Paris, 22 September 1849 to 16 October 1855. The first letter addresses travel to New York with his children. The second letter, written to his niece, sorry to hear…how much you have suffered from illness, and I know well how to pity you. He continues to tell her that her health will improve with age.Holladay, Benjamin. Check signed, San Francisco, 15 February 1869, drawn on his account at the London and San Francisco Bank and made payable to Draft, T.R. Brooks in the amount of $186.50.Morris, Robert. Two partly printed documents signed, each 1 page oblong quarto, Philadelphia, 28 May 1795 and 15 October 1795. Conveying ownership shares...in the entire property of the North American Land company, the dividend whereof shall not be less than six dollars, on each share annually…Stanford, Leland. Partly printed document signed, 3 pages legal folio, San Francisco, 21 September 1885. The document is a deed for the sale of land in Tetrama, California by the Central Pacific Railroad Company to George M. Lowrey for the sum of $1224.40. $5,000 - $8,000

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[American Financiers.] Group of 11 letters written by signers of the Declaration of Independence

Lot 7: [American Financiers.] Group of 11 letters written by signers of the Declaration of Independence

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Description: 7. [American Financiers.] A fine group of eleven letters written by signers of the Declaration of Independence and generals in the American Revolution that outline financial matters of the Continental Congress. This collection includes:1-Ames, Fisher. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages legal folio, Dedham, [Massachusetts], 13 April 1799 to John Worthington with a one-page note from Mrs. Ames written on the integral address leaf. The letter addresses the possibility of procuring investors in Early America. 2-Cabot, George. Letter signed, (“GC”), 4 pages quarto, Brookline, [Massachusetts], 20 January 1801 to [Mr. Mason]. With the concluding three lines in Cabot’s hand and a lengthy docket by J. Lowell. The letter addresses the disputed presidential election of 1800 and upholding the Federalist cause. 3-Gallatin, Albert. Four letters signed and a partial document signed, 7 pages, various sizes, New York and Washington, 7 August 1801 to 16 September 1838 to various recipients regarding land acquisitions and eliminating public debt.4-Lee, Richard Henry. Autograph letter signed, 1 page large legal folio, New York, 2 June 1785, to Colonel John Fitzgerald, with integral address leaf. The letter examines entering trade with wealthy houses in Holland. 5-Morris, Robert. Secretarial copy of a letter, 9 pages, legal folio, Office of Finance, 9 February 1782 to the President of Congress. From the papers of John Lowell, Massachusetts member of the Continental Congress. This important letter to the Congress outlines the state of the country’s finances and offering a number of recommendations for establishing public credit and recruiting men for the army. 6-Thomson, Charles. Document signed, 3 pages quarto, [Philadelphia], 27 July 1784. A resolution of the Continental Congress, revealing the central government’s financial and administrative weakness under the Articles of Confederation. 7-Osgood, Samuel. Letter signed, 2 pages quarto, [Philadelphia], 11 November 1788. As a member of the Board of Treasury to Nathaniel Appleton, Loan Officer for Massachusetts. Also signed by Walter Livingston, member of the Continential Congress from New York. The letter addresses the national debt in 1788. In part: We have hitherto deferred transmitting to you directions for issuing one years Interest on the Domestic Debt in pursuance of the Requisition of Congress of the 20th of August last, in hopes of being able before this time to have had all the Accounts of the former issues adjusted by the proper Officers of the Treasury… $5,000 - $8,000

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[American Financiers.] Group of nine letters by important figures in the world of banking in America

Lot 8: [American Financiers.] Group of nine letters by important figures in the world of banking in America

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Description: 8. [American Financiers.] Fine group of nine letters by important figures in the world of banking in America including:Belmont, August. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages octavo, New York, 14 April 1877, to John Sherman, Secretary of the Treasury. Letter discusses funding of Belmont’s operations. Cooke, Jay. Series of five autograph and typed letters signed, 6 pages various sizes, 11 April 1874 to 28 September 1899, to various correspondences on stocks and bonds. Girard, Stephen. Letter signed, (“Stephn Girard”), two pages quarto, Philadelphia, 28 September 1811, to William Adgate, London, concerning the supercargo of the ship, Good Friends. I have not yet heard of your arrival at your destination, no change since your departure, our poli[ti]cal affairs remain in statu[s]-quo, and will perhaps continue in that state until the opening of Congress when the President’s message &c will devellope our situation with the several Belligerent Powers, should any interresting circumstances appear I will advise you in time…Johnson, A.B. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages legal folio, Utica, [New York], 18 March 1834, to W[ilia]m L. Marcy on what will save the ailing banks. …The Chenango stock will save the banks, but it cannot very greatly relieve the country. It may perhaps accomplish much relief even to the country, butr not permanently I think. If the Bank of the United States is to die, we need something in its stead that shall supply the capital which will expire with the bank…Peabody, George. Letter signed, 2 pages octavo, Salem [Massachusetts], 13 June 1869, to Mr. Childs. The letter discusses his ailing health and mentions two things which seem to be written in error in the Ledger. One is my age, which will be 75 in February next, and the other is the value of the site give by the City of London for my statue. $5,000 - $8,000

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[American Financiers.] 18 letters & documents by important figures in the world of American finance

Lot 9: [American Financiers.] 18 letters & documents by important figures in the world of American finance

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Description: 9. [American Financiers.] Fine group of eighteen letters and documents by important figures in the world of American finance including:Durant, William C. Typed letter signed (“W.C. Durant”), 1 page quarto, New York, 13 April 1920, on imprinted stationery of General Motors Corporation, to C.W. Barron of the Boston News Bureau. Durant sends an advance proof of the Annual Report for 1919.Eastman, George. Typed letter signed (“Geo Eastman”), 1 page quarto, Rochester, New York, 18 April 1927, on his imprinted stationery to Dr. Henry Fairfield Osborn. Eastman extends an invitation for the Osborns to visit him during the music season. Hill, James J. Typed document signed, 2 pages legal folio, 15 November 1899 regarding an agreement between the Lake Superior Company and C.X. Larrabee.Huntington, Collis P. Typed letter signed, (“CP Huntington”), 1 page quarto, 22 December 1898, to Dr. Stephen Bowers, editor of “The California Voice” regarding a request for line passes.Lorillard, Peter. Two documents signed (“P Lorillard” and “Peter Lorillard”), 5 pages legal folio, New York, 3 January 1870 and 7 November 1870. The first document grants power of attorney to Charles S. Huntoon to sign checks on the fourth National Bank of the City of New York. The second document is a bond of indemnity wherein Peter Lorillard, Charles Siedler, and Jacob Lorillard all of the City of New York, are held and firmly bound unto the Fourth National Bank of the City of New York in the sum of Fifty Thousand Dollars…Rockefeller, John D. A series of 9 typed and autograph letters signed and a document signed (“J.D. Rockefeller” and “John D. Rockefeller Jr.”), 12 pages various sizes, 29 January 1883 to 28 July 1933, to diverse recipients on personal matters of thanks also including a check payable to Wetherbee and Fuller drawn on the account of The Standard Oil Company.Rosenwald, Julius. Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, Chicago, 30 January 1928, on imprinted stationery of Sears, Roebuck & Co to C.W. Barron. The letter concerns the promotion of General Wood: We have in him the best president this company has ever had.Stanford, Leland. Letter signed, 1 page quarto, 1 February 1892, on imprinted stationery of United States Senate to Aviel Lathrop on an interest of the Grand Duke Demetrius of Russia’s request to see property in Palo Alto.Westinghouse, George. Letter signed (“Geo Westinghouse Jr”), 1 page quarto, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, 10 June 1874, on imprinted stationery of The Westinghouse Air Brake Company, to D.J. Harris, Springfield, Massachusetts responding in reply to a letter regarding faulty vacuum brakes. $5,000 - $8,000

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[American Revolution Officers.] A comprehensive archive of twenty-one letters and documents.

Lot 10: [American Revolution Officers.] A comprehensive archive of twenty-one letters and documents.

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Description: 10. [American Revolution Officers.] A comprehensive archive of twenty-one letters and documents relating to major incidents and battles of the American Revolution.An exceptional archive providing highly important information regarding major battles during the American Revolution.The present archive of letters and documents on the Revolutionary War is a superb chronological testament of the war written, first hand, by major war Generals. The earliest letter in the archive, an autograph letter by John Thomas, Major General in the war, mentions the desperate situation in Boston. I…am sory for your Situation but at present it is not in my power to Give Releaf unless you Petition to the Committee of safety which if you will forward to me I will Doe Every Thing in my power to Serve you it if…I Should be glad that you and all my old friend was Clear from the Town of Boston as I must Suppose it will not be Long before that Situation will be Desparate. Thomas led his troops to the invasion of Boston in February 1775 and the Congress made him brigadier of the Continental Army.With disease and sickness rampant, in an autograph letter signed, Horatio Gates writes to His Excellency General [George] Washington discussing the prevention of spreading small pox. Sir Yesterday Evening I had the Honour to receive your Excellency’s Letter of the 28th. Instant; I immediately consulted with Doctor [William] Shippen, & Mr. Morris, upon the best method of preventing the spreading of The Infection Small Pox, & have Issued Orders to Oblige all the Troops, & Recruits, upon their March from the Westward, to Avoid this City, & take their Route through German Town. Gates was given command of the Canadian Department and was quite disorganized with the retreat from Quebec. At this time, disease, especially smallpox, had taken a significant toll on the ranks. He eventually made it to Fort Ticonderoga, but had a tiff with Phillip Schuyler, as that was his territory. It was eventually worked out between the two.Sickness did not elude the Generals. John Sullivan, whom Horatio Gates replaced, became ill and needed to leave the field. In an autograph letter signed he writes: At a time when the rapid and alarming decline of my health forces me (reluctantly) from the field, so flattering a testimony respecting my conduct by two brigades, which have so eminently distinguished themselves on sundry occasions…It is with great truth I assert, that while I feel the most lively sentiments of gratitude for the regret you are please to express on my retiring from the Army, I sincerely lament the misfortune which alone could have forced me to adopt a measure, so repugnant to my own wishes, and so contrary to these repeated solicitations of my friends…However, not all battalions fell ill and many fought strongly. In an autograph letter signed, as Lieutenant Colonel William Stephen Smith reports to Baron von Steuben that: The Enemy detached a small party to engage those stationed at this post. I have the satisfaction to inform you that they retired with more expedition than they advanced and at present remain quiet but still keeping possession of the Main Bridge…A small party are again advancing. We Will Drub them and send you the account there. After receiving several wounds while holding the command of the 13th Massachusetts Regiment, Smith subsequently served for a short time on Baron von Steuben’s staff before becoming aide-de-camp to General Washington. Springfield, New Jersey, the town to which Smith addresses this letter, was the scene of a Revolutionary battle on 23 June 1780, at which time General Greene repulsed the British. The town of Elizabeth was an important point in General Washington’s maneuvers during the Revolution.In an autograph letter signed, Major General Nathanael Greene writes to General George Washington on 23 June 1780 at 8 O’Clock P.M. about the Battle of Springfield that took place on the same day. Docketed 23rd June 1780 to Genl. Washington.This archive concludes with a retained copy of John Burgoyne’s letter in which he is negotiating an exchange for Ethan Allen. On 2 October 1777, the letter to General Horatio Gates says Mr. Allen is detained as a prisoner of State; but without entering into that consideration, I think it would be inconsistent with the powers or propriety of Sir Henry Clinton’s station or mine, to interfere in a matter which has already been under discussion between Sir William Howe and General Washington…Ethan Allen was captured by the British following his disastrous attack on Montreal in September 1775. He was a liability to the English, who were afraid of reprisals if they executed him. As Burgoyne wrote his letter, the Crown was in the final stages of negotiations with the Americans to free Allen in New York City, an event, which occurred a month later. Included in the archive are documents relating to Joseph Trumbull, Anthony Wayne, Benjamin Lincoln, William Howe, David Wooster, Philip Schuyler, Baron von Steuben and Israel Putnam. A significant archive that documents the personal accounts of defeat and triumph during the American Revolution. $6,000 - $8,000

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Armstrong, Louis. A group of three letters, a signed contract and a photograph of Armstrong.

Lot 11: Armstrong, Louis. A group of three letters, a signed contract and a photograph of Armstrong.

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Description: 11. Armstrong, Louis. A group of three letters, a signed contract and a photograph of Armstrong inscribed and signed accompanying one of the letters.Quintessential Satchmo. Included in the group: Autograph letter signed (“RED BEANS & RICELY, Louis Armstrong”), 1 page octavo, Chicago, Illinois, 29 May 1949, to John B. Elwood, Jackson, Michigan; with integral blank leaf attached and original envelope. He writes in full: Man, -- I’ve just finished reading your Script concerning the Crosby Cavalcade -­ I’m tellin’ yooo you really came on. You sure ought to see that my Boy Pappa Bing Crosby get one of these Scripts. That would really Gas him no End. And I wanna thank ‘ya too. Regards to your wife and your staff. Thanks again.Typed letter signed (“Louis Armstrong Satchmo”), in green ink, 1 page large quarto, in green typewriter ink, Corona, New York, 21 December 1957, to Midori Tsuji in New York City, on the verso of a printed diet plan entitled “Lose Weight the Satchmo Way”; with several handwritten corrections and with the original envelope. He writes in full: Before I say another word, please allow me to wish you the best Merry Christmas that you’ve ever had in your fine life. I hope that the Lord will keep you -Ernie Anderson -Lucille and Joe Glaser- for ever ‘n’ ever. Thanks, very much for keeping your promise to send Mr Todd’s Book (around the world in a ‘gang of’ days) to me. Although I saw the picture, I immediately started reading it all over again, just like I’d never seen it before. Thanks again. Well, our dear boy, Breir Anderson has cutout from these shores of our’s. I hope, it won’t be for too long. Ernie is my man. His heart is as big as my trumpet case. I miss him just like a brother. I hope that I never have to travel anywheres, abroad without him. He and I speak’s the same language. And also speaks’ the same words of the Hot Clubs -all over the world. Thats, WHY we both appreciate the same music and the fans (no matter how big- they come) appreciate us along with the music that we dish out. Thats, why -when ever we’re on tour through the Foreign Countries I usually meet Presidents, Ambassadors, etc, who’s also, ‘Cats, who ‘Digs’ life and music (our music) the same as we. . . And, as for you, you are one of the ‘Hippiest ‘Chicks’ that I’ve met, in a ‘Hollywood Long Time.’ Tee Hee. . . .I am sitting here at home after one of those big nights at the Copa. Recording some of the fine recordings that I picked up in Europe, and all points, South America. Great kicks. And thats, for sure. It’s now eight o’clock in the morning. Lucille has an appointment with her hair dresser. They think -it best to get in the shop before the mad customer’s rush starts. The same way that my dentist used to do for me. I’d always get into his chair before the mad rush of his clients. And it would give us chance to have a few good laughs, -while he’d be standing on my Chops. Wow. My dentist Dr Gottleib would tell me –‘You’re the Damdest Patient that I’ve ever had.’ After finishing work at Bop City three thirty & four o’clock in the mornings, I’d be so ‘beat for my youth’ until I’d fall asleep while he would be working on me. He’d be justa gri[n]ding in my chops­ and would have to awaken me in order to have me tum my jaw over so he could grind on the other side. [I]’d do just that and return back to sleep, just like a ‘Mall Tees Kitten . . . . Cute? P.S. Now why would I say all of this? I only wanted to thank you. But since I’ve started, I’m happy...I am very happy to have met you. You are real fine people. Lucille ‘sez’ the same thing. Goodluck and don’t make yourself a total stranger to us. You’re always welcome anywheres ‘you should see the sign saying Louis Armstrong. You Hear?Typed document (mimeograph copy) signed, in green ink, 26 pages quarto, 24 September 1958 being a contract between Paramount Pictures Corporation and Associated Booking Corporation (Armstrong’s agent), concerning the trumpeter’s performance in the role of himself in the motion picture photoplay, The Five Pennies. Terms of the contract include the period of employment (beginning on 30 September 1958), cancellation and obligation clauses, Armstrong’s commitments to render his services outside of Paramount, compensation, breaches and damages, transportation and living expenses, Armstrong’s appearances at the studio for various purposes, rights, royalties on phonograph records, and various other provisions.Autograph letter signed, 3 pages quarto, Corona, New York, 16 June 1970, to Chris Clifton; with hand-addressed transmittal envelope. Louis Armstrong’s words of wisdom for a budding trumpeter who played with the Tuxedo Brass Band, the same band Satchmo played with 50 years earlier: Dear Chris Man. I received your letter and as usual very happy to get it. The presents were beautiful. The photo of you blowing with the Tuxedo Brass Band is very good of you. I see that you really enjoyed playing with them. That’s the Brass Band that I was playing with [when] I left New Orleans in 1922 to join King Oliver in Chicago and met Lil [Lillian Hardin, Armstrong’s second wife, of four. It was she who was credited with getting Louis out from under Oliver’s shadow]. She was blowing/PLAYING with the King -Johnny -Baby Dodds Outrey - and Bill [William K.] Johnson. Man what a Band. They live my memories.I haven’t seen or heard from our boy Jack Bradley since he was here with you. Guess he’s a busy man these days. I am coming on better each day. Soon as my legs strengthen up a little more, I’ll be straight and I can put the cane aside. I am glad to hear about you doing so well with your horn. That’s right. Blow with everybody. And see for yourself you’ll be glad you did. Nowadays you just can’t depend on one certain bunch of musicians to back you up. And good musicians will be very glad to Blow behind a good Trumpet Man that plays like you. Because there aren’t too many, if any at all playing the way that you play. Understand? So keep it up - playing with Lil will do you some good. She’s from the Old School and can do wonders for you, don’t you think so? I am looking to hearing you playing with your own Band some day. You have everything to work with. You are young & strong and knows your Horn, so there you are. Take advantage of it Gate, and you know that I am with you all the way. Lucille sent regards. Thanks again for everything from your Boy. Satch LouisArmstrong.Accompanied by a photograph signed being a publicity photograph (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm) of Armstrong in a half-figure portrait. He is dressed in a white suit and holds his trumpet in his right hand. Boldly inscribed in green ink on the image: To Chris Clifton Oh those Duets on Tape were wonderful Louis Armstrong Satchmo. $5,000 - $8,000

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Barnum, P.T. A collection of six letters and documents.

Lot 12: Barnum, P.T. A collection of six letters and documents.

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Description: 12. Barnum, P.T. A collection of six letters and documents outlining the business dealings of the “Greatest Show on Earth.” Known for unethical business practices, the circus’ sole purpose was to make money, at any cost. That cost often came at the expense of the animals and performers outlined in the letters herewith. Included in this group:Autograph letter signed, 1 page octavo, Bridgeport, Connecticut, 23 April 1877, on his imprinted stationery bearing a wood engraved vignette of his seaside mansion, Waldemere to Mr. Talmadge. He writes in part: I hope you will see the monkey mother & her infant 5 weeks old in my menagerie 27th St. She is a pattern for many a human mother in America. She fondles hugs kisses & nurses her baby with more apparent fondness than my mother ever exhibited in the same vocation! Also I hope you will see the baby lions & the…Stallions. They are wonderful…Autograph letter signed, 2 pages octavo, Bridgeport, Connecticut, 15 May 1878 to Reilly. Barnum writes in full: My managers and myself in consultation this year and last summer agreed that if the London show saw fit to abandon the plan of attacking us as they did early last year, we would not in any manner attack them or stand in their way. Indeed as long as they pursue an honorable and legitimate course they and you have my best wishes. I have heard (I hope incorrectly) that they have recently concluded to pick up any unfavorable notices they could find of me and my show and have them surreptitiously published in other papers. This thing cannot be done long without its coming to the knowledge of myself, my press agents and managers. I therefore write you this friendly letter and shall send a duplicate to your manager to say that if this thing should be done, or any other unfriendly allusions to me or my show be made by them I must of course in justice to my own interests, take such steps as I may think best calculated to retaliate, and also to vindicate myself. The world is wide enough for all to get along friendly and in peace—but those who sow them must not expect to gather grapes.By the late 1870s the Greatest Show on Earth was in existence long enough to inspire several serious rivals. During this period smaller circus owners began suing Barnum for libel and damages, claiming he was using their names and ruining their profits. However, larger circuses such as Adam Forepaugh’s circus, the Sells Brothers’ Great European Seven Elephant Show and the London Circus, presided over by James A. Bailey were also taking away large shares from the market Cut throat advertising wars with the London Circus exhausted Barnum to such an extent that in 1880, after meeting several times with Bailey, he signed a contract to form what was later to become the Ringling Brothers Barnum and Bailey Circus.Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, New York, 14 November 1878, on letterhead stationery with an engraved portrait of Barnum in the upper left-hand corner to W.H. Vanderbilt, Esq. Barnum writes in full: Dear Sir-I have consulted my managers about the Hippedrome building & find they feel as if this is our last visit here. This makes twice that we have lost money here & we give it up. The expenses of the building are far too high for these times. The building requires many repairs, the room leaks badly and the whole sadly needs painting.Barnum, General Manager and Sole Proprietor of The Greatest Show on Earth built the Hippodrome in 1874. He writes to financier Vanderbilt that he can no longer afford the facility. For twenty years of its existence, Barnum opened each spring in New York City, usually at the Hippodrome, now known as Madison Square Garden. Autograph letter signed, 1 page octavo, Bridgeport, Connecticut, 10 February 1881, on imprinted Barnum Building stationery to A. Houghton. Barnum writes in full: I own only $2500 worth of Cattle Bonds and I never give them a thought. I paid par for them but had rather seen the amount in some other way then to fret over them. Daniel W. Sherwood is considered here where he was born an honest man, and he certainly is also a worker. He may misjudge sometimes & perhaps be too hopeful. I am nearly 71 years old & have no ambition to embark in any enterprise. Any plan which the majority of bond holders prefer I shall undoubtedly agree to unless it involves the investment of more money.Autograph letter signed, 2 pages, octavo, Adirondack Mountains, New York, 22 August 1888, on imprinted stationery of Paul Smith’s to [James A.] Bailey, his partner. Barnum writes in part: Forepaugh says our man Cook is slippery –cares only for Cook and needs watching badly…He says Adam is training a pony to turn a double back summersault. He has 2 double summersault dogs, who perform at the same time in one ring. He pays much less salaries than we do. He says that in Boston he turned them away at each & every performance. Barnum mentions Forepaugh being Adam Forepaugh, a rival circus manager from Philadelphia. Among Barnum’s major concerns in the circus business were earnings and the performers who generated those earnings, both of which are reflected in this letter. The 1880s proved to be a decade of continued prosperity for Barnum and his business partners, James A. Bailey and James L. Hutchinson. Ringling, John. Document signed, 1 page, Bridgeport, Connecticut, 29 April 1911 on a check imprinted with color portraits of Barnum and Bailey surrounded by filigree and circus animals to M B Bulter-Agent and endorsed by him on the back. $6,000 - $8,000

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Burr, Aaron. A group of 3 autograph letters signed by the third Vice President of the United States

Lot 13: Burr, Aaron. A group of 3 autograph letters signed by the third Vice President of the United States

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Description: 13. Burr, Aaron. A fine group of three autograph letters signed by the third Vice President of the United States, including: Autograph letter signed (“A Burr”), 1 page quarto, New York, 4 January 1797, to Peter Van Gaasbeck of Kingston, New York; integral address leaf; seal hole repaired, light spotting.In the present letter, Burr comments on the election of both Adams and Jefferson. He writes in part: . . . It is now known that Adams is chosen President and Jeferson [sic] Vice President. It is doubtful whether the latter will serve––I think he will . . . As Burr predicted here, Jefferson did interrupt his retirement from public life to hold the office of Vice President and successfully ran against Burr for the office of President in the election of 1800. Provenance: The Estelle Doheny Collection, Christie’s New York, 21 February 1989.Autograph letter signed (“AB”), 1 page folio, February [1804]. To David Gelston, Collector of the Port of New York. With the integral docketed leaf attached. An interesting letter, written only two days before his fateful nomination for New York governor. During that unsuccessful campaign, Burr’s simmering quarrel with Alexander Hamilton culminated in their fatal duel, on 11 July: By the Letter of Mr Astor herewith enclosed you will see that be offers not quite 2500 dolrs. for the lots - but with the deduction of 500 & odd dolrs. which I owe him. This debt was created by an error in our accounts of his own creating. He convinced me of the error; but the money had been paid to me & was appropriated. It was therefore left as a debt. Those lots are really worth 300 Drs. apiece & will sell for that in the Course of the summer. What now prevents a fair Sale is that they are included in a mortgage with other lots which were sold to Mr Astor & the money left in his hands to pay the whole mortgage for doing which I have h.is Covenant; but all this could not be explained at auction. If you choose to take the lots yourself, you may have them for 2500 Drs. if not you may sell them at the offer of Astor in case nothing better offers. Dr Browne will execute the Deed I shall then owe you 7 or 800 Drs. which I will pay as soon as possible... In July, Burr’s duel with Hamilton effectively ended his career in politics. John Jacob Astor, having made substantial sums in the fur-factoring trade, began at this period to make large purchases of city real estate which later formed the bulk of the Astor family fortune. Provenance: David Gelston (1733-1828) of Long Island, delegate to the Provincial Congress in New York and to the Constitutional Convention, appointed Collector of the Port of New York by Jefferson in 1801 - A direct descendant of the above (sale, Christie’s New York, 19 December 1986, lot 24)––to the present owner (sale Christie’s New York, 14 May 1992, lot 43.Autograph letter signed (“A Burr”), 1 page quarto, 1 June 1798, to the Honorable John Laurance U.S. Senate, regarding controversies between Samuel Bayard and Moses and Joseph Hunt of Ulster County over payment claims; paper loss at margin of horizontal fold and on the integral address leaf. $5,000 - $8,000

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Chandler, Raymond. A series of 8 letters vividly documenting his thoughts on famous mystery novels

Lot 14: Chandler, Raymond. A series of 8 letters vividly documenting his thoughts on famous mystery novels

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Description: 14. Chandler, Raymond. A fascinating series of eight letters vividly documenting Chandler’s thoughts and ideas on famous mystery novels. Included in the group: Partly printed document signed, three times, 4 pages folio, Los Angeles, California, 3 July 1941. Chandler initialed two amendments within the body of an agreement and signed his name in full at the conclusion. Also signed by the Vice-President of RKO, Ned E. Depinet. In the contract with RKO Radio Pictures, Inc., Chandler grants all televised motion picture rights, radio-broadcasting rights and television rights for his novel, Farewell My Lovely, published by Alfred A. Knopf in 1940 to RKO.After months of hard work, Chandler finished his greatest detective novel, Farewell My Lovely, on 30 April 1940. The book was published by Knopf in August and was highly acclaimed by critics. Before long, Chandler’s literary reputation as the foremost exponent of the tough-guy school of writing paved the way for Hollywood. This signed contract for the price of $2000 was what later Chandler described as a contract of almost unparalleled stupidity on the part of my New York agent. He gave all other rights to RKO as well [Frank MacShane, The Life of Raymond Chandler]. Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, La Jolla, California, 18 March 1948, on his name imprinted stationery to James Keddie, Jr. in Boston, Massachusetts. With one handwritten correction. Chandler expresses his preference of American detective stories over the English counterpart: I do think that what might be called the second-grade English detective story is better reading than an equivalent accomplishment over here. But I think the best American mystery stories are ahead of the best English stories, for the reason that they recognize and accept the inherent fallacy of the form; whereas the English practitioners prefer to disregard it and go on talking about logic and deduction as if these words actually meant something in this connection. From the English point of view the mysteries of Freeman Wills Crofts and R. Austin Freeman, both of whom you mention, are rigidly honest simply because they don’t tell lies or conceal material facts or, as Agatha Christie so often does, ring in violent reversals of character in order to justify an unexpected motivation. Chandler continues to criticize English detective stories stating is transparent and a physiological fraud. Finally, he mentions Sherlock Holmes again: As for the enjoyment of Sherlock Holmes, it appears to me at this date to rely partly on nostalgia and tradition and partly on qualities which did not originally make the principal interest of the Holmes stories. Doyle understood the uses of eccentricity, but to a person with any knowledge of the police and how they operate his policemen are utterly absurd.Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, La Jolla, California, 23 August 1949, on his name imprinted stationery to James Keddie, Jr. With nine handwritten corrections. Chandler offers literary advice to fellow mystery writer, James Keddie, Jr. He writes in full: THE LITTLE SISTER was published by Hamish Hamilton on June 24th, and will be published by Houghton Mifflin on Sept. 15th., the last I heard. Hamilton’s edition has far too many errors, some mine, some the copyist’s and some just a combination of stupidities. Hamilton was in such a hurry to get into print that I had no chance to correct proof and he had no American galleys to set from. Yes, it’s a Marlowe story. Hamilton printed a first edition of 20,000 copies and had sold 14,000 a month ago, but I don’t suppose many have been sold since and I’m sure the booksellers will have plenty. They tell me this is a very good sale for this kind of book as things go over there now. I mention this only because if you should have any trouble getting what you want, I have a couple of spares. But they got a little bent in shipping. I’d rather not give them up, but I would, rather than have you go without. Haven’t ever understood this collecting bug myself. I’m still waiting to be told about the detective story with the logical analy (s or z?) able plot. The one I can’t tear down. You mentioned Warrant for X, which I had read and which I read again on your advice. I cannot pass it. Philip McDonald, whom I know, has a lot of natural charm and a nice easy style. There is much good deduction in the story. But 1. Anthony Gehlryn is dealt far too many cards. He has helpers, an organization, and can break the traffic laws with impunity. The atmosphere of the search therefor becomes far too fantastic. 2. The electrical impersonation in the hotel is right out of Oppenheim. It also becomes fantasy. 3. and worst of all, the actual capture (discovery) of the criminal is a result of pure chance, is not accomplished by the detective, but by the sub-hero who just happens to hang on to the back of the cab, being in the right place.These, I admit, are small matters in one sense. But the whole point with me is that the deductive type often cannot rest its case on anything but a fool-proof and analysis-proof construction. However great its merits in other ways, they do not compensate for a lack of mathematical purity in the plot. I will not give them an inch, because once you give them an inch, you give them a mile. You have to admit a fraud like Sayers’ HAVE HIS CARCASE. The whole problem there turns one alibis. The strength of the alibis is linked to a certain period of time. This period of time is determined by the time of death of the victim. This time of death is falsely assumed up to that point, quite late in the story, when it is discovered that he was a hemophilic. The discovery of this fact destroys the alibis and there ceases to be a mystery. The ALL *IMPORTANT CLUE is concealed from the reader, and the problem created is a false problem. Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, La Jolla, California, 24 September 1949, to Vernon Howard. He writes in full: It has taken me all this time to get a bibliography of Austin Freeman’s books in order to tell you what I should like to have. A professor of bibliography I know finally came through. He says these are fairly easy to get and should not cost more than a dollar or so. At that rate it may not be worth your while to look them up. But if so: 1911, The Eye of Osiris, 1912, The Mystery of No. 31 New Inn, 1926, The d’Arblay Mystery, 1930, Mr. Pottermack’s Oversight, 1932, Pontifex, Son and Thorndyke, 1935, The Penrose Mystery, 1937, Death at the Inn (English title Felo de Se), 1938, The Stoneware Monkey. These of course are not all, merely the books I should like to have.Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, La Jolla, California, 15 August 1950, on his name-imprinted stationery to James Keddie, Jr. in Boston, Massachusetts. Chandler expresses why he cannot become a follower of Sherlock Holmes to his novelist friend as it would be a waste of time: Thank you also for the report of the proceedings of THE SPECKLED BAND. No, I don’t think you could convert me. This is not due to any superciliousness on my part towards the faithful, nor towards the great Sherlock. It is just that I do not seem to find any hollow place in my life which the cult of the master alone could fill… Chandler explains that the crimes within the novels are never explained to his satisfaction. The history of actual trials is so full of these beautiful and impossible tangles that a devotion to the minutiae of the life of Sherlock Holmes seems to me rather a waste of energy—nothing against it of course…Typed letter signed (“Ray”), 1 page quarto, La Jolla, California, 30 July 1956, on his name-imprinted stationery to William Gault of Pacific Palisades. With a related copy of a letter to Harry E. Maule. He writes in full: I was so sorry that we could not get together in Los Angeles, but I really did not feel well enough to face it. I am enclosing a copy of a letter I have written to Mr. Maule, because I do feel that in this case if it would be of any help, I should break down and say a few kind words about you. I don’t really think anyone would suspect me of taking money for this sort of thing. I think my reputations is probably too well established. You seem to know so much more about writers than I do. I didn’t know anything about Craig Rice; I never heard Bill Temple, who I suppose is an agent, and you certainly got a raw deal at the Del Charro. I get the best room in the place for twelve dollars and fifty cents. I agree with you that the food there is not as good as it should be. Am I to infer from your letter that Mickey Spillane does this endorsing for money? I should regard it as disgusting, and so would you, and if I may use your recently invented phrase, it does rather put one on the horns of a dilemma. I think you might do one nice thing for me. If you have written other books about Brock and Jan, I think you might send me on, inscribed.Chandler’s letter to Maule explains why he wanted to say a few kind words about Gault as a writer and why never in this country have I written anything for quotation about any writer . . . A few years ago I learned through my agent that certain perennial quoters were paid for these quotes—something which I consider a little too unethical. Chandler goes on to say that newspaper interviews often distort what a person says. Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, La Jolla, California, 3 February 1958 on his name imprinted-stationery to Miss Rogers with one handwritten correction. He writes in full: Thank you for remembering me and for your courteous invitation to meet you when you come to California. But I am afraid you would have to meet me in London, as I am leaving on February 17th, and shall be tied in knots to get away, having just finished a book, and having innumerable things to do. You could always, if you care to, reach me through The Helga Greene Literary Agency…But honestly I don’t think I am your kind of writer—I don’t mean personally, but as a possible contributor to The Reader’s Digest. What sort of thing could I write for you, or attempt to write for you? I am going to London for several years, because I want to try to write plays, and London, with over forty active theaters, seems the best place in which to attempt it. London producers are not very much intimidated by the critics. If they believe in a play, they will give it a chance. In New York, as I understand it, You are sold out three months in advance or they bury the body… Typed letter signed (“Ray”), 1 page quarto, [no date], to Mike. He writes in full: I am absolutely appalled. I haven’t any excuse at all. It would almost have been less beastly if I had done it on purpose. Then I should have been merely a bastard. But I clean forgot the engagement I had with you until late last night when I couldn’t even call up and apologize. My memory has been paying me some pretty queer tricks lately, I’ll admit, but we had been talking about it only the day before, it was quite firmly in my mind (I thought), it was down in the engagement book, and I didn’t even look at the damn book. I’m not used to them, you know. In California for years I have of necessity lived a very withdrawn life, and had very few engagements to remember. Tomorrow I get a desk calendar, which is absolutely the only safe thing for me. I am not offering any of the above as excuses. I have been disgustingly rude and I have no excuses. There is nothing for me to say except that I am terribly, terribly sorry.This interesting collection of letters clearly reveals Chandler’s opinion on writing and good detective literature. $5,000 - $8,000

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[Civil War - Prelude to War] An important collection of nine letters and documents.

Lot 15: [Civil War - Prelude to War] An important collection of nine letters and documents.

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Description: 15. [Civil War – Prelude to War] An important collection of nine letters and documents covering the events and central characters leading to the outbreak of war. Highlights include:Stevens, Isaac I. Letter signed, 3 pages quarto, Office Coast Survey, Washington, D.C., 26 November 1852, to a Major; with one handwritten correction; mounted to a larger leaf at the margin on verso of the third page. A Northern Democrat, Stevens was a General for the Union who would die in action leading a charge at the second Bull Run on 1 September 1862. One thing, as President Lincoln remarked, was certain – Stevens and other political opponents of the Republicans had proven with their blood that their devotion to the Union was second to none. Stevens writes in part: I take the liberty to offer some suggestions in reference to a bridge across the Potomac. I know your public spirit and the interest you take in the welfare of the City of Washington. The City authorities have already moved in the matter of the extension of the Orange and Alexandria Railroad, and it seems to me now is the time to strike for a permanent structure to unite us with Virginia, one which will be creditable to the metropolis of a great nation, and which shall make easy of access the neighboring country. My attention has been directed to this subject for a long time, and I am impressed with the connection that the railroad bridge and the bridge for ordinary travel should be united. Both must be solid and enduring structures made of the best materials, and of the same general style of architecture…and I cannot doubt that it would determine without delay to give our City a communication with Virginia. I am ready to do what little I can to bring about so desirable an end…Wise, Henry A. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages octavo, Anly, near Ananicock Virginia, 28 July 1855, to B.B. French, Winfield Scott’s Chief-of-Staff.Wise became Governor of Virginia in 1855 and later a Confederate general. An active advocate of states rights, he had initially opposed secession, believing that Virginia could defend its rights within the Union. He writes in part: ...The representations to me concerning your connection with Know Nothings were wholly different from your own statements. Your adherence, I was told, continued until late this spring. When you separated from the organization it was said that you made it a donation and it was supposed it had your sympathies. This was affirmed so boldly and often that I believed you were of the order, implicitly, though nothing could have given me more surprise. I confided in you as a Democrat and regretted exceedingly that you had left your old friends for a new ‘Ism,’ as I still am surprised that you should ever have allowed yourself to be duped by the imposter. I think you may attribute the distrust of yourself as a sound Democrat to your own continuance with the council or to your silence in not disclaiming connection with it. I spoke indignantly to the President and to everybody of those Democrats who were in office and who had joined Sam and had failed to denounce and renounce him as soon as he was known to them. I spoke this of you with much regret because I was warmly attached to you personally and was mad that you should have so blundered. I could not confide in what any man would say as long as he was a member of the order. I think you did right to resign at the same time as I think your resignation makes the proper atonement and that you should not be prejudiced in future. Were I in your place I would publicly announce my withdrawal. Your friend Mr. Lewis is mistaken in supposing I was informed by a person he calls “Bill Robinson.” I don’t know who he is.Parker, Theodore. Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, Boston, 7 July 1855, to Henry Wilson, ardent anti-slavery advocate.Parker was a abolitionist and theologian who gained notoriety for his public vilification of Massachusetts senator Daniel Webster for voting in favor of the Fugitive Slave Act as well as raising money and providing encouragement for John Brown’s raid on Harper’s Ferry. He writes in part: ...Thank you for the noble service you have done for the cause of Freedom. You stand up most mercifully and heroically, and do battle for the right. I do not know how to thank you enough. You do rally at all places, all times. If the rest of your senatorial term be like this part, we shall get times as we only wished for but dare not hope as yet. There is a North, a real North quite visible now. God bless you for your services and keep you ready for more.Seward, William H. Autograph letter signed, 1 page octavo, Washington, 16 April 1856. To W.R.G. Miller, Gloucester, Massachusetts. Seward writes in part: …I begin to look forward with confidence to a time when I can resign and retire from active service without doing the cause a serious injury. Mrs. Seward joins me in assurances of sincere and devoted respect and esteem for Mrs. Mellon & yourself.When Seward wrote this letter, he was an active abolitionist and leader of the anti­slavery wing of the Whig Party, which he had led into the Republic Party the previous year.Sherman, William Tecumseh. Autograph letter signed (“W.T. Sherman”), 4 pages quarto, Leavenworth, Kansas, 16 November 1858, to J. E. Williams, President, Metropolitan Bank, New York, New York. He writes in part: ...I see your prediction is now realized, and that the Republicans have succeeded every where this fall. For myself, I have hardly had time to form strong political preferences - My Army life first and Ranching next were not such as to make a choice necessary, but now that I am in a life where all must be classified, I feel the necessity of caution. My brother John Sherman in Congress is Republican enough to suit the most ultra - My two partners here are the sons of the Hon. Thomas Ewing of Ohio, and have been here for two years and have been free-state men. Had I been here I am free to confess I should have opposed Kansas’ becoming a slave state, because it is not suited to slave labor. And more especially because it was attempted by unfair means - That question is now forever at rest so far as Kansas is concerned. And I am convinced that Missouri certain, Kentucky, Virginia and Maryland also will little by little fill up with white laborers who will displace a corresponding number of slaves, and having votes will soon outvote the owners of slaves. And thereby convert these slave states into free.But the extreme southern states will not be free during our time, and I am willing to abide the solution that Providence will indicate in due Course of Development…I should vote against slavery here in any shape. I would oppose it as a matter of common ‘foul play’ if the administration should attempt to force it here where it is not wanted - but I should in like manner discourage and even oppose any interference with slavery in Missouri or Kentucky by their free state neighbors…The State of South Carolina. A formal manuscript ultimatum from South Carolina for the President of the United States, 5 pages folio, on State of South Carolina, Executive Office, State Department letterhead, Charleston, 12 January 1861, being the letter of instructions from South Carolina’s Secretary of State, Andrew Cordon Magrath, to Isaac William Hayne, Special Envoy from the State of South Carolina to the President of the United States, as well as serving as the state’s Attorney General; light soiling.After having voted to succeed from the Union on 20 December 1860, the State of South Carolina attempts to negotiate as a sovereign nation with the United States concerning the removal of US Troops from Fort Sumter. Excerpts therefrom: The Governor has considered it proper in view of the grave questions which now affect the State of South Carolina and the United States, to make a demand upon the President of the United States for the delivery to the State of South Carolina of Fort Sumter, now within the territorial limits of this State, and occupied by troops of the United States…The interruption of these negotiations left all matters connected with Fort Sumter and troops of the United States, within the limits of this State; affected by the fact that the continued possession of the Fort was not consistent with the dignity or safety of the State, and that an attempt to reinforce the troops at that fort, would not be allowed. This, therefore, became a state of hostility in consequence of which the State of South Carolina was placed in a condition of defence. During the preparation for this purpose, an attempt was made to reinforce Fort Sumter and repelled…The Governor to save life, and determined to omit no course of proceeding usual among civilized Nations, previous to that condition of general hostilities, which belongs to War; and not Knowing under what order, or by what authority, Fort Sumter is now held…You will therefore demand from the President of the United States, the withdrawal of the troops of the United States from that fort, and its delivery to the State of South Carolina…Carl Sandburg, winner of the 1940 Pulitzer Prize in History for Abraham Lincoln: The War Years, writes in Lincoln Collector: The Story of Oliver R. Barrett’s Great Private Collection (New York: Harcourt, Brace and Company, 1949), about the letter here offered, which was then in Barrett’s collection: “On December 20, 1860, in secret session, the unanimous vote of 169 delegates forming a State Convention, ‘dissolved’ the bonds holding South Carolina a part of the United States. The delegates, one by one, signed the Ordinance of Secession. Governor F.W. Pickens of South Carolina on December 22 wrote to the president of the Convention: I have recd from the Convention as yet no official notification of the purpose of the ordinance. I would most respectfully suggest that any such notice be given in order that I may issue a proclamation announcing to the World, that we are a free and independent Republic ... Governor Pickens named a ‘Special Envoy,’ I.W. Hayne, to go to the capital of ‘a foreign power,’ Washington, D.C., there to call on the Chief Magistrate, there ‘to make a demand.’” Sandburg continued, “Hayne carried a letter of instructions, an important document.”President Buchanan refused an interview to ‘Special Envoy’ Hayne and sent word that any communication must be in writing, under the old theory that ‘a written paper is the best witness.’ After days of waiting and conference with Southern colleagues, Hayne delivered his important document of 12 January 1861, into the hands of President Buchanan. What the President read, if it had to be put in short and simple words, carried the notice: ‘We don’t want war but you can be sure we are ready to make war if we don’t hear the right answers.’” Carl Sandburg proceeded to transcribe the text of the “important document,” then in Oliver R. Barrett’s collection, the present document here offered.Provenance: Parke-Bernet Galleries, New York, The Public Auction of Barrett’s collection of Lincolniana City, 19 February 1952.Thompson, Jacob. Letter signed (“J Thompson”), 5 pages octavo, Memphis, [Tennessee], 21 September 1877, to J[eremiah] S. Black, Buchanan’s Attorney General; with handwritten corrections.The Secretary of the Interior under President Buchanan writes a letter to set the record straight on Buchanan’s role in North Carolina’s secession from the Union. Thompson writes in full: I feel bound in vindication of the truth of history & in justice to the memory of a chief magistrate who held the reigns of Government in the most trying crisis in the history of the Government, to explain some of the facts connected with my mission to North Carolina. Sometime in the December 1860, while I was Secretary of the Interior, the Gov of Mississippi sent me a letter requesting me to act as commissioner of that State to the State of North Carolina and urge her to cooperate with Mississippi in measures for the protection and maintenance of Southern rights. This appointment was unexpected and took me by surprize. I was known as a co-operationist and opposed to separate State action. I believed all the Southern States should have a perfect understanding with each other and when the time came for movement, if movement must be made, they should all act together & simultaneously. At that time Mr Buchanan had sent to Congress, his very able message in which he had denounced secession as a heresy, unconstitutional and unauthorized. I differed from that message in this, that while I admitted that the constitution did not provide this remedy for the States, yet each had retained the right from which they had never parted, to withdraw, for cause, the powers they had conferred upon the General Government & resume the full exercise of them…When the Governor’s letter was received and I had determined it was my duty to accept the appointment, I sought and obtained a private interview with the President and told him I wished a leave of absence to visit the Legislature of N.C. At first he endeavored to dissuade me from going: but as I persisted, he insisted upon knowing what I proposed to do. I unbosomed myself to him with the utmost frankness. I told him that an exciting canvass was going on in Mississippi on the subject of Secession. That I was opposed to any hasty or hurried action on the part of the State. But that he knew my conviction was that I owed my primary allegiance to my state and whatever destiny she chose, must necessarily be my destiny. As yet there was no existing cause which would justify secession…If the President preferred, I would at once resign or I would hold my place just as he desired. To this he frankly replied, that while he feared I would be subject of misconstruction, yet he could not say he wished me to resign. And with that leave of absence I visited N.C...I cannot close this letter without bearing my testimony to the greatness, goodness & worth of our old departed Chieftain. It was his fortune to live amid disolving empires. But a purer man, a more sincere friend, a more devoted patriot, an honester citizen and truer guardian of the public interest never lived or wielded power.In January 1861, Thompson differed with Buchanan over the sending of the relief ship Star of the West to Fort Sumter and resigned his post. Returning to Mississippi, he offered his services to the Confederate Army and received a commission as a Lieutenant Colonel.Walker, Leroy P. Letter signed (“L.P. Walker”), 3 pages quarto, Montgomery, Alabama, 1 March 1861, to A[ndrew] B. Moore, confederate governor of Alabama, on imprinted stationery of the War Department, as Secretary of War. He writes in part: The Congress have passed an Act to raise provisional forces for the Confederate States of America, and for other purposes. I beg to enclose a copy of the act Under this act, the President directs me to inform you, that he assumes control of all military operations in your State, having reference to, or connected with question between your State, and powers foreign to it. He also directs me to request that you will communicate without delay to this Department, the quantity and character of army and munitions of war acquired from the United States, and which are now in the Forts, Arsenals, and Navy Yards of your State, and all other army and munitions which your State may desire to tum over, and make changeable to this Government. The President further directs me to say, that he will proceed with as little delay as possible to organize the provisional forces in the respective states, as provided for in the 3rd & 4 sections of said act...Jefferson Davis was elected president of the Confederate States of America on 18 February 1861.Thomas, Lorenzo. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages octavo, Head Quarters of the Army, Washington, 2 March 1861, to B.B. French, Winfield Scott’s Chief of Staff and Chief Marshal at Lincoln’s first inaugural procession. He writes in full: The General in Chief [Winfield Scott] proposes that the army shall be represented in the inauguration procession by a company of horse, and one of sappers and miners availing himself of your polite invitation, he requests that you will assign the horse to the lead of the military escort and the sappers and miners to the position immediately in front of the President elect, that is of the national flag which will precede him. The General is particularly desirous that this latter company may be near the President elect to guard his personal safety, having a very great reliance on the superior merit of the company which is composed of picked men.In just one month the country would be at war. $8,000 - $12,000

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[Civil War - Opening Days] A fine collection of 8 letters documenting the early months of the war.

Lot 16: [Civil War - Opening Days] A fine collection of 8 letters documenting the early months of the war.

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Description: 16. [Civil War – Opening Days] A fine collection of eight letters documenting early actions taken during the early months of the war in both the North and the South. Highlights include:1-Cooper, Samuel. Letter signed (“S. Cooper”) as Adjutant and Inspector General, 1 page quarto, War Department, Montgomery, 15 April 1861. Headed General Order No 43; with integral docketed leaf attached. He writes in full: Lieutenant Worden of the U.S. Navy, having been detected in conveying secret communications, of a hostile character against the Confederate States, to the fleet of War vessels of the U.S. off the Harbor of Pensacola, he will be imprisoned and held as a prisoner of War, until further orders, By order of the Secretary of War. Cooper was one of the few West Pointers of Northern origins who sided with the Confederacy. John Lorimer Worden, who a year later was appointed to command John Ericsson’s Monitor, was at the time of this document, captured after he had delivered special orders to Fort Pickens and attempted to return North by train. He was held for seven months and released in October 1861. 2-Cameron, Simon. Autograph letter signed as Secretary of War, 1 page small quarto, War Department, [Washington, D.C.], 18 April 1861, to an army officer. He writes in part:Will meet Major Pater of the U.S. Army at Baltimore or extend to him all the information in his power regarding the N. Central R. Roads in its capacity to bring forward the troops coming to Washington. He will...aid...all means in his possession to [assure] the speedy arrival of the troops. Cameron’s instructions were issued in response President Lincoln’s call for the raising of 75,000 militia and volunteers in Northern states after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter. 3-Pillow, Gideon J. Autograph letter signed (“Gid J Pillow”), 3 pages quarto, Memphis, [Tennessee], 15 May 1861, to the Committee of Public Safety and Military Board. The Confederate Commander of the Provisional Army of Tennessee makes an impassioned plea for arms for the regular troops and underscores the difficulty of coordinating the actions of the many independent groups in the south. He writes in part: I need the public arms that were issued to Col Pickets Regiment to arm Troops that are ready to take the Field, for the defence of the country…So numerous are the Patriotic Volunteers for Home Service that out of 2000 stand of arms issued to Walkers & Pickets Regiments. I have only 380 men Rank & File who could be found ready for the Field, to be mustred into the Service. There Belong to a new Regiment organized by Col I.K. Walker and are now in the Randolph Works.-- Here are about 1600 stand of Arms sent here by the authorities of the Confederate States & the Gov of Louisiana which are not under my controul - but in possession of Citizens of the City of Memphis, the individuals not known to me. Neither the officers nor men are under the power of the military arm of the State. I have had many interviews with officers of those companies & with prominent citizens seeking to be placed in possession of the arms, but to no purpose. There are many Brave men scattered all over the interior of the state ready to be mustered in, and actually mustered into the service of the state ready to fight any where in defence of the right & honour of the country, whom I cannot supply with arms...If you would save the country from Devastation & ruin & your city from ashes these arms must be turned over to me & promptly… 4-Legare, Joseph J. Autograph letter signed (“J.J. Legare”), 2 pages octavo, Charleston, South Carolina, 8 June 1861, to Brigadier General [P.] G.T. Beauregard, a few weeks after the firing on Fort Sumter. He writes in part: Since your departure from this place we have heard but little definite of your movements, except through the newspapers. I have heard nothing of my application for the Army except that Major Gorgas incidentally informed Capt Lee that I had been appointed, but as I was sick when the Major was here and did not see him, I do not know that be was positive in his statement. There is nothing at all occurring here, yesterday 3 more steamers joined the Minnesota off the bar but one, or two of them, (about 600 or 700 tons) left later in the day. The other steamer seems to be larger than the Minnesota. A privateer (a pilot boat fitted up) from this port left a few days ago & very soon captured a brig with sugar &c, & took her into Georgetown! You know that Major Trapier has been tendered a commission in the Confederate Engineer Service but will only accept it on condition that he is not removed from the State? I send you enclosed two bills for the Photographic views of Fort Sumter & Moultrie after the Surrender of the former, which please approve & return for Capt Lee to pay. They (the views) were sent to Montgomery you will recollect.... 5-Letcher, John. Confederate Governor of Virginia. Autograph note signed, 1 page octavo, Va. Department, 27 June 1861. The Governor of Virginia organizes forces during the early months of the war. He writes in full: If I am compelled to order out the militia as a whole, or to draft a portion of them for service, they will not have the privileges then, of enrolling themselves in volunteer companies. They will then be required to serve with the militia. 6-Wool, John E. Autograph letter signed, 1 page octavo, 24 July 24 1861, to J. Sherman, Washington, D.C. A Union General comments on the First Bull Run. He writes in full: I give you many thanks for your letter of the 18 instant received yesterday. I regret, greatly regret of the loss of the battle of Bulls Run. It was a battle of blunders. Why should 15,000 men be allowed to contend with a superior force for 7 hours without being relieved, with 30 or thirty five thousand men near by doing nothing. Ten or 15,000 men in addition would have been sufficient to have overwhelmed the rebels before Johnson with his forces of 20,000 arrived.7-Hardee, William J. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages octavo, Greenville, Missouri, 4 August 1861, to Dr. Nagle, Pocahontas, Arkansas. He writes in part: I am pleased that you are exerting yourself to make the sick comfortable. I approve all you have done. If help were necessary I suppose from what you say that Dr Orme [is] as good a person as you could get Make every effort to put the sick on their feet, we shall want them all. The troops have travelled slowly in consequence of the extreme heat of the weather. The enemy heading afore advance backed up in haste and retreated back to Ironton. It is doubtful whether I shall proceed any further at present, much will depend on the prompt execution of an order I gave to a party of Missourians to burn the bridge and tear up the rail road between Ironton & St Lows. If I can cut them off from reinforcements I shall advance on Ironton. I hope to get the active cooperation of a body of Missourians, better than those I trust who fought under Jackson...Ironton. I hope to get the active cooperation of a body of Missourians, better than those I trust who fought under Jackson... 8-Wright, Horatio G. Autograph letter signed (“Wright”), in pencil, 1 page small octavo, [Port Royal], 27 November [1861]. A Union General (acting as Chief Engineer here), while making some preparations for an inspection, shows that the Army has yet to comprehend the long, bitter struggle that has begun. He writes in full: This is such a beautiful morning that I have sent to Saxton for the boat, knowing that you could not fail to be ready to pay the visits about the harbor. Shall I expect you at 10 1/2 A.M.? And do you propose going in simple undress or en grande tenue? [full dress uniform] $5,000 - $8,000

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[Civil War - Northern Blockade - Anaconda Plan] A comprehensive group of 18 letters and telegrams.

Lot 17: [Civil War - Northern Blockade - Anaconda Plan] A comprehensive group of 18 letters and telegrams.

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Description: 17. [Civil War – Northern Blockade – Anaconda Plan] A comprehensive group of 18 letters and telegrams relating to the Anaconda Plan. With the fall of Fort Sumter in April of 1861 the small Union Army was suddenly tasked with subduing an area in excess of 750,000 square miles with a population of 9 million people. At the beginning, many expected the conflict would be over in a few months. With over 50 years of domestic, foreign and military affairs, Army General-in-Chief Winfield Scott saw the magnitude of the conflict more clearly. For Scott, war was a game of chess and required thinking many moves ahead of your opponent. Scott’s Anaconda Plan called for the Union Army and Navy to exert constant pressure on the South and gradually strangle it to death. The plan had two main parts. One was a naval blockade that would cause economic hardship in the South. The other was to use naval and land forces to open the Mississippi and other Southern rivers and split the South into two parts. Controlling these rivers would deprive the Confederate army of its interior lines of communication and transportation as well as allow the Union army to then use them. Ultimately, four years of bloody battles and bitter occupations were also needed to achieve the political goal of victory by means of a strategy of annihilation. The Confederacy’s military forces had to be bludgeoned into submission in a methodical, destructive, total war. These weaknesses and shortcomings notwithstanding, Winfield Scott’s Anaconda Plan did indeed influence the strategy that the Union military eventually used to win the Civil War.Eventually the Union blockade spread to all the Atlantic and Gulf ports, and before the war ended it would employ more than five hundred ships manned by a 100,000 sailors. In its sheer size and ambition, it was the greatest naval operation ever undertaken by the United States. Its effectiveness was controversial at the time and has been debated by historians ever since. But whether the blockade was a key element of Union victory, as many insist, or “a naval sieve,” as one authority has claimed, establishing and maintaining the blockade was a central component of Lincoln’s strategy for the war that began at Fort Sumter. [Craig L. Symonds. Lincoln and his Admirals, Oxford University Press, NY, NY, 2008, page 38.]Highlights of the collection include:Smith, Gustavus Woodson. Confederate General and Secretary of War. Three letters and four telegrams from his letterbook signed (“G.W. Smith”), one signature in pencil, 10 pages legal folio, Goldsboro [North Carolina], 26-27 January 1863. To the Secretary of War, James A. Seddon; railroad administrator, John D. Whitford; and other commanding officers.In a lengthy letter to Secretary of War Seddon on 26-27 December 1863, Smith outlines in detail his plans for defense. He writes in part: ...With the troops from General Beauregard, General Whiting can hold the enemy in check until our forces from Magnolia and this place can be brought to his relief. The matter to be apprehended at Wilmington is the passage of the iron clads past the forts, which would not only give them the outer harbor but would seriously embarrass and endanger the defences of the city.... In placing the three brigades near Kenansville...we are in position to move against the flank or rear of the enemy in case they attack Wilmington.... I scarcely think they will cross the river. If they do, I have two brigades here...and will endeavor to beat them. ... Rail Roads are an uncertain reliance; they will worry me out of my life yet.... The State of North Carolina owns two thirds of the stock in all of the Rail Roads...and has placed everything possible at my disposal. The only trouble heretofore has been in the condition of the roads and their fixtures.... The works at Kinston are strong against attack from the south side, and the evening will find it a very different place to take from what it was before, even with the same force.... The enemy have put on double guards around Newbern and Beaufort, and our usual channels of communication ...has been cut off or delayed for ten days. But we continue to get information that their forces and fleet are both large -- that all preparations have been made for a movement and that there is much dissatisfaction in their army.Smith’s letter to the government agent of railroad transportation, John D. Whitford, acknowledges; his valuable services so willingly and efficiently rendered ...during the operations in this vicinity since my arrival here in December.... and a telegram to General French informs him: Two wagons are allowed to a regiment, one for ammunition, and one for light cooking utensils. At your urgent solicitation you are allowed to take with you all the wagons that could be spared from here at that time.... In a lengthy letter to General French, Smith reminds him: we must move with the least possible baggage.... One wagon to one hundred men.... Please have the wagons returned here at once.... Let us do the best we can with what we have and can get. But...I urge you to be stringent, and that is not to allow the means we have to be loaded down with baggage of officers and men.... Smith also questions if General Ransom know[s] that our pickets are in advance of New River” and notes that “a brigade [at Kinston] can make effective resistance there against almost any force that may be brought against us from the south side. But the road and way is open to cross below and came against us on the north bank....Ericsson, John. American Engineer, Inventor and builder of ironclad ships, including the Monitor. Three autograph letters signed (“J. Ericsson”), 3 pages various sizes, various locales, 21 April 1858, 26 March [no year] and 8 October 1886. On 21 April 1858, he writes in part: I can see no good reason why the two 12 inch internal fire engines should not be sold for pumping when the quantity to be raised is small. I have no question but...that...engine would answer even better, on account of the constant call for starting in order to exhibit. You are aware that very little more than half the time is required for firing up and the cooling down is very rapid. On 26 March Ericsson writes: I am just going to Drigg’s to instruct Mr. Banks how to fix the new momentum wheel and pulleys, all of which Mr. B. sent there yesterday. Such dispatch & punctuallity merit praise. As soon as I return I will visit 164 in order to direct the placing of the hoisting machine. We will have the [noire villue] made next week, by Mr. Banks. In his letter of 8 October 1886, he writes: I request as a special favor that you will instruct the most competent of your torpedo experts to prepare a plan and description showing the safest method of charging the powder chamber of the projectile of my submarine gun, drawing enclosed. I infer from your statement to the Navy Department, concurred in by Secretary Chandler, September 25th, 1884, that you deem it safe to employ wet gun cotton for submarine projectiles. Emory, W. H. Union General in the Civil War. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Fort McPherson, [Kansas], 28 September 1869, to Major T.M. Gould. He writes in part: I am glad you are to publish the records of the regiment . . . .The 29th Maine was the regiment I put across the road at Mansfield on ...the 8th April 1864 and which …did such signal service . . . . I wish you would communicate with Dr. Armstrong ...who was left behind that night to take care of our wounded. The slaughter we made that night against the Rebels was immense. . . Armstrong has frequently told me all the particulars as he got them from the Rebels . . .. So far from objecting to be figured amongst the brave men of the 29th who so often stood shoulder to shoulder with me in the battle, and who on all occasions behaved so well, I will take it as a compliment to be classed with them . . . On 8 April 1864, during the Red River Campaign, Emory held a command in the Battle of Sabine Crossroads, near Mansfield, Louisiana. On that day, Confederate forces under Taylor surprised and disrupted the Union troops; but Emory’s bravery and skill at Pleasant Grove prevented a complete rout. The next day, his distinguished leadership at Pleasant Hill contributed to the Union victory.Butler, Benjamin F. Union General in the Civil War. Letter signed twice (“Benj. F Butler”) and with initials, 2 pages quarto, Lowell, Massachusetts, 24 July 1866, to Major H.C. Lockwood of Albany, New York. He writes in full: Many and grateful thanks for your soldier like paper upon the two expeditions against Fort Fisher. You have not access to a few facts which would make your exposition perfect. There was an agreed day for sailing from Fortress Monroe, between the Army and Navy, and an agreed place and time of rendezvous off Fort Fisher. I did not sail until all the Fleet had sailed. I informed Porter of the necessity of putting back into Beaufort after the storm began, and went there by his advice. I sent from Beaufort a staff officer, Capt. Clark, to Porter, to inform him I would be back as soon as we could and watered (over) certainly by the 25th of December. I got there the 24th. Porter sent back word that he should commence on the night of the 23d, before the time when he knew it was possible for me to be back. He is simply a braggart Liar without honesty or patriotism. In a postscript, Butler has added, Perhaps you may desire to amend your account. If you do so I will be glad if you will favor me with a copy of it.Wright, Horatio G. Union General in the Civil War. Autograph letter signed (“H”), in pencil, 3 pages quarto, James Island, S.C., 5 July 1862, to his wife, Louisa, a few light stains. He writes in part: ...You have doubtless heard of our affair of the 16th in which we lost so heavily (the enemy lost heavily, too) and for which General Benham who ordered it was condemned by General Hunter and sent north in arrest immediately after that battle. Benham was relieved and I was placed in command -- I at once went to work at the establishment of lines and batteries and had progressed so far as to be able in the course of three or four days more to put in position an armament superior Lo the enemy in weight of metal and range, when I got the order from General Hunter to evacuate. Some of the ordnance was already in position. You may imagine how disappointed everybody was. The men were in fine spirits at the idea of being able to overwhelm the enemy with our fire and worked most cheerfully. But there was nothing to be done but to obey, and I proceeded at once to the task of getting off, with very limited means, the various regiments and all the vast impedimenta of so many troops who had brought everything in the expectation that the movement when made was to be forward and not backward. So far I have succeeded satisfactorily and we have not lost a man or abandoned an article of property. The upper camp has been broken up (where I had my HQs) and a considerable part of the lower camp is also gone. I have been in constant expectation of an onslaught from the enemy now that our forces are so reduced, and I shall look for it till we are all afloat General B., I thought, was very desirous of shifting the responsibility of the failure of the 16th on to the shoulders of someone else. I don’t know that he charges me with having any part in occasioning it -- he had better not -- he ought to take it himself. AU the troops fought well and we failed because troops could not stand up against such a fire. In the short contest we lost more near proportionally than in the long contested battle of Bull Run. I go to Edisto in command of that place. I won’t like it for I don’t want to settle down and do nothing during the summer. I shall therefore hope for some change.... Of the Battle of Secessionville on 16 June 1862, H.W. Benham was left in command of about 9,000 troops (divisions of H.G. Wright, I.I. Stevens and Robert Williams) with orders not to undertake any offensive operations against Charleston. Over the objection of his Division Commanders, however, Benham ordered an attack against the position around Secessionville, which was defended by N.G. Evans. In three assaults, Stevens and Wright lost 683 while inflicting a loss of only 204 on the Confederates. 500 men under Col. T.G. Lamar repulsed the first assault. For this action, Lamar was voted the thanks of the Confederate Congress. Benham, on the other hand, was relieved of command, arrested for disobedience of orders, and his appointment as B.G. USV revoked by Lincoln.Butler, Benjamin Franklin. Letter signed, 1 page quarto, New Orleans, 7 May 1862. Written to Col. J. P. Taylor, Commissary General, U.S.A. Butler writes in full: There is need for some haste in answering the accompanying requisition, for the reason that it may become necessary to feed the people of this City out of said subsistence stores, in the absence of other food. The requisition of April 6th has not yet been received, we shall need it thirty days from date hereof.Benjamin F. Butler became notorious for his administration of New Orleans after commanding the land forces that took the city on 1 May 1862. Despite the controversies he created, Butler preserved the peace there and governed the city effectively - improving sanitation, and providing food for the inhabitants, as the present letter illustrates. At the same time, be ignored the U.S. government, assumed full financial control, collected taxes, and expended monies. He hung William Mumford for hauling down the United States flag. He seized $800,000 in bullion belonging to Southern owners, which had been left in charge of the French consul, resulting in protests from many European governments. Then there was Order No. 28, issued by Butler after a woman in the French Quarter leaned out her window and emptied the contents of her chamber pot on the head of Admiral Farrugut. Southerners were outraged, and nicknamed Butler “Beast.” On 16 December 1862, be was removed from his post there.Ashe, William Shepperd. President of the Wilmington and Weldon Railroad from 1854, Ashe was appointed Superintendent and Director of Railroads for the Confederacy. Letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Wilmington, North Carolina, 22 August 1862. Written to George Wythe Randolph who served as the Confederate Secretary of War (1862), the first Confederate military official to hold the difficult position. In the month before his death, he writes in full: Dear Sir Capt Isaac B. Smith of this place, by profession a pilot, who has since the Estab­ lishing of the Blockade of our ports, been engaged in successfally piloting vessels from Nassau & other places, to this & other points - & who has I am credibly informed brat [brought] through safely more vessels than arcy other man engaged in this business; has at last been cap­tured by the enemy. He was in the Steam Ship Memphis. The object of this is to enlist your influence to effect his speedy exchange - He is young & active &: will be of great advantage to the Confederacy, being acquainted intimately with all the intr[ic]acies of our Coast. He & his family are warm friends of mine&: I solicit your aid as a personal favor. Very Respty Yours & c. W S Ashe”The incident referred to in present the letter to the Confederate Secretary of War is the capture of the steam ship Memphis, which successfully completed one run through the blockade operating in the Atlantic from May - July 1862 - until it was captured by the U.S. naval vessel the Magnolia after escaping from Charleston (31 July 1862). Eventually, the ship was purchased from the prize court and taken into the U.S. Navy. Chase, Salmon P. Letter signed (“S P Chase”), 1 page quarto, Treasury Department, 14 June 1861, as Secretary of the Treasury, to Messrs. Du Bois & Vandervoort, New York. He writes in part: I have received your letter of the 8th instant, with three enclosures, requesting the release of the British Barque Hiawatha, seized by the Blockading Squadron in the Chesapeake; the said vessel, as you allege, being loaded with Tobacco for foreign account, and bound for a foreign port. As this case comes within the jurisdiction of the Department of State, your letter and papers have been transmitted to that Department for its action.... Banks, Nathaniel P. Autograph letter signed (“N.P. Banks”), 3 pages quarto, New Orleans, 28 August 1863, to Commodore Thomas O. Selfridge, Commander of the Naval Forces in Vicksburg, requesting tin clad boats, reporting on enemy movements in southern Louisiana, and sending news of captured prize vessels, Johnston’s weakened army, and the state of military affairs in Mobile and Fort Sumter. He writes: ...I am aware how strong the pressure must be upon you for light draft boats, and nothing but the positive movement of the enemy would have prompted me to apply to you for assistance The movement of which I gave you notice is still in progress. All the troops have been moved southward from the vicinity of Alexandria and are concentrated to the number of 8000, near Irish Bend, for the purpose of crossing Grand Lake. A part have already crossed. Their purpose is to attack the transport on the River near or between Morganria and Red River, or to come near Plaquemine Bayou for the purpose of intercepting and capturing our forces al Thibcdaux and Brashcan City. They can do us no material harm but we hope not to allow them to escape, if they cross the lake and approach the River. This can be prevented only by the aid of Gun Boats, which would destroy their steamers and flat Boats on the Atchafalaya and in Berwicks Bay, and result in their certain capture on dispersion. The Red River steamers sh[oul]d at least be stationed at the mouth of the Atchafalaya, if they cannot patrol the River. All our Gun Boats draw too much water for this service. We have suffered incalculable evils from the deficiency of light draft Gun Boats. The enemy in Western Louisiana owes the existence of his army to this deficiency alone. The defence of New Orleans is almost exclusively a naval affair, as was its capture. You will confer the greatest favor upon this department by aiding us in obtaining, if it be only for the shortest lime, a few of the Tin Clad steamers drawing four or two feel water. Our information from Mobile is satisfactory. The troops are fighting each other -- the people in great distress & confusion. Our naval officers report the capture of prize vessels laden with Beef and Pork which leads us to believe that their provisions arc not abundant. Johnston is near the Rail Road covering Mobile, his army weakened by desertion and greatly demoralized. The Mobile papers of the 22nd reports that the south face of Fort Sumpter had been broken in by our Batteries, and that the north wall was crumbling. They had moved several of their Guns, from the fort to the neighboring island. The impression at Mobile seemed to be of the most despondent character. The movement of the enemy from western Louisiana to this quarter is obviously to prevent the removal of forces to Mobile or elsewhere .Toward the end of 1862, Banks was placed in command of New Orleans and was given the task of holding the city and other parts of the state, which had been reduced to submission, and of aiding Grant to open the Mississippi. After placing his garrisons, he had hardly 15,000 men left for aggressive action, but he did achieve military successes in 1863, including the capture of Port Hudson in July, which removed the last obstruction to the free navigation of the Mississippi River. This letter reflects on his subsequent movements -- his advances up the River and along the coast toward Brownsville.Farragut, David Glasgow. Autograph letter signed, on Western Gulf Blockading Squadron, Flagship Hartford letterhead stationery, 2 pages octavo, Key West [Florida], 14 January 1864 to My dear Son - his only son, Loyall Farragut, named after Farragut’s second wife, Virginia Loyall, the daughter of William Loyall, a highly-esteemed resident of Norfolk, Virginia. A notation in red ink on the blank leaf states: Presented by Loyall Farragut Rec’d June 12 th 91.” Rear Admiral Farragut writes in full: My dear Son, We arrived here in six days & a half from Sandy Hook. We sailed in a snow storm, but soon ran off in to good weather, but we did not get the sun for 4 days & the ship rolled a good deal more than would have been comfortable for you, every body was sea sick. We ran through the Providence channel - did not see but one sail on the passage (an English schooner). I dined with [Acting Rear] Ad[mira]l. [Theodorus] Bailey yesterday - & got to sea tonight after taking in coal. Give my kind regards to Medcalfe & tell him to do the same to his father &family when he writes to them. I hope you have gotten over all your trouble by this time & are more reconciled to West Point. Only look ahead to the final year my son & disregard the little inconveniences of the life for the first year. You know that your father & mother will always love you & stick by you so long as you are what you now are an honorable man. Your devoted father. D. G. Farragut In January of 1864, at the time of the present warm letter to his son, Farragut returned to the Gulf, visiting Ship Island and Pensacola on the way, where he established depots of supplies - all in preparation for his long-mediated attack on the Confederate defenses in Mobile Bay. The entrance to Mobile Bay, thirty miles from the Gulf, was defended on its east side by Fort Morgan, and nearly three miles distant on its west side by Fort Gaines. Close under Fort Morgan was an open channel used by blockade-runners. The rest of the passage was obstructed by a double row of mines. On 4 August 1864, Farragut, with four monitors and 14 wooden ships ran past the forts into Mobile Bay intent upon destroying the ironclad ram Tennessee and three wooden gunboats under the command of Admiral Buchanan. Narrowly escaping death in the attack, Farragut was successful; at approximately 10am, Captain J. D. Johnston surrendered the Tennessee. $10,000 - $15,000

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[Civil War - Financing the Confederacy] - A collection of four letters.

Lot 18: [Civil War - Financing the Confederacy] - A collection of four letters.

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Description: 18. [Civil War – Financing the Confederacy] A collection of four letters providing insights as to how the newly formed Confederacy was organizing a monetary system for a new country and financing a war simultaneously. Three letters from the Secretary of the Confederate Treasury on policy and tax issue and a letter from a General showing a practical side of funding the army involving commanders in the field (separate from foraging in the field and the confiscation of enemy property, etc.).Memminger, Christopher G. Confederate Secretary of the Treasury. Letter signed (“CG Memminger”), 4 pages legal folio, Treasury Department, Richmond, [Virginia], 5 October 1862, to Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States of America.Still early in the war, Memminger reports on the current monetary and financial conditions in this extraordinary letter. Memminger warns of impending disaster if issues of notes continue to be made. He discusses, in great detail, remedies for obtaining capital to redeem these notes and to safeguard the depreciation, which would be inevitable because of the circulation of so many additional issues. His two proposals to solve the problem include loans made to the government based upon a portion of all income and a reduction of the interest on bonds in which Treasury Notes are authorized to be funded. He also emphasizes the high cost of carrying on the War and the importance of continuing the War Tax without raising it. He writes in full: At the opening of the present session of Congress, estimates were furnished for the support of Government for the single month of December. Since that time Congress has determined to extend its appropriations to a later period and the large additional sums in Treasury Notes which are required to meet these appropriations render it necessary now to consider the proper means for sustaining the credit of these Notes. In my Report made to Congress upon these estimates it was shewn that in order to pay them, the issue of Treasury Notes must probably reach the sum of $433,000,000; and that after making every allowance for interest bearing notes, the amount of Currency Notes left in circulation would be at least $340,000,000. It was further stated that a just consideration of the case required that the expenditures for February, March and April should also be had in view; and that these would probably add about forty millions per month, thus making an aggregate on 1 May 1863 of about four hundred and sixty millions of Treasury Notes circulating as currency, besides about one hundred millions outstanding of interest bearing notes. When it is remembered that the circulation of all the Confederate States before the present war, was less than one hundred millions, il becomes obvious that so large an increase must produce depreciation, and final disaster, unless sufficient remedies are provided. It has been already shewn in my Report made at the opening of the present session, that the funding of Treasury Notes in 8 per cent Bonds and 6 per cent Call Certificates, although working well, had not proved sufficient to absorb the large issues which the necessities of the war required. While therefore it is proper still to pursue with energy all these plans which have thus far assisted the public credit, it is necessary to add other measures which will retire from the circulation and absorb the very large issues which each succeeding month compels us to add.The original foundation which was laid for all our financial plans, is the War Tax. This can, on no account be dispensed with. It furnishes the basis of our credit, and rests upon a direct pledge made by the Provisional Congress that sufficient Revenues would be provided to pay both interest and principal of the public debt I take it for granted therefore that a War Tax will certainly be imposed annually by Congress; and the only question will be as to its amount. According to the Returns and Estimates, the War Tax of last year will reach about twenty millions of dollars. This tax is laid entirely upon property and is so small that it can certainly be paid for the ensuing year. If no duty other than this were laid by the Confederate Government, the tax could easily be doubled, as even then it would only amount to one per cent upon the property of the citizen. But as one of the measures which I shall recommend calls for other contributions from the same parties, I propose to leave the War Tax at the same rate as last year. Congress having thus provided the foundation for the system, I would respectfully propose to them two measures of relief against depreciation of the currency. The first of these is a loan to the Government of a portion of all incomes. The statements herein before submitted, shew that unless some absorbent is provided within the next three months for at least one hundred millions of Treasury Notes, very serious evils may be anticipated. The increase of the currency from a nonnal circulation of one hundred millions to four or five hundred millions compels its depreciation; and it is obvious that if instead of allowing this increase, the citizens will place back in the hands of the Government a portion of the currency, great and mutual benefits will result proportional exactly to the amount returned. The portion remaining in the hands of the citizens will to the same extent be enhanced in value, and the Government will be furnished with means capable of purchasing so much larger an amount of army supplies. The value of the circulating medium will thus be preserved, while at the same time the credit of the Government is sustained. Such a loan may be made fair and equal to all, by graduating it in proportion to the incomes of the citizens, and by excusing those who have no income. Assuming four thousand millions as the value of the property in our Confederacy, and ten per cent as the value of gross income, the total of income would be about 400 millions, and if the loan be set down at one fifth of the income, it would realize about 80 millions of dollars.The other measure which I would propose is the reduction of the interest on Bonds in which Treasury Notes are authoured to be funded The rate of 8 per cent was adopted for our securities, because at the commencement of our Government that rate prevailed in the majority of the States of our Confederacy. The Treasury Notes hitherto issues are all fundable in 8 percent Bonds. But that rate may be charged as to Notes hereafter to be issued. If after a certain date no Eight per cent Bonds be issued except to fulfil existing contracts, it is obvious that the currency now in circulation would have an advantage over that afterwards issued; and the effect would be, a general effort on the part of moneyed men to get possession of and hold those notes which were fundable in Bonds at the higher rate of Interest This effect is now exhibited by the Two year Treasury Notes which were first issued. These Notes have an advantage over the others afterwards issued being fundable in 8 per cent call certificates, and although about seventeen millions of them have been issued, they have disappeared from the circulation. A similar effect will be produced upon a large portion of the present circulation, of a distinction were made between it and future issues. To what extent it would operate is merely to be conjectured; but it may I think be assumed that the united effect of both absorbents herein proposed would not be short of 200 millions of dollars. Should they fall short, an additional force could be given to the last by fixing a period within which all funding at 8 per cent shall be claimed. If this period should give full time to the holders of Notes to come in and claim their privilege, there would be no just objection to the measure.Martin, William T. Confederate general in the civil War; fought at Chickamauga; commanded a division of Wheeler’s cavalry in the Atlanta campaign. Autograph letter signed (“Will T. Manin”), 1 page quarto, Red Qrs Manins Cav Div, Alexandria, [Virginia], 2 August 1863, to Major D.G. Reed, repairs to folds. A letter from a Confederate General in the field demonstrating the financial difficulties the South was facing in waging war with the North. He writes in full: I have a communication from Col Prather in relation to the picketing in the Tennessee River between [Eustusville] & Decatur, in which he asks that his line may be shortened to 40 miles. This distance is, I think, quite as much as he can well attend to. One company of Ruddy’s men is picketing the River between Decatur & Whitesburg, under the direction of Gen Pillow. Col Ruddy’s regular line commences at Decatur. A portion of the 3d Confederate is at [Eustusville], at Depoint...& Whitesburg. I would respectfully ask that Col Ruddy may be required to picket on the river as far as ten miles above Decatur and that the 3d Confederate may picket as far down as Depoint This would leave to Col Prather 40 miles of the River, between Depoint & a point 10 miles above Decatur -- 40 miles is quite as long a line I think as he can well attend to. $40,000 are due my men for horses killed in action. I have had the estimate forwarded to Maj Chaffin. It is very hard that the men have many of them waited 6 & 8 months for their money. I would urge the furnishing of this money, as necessary and but just.Memminger, Christopher G. Autograph letter signed (“C.G Memminger”), 2 pages quarto, Richmond, [Virginia], 22 October 1863, to Alex[ande]r Masyck, South Santee, South Carolina. The Secretary of the Treasury attempts to explain the complex tax laws governing the Confederacy. He writes in part: Your Letter of 15 with that of Mr Pope of 10th has been received, and before sending it for the formal answer of the Commissioner of Taxes, I address you a few lines. I think you have overlooked the special definitions of a Dealer contained in the Law. It is a person whose business is to sell or to offer to sell groceries, goods, wares, merchandise or other things of foreign or domestic production. If the term Dealer had been used without definition, there would be ground for the views you express. But Congress has carefully avoided one of the usual incidents of Dealers and really intended to include the very cases to which you refer, with the exception of those who pay a Tax in kind. The Tax act is not exactly in conformity with any settled principle. Many things are taxed several times, this [estate] debt being first taxed specifically -- then again whenever sold by a Retail or wholesale Dealer and again in the shape of income when profits are realised on the sale. Congress found itself embarrassed by the clause in relation to the apportionment of Direct Taxes, and not finding itself able to Tax land...resorted to the best practicable substitute. I hope you will be able to concede your doubts to this difficult position of the laws.Memminger, Christopher G. Letter signed (“C.G Memminger”), 1 page quarto, Richmond, 26 May 1864. As Secretary of Treasury, on imprinted stationery of the Treasury Department, C.SA., to F.C. Barrett of the C[onfederate] S[tates] Depository in Gainesville, Florida; with an original unaddressed envelope of the Treasury Department. In his continuing effort to protect the value of the Confederacy’s currency, Secretary of Treasury Memminger gives detailed instructions on cancelling notes being taken out of circulation and forwarding them so they can be accounted for. He writes in part: In reply to your letter of 12 inst[ant], stating that there is no express from your place by which to forward cancelled notes, and proposing to send them by mail, I would state that the suggestion is approved. You will, however, be careful that the notes are thoroughly cancelled and unfit for circulation, tho’ not too much mutilated for examination by the accounting officers...Less than three weeks after Memminger wrote this letter, on 15 June 1864, the unpopular Secretary of the Treasury resigned. During his term of office, which had begun in 1861, he was faced with an undiversified economy, which he attempted to fund through the sale of bonds and treasury notes. By 1863, military reverses and redundant notes had caused rapid depreciation of the currency. Prices rose alarmingly, increasing governmental expenditures that could be met only by more treasury notes. Bonds were taken sparingly. His various funding schemes failed, partly because of business conditions and partly because of the tinkering of Congress. The blockade prevented the exportation of cotton, the only resource that could command cash. When the government’s credit completely collapsed, with a public domestic debt of $1,371,000,000, Memminger was generally held responsible for the disaster. After his resignation he retired to his country home at Flat Rock, North Carolina, remaining there until after the war. $5,000 - $7,000

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[Civil War - the Ladies of Robert E. Lee.] A collection of three wartime letters.

Lot 19: [Civil War - the Ladies of Robert E. Lee.] A collection of three wartime letters.

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Description: 19. [Civil War – the Ladies of Robert E. Lee.] A collection of three wartime letters from the female family members of Robert E. Lee, including:Lee, Mary Custis. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages octavo, Lexington, Virginia, 5 November [no year,] to Mrs. Nixon; marginal browning.Robert E. Lee’s wife moves family heirlooms to safety in wartime. She writes in part: I should have answered your letter sooner, but that I have been very much occupied preparing for my departure to Europe, having expected to sail yesterday, the 4th. However, I had requested my sister to hunt up some things, & now that I find I am not to go until the 22 of Decem[ber], I have a little more time to attend to the matter myself. I send you by tonight’s mail, a box containing a saddle cloth, worked for my father by some ladies...(at the South) though the past is so long ago, that I cannot recall just now by whom. It should be sufficient to label it saddle [cloth] worked by & presented to Gen R.E.Lee, by southern ladies, & doubtless it will then come out who were the donors, which I shall be glad to know, & am ashamed to have forgotten. The old silver mounted pistols belonged first to Gen. Washington, & then to his adopted son, my grandfather, George Washington Parker Custis, of ‘Arlington.’ He had always intended them, he said afterwards, for my brother Custis, his namesake, & to whom he left ‘Arlington.’ However, when my father returned so distinguished from the Mexican War, he presented them to him with great Pride & affection, & now they are my brother’s in the natural course of inheritance. You can imagine how we prize these articles, & I need not, I am sure, commend them to your special case.I add on my own account two pieces of Japanese embroidery which I bought myself in ‘Kioto,’ the old capital of Japan. They are intended to be hung on the wall as pictures, are very old, & I had them relined at ‘Yokohama’ with silk, instead of the original dull red, & much faded, Canton crepe. Each tells a mythological story which I only half remember. In one, the old saint or priest, is receiving messages from his storks, while his little servant is fanning the charcoal burner where his tea is making. In the other a ‘Daimio’ is coming to consult a sainted recluse & a monkey god figure, I know not why! The embroidery is all done by men . . .Congratulate us on our triumphs in . . .Virginia!Lee, Mary Custis. Autograph letter signed (“Maiselle”), 4 pages octavo, Richmond, [Virginia], 7 December 1863, to My dear Miss Lettie; light browning.Mary Custis Lee gives a detailed description of life in wartime Richmond. She writes in full: I have been intending to write to you for a long time, but I need not remind you of that unmentionable locality that is said to be paved with ‘good intentions’, nor of the innumerable distractions incident to a city life, even to such a quiet family as ours. I had but written so far when I was interrupted by persons who insisted on being admitted, in spite of my positive orders to the servant, & now they have just left, & it is 2 p.m. & Mag Smith said I must produce my epistle by four, at the latest Alas! Alas! Is it that we are so peculiarly attractive, or that people have so little to do! From breakfast till dinner, from dinner till tea, & from tea till bed-time, there is one ever flowing, never ceasing, stream of men, women & children, black, white & copper colour, interesting & uninteresting; till really, I commence to fear that my poor little tongue, which already is said to have some proclivities that nay, will make discovery of the secret of perpetual motion, & drag on mechanically through all time & space. If I had the ‘flood’of Rosa &Aggy I might bear up under this overwhelming tide of conversation, but as I have not, I find myself sinking into the merest common places, the weather being the most prominent topic. We were agreeably surprised last night by the apparition of my youngest brother, just from the Cavalry, & this morning Custis, who has been absent ever since our arrival here, also presented himself. A perfect wave of feminines washed them off the scene, & as it was Monday morning & I had some mending to do, I just composedly gathered together my tattered garments, & sat & sewed persistently in spite of a strong infusion of the masculine element into our cup of horrors.To change the subject, last Tuesday (a bitter day) we went down on the flag of truce boat to visit a french man of war lying off City Point. We were much edified, especially the champaigne administered on board the Grenade, & I talked french, until I was in great danger of forgetting the vernacular, & was complimented like true parisien blarney on my proficiency. Capt. Bayot was not remunerative, but Lieut Rosseau was charming, & commencing with Les Misérables, we roamed over the field of literature that we had in common with great satisfaction to ourselves, & increasing fluency of speech on my part. He like About’s books as much as I do & moreover was personally acquainted with About, so I was really quite sorry when I thought it [close] to the occasion to present him to some of the other ladies, & turn my own attention to a very promising (?) specimen of the genus, Young America. I had a nice little note from Mrs. Bowyer some time since, to which I replied, informing her that the stockings & socks, to which you also alluded, had never made their appearance in Richmond. As I was rather misty about her address I am more than doubtful whether my letter has reached her. We heard yesterday from Aggy Dabney, a very amusing epistle indeed, & while we are on the subject of correspondence, Agnes begs me to thank Rosa for her acceptable letter to which she will reply on some future occasion, and so the ‘bark’ still each & all of your pleasant circle. Tell Dr. B. his ‘form’ is still bound in grateful remembrance. Ever yrs truly Maiselle Lee, Agnes. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages octavo, the last portion cross-written over the top part of the first page, octavo, Richmond, [Virginia], 5 January 1865, to Rosa Burwell.The daughter of General Robert E. Lee comments on social topics disrupted in wartime. She writes in full: And is it possible dear Rosa, that you at this period of your country’s perils seriously contemplate this step y[ou]r best friends accuse you of? At a time my uncle Capt[ain] Lee says he can understand why persons might apply for divorce but to be bound by new ties!! Ah the Richmond contagion has reached Bedford. Young women here are married in church & out of church with a recklessness as to time & place & spectators that almost takes one’s breath away! Thank you dear for y[ou]r kind wish to have us with you. How much we w[oul]d enjoy it! But we think considering this season & the great & constant derangement in the railroads it is better not to attempt it. I know we will miss a great deal of pleasure & ‘nice times’ besides being with you. I do hope some one will have time to write us all about it. Who are to be the bridesmaids? Men you know are of no possible interest at weddings. I suppose Kitty & Aggy will ‘assist’ will they not? but I see no hopes these war times. But you will live upon romance & poetry of course! Do send Mr. D’s last effusion on the subject. Think of this frantic little missive that will be rushed across...by lantern light. I seem destined never to finish this disjointed epistle. Company have talked me into a state similar to that of an exhausted receiver, so I must not tire the bride elect with stupidity from common people. You mustn’t quite forget & tell Aggy or Billy, if with you, to write us glowing accounts of all that is done. My very warmest wishes dear Rosa for a life long of brightness & happiness...In a lengthy postscript, Agnes has written, I have a secret wish you will be badly scared! I don’t know why I should have such kind wishes for you my dear, but there seems a fitness in it! The poor ‘bark.’ how could you Rosa allow him to destroy all of his clothes & provisions! his poetry might be replaced! I think I’ll send y[ou][r cousin Mr. Burwell up to spend the festivities with you. He wishes to marry in V[irgini]a he says. I wish there was any way in which we could assist you, if there is you must be very sure to call upon us. Mama sends her best wishes & congratulations, & says she has a p[ai]r of gloves for you whose highest recommendation is they passed direct from Paris without Yankee contamination. I wish I had some substantial way of showing my good wishes. Mama is afraid the gloves are too large. I hope not. Will find out. Y[ou]r father, I sent them by him. Best love to Mrs. Burwell & Mrs. Boyer. Maj[or] B. came to us before Christmas, said his wife was coming down. $5,000 - $8,000

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[Civil War - Missouri] A collection of 18 letters (mostly from General Thomas Ewing Jr.)

Lot 20: [Civil War - Missouri] A collection of 18 letters (mostly from General Thomas Ewing Jr.)

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Description: 20. [Civil War - Missouri] A collection of 18 letters (mostly from General Thomas Ewing Jr., the foster brother of William Tecumseh Sherman) chronicles the operations in western Missouri immediately following the Lawrence Massacre. The letters give detailed accounts of the two matters upmost in Ewing’s mind: the Confederate Colonel Joseph Shelby and the leader of the massacre at Lawrence, Charles Quantrill. The dispatches give one as close to a moment-by-moment update to the movements of the engagement as one could experience 150 years later. While the nation’s attention (both North & South) was with the epic battles taking place in Virginia and Pennsylvania, a brutal guerrilla war was being waged in Western Missouri and the bordering areas of Arkansas and Kansas. Missouri was a state uniquely divided with the population roughly divided between Missourians of Northern or foreign birth vs. natives of the South. The state divided with the nation. As a consequence, few adult men did not bear arms.The guerilla, Charles Quantrill, led the Massacre of Lawrence, Kansas, less then 40 miles from the Missouri border. Quantrill managed to secure a captain’s commission from Richmond after a successful raid on Independence, Missouri. Approximately 450 men conducted the raid on the morning of 21 August 1863. At least 150 men were killed, with less then 20 of them soldiers. They were killed in beds, shot as they ran, burned to death as they hid in their houses and dragged from their homes to be murdered in front of their wives and children. In the days immediately following, any of the men involved in the raids who were captured were then killed. Even Ewing, who just five months before issued his General Order No. 9 governing the expected good conduct of his men, stated, “No prisoners have been taken, and none will be.” It was at this time Ewing issued the infamous General Order No. 11 that would effectively depopulate four Missouri counties.While all this was going on, Ewing was pursuing regular Confederate forces under Colonel Joseph Shelby. Shelby was considered one of the best Cavalry Officers of the South and in September of 1863, he headed from Arkansas to the Missouri River for what would be one of the longest and most successful raids of the Civil War.Highlights include:Ewing, Thomas Jr. Document signed (“By order of Thomas Ewing Jr. Col. Comdg 2nd Brigd”) in the hand of an aide, 2 pages legal folio, 29 March 1863, headed General Order No. 9. This general order written five months before the massacre at Lawrence, gives newly promoted Brigadier General Ewell’s expectation of the conduct of those under his command: …If any man in any company commits an act of violence or pillage he must be arrested and the facts reported to their Head Quarters, and a punishment shall then be inflicted commensurate with the crime… Autograph draft of letter, 2 pages quarto, 7 October 1863, to the commanding officer in Warrensburg. General Ewing tries to coordinate the campaign against Shelby: Send messengers to Genl. Brown wherever he is telling him that I leave here tomorrow forenoon with five hundred men…with five pieces of artillery, for Rose Hill, & may go six or eight miles beyond there tomorrow…send me all the information you have as to Shelbys movements & force & Genl Browns whereabouts…Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, 8 October 1863, to Colonel Lynde. Ewing brings a subordinate up to speed on intelligence he has just received from General Brown (see below, letter of 7 October): Last advices from Shelby he was at Stockton at 3 p.m. day before yesterday with 2000 men and 3 pieces of artillery, going north. Genl. Brown will have force enough at Clinton by tonight to head him off…Autograph letter signed, in pencil, 1 page quarto, 9 October 1863, to Major General J[ohn] M. Schofield in St. Louis Missouri. General Ewing continues to relay troop movements: Dispatch from col Weer 6 miles south of Fort Scott yesterday 6 a.m., just starting for Clinton via Papinsville. I expect to meet him to day about Johnstown unless he or I encounters Shelby. He reports Genl Blunt surprised by Quantrill losing 42 & baggage trains burned. Maj Curtis & 11 others & prisoners. Don’t say where or when; but says Genl Blunt puts Quantrills force at six hundred, & has taken all troops from Fort Scott southward…Letter signed, in pencil, 1 page oblong octavo, 9 October [1863], to Colonel Lynde. More orders from Ewing trying to balance the engagement of Shelby vs. the capture of Quantrill: In pursuance of suggestion of enclosed dispatch, I turn off from this point in direction of Rose Hill & Warrensburg & send word to Col. Weer to conform to changed movements. If Quantrills gang has gone out of the way and needs no liking after by you, join me, otherwise not.Letter signed, in pencil, 2 pages quarto, 13 miles from Sedalia, 13 October [1863], to Colonel Weer. Ewing continues to try and engage Shelby: James Wright living near the crossing of the Lamine by the Georgetown & Booneville road says that he left Gen. Brown at about two hours before sunet yesterday – that Gen Brown was then near the crossing of the Black-water nearest to the Lamine, at Sutherland’s place, and about 2 miles below the Marshall bridge – that Gen. Brown’s advance there skirmished with Shelby’s rear, and after I left, I heard artillery firing which continued for about an hour, until dark…Autograph letter (draft), in pencil, 2 pages oblong octavo, Carthage, [Missouri], 18 October 1863, to Major General J[ohn] M. Schofield in St. Louis, Missouri. General Ewing reports on his pursuit and the difficulties in pursuing the wily Confederate Cavalry Officer, Joseph Selby: After a march of 16 miles in twenty four hours I reached here at daylight expecting to encounter Shelbys whole command. He passed through here however last night for Neosho leaving a small command of about thirty to run the mill & collect stragglers. These I captured with their horses, arms & equipment…He has no transportation nor artillery, keeps no roads & is hard to follow rapidly by night…Brown, Egbert B. Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, 4 October 1863, to General Thomas Ewing Jr. The brigadier general reports on engagements with the guerrillas: The enemy after their defeat yesterday scattered as usual – My information is that they will concentrate about the head waters of the…where Quantrill & Jackman will join them – and move south from there by Kansas or such other route as may be open…Autograph letter signed, 1 page oblong octavo, 7 October 1863, to General Thomas Ewing Jr. The generals continue to try and coordinate their efforts against Shelby: Coffee and Shelby with two thousand men and three pieces of artillery passed Stockton coming north at three oclock yesterday p.m. by tomorrow I shall be able to concentrate sufficient force to prevent their advance on this line & hope you will to prevent a movement through Cass. Please direct commanding Officers of troops on the border to cooperate with me. Lazear, B[asil] F. Autograph letter signed (“B.F. Lazear”), 1 page legal folio, Warrensburg, 14 October 1863, to general [Thomas] Ewing [Jr.]. The Union Colonel reports to General Ewing: I have just reached this place. Shelby and perhaps 400 to 600 men is now probably on Blackwater near Columbus. He may attempt to take this place in the morning, as it was their intention to take this place this evening. I can whip him if he comes in… $5,000 - $8,000

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[Civil War - Shiloh.] Collection of seven letters relating to the Battle of Shiloh.

Lot 21: [Civil War - Shiloh.] Collection of seven letters relating to the Battle of Shiloh.

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Description: 21. [Civil War – Shiloh.] Collection of seven letters relating to the Battle of Shiloh. With Grant’s capture of Fort Donalson in February of 1862 the Union was in a position to deal the first major blow to the Confederacy. This was in following with Lincoln’s strategic plan to pressure the South at several points at once. This was not lost on the Confederacy and troops were moved from other fronts in anticipation of the Union march to Corinth (the key railroad link less then 20 miles south of Shiloh). This was arguably the first major victory for the Union and the beginning of the splitting of the Confederacy. Up to that date, it was the largest battle in American history and one of the bloodiest of the war. The present collection of seven letters demonstrates how the CSA understood the importance of upcoming events. The collection further provides eyewitness accounts from the men who fought and led troops in the field and provides the views of Union and Confederate Officers commenting on events soon after the battle on the effective start of the splitting of the South in two. The collection includes:Botheler, Alexander R. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (10 x 7.75 in.; 254 x 197 mm.), Richmond, 23 February 1862, to a colleague. The Confederate Congressman and aide/confidante to Stonewall Jackson comments on the dangers facing the South after the loss of Fort Donalson: Our recent disasters in Roanoke [Island] & Ft. Donalson have aroused our govt…to a proper realization of the perils that surround us and the most prompt & energetic steps are being taken to repair the damage & ward of[f] the dangers…Nashville having no defences has been evacuated. This Donalson affair is a staggering blow to us in that region but if it arouses our People to a sterner resistance, as I feel assured it will, this loss will eventuate in gain & do good to the cause of our country. I am working to have yr general reinforced…Ruggles, Daniel. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (5 x 7.87 in.; 127 x 200 mm.), Corinth [Mississippi], 5 March 1862, to General [Braxton] Bragg. One month before the Battle at Shiloh one of the key Confederate commanders reports on units reinforcing the overall command. Ruggles writes in part: Col. Samm’s Reg[ime]t 25th Ala[bama] & Col Smith’s 10th Miss[issippi] Reg[imen]t and Major Chadwick’s Batt[alio]n Ala[bama] arrived today. Three Artillery Copanies 1st So[uth] Regulars proceed to Memphis Today at 12….Claiborne, John. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages (8.62 x 7.25 in.; 219 x 184 mm.), Corinth Mississippi, 9 March 1862, to Brigadier General Daniel Ruggles; mounting remnants on integral docketed leaf attached. The Quarter Master reports on the ability of the two key rail lines that meet in Corinth to supply large-scale transport at short notice. Mayor Claiborne writes in part: In obedience to your instructions of this morning, directing me to ascertain the amount of rolling stock which might be made rapidly available for the movement of troops by rail from this point…Ruggles, Daniel. Autograph manuscript, 3 pages (12.12 x 8 in.; 308 x 203 mm.), Corinth [Mississippi], [April 1862], to General [Braxton] Bragg; tear on bottom right margin 1st page recto. A detailed report from the General who took the “Hornet’s Nest” in Shiloh. General Ruggles writes in part: …A Cavalry force under Captain Jenkins, surmounting to some four hundred men was divided into nearly two equal parts and turned upon the flanks of the Division for such appropriate Service as they could render. On his left, when the whole line gave way and out advance soon too possession of the Camp and batter against which the charge was made. At this time Colonel Gibson’s 1st Brigade was united with Brig. Genl. Andersons Troops making repeated charges against the Enemys lines, now taken on the margin of an open field which he swept with his batteries.Smith, Marshal J. Autograph letter signed, 8 pages (12.5 x 8 in.; 318 x 203 mm.), Camp McPheeters, 14 April 1862 to Colonel Preston Pond (Brigade Commander reporting to General Daniel Ruggles). A detailed report that conveys the passion and ferocity of the battle. Smith writes in part: We remained in this position until about 1 ½ o’clock P.M. when we received orders through Colonel Beard, Aid to General Bragg to come immediately to the front. We moved both regiments by the right flank rapidly forward and to the right, my me throwing off their blankets and all encumbrances to facilitate their movements, and passed through the enemy’s Camps which appeared to have been the scene of severe Conflict, towards the heavy firing in front, passing by the position occupied by General Beauregard who ordered us to “go forward and drive the enemy into the Tennessee” – Advancing about three hundred yards further through open woods, raked by Shell from the Enemy’s batteries we came up with Genls Polk, Ruggles and Anderson- The Enemy’s battery sustained by Sharp Shooters were posted in considerable force…Lee, William Henry Fitzhugh. Autograph letter signed (“W. H F Lee”), 4 pages (9.75 x 7.75 in.; 248 x 197 mm.), [c. June 1862] to his mother, Mary Custis Lee. The son of Robert E. Lee writes to his mother on the losses suffered by the Confederacy during the entire campaign from Forts Henry and Donelson to Shiloh. Lee writes in part: ...I hope the dreadful reverses of our armies has not distressed you. I feel the same now as before and so far from causing a diminution of my adore for the cause, they have increased it…General Floyd and General Pillow I think, ought to be shot for disgracefully leaving their commands…I hope if Genl. Sherman intends attacking that he will do it very soon and that he may get a good thrashing which he deserves… Cullum, George W. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages (8.37 x 5.25 in.; 213 x 133 mm.), Corinth [Mississippi], [April], to General [Braxton] Bragg; tear on bottom right margin 1st page recto. The Chief of Staff to General Henry W. Halleck comments on the successful campaign resulting in taking Corinth after the Battle of Shiloh. General Cullum writes in part: …The newspapers have given you the details of our progress from Pittsburg Landing to this place. To us it was a most anxious period, not only for our professional reputation but for the nation’s existence. A failure here would have given a lock-jaw to the Union…The hydra of secession is already nearly dead in the taking of the Mississippi… $5,000 - $8,000

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[Civil War - Closing Days] Collection of 7 letters from Officers of the Union and the Confederacy

Lot 22: [Civil War - Closing Days] Collection of 7 letters from Officers of the Union and the Confederacy

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Description: 22. [Civil War – Closing Days] A collection of seven letters from Officers of the Union and the Confederacy as the war entered its final months and finally ended.1- [Morgan, John T.]. Autograph document signed in the hand of Whitfield Walker, 1 page small oblong quarto, Head Quarters Negro Rendezvous, Eutaw, Alabama, 14 April 1864 [1865?]. In this document concerning the arming of Black troops for the Confederacy in the waning days of the war, Morgan appoints Private James M. Oxford a First Lieutenant for the enlistment [of] Negro Troops under the late Act of Congress for the organization of Negro Soldiers, and will enter at once upon his duties as recruiting officer for Pickens County....Lee had already surrendered, but Morgan continued the fight; and in desperation, he resorted to the use of Black soldiers. Even though some of the states had passed enlistment acts, the Confederate Congress hesitated to do so until 6 March 1865 when Lee finally endorsed the plan, stating, “I think we could do as well with them as the enemy, and he attaches great importance to their assistance.” The Negro Soldier Law authorized slaves to perform military service, with the same rations, clothing and pay as were allowed others. Although no significant results were hoped for, as England was not induced to extend diplomatic recognition of the Confederacy, recruitment was carried out, as is evident in this document. In all probability, the document is incorrectly dated 1864, since Black enlistment did not begin until March of 1865.2-Cooke, Giles B. Typed document signed, 2 pages small quarto, 20 February 1923, [Virginia]; with handwritten biographical sketch.The Aide to Robert E. Lee on the days immediately following Lee’s surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia at Appomattox.He writes in full: A quotation from my diary written at Appomattox.“Monday, April 10, 1865.-­ Raining all day. Did not leave my camp except to dine with the General and Staff. Had no heart for conversation with anybody. Wrote to my dear mother. “Tuesday, April 11th.-­ Broke our camp and left for Richmond at 6 a.m. with the General and Col. Taylor. I rode in an ambulance loaned me by Gen. Grant, (another instance of his kindness to the general and staff) and driven by my colored servant, William. This ambulance and two fine mules I turned over later to a U.S. Quartermaster at Richmond. I traveled with General Lee and Colonel Taylor until Thursday, 13th, when they stopped at the home of his farmer brother, Charles Carter Lee, and I went on my way to join my mother and sisters, refugeeing near Richmond. Farewell war; farewell brother staff officers and companions in arms. I am now a citizen slave and what will become of me and the people of our Southland, God only knows. Thus ends the diary that I have kept since the commencement of the war.” Twice since the war I had the pleasure of seeing and conversing with my dear old commander. Once when in the Summer of 1865, he was living in a house loaned him in Powhatan Co., Va., by a dear friend and kinswoman, Mrs. Elizabeth Randolph Cocke, just before he became President of Washington College, now Washington and Lee University, and I was on a visit to a dear friend, Mrs. Philip Saint George Cocke, living near Belmead, about six miles from Mrs. Elizabeth R. Cocke’s house. The last time I saw the General was at the marriage of his son, ‘Roney’ Lee, to Miss Tabb Bolling, in Petersburg, Va., a few years before his death. During his Presidency of Washington College, I had the pleasure of corresponding with Gen. Lee, and I have in my possession five letters which he wrote me -- two others have been lost The five that I have been able to preserve shall be handed down as sacred mementoes to my children and children’s children.Below his signature, Giles has written, Major & Asst Inspector General I Staff of Gen. R.E. Lee - 1864-1865. Now 20 Feby. 1923, a retired minister, nearly 85 years old, at Mathews Court House Virginia, and also Chaplain General of the Confederate Southern Memorial Association / United Confederate Veterans.3-Meade, George. Autograph letter signed (“Geo G. Meade”), 4 pages octavo, 10 February 1865, to My Dear M’s. Neil - probably the mother of William Neil of Columbus, Ohio - a promoter of stage transportation. Neil’s daughter married Gov. Dennison of Ohio (mentioned in Meade’s letter), on “Head-Quarters, Army of the Potomac” letterhead stationery.Meade writes in full: My dear Ms. Neil - I don’t know where your letter of the 15th. ult[im]o.. [i.e., of last month] could have been, but it has only quite recently reached me. I had not forgotten my request and am glad to find by the enclosures in your letter, that the request had not passed out of your mind - which from your silence, I feared it had. I decidedly prefer the full length figure, tho’ I shall preserve both. I think you are altogether too modest, in attributing so much to the work of time -for I think you appear to be but lightly touched by this formidable adversary to our case. I am sorry I did not see your son, when at City Point. My Hd. Qrs. are 14 miles from that place, but we have a rail-road running out here & should your son again visit City Point tell him to come out & see me. I have had the pleasure of meeting Gov. [William] Dennison [of Ohio - served 1860-61] but never his wife or daughter. I have only been in Washington one day since last April, and rarely have a chance to get there. My family you knew well in Philada. and being a very domestic man, I spend with them all the time I can get away from here and how long do you think this has been in the last 4 years - just Twenty five days - and this when most of the time, it was only a 12 hours journey to reach them. This winter it has been particularly hard on me, because it has pleased God to suffer my eldest boy 23 years old, to be seriously affected with lung disease - and tho I could do him no good - yet my presence would be a comfort to him & great support to his mother and yet when I h.ve made two efforts to get home, I have been each time recalled by telegraph after spending the first time 5 days & the last time 48 hours. I am sure you will agree with me this is pretty hard. Still I am willing to submit, if I can flatter myself that my humble services are in any way necessary to save my country. You speak of Peace - I do hope you & all good people will earnestly pray for it - but it must come on the right basis - the Supremacy of the Union & the final settlement of slavery. I saw the commissioners who recently met with our President - and had a long talk with them - but did not infer from this conversation, that recognition of their independence was to precede all negotiations. I think they have committed a fatal error second only to the one they committed when they went to war. I am glad however our worthy President has listened to them & learned their terms. It will silence all opposition to the war and if the people will now only tum out & re-inforce our armies, we will soon conquer a peace. Trusting I may some day have the pleasure of meeting you, I remain, Most truly yours, Geo. G. MeadeOn 3 February 1865, just one week before this letter, President Lincoln and his Secretary of State William H. Seward secretly met Confederate leaders Alexander H. Stephen (C.S.A. Vice-President), R. M. T. Hunter and J. A. Campbell in an unsuccessful peace conference at Hampton Roads, Virginia. The Southern commissioners were instructed to discuss securing peace to the two countries. Brought about through the efforts of Francis P. Blair, an old-time Democratic friendly with the Lincoln administration, the four-hour conference failed, because the Confederates insisted on independence and because Lincoln and his Secretary of State Seward refused to condone any plan that permitted the continuance of slavery, demanding adherence to Federal law. Armistice was unobtainable. The Southern Commissioners returned to Richmond in failure and the fighting would continue for another two months.4-Beauregard, Pierre Gustave Toutant de. Autograph letter signed (“G.T. Beauregard”), in pencil, 1 page narrow oblong octavo, Greensboro, North Carolina, 17 April 1865, to Brigadier General R. Semmes at Ready Fork Break, North Carolina. The legendary General gives some of his last orders as a Confederate Officer. He writes in full: G[enera]l Johnston orders that troops should remain where they are at present -- provisions will be sent -- have guns ready to be destroyed at moment’s notice -- no objection to your coming here personally if it would not cause your troops to desert --5-Lee, Fitzhugh. Autograph letter signed, (“Fitz-Lee”), in pencil, 1 page narrow oblong legal folio, undated, to Union General [Alexander] Webb (General George Meade’s Chief of Staff at the time). The Cavalry General nephew of Robert E. Lee seeks permission to travel to Richmond sometime after its fall on 3 April 1865. He writes in full: Just arrived at Depot Can be found at Christians Commission. Please send me necessary authority to go to Richmond on first train. There are two gentlemen from Richmond with me who ask to be included. Fitzhugh Lee wrote this letter at the end of the Civil War, after Richmond’s surrender and occupation by Union troops on April 3, 1865. As Cavalry Commander, Lee had served admirably in the defense of Richmond, fighting in skirmishes along the Petersburg ­ Richmond line. On 2 April, however, Ulysses S. Grant’s VI Corps broke through the Confederate defense, collapsing the entire right. That night, Robert E. Lee evacuated Petersburg, and the Davis government and army garrison evacuated Richmond with orders that its factories, arsenals and mills be destroyed. Fires soon raged out of control, commissary depots were left vulnerable and invited a wave of pillaging. Union troops immediately set about to restore order and subdue the fires. By midafternoon progress had been made as Richmond slowly quieted down. It was probably under these circumstances that Fitzhugh Lee made his request to Union General Webb for permission to go to Richmond.6-Toombs, Robert A. Autograph document signed (“R Toombs”), in pencil, 1 page octavo, Augusta, Georgia, 27 April 1865. The Chief of Staff of the George Militia drafts the final order to stand down. He writes in part: …It is hereby ordered that all the militia of this state, ordered to assemble at this place under the late proclamation...are sent under command of…Genl. Carswell or me and they are ordered to return to their respective homes… 7-Johnston, Joseph Eggleston. Official contemporary copy of General Orders No. 18, Johnston’s surrender to Sherman, 2 pages octavo, 27 April 1865, Near Greensboro, NC, General Order No 18; marginal chipping, faded, foxing. The Commander of the Department of South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida and the Department of North Carolina and Southern Virginia (to include his former command of the Army of Tennessee) issues instructions for the orderly surrender of the troops under his command to General William Tecumseh Sherman. The document reads in full: General order No 18} By the terms of a military convention made on the 26th inst by Major Genl W T Sherman USA, Genl J E Johnston of the CSA the officers and men of this army are to bind themselves not take up arms against the U States until properly relieved from that obligation & shall receive the guaranties from the United States officers against molestation by the United States authorities so long as they observe that obligation and the laws in force where they may reside for these objects duplicate muster rolls will be made out immediately & after the distribution of the necessary papers the troops will be marched under their officers to their respective states and there be disbanded. All retaining private property. the object of duplicate muster rolls will be made out immediately and after the distribution The object of this convention is pacification to the extent of the authority of The Commanders who made it – Events in Virginia which brake every hope of success by war imposed, the general of this army the duty of saving our country from further devastation and our people from ruin. Signed J E Johnston Genl After the surrender, Sherman issued ten days’ rations to the hungry Confederate soldiers, as well as horses and mules for them to “insure a crop.” He also ordered distribution of corn, meal, and flour to civilians throughout the South. This was an act of generosity that Johnston would never forget; he wrote to Sherman that his attitude “reconciles me to what I have previously regarded as the misfortune of my life, that of having you to encounter in the field.” Johnston, like Lee, never forgot the magnanimity of the man to whom he surrendered, and would not allow an unkind word to be said about Sherman in his presence. Sherman and Johnston corresponded frequently and they met for friendly dinners in Washington whenever Johnston traveled there. When Sherman died, Johnston served as an honorary pallbearer at his funeral; during the procession in New York City on 19 February 1891, he kept his hat off as a sign of respect in the cold, rainy weather. Someone with concern for the old General’s health asked him to put on his hat, to which Johnston replied: “If I were in his place and he were standing here in mine, he would not put on his hat.” He caught a cold that day, which developed into pneumonia, and he died several weeks later in Washington, D.C. $8,000 - $12,000

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[Civil War - Reconstruction] Four letters providing insights of the Reconstruction of the Nation

Lot 23: [Civil War - Reconstruction] Four letters providing insights of the Reconstruction of the Nation

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Description: 23. [Civil War – Reconstruction] A collection of four letters providing important insights of the Reconstruction of the Nation. The reuniting of the nation would take twelve years and involve dealing with the difficult balancing act of granting rights to free men and restoring rights of former rebels. Such issues occupied Lincoln’s mind in his last days. Stephens, Alexander H. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages octavo, 13 February 1865, Near Fort Mill, S.C., to Hon. Louis T Wigfall, Richmond, Va. Stephens writes just ten days after the Vice President of the Confederacy had met with President Lincoln at the failed Hampton Roads Peace Conference (Stephens was one of three Commissioners selected by Jefferson Davis). With Lincoln unswerving on and question of restoring the Union and Jefferson Davis’s instructions that the commissioner had the power to “make any treaty, but one that involved the reconstruction of the Federal Union” the effort was doomed to fail. Still, this letter shows that Stephens, an avowed supporter of state’s rights but one who did not support succession, had not given up and did not see that the writing was clearly on the wall. He writes in part: Dear Sir...I am about 13 miles from Charlotte on the road to Columbia. I drop you a line in fulfillment of my promise to write to you daily to say that I find spirit and vitality enough in the mass of the people as far as I have met with them in my reaching here. All that is wanting is the proper wisdom and statesmanship to guide it. But our ultimate success in my deliberate judgment will never be attained never can be without a steady & thorough change of our policy towards the masses of the North. We must show that we are against the doctrines & principles & power of the radicals there - the fanatics - the abolitionists and consolidationists - while we should do and say anything in our power in a manly way to enlist the sympathy and action of all the true friends there of Constitutional liberty. We should show them that we are fighting their battle as well as our own. If we go down - if our liberties are lost in this contest - theirs will be too. We must make them allies in a common struggle. We must not be deterred from this by any such ghosts or the goblin of reconstruction - on this point the future must be left to take care of itself. Congress ought to pass before it adjourns some such resolutions as the 3 first that were reported to the House by our Committee on Foreign Affairs - Nos. 1. 2. 3. of those Resolutions are now quite as effective as they were when reported -for the remaining Resolution in that series one might substitute - embracing some of the ideas in them and appealing from the authorities at Washington to all friends of Constitutional liberty at the North, invoking an adjournment of the question of strife from the arbitration of armies to the forum of reason - upon the great principles of self government on which all American institutions are founded. On this line if our people can endure for two years longer - all may yet be well. But my word first the only peace that the sword alone will bring us in fighting the united North will be the peace of death & subjugation. Yours Truly Alexander H. StephensWright, Horatio Gouverneur. Autograph letter signed (“H.”), 4 pages octavo, 16 April 1865, to My darling Wife, on Head Quarters 6th Anny Corps letterhead stationery. The Union General writes to his wife summing up the fears of many days after the assassination of Lincoln. He writes in full: My darling Wife I have written several letters of late to you and Mollie but somehow I don’t seem to get any from you. I fear you don’t write often; or perhaps you send them by private hands instead of by mail. The latter is, as a rule, much the more speedy and safe, and I advise you adopting it exclusively hereafter. With this I send my pay A/cs for March, which you must collect from Maj. Rochester, asking him to give you a slip showing amount to send to me: for I am not sure what it is, seeing that late laws & regulations may have affected it somewhat. We are quietly in camp here, and may be so for days to come, so far as present appearances are concerned. I don’t like to leave the corps while matters are in their present transition state, or I would try to run up for a few days to see you and the babies.The Army was much horrified last night by the intelligence that the Presdt [Abraham Lincoln], Secy [William H. Seward] & Asst Secy of State [Frederick William Seward] have been assassinated, & we are yet in the dark as to the details, further than that the Presdt met his death at the hands of J Edwin Booth the Actor [i.e., John Wilkes Booth; Booth ‘s brother, Edwin Thomas Booth, was also an actor]. I trust the people hung him on the spot - and if this tragedy is the result of a matured plan of the Southern rulers, I shall advise that their crime be visited promptly, & relentlessly upon them. God grant that it may turn out to be the mad act of a few fanatics for which the rebel rulers and people are in no wise responsible. Otherwise I fear that all the restraint of discipline will not suffice to prevent our soldiers from wreaking what they may conceive to be a just vengeance even upon the innocent and the helpless. I hope, however, for better tidings soon; and that the excellent feeling hitherto manifested by our soldiers toward the rebels may return. It has received a rude shock, but all may be well if they can be convinced that the South is not responsible for the horrid crime. With lots of love to the children - to Grandma, M. Smith & other friends. I will close this hasty scrawl. Write often. Ever Yours H.Stephens, Alexander H. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages octavo, Crawfordville, Georgia, 14 November 1865, to Major Henry C. Whitney, Nashville, Ten. One month after his release from a Federal prison, the former Vice President of the Confederacy, Alexander H. Stephens, vouches for the safety of any Northern emigrants hoping to settle in post-Civil War Georgia. He writes in full: Dear Sir Your letter of the 9th Inst. Has just reached me. In reply I can only say that I was very much surprised to hear that the opinion existed at the North or any where that it would be unsafe for a Northern man to settle in Georgia. Of course I can speak prudently only of my own section of the State and of this only in a limited degree as I have been recently returned after a few months absence - But I have no hesitancy in giving it as my belief that a Northern man would be as safe in this region of country as any one ‘to the Man[n]er born’ [accustomed from birth, i.e., a native Southerner]; - and I have not the slighest idea in the world that Northern emigrants would be in the least degree interferred with or molested in my part of the State. Enterprise and capital backed by honesty and integrity are what our people want and these in my opinion would not only be kindly received but welcomed throughout Georgia coming from whatever quarter they may. This is my opinion. You can assist as you please in a private way but of course I do not wish it published for the bare publication of such an opinion from me would seem to give grounds for some apprehension upon the subject. It would be giving notoriety at least to a most groundless surname of injurious character. Yours very Respectfully Alexander H. StephensAfter the collapse of the Confederacy, Alexander Stephens was arrested in May of 1865 at his estate by a detail of Federal troops and taken eastward in custody. He was held prisoner at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor until being released on parole on 12 October 1865. Just a few months later, he was elected to the U.S. Senate (January, 1866), but was not allowed to take his seat because of restrictions on former Confederates. Throughout the early years of the Reconstruction period, when the scars of battle were visible throughout Georgia (particularly along William T. Sherman’s track), Stephens counseled self-discipline, patience and forbearance from recrimination - and supported President Andrew Johnson’s policies. He would eventually serve as a U.S. Representative from 1873 to 1882 and became the Governor of Georgia a few months before his death.Early, Jubal A. Autograph letter signed (“JA Early”), 1 page quarto, undated, to Allen Thorndike Rice; letter cut off with some text missing prior to the lines below. He writes in part: I knew generals Lee and Jackson as Christian soldiers, patriots, and gentlemen, who had a profound sense of duty to guide them in defense of the cause they espoused, and the highest regard and consideration for the men they commanded. Neither of them ever indulged in buffoonery, and they did not find it necessary to seek for examples in the beasts of the field or forest to inspire their soldiers or subordinate commanders with a proper sense of duty. There is nothing I could say in regard to either which would not be regarded as an [antagonism] however inadequately expressed, and you must therefore not expect a contribution from me for your proposed publication...C. Allen Thorndike Rice was a journalist and the Editor and Publisher of the North American Review from 1876 to 1889. Jubal A. Early, a Confederate General, lived to 1894 and was a founder and president of the Southern Historical Society. He never sought to have his citizenship restored and remained an “unreconstructed Confederate” to the end. $5,000 - $7,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Three letters from the famed writer of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Lot 24: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Three letters from the famed writer of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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Description: 24. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A collection of three letters from the famed writer of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.The letters discuss financials and lecture schedule, noting he couldn’t go far as his wife would be saddened. Autograph letter signed (“Mark”), 2 pages small octavo, Logansport, 2 January (1872), in pencil to lecture agent Redpath. He writes in part: Had a splendid time with a splendid audience in Indianapolis last night—a perfectly jammed house just as I have all the tie out here…I like this new lecture but I hate the Artemus Ward talk, & won’t talk it anymore…if I am to talk in New York, am I going to have a house? I don’t care now to have any appointments cancelled, for I’ll even ‘fetch’ those Dutch Pennsylvanians with this lecture. Have paid up $4,000 indebtedness. You are the last on my list. Shall begin to pay you in a few days, & then I shall be a free man again… Clemens asks that circulars be printed and sent to all my committees--& they can get it into their local papers & thus pave the way for change of subject without making anybody mad…Autograph letter signed (“Samuel L. Clemens”), 4 pages octavo, 4 February [1874], on personal letterhead stationery to My Dear Friend. Clemens writes in full: Welcome home—didn’t know you had returned. I had intended to lecture in New York, Brooklyn and Boston, but I have been gone so long that Mrs. Clemens disliked the idea so I have it up at once. You see we live out here in a lonely part of this town & it is not cheerful for her when I am away. If I lecture at all, it will be only in Boston, since Mrs. Clemens wishes to go there for awhile to have the child’s portrait painted. I can not lecture elsewhere because even short journeys are not only irksome to her, but rather exhausting. I have just received from Dan Slote the enclosed, bringing the saddening news that another of our thinning band of pilgrims has gone the way of all flesh while in a far land among a strange people. I have always held Dr. Birch in grateful memory because he stood by me so stanchly when I was dangerously ill in Damascus. Will you kindly return Denny’s letter to Dan Slote, 121 William street? With kind remembrances to all your household…This letter is most likely written to Emeline B. Beach, daughter of former New York “Sun” editor and proprietor Moses S. Beach, had been among Clemens’ few close friends on the “Quaker City” voyage to the Holy Land in 1867. Clemens wrote the last of a series of flirtatious letters to her on 10 February 1868. Slote, Woodman and company is a stationery firm in New York. The letter from William R. Denny had brought news of the death of Dr. George B. Birch. Beach must have returned it to Slote. In The Innocents Abroad, when Clemens described how William F. Church stood by him in Damascus after he became ill on 15 September 1867 with cholera. Autograph letter signed (“S. L. Clemens”), 1 page octavo, Hartford, 27 October 1889 to My Dear [Robert Underwood] Johnson. He writes in full:I can’t accept your invitation to go to Chicago after declining Bowker’s invitation to read in Brooklyn. I thank God I’ve got some decency left, anyway. I wish I could sell it. Clemens tried to obliterate the last six words with ink. $5,000 - $8,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 25: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed ("Mark"), 3 pages octavo, [14 Febrary] 1869

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Description: 25. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (“Mark”), 3 pages octavo, Ravenna, Ohio, [14 February] 1869, on Gillette House letterhead stationery to Dear J. H. & Tribe.Happiness abounds as Clemens declares to good friends Rev. and Mrs. Twichell that he is engaged to be married. Clemens writes in part: Dear J.H. & Tribe—I greet you with all the great accession of love that naturally comes to one on the feast day of St. Valentine. And you can just rise up & blow your horn, too, & blow it loud because the subscriber is engaged to be married!--hip, hip, hip—[now, all together!] On bended knees, in the presence of God only, we devoted our lives to each other & to the service of God. And let this writing be a witness of it, to you.And so, as soon as I am permanently settled in life, we shall be married. [I don’t sigh, & groan & howl so much, now, as I used to—no, I feel serene, & arrogant, & stuck up--& I feel such pity for the world & every body in it but just us two.] I have suddenly grown to be prodigiously important to the world’s welfare, somehow—though it didn’t use[d] to seem to me that my existence was such a very extraordinary matter…The recipient of the letter, Rev. Joseph H. Twichell was the pastor of the Asylum Hill Congregational Church in Hartford. He and his wife, Julia, became Clemens’ closest personal friends. Samuel Clemens and Olivia were provisionally engaged in November 1868; the engagement was formalized on 4 February 1869. According to Clemens’ recounting to Twichell, the moment was filled with intense religious emotion. Clemens’ plan was to live in Cleveland after their marriage—if he could buy a share of Abel Fairbanks’ “Herald”. By the spring of 1869, other possibilities appeared—the “New York Tribune” and “The Hartford Courant”—the latter owned by partners Gen. Joseph Hawley and Charles Dudley Warner. Cleveland soon lost its attractiveness, replaced by the quiet and moral atmosphere of Hartford. In the end, however, Hawley and Warner turned down Clemens. Instead, Clemens bought a third interest in the “Express” in Buffalo, taking possession on 14 August 1869. He was determined to support his wife without any help from her father and made the purchase of a newspaper a prerequisite to his marriage.Approximately a year after this letter, on 2 February 1870, Clemens married Olivia Langdon. Reverend Twichell performed their marriage service. The day after their marriage, they set off for Buffalo in a private railroad car. Their sojourn in Buffalo was short lived. Clemens soon sold his interest in the “Express” and his journalism career ended. He and Livy moved back to Hartford, where his three daughters were born and they lived their lives out actively and happily. $5,000 - $7,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Three letters by, American author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

Lot 26: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Three letters by, American author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer

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Description: 26. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A collection of three letters by, the classic American author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn. His satirical voice can be heard throughout the letters. Secretarial letter [incomplete], 4 pages octavo, [1873] to Stoddard. The letter reads in part: …having at the same time his blood drained by harlots, he can’t expect to last very long without suffering the penalty of excess. And now bone Deus I have to give up everything except one absinthe a day & no visits are allowed to the place where the concubine twineth. I also ingurgitate a lot of yak excrement & cobraesque drugs, so you see, my dear Stoddard, that I am not to be cured. However my head is clear thank god, if there be such a party to thank. Last week when too ill to write, I posted you a paper called Thoughts & Events which I regret to say has ‘bust’. The editor was a genuine Gilbertian, opera bouffe editor. He lost twelve thousand dollars on the paper, and no wonder. He was such a good hearted Wilberforcian utopish that he never would refuse a proffered article from anybody, because he thought he might hurt their feelings!!...He continues his letter by talking of mutual friends to write and updating the recipient of their friends’ health.Autograph letter signed (“S.L.C”), 2 pages octavo, Saturday, undated to David Munro. He writes in part: This is for the March number of the N.A.R—while Russia will still be a subject of interest. The Colonel was here the other night and inspected it. He has not seen pages 8 & 9; I have added them since. They discharge an impertinence at God. Are you a friend of His? Is the Colonel? I prize that impertinence. I hope it can get by the blue pencil. I thought of changing ‘approval’ to ‘indulgence,’ but I think that that would be a shade too impertinent. By the Colonel’s advice I have chopped the article in two in the middle & suppressed the last half. He also suggested that a brief conclusion should be added after the fac-similed newspaper-clippings. Pages 8 & 9 are that conclusion…Autograph letter signed (“S.L. Clemens”), 1 page large octavo, 17 December [1902] to William D. McCracken, member of the Christian Science faith. Clemens writes in full: Have you begun your chapters? I hope not, for without access to all of mine you might be hampered, and work at a disadvantage. I have copies (in print) now, of all my truck except the chapters which are under my hand and unfinished, and if you will run up some fore noon (not the 21st) telephone me first, to make sure---“150 Kingsbridges” I will show the lot to you, and if you like you can carry it confidentially away. It seems unfair that you should have to wait while the slow North American grinds me out. Clemens became quite friendly with McCracken during his attacks on the Christian Science religion. Clemens was planning a proposed collaboration with McCracken that was never carried out. $5,000 - $7,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A fine grouping of three letters.

Lot 27: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A fine grouping of three letters.

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Description: 27. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A fine grouping of three letters from the beloved American author and humorist who wrote The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and its sequel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. The group includes: 1-Autograph letter signed (“S L Clemens”), 2 pages octavo, Elmira, [New York], 7 September 1889 to Nellie Bunce on the occasion of her engagement to Archie Welch. Author of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, writes a heartfelt letter describing the feeling of falling in love and the beauty of contentment and serenity. Clemens writes in full: How well I know the feeling! Know it to the uttermost delicious pang of discovery & surprise. There is nothing in the world that approaches it; all other enthusiasms, heart-leapings, exaltations are pale beside it; it’s as if you had struck gas. Yes, & Worlds & worlds of it, & all your own; nobody in the Trust but just you two. And this is only the beginning. You will go on striking well after well, as the years glide by—in this & that & the other planet, till by & by you will occupy the solar system, & every twinkle in it will but indicate a flame-spout of yours, private property of the firm; a heaven of love, & soft peace, & contentment, & serenity; held in fee, forever secure, & just enough of it for two. Yes indeed, I know all about it-all! We who have our home in this divine far country, spread wide its hospitable gates to you, & say out of heart & mouth, Enter in, ye are welcome!Nellie Bunce married Archibald Ashley Welsh on 24 October 1888, with Clemens in attendance. With her husband, she founded the Hartford School of Music, later to be called the Conservatory of Music in Hartford, CT. 2-Autograph letter signed (“S.L Clemens”), 2 pages octavo, Villa Paulhof (near Vienna), 2 July [1897], to Lord Monkswell, on mourning stationery as his brother had just died. Clemens writes in part: I feel like a criminal for putting you and Lady Monkswell and Mr. Murray to such a deal of trouble...Mr. Murray’s British and German statistics cover all the necessary ground, and I am very glad to have them...I have dropped out the ‘professional’ author detail, since it is doubtful quantity, and is not really essential to my project anyway––though at first I thought differently...We are so pleasantly housed here that I think we shall hold on to this place til the cold weather drives us back to Vienna... Twain seems to be compiling notes for an article or book. A pleasant letter in excellent condition during one of his many trips abroad. 3-Autograph letter signed (“Father”), 2 pages octavo, [Redding, Connecticut], 19 May 1908, to Clara Clemens; with transmittal envelope.Clärchen Dear, you are half-way across now – I have been keeping the progress of the ship in mind ever since you left, & watching her lay the meridians of longitude behind her. By the time she has cut twenty-five or thirty of them in two, I guess. Robert Collier did certainly do well by you. He is a dear. He was going to find an automobile for us, but we’ll call him off from that quest today. We should need it only 4 or 5 months in the year; it would cost a good deal; the chauffer would be expensive; we shouldn’t use the thing often, for I mean to walk, not ride; we should have to build a garage -- an unsightly one, no doubt. And so, there’s not going to be any ‘mobile. We took the subway at 9 this morning, & had half an hour with Jean at the Grand Central Station. She was on her way to Glo’ster – a tedious long journey. I was sorry for her, but she was cheerful. From the station I walked out to the Plaza Hotel & then back home. If you should run across little Dorothy Butes, be good to her. She is one of my pets. With warm regards to the others & lots of love & kisses to you. Father As a postscript Clemens writes: Dear heart, I hope everything will come out exactly as you would wish. $5,000 - $8,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A pair of letters by the author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

Lot 28: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A pair of letters by the author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

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Description: 28. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. A fine pair of letters by the author of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. Clemens, is well-known for his sarcastic humor and bawdy wit. His heartfelt sentiments, however, are often present in his personal letters. Included in this group:1-Autograph letter signed (“S. L. Clemens”), 2 pages octavo, 10 February [1898] on mourning stationery to publisher his Mr. [Robert] Barr. Clemens writes in part: …My desire is to keep wholly out of print for a long time yet; for until the hurt of my bereavement shall have healed in some degree I shall have no heart for publicity…I am at work & shall go on; indeed there is no fear that I shall fall into idle ways, since when one works one lives in another world & can make his own heaven—a most desirable thing to do when death has darkened this one. I do not go out, & do not see anybody; & this is well when one has a long book under way & no surplus time in stock…It is most likely that Clemens speaks of his brother, Orion’s death. Though Orion did not live nearby to Clemens, they were very close. Clemens often provided income to his brother’s family and was quite close to their daughter, Jennie. Unfortunately, in 1864, young Jennie died from complications of meningitis, which broke Clemens’ heart. 2-Autograph letter signed twice (“S. L. Clemens”), 3 pages octavo, 28 February 1905 on black-bordered stationery to Mr. Thayer and his wife, Emma. The author writes in part: Dear Mr. Thayer: I shall no doubt receive your letters before I put this in an envelope. Thank you ever so much for your telegrams . . . Miss Katy Leary our housekeeper knows by old & seasoned experience just what we want in the way of house & so, if you will send her to Mr. Gleason I shall be very greatly obliged. Sincerely yours…Dear Mrs. Emma: The letter has arrived & my daughter Jean is prodigiously delighted to go with Katy. Many thousands of thanks! Yours now, as long ago. A fine pair of personal letters written by such a prolific writer. $5,000 - $7,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 29: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed ("S L Clemens"), 2 pages, 15 December 1905.

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Description: 29. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (“S L Clemens”), 2 pages (6.12 x 3.87 in.; 156 x 98 mm.), 15 December 1905, to an unnamed recipient in Vienna; on his 21 Fifth Avenue engraved mourning stationery. Clemens explains his pseudoynym, “Mark Twain” with great detail. Clemens writes in full: My Dear Sir: I am very glad indeed to have a copy of that cordial and complimentary appreciation, & I thank you for sending it. Coming from anywhere it would be gratifying: coming from Vienna, where I spent so many pleasant months & knew so many delightful people, it is peculiarly & especially welcome. I have been writing for the history of the “Mark Twain,” & at last I have found it in chapter 50 of my book called “Old Times on The Mississippi.” It is all set down there & rather lengthily: but to state it in a word, I took the name from the leadsman’s cry: it means 2 fathoms, 12 feet. Very sincerely yours SL. Clemens. $5,000 - $7,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade).

Lot 30: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer's Comrade).

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Description: 30. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn (Tom Sawyer’s Comrade). Charles L. Webster and Company, New York, 1885. Quarto (8.5 x 6.6 in.; 215 x 168 mm). Half-title with portrait of the title character on verso, photograph of bust of Clemens by Karl Gerhardt with the author’s signature reproduced below and the imprint “Heliotype Printing Co.” with tablecloth visible; some light marginal spotting and soiling. Publisher’s green cloth with gilt and black stamped pictorial title on upper cover and on spine, pale peach end leaves and pastedowns, in a green quarter morocco box; extremities a bit rubbed, light wear to foot of spine. Superb First American Edition, First Issue, with the points: title leaf a cancel and copyright notice dated 1884, illustration captioned “Him and another Man” is listed (on page 13) as at page 57 up 11 lines reads “. . . with the was . . .”; no signature mark on page 161; and the final leaf blank. Some bibliographers have additional issue points, and this copy has the following points also considered to be first issue: page 155 missing the final “5”; page 143 with the missing “l” in “Col.” At top of illustration, “b” in “body” in line seven is broken; page 283 bound in, with a straight pant fly in the illustration. References: BAL 3415, MacBride 93, Grolier American 100: 87. $8,000 - $12,000

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Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Two handwritten letters regarding a biography & a book on baseball fundamentals

Lot 31: Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Two handwritten letters regarding a biography & a book on baseball fundamentals

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Description: 31. Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. A set of two handwritten letters regarding an authorized biography and a book on baseball fundamentals to be written by baseball’s greatest players, including Cobb himself, Eddie Collins, George Sisler, Michel Cochran, Joe Tinker and Joe Dugan, all of whom he mentions in the letter. The idea was to inform players how to hit and run bases like a pro. Included in the group:1-Autograph letter signed (“Ty”), 3 pages quarto, Menlo Park, California, 25 March 1946, on personal letterhead stationery to Stoney McLinn of Philadelphia. Cobb writes in full: Dear Stoney: I find most of what you had is right and good on base running. I have made some corrections, not many, have added some ideas also put in some elaborations & yet in next paragraph found you had covered it, so it is a little jumbled up and not bery orderly as I simply started without going over it & went on through. Now you cut out anything you wish and put it into proper order that suits you & will be O.K. with me. I dashed off some points and had it copied in ink which you will find enclosed & seperate [sic] from your typewritten matter. Take only what you want of this matter. As to batting stress the important things to begin with, position of hands, elbows away from body, the arm towards pitcher whether right handed hitter or left, elevated, bat must not be on shoulder, but back in proper position to hit only forward. Also position of feet. Use these fundamentals. Don’t try to use all I have outlined in the beginning. It would confuse and affect proper concentration. Use these fundamentals & never try to copy some favorite players stance or style. For instance just two players who got results but should never by copied, Simmons & Heine Groh as example. I like the batting thing. IF you can get these old boys lined up to do their positions. To them they were little things, position of body bent over on infield, position of feet, how to pull the ball in, blocking the ball, double plays, the proper throw manner or style, all such would be very interesting & would sell syndicate, book etc., and how about a short Radio instruction, Eddie Collins said so & so, Sisler, Cochrane, etc. Sure get Tinker and Frank Chance and Joe Dugan. Get all the best you can then if fail get someone good, not a fill in. Write those you haven’t secured. Tell them you wanted to get the true fundamentals of their position play back when they had the real fundamentals which many do not use or have today and you want them in book form for kids as present day kids dont get them and give them some question relative to each position play. Get in touch with good old Lobert and have hi come out and help you as to questions. He will & you can in that way get it all worked out in a couple of hours as one ball knows even if it isn’t his position. Good pictures, autographs and I believe the kids will go for it. Actual instructions outlined from the great players of the greatest era in baseball. Anything else just drop me a line. All kinds of luck and best wishes to Mrs. McLinn & yourself, I am, as ever…Cobb writes to his ghostwriter regarding a book covering baseball fundamentals, providing suggestions of a few of the great names in baseball history. Cobb says that he himself will write the sections on hitting and base running. A remarkable hitter, Cobb batted .320 in 1906, the first of 23 straight years in which he hit .300 or better. In that period, he led the league 12 times, 9 in a row. Three times he hit more than .400 in a season—a feat equaled by only two other players. A left-hander at the bat, he hunched himself in a knock-kneed crouch with his feet close together, grasping the thick-handled bat with his right hand about three inches from the knob and placing his left hand about six inches above the right. The sliding grasp gave him incredible control; he could poke the ball through the infield, deliberately foul it off, hit to any field, bunt precisely, or even swing from the heels without telegraphing his intentions to the opposing team. Cobb hopes to rise above the current slate of “baseball” books by coming out with his own, a compilation written by baseball’s great players of the greatest era in baseball.2-Autograph letter signed (“Ty”), 6 pages quarto, Nevada, 28 October 1952, on personal letterhead stationery to Stoney McLinn, Country Club Acres, Northfield, N.J. Cobb writes in part: Dear Stoney: I know you think me a hell of a guy. I pleaded guilty on some counts. I should have written you long ago, but possibly the delay might help in negotiations, etc. I am truly sorry as I know what [it] means to wait and expect an answer, etc. But Stoney you know that I would let no one else other than you do a book and we will exact every recompense possible. …Those jews are tough and develop some sensational angles to one’s discredit. The book I am in no way anxious but will do it. I would like it right and that would have to be our aim. I do feel there has been lots of garbled things not true that has been written, some down right rotten and damaging…I would like as I said to have something done that would clear up such as coming officially from me…The following is in confidence as am not ready for it to be known, though not sure that I have written you of it. Next year before July, I hope to have everything in order to announce a Ty Cobb educational fund in Georgia to finance worth high school graduates into higher educational institutions, university, technological and manual arts… It is not known whether Stoney McLinn ever completed a biography of Cobb. An authorized autobiography, prepared with the assistance of Al Stump, was published in 1961, entitled My Life in Baseball: The True Record. Other biographies included: The Tiger Wore Spikes (1956) by John McCallum, and The Story of Ty Cobb (1952) by Gene Schorr (mentioned in disgust by Cobb in the second letter herewith). $8,000 - $12,000

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Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. A collection of five letters written to Sal, a reporter for

Lot 32: Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. A collection of five letters written to Sal, a reporter for "Sporting News".

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Description: 32. Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. A collection of five letters written to Sal, a reporter for “Sporting News”. In his letters, Cobb asks Sal to clarify incidents that Cobb was involved with such as calling Honus Wagner a Kraut Head. In his usual fashion, Cobb tries to make light of situations that have garnered his reputation as the meanest man in baseball. Included in the group:Typed letter signed (“Ty”), 1 page quarto, Glenbrook, Douglas County, Nevada, 6 February 1949, on personal letterhead stationery to Sal of the “Sporting News”. In full: Dear Sal: A few weeks ago I heard that you were ailing I had intended writing you ere this. I sincerely hope that at this time you are well, up and about.While it is true that I have tried to discipline myself in pursuit of good health I have discovered that at my age 62 that one must exercise more precaution along the lines of food indulgences also rest is important and moderation in exercise, in other words, slow up the old tempo.Prior to Xmas I had another of my usual attacks called a doctor went to the hospital not for check up as doctor gave out. Went thru the clinic. After findings Dr. changed my diet took several items off of reducing diet, added several items. I made an immediate turn-around have every day seemed to improve and with vitality increase.Sal take care of yourself, good people are scares, give them the old determination and fight. My sincere for your good health. I am, as ever: Ty.Autograph letter signed (“Ty”), 1 page quarto, Menlo Park, California, 28 February 1950, on personal letterhead stationery to Sal.In full: Dear Sal: Thanks so much for your of 2/13/50 with enclosures also for your thought and kindness and appreciation much your appraisal and defense of me.As you see I am enclosing to you something. I want you to see which is relative to one person that has brought much into my ‘late’ life. I feel too bad it was not of 25 years ago, every day I am forced to feel this.I never thought I would venture again, per past experience, this might sound like a cad but I dont mean it that way. I have had disappointments in what I wanted to attain per ideals etc. but had no cooperation, our lives and reactions were so different.Naturally I send this as I being proud of the one now, I knew before I went into it this last year, the enclosed is only of the mater side, grand Father & Great Grandfather. Hope you are fine. Best of everything Sal Why not come out & be our guest for as long as you can stay…Autograph letter signed (“Ty”) and initialed (“T.R.C.”), four pages quarto, Glenbrook, Douglas County, Nevada, 12 July 1950, on letterhead stationery to Sal.In part: Dear Sal: I have had the impulse to write you for sometime, then after your first article relative to myself in Sporting News but I decided to wait until your final article. Sal I haven’t the ability to convey to you my appreciation and feelings in the manner you treated me in your articles Yes and in more ways than one, first in my defense per the recent poll, secondly every line you wrote was true to the facts. I feel so highly complimented as to the accuracy of same. What intrigued me was several subjects you dealt with that I did not understand how you had knowledge of and yet they were so true, I did not remember ever discussing them with you or anyone in fact also some of the pictures shown. I have suffered at times from stories written that were not true. There have been qite a few naturally, hearsay or even manufactured where it placed me in a false light, things foreign to my nature and makeup, some not hurtful to me and yet even so they hurt because they were not true, one could think me thin skinned over some of these. For instance, the Durocher thing where he shouldered me at short on my way to third on a potential three base hit, knocking me on my ‘can’ and I was thrown out. First by the time Durocher was in the league, I knew enough and big enough not to let such happen again if true I would have been entitled to third for interference. Then my calling Wagner a Kraut head and what I would do when I came down and his tagging me in the month with loss of teeth etc. Why no ball player had greater reverence for Wagner. I was only 23 years of age at the time and he was a veteran and I would have been run out of the league. I seldom if ever slid to second or third except a fadeaway of fall away slide and you can’t do either without the foot on the ground and one at that to tag bag with. First and home was only places I would slide straight, to get there quickest way and home when with all their armor they would block one off and yes how about the bat and mask laid in the line in front of plate…Cobb discusses in some detail the notorious incident during the 1909 World Series against the Pirates, when he, the American League batting champ, faced off against the National League batting champ, shortstop Honus Wagner. In most accounts of the second game in the series, it is stated that Cobb made it to first base and yelled down to Wagner: Watch out Kraut Head, I’m coming down on the next pitch! He took off and was met by the 200-lb Wagner who tagged him less than gingerly in the mouth. Cobb required stitches and refuted the tabloid-style headlines regarding the incident and said that most accounts of the incident were untrue. The great outfielder-manager also mentions his firing in 1926 after being accused of fixing a game on 24 September 1919. In 1926, after five straight winning seasons as manager of the Detroit Tigers, Cobb suddenly retired. On 25 December 1926, the public found out he was accused by former player, Dutch Leonard, of fixing the game. Allegedly, both Cobb and Tris Speaker agreed to let Detroit win the game to give the team third place. After hearing the allegations, American president Ban Johnson forced Cobb and Speaker to quit. Commissioner Kenesaw Landis reinstated them both when Leonard refused to leave California to testify.Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, Menlo Park, California, 20 December 1952, on letterhead stationery to Sal. In part: …Sal, why don’t you be the first to set a fire under the pot for Casey Stengel in the Hall of Fame. He is nothing to me but he surely has an enviable record and seems rightfully to belong there. He never had a club like [former N.Y. Yankees manager Miller] Huggins [who managed the Yankees to their first six pennants and three world championships] and [Joe] McCarthy [who managed the Yankees to seven world championships]. Think of his terrific finishes the last three years. The men he lost, the unusual shifting of line-ups all this last year when reviewing back, any change that did not turn out well could have lost him the pennant. [Pitchers Ed] Lopat and [Vic] Raschi not near up to their form of the previous year, yet Casey pulled them through. Even after they looked like they enjoyed coasting and it seemed two or three times that they were going to fall out of the race. He lost [infielders Bobby] Brown and [Jerry] Coleman and [outfielder Joe] DiMaggio; had no real hitter on his ball club. Looks to me like Casey’s record now is about the most unusual of any manager we have had in the past. He still may go further. I think he will win the coming season…With Cobb’s handwritten postscript, indicating that he has corrected a number of spelling errors in the body of the letter: P.S. I am sick in bed with a real cold, not too sick to dictate, the girl needs experience. I tried to correct…Cobb evaluates the fortunes of N.Y. Yankees manager Casey Charles Dillion Stengel (1890-1975), who, after the 1952 season, when he almost lost the pennant, won four consecutive World Championships and could be the first man to manage five straight pennant winners. As Cobb mentions, the odds were against him, as Joe DiMaggio retired and two starting infielders, Bobby Brown and Jerry Coleman, went off to the service, along with pitcher Tom Morgan. But Cobb’s predictions came true, as Stengel took the 1953 Series in six games to make it five World Championships in five years. During his 25-year career as a Manager, Stengel led the Yankees to 10 pennants and 7 World Series. He was to become a Hall of Famer in 1966.Autograph letter signed (“Ty”), 5 pages quarto, Menlo Park, California, 22 June 1953, on personal letterhead stationery in green ink to Sal.In part: …I have been like a ‘shot cat’ for some time also I do procrastinate, then I had some business affairs and illness, recurrence of trouble March a year ago which was corrected quickly, reason too much ‘banquet league’ appearances and so called talks, now since my second fibrillation of heart I have turned over a new leaf and put the eliminator on. Now Taylor wants some kind of a book you & myself etc. there is nothing I would not do for this guy and I may consent to do this, I have never wanted to have a book done on myself, first there has never been one done that failed in being criticized, for alibis, too much placing oneself in a favorable light etc. when so much about myself has been written and so much already known etc. it just never appealed to me. I have had several friends of standing & station insist I should and was a duty etc. I never considered doing a story until I saw so many phony plagiaristic articles written and I started thinking it might be well if I straightened out the record good or bad, then there is some material never been printed that would freshen a book-and possibly be worth a few to read. There are several false lights I have been placed in, that I feel an urge to correct. I have had several after such a story, Putnams and Harcourt Brace etc. then individuals. I have never considered I could do such a thing with anyone better than yourself. Cobb goes on to write about the logistics of writing a book that is accurate and syndicating articles. He writes about developing a new system for voting in members of the Baseball Hall of Fame because he feels the present way is keeping deserving men such as Sam Rice and Charlie Nichols out. $12,000 - $15,000

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Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. An interesting set of two handwritten letters.

Lot 33: Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. An interesting set of two handwritten letters.

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Description: 33. Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. An interesting set of two handwritten letters remarking on his personal life for a biography years after his golden years. He also writes about legendary pitcher, Walter Johnson.Autograph letter signed (“Ty Cobb” and “Ty”), 7 pages quarto, Menlo Park, California, 21 February 1953, on personal letterhead stationery in green ink to a writer he calls “Darby”. Cobb writes to “Darby” regarding a biography he is working on. Cobb responds, giving consent for use of biographical material in Darby’s book, but regrets he can’t help out with any particular task. In a lengthy letter, Cobb, on his early amateur career, writes of the opposition he met from his father to baseball.Cobb writes in part: …I played amateur baseball in Royston, Ga. Without knowledge of my father. I wrote every club that was being formed as South Atlantic League had only one reply from Con Strouthers Mgr. Augusta Club, he extended the privilege of a try out if I paid all my expenses, rail fare and hotel also furnish own uniform. I was more than happy, his generous offer, I worked in their training period, not too many tryouts back that time 1904, first baseman Harry Bussey had some contract difficulties and was not allowed to play in first two games of opening of season, center fielder McMillan played first base and someone had to play in his position and there was no one else but me, no doubt you can dig up box scores of those first two games, I really did well, was only 17 years of age, naturally green, third game Bussey back at first base, McMillan in center and Cobb released, I was leading the club in hitting, the part about calling up my father and he saying not to come home a failure was very true and very unusual and unexpected as coming from my father, in explanation, he opposed my playing baseball as a profession, he was in position to get and did have an appointment to West Point, which was bondage to me and I opposed then it was to University of Ga. That he wanted me to go, I was not quite ready at 17, so I had signed contract, not of age, etc., my clothes packed, train leaving next morning, I had to announce my acts and desires to leave after dinner the night before I was to leave, early next morning, well it was up & down the floor, hands behind his back, and my father being an unusually well educated man and an outstanding orator, I probably heard the greatest arguments any boy ever heard against baseball and going straight on the downward path, associates, etc. it simply was not done in those days be southern boys, (professional baseball)…Then, Cobb writes about going to Amiston, Alabama to join the semi-pro league, and details the “peanut” incident, when he dropped a ball hit to him as he unsuccessfully tried to mask the fact the he was eating from a bag of peanuts hidden in his glove. Cobb continues about his eventual career in baseball, indicating I had no serious thoughts to make baseball a profession drifted along with the spirit of the club.Autograph letter signed (“Ty Cobb”), 1 page quarto, Menlo Park, California, 15 May 1955 on personal letterhead stationery in green ink to Dr. Turner.The legendary pitcher writes in full: Dear Dr. Turner: I feel much complemented the sentiments you express—also honored you would want my autograph—also that you should take time to remind me of happenings baseball wise of the past. I fully appreciate the great class and ability of the players you mention as having seen and followed—also in your expression of Detroit trying to beat ‘poor old Walter Johnson’—first I assure you when we were fortunate to win against Walter, it was with great effort—also when you use the world ‘poor’ I realize fully what you mean. Walter had to strive so hard and he had so little back of him, defensively and offensively for so many years of his career, only a few after he had lost his great ability did he enjoy a stronger club. Yes Walter was my idea of the best. I apologize for this for as you see its in character, a baseball, fan letter. With my kindest regards, I am, Sincerely, Ty Cobb.Nicknamed the Georgia Peach, Cobb was the greatest offensive player the game ever saw prior to Babe Ruth. Detroit Tiger outfielder, Ty Cobb, who put on his spikes for 24 years, set numerous records including a lifetime batting average of .366—the highest career batting average in baseball history. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1936 for his achievements. In this final letter, he mentions pitcher Walter Johnson, known for his nearly invisible pitches, was thought to possess the fastest ball in the game. In 21 seasons with the Washington Senators, Johnson won 416 games. There was no pitching category in which he did not excel. Ty Cobb was supposed to have said that his greatest embarrassment was batting against Johnson on a dark day in Washington; the truth to Cobb’s statement is debatable, as the stats reveal that Cobb batted .335 in 67 games against Johnson. $8,000 - $12,000

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Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 34: Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Autograph letter signed ("Ty" and "TRC"), 26 pages quarto, 26 January 1955.

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Description: 34. Cobb, Tyrus Raymond. Autograph letter signed (“Ty” and “TRC”), 26 pages quarto, Menlo Park, California, 26 January 1955 on personal letterhead stationery in green ink to his step-daughter, Gerry.Ty Cobb writes a heartfelt yet salacious letter to his step-daughter, Gerry, expressing his love for her and her mother even though a divorce is pending because of his abuse and his infidelity.Cobb writes in part: Dear Gerry: No doubt you are surprised my writing really should not be on account and basis of my appraisal of you, what you think of me, I cannot say or even guess. You are the daughter of the woman I happen to have loved and do even now and often what’s happened in the several circumstances and happening as you will know and I feel I need not come out in words, then this last one worse than all, I still have a love for her, now coming from a man of my age, experience and maturity to say such, you know quite well that is really something to say and admit for instance to you her daughter and so much my junior also hers.There are so very, very many in this world who marry, many of course for gain or other ‘phoney’ impulses and reasons, I have observed many such cases in my life and travels also resultant endings, strife etc. And if one has a brain in their head and half way uses it they by equasions see what such classes of so called love brings in divorces tragedies etc. So again I say I have and do yet really love your mother and I hasten to say one with such love, never, never, never can in any way mistreat or be rough with the one they love, every desire or wish is a pleasure to grant, and I say and she will tell and assure you personally if she has not already and at all times told you this for it is the truth.He continues to talk of Gerry’s grandfather and how venomous he was acting heinous and inexcusable however, it didn’t change his love for his wife. All this affects me yes, but I love your mother and I did not marry him.Your mother freely on her own tells me all and that’s as it should be. I am truly sorry for you, your position as a grand daughter also as a daughter of your mother, the position you have been ruthlessly placed in. I feel so deeply, because of my love for your mother, that you would think I feel as if you and your brother was my own children. I must say my feelings toward you are far more than your brother, this I must say all caused by him. With the poisonings from his grandfather and his make up within himself what experience I have had, inflicting I should say with him as of what I have experienced in the time I have known Bill up to the last seeing of him, I confess I don’t feel the same to him as I do to you, think you would know that is quite understandable, I have seen him quite difficult towards you and others, not counting me in on it.Further in the letter, he expresses that he only hopes for the best for his wife, Frances Cass. He continues to say that neither of them is to blame for this outcome. Without mentioning explicitly, he seems to forgive her for infidelity: I have forgiven her for each time including this last time, though it was rough and gained the public’s attention through the papers. Now the public knows. This is destroying the real foundation of a home, of our name as people it’s a common subject. I will tell you on the grounds I have forgiven this. First your mother has been a wonderful person to me in the home in what she does for me personally. She has to have something finer within her to do what she has for me. After speaking of Gerry’s father and his infidelities, he seems to suggest that Frances had a mental break down and accused Ty Cobb of abuse: My daughter came. She saw lots and heard lots. I never had seen or heard your mother before in this way. She was not herself. I forgave her, my daughter also. She asked my daughter to take her to plane. I tried to have her sit down and compose herself before acting, let me explain what it means in what you want to do, calm her. She refused. I cannot hold her even if my daughter was not there. Your mother cannot and I know would not ever say I even put my hands on her in such a way. So she went, she got a lawyer also instituted action, but under a number. Cobb continues to discuss their relationship cryptically, not stating explicitly issues yet explaining that she was anxious and did such things that he tried to forgive and help mend. Concluding the letter he states: So Gerry here it is for you only her daughter one that I have learned to think much of. The letter is long, no doubt the longest letter, even taking in Hoover that you have ever received. Well at least I hold that record with this your longest letter—ha!ha! If you should have impulse to write me about my desire and outpourings in this as I felt you her daughter should know all that happened and then you would not be thinking of things, influences etc. that did not happen and with me could never happen in my treatment of your mother, my wife. For proof of my honesty of all this also sincerity I give you my permission to send this letter to your mother. If you should not want to do this then I do ask that you destroy it at any time you elect after reading and rereading to your satisfaction… His postscripts, which are numerous, go on to mention how wonderful his soon-to-be ex-wife is.While Ty Cobb professes his innocence in the relationship and forgiveness for his wife’s behavior, he can’t be held without contempt. Cobb was known as an abrasive personality who was abusive and an alcoholic later in life, while married to Frances Cass as well as before and after. This letter, to Gerry, seems to be a public declaration of innocence for his behavior during their marriage. $8,000 - $12,000

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[Constitutional Convention.] An important pair of letters relating to the Constitutional Convention.

Lot 35: [Constitutional Convention.] An important pair of letters relating to the Constitutional Convention.

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Description: 35. [Constitutional Convention.] An important pair of letters relating to the Constitutional Convention, including: St. Clair, Arthur. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages octavo, ca. 1787, Philadelphia, to James Wilson; with integral franked address leaf; red wax seal remnants.An informative letter from St. Clair, President of the 1787 Continental Congress, to his friend James Wilson, discussing the Constitutional Convention. He writes in part: ...We have no news of any kind, but a very anxious expectation pervades the People here, both that part which expects great good from the Convention, and that which will endeavor to prevent any good resulting from it. The last are much the least numerous however, tho I fear the most industrious. We have but six states in Congress, but I think by the time you are ready to rise it will be full...Wilson, a most important member of the 1787 Convention, created the draft of the federal Constitution and pursued its ratification. The letter also discusses at length a debt owed since 1776 to St. Clair by Van Sweringen, and he asks Wilson assistance in collecting it. St. Clair was elected a Pennsylvania state delegate to the Continental Congress in 1785 and was chosen President in 1787. With the creation of the Northwest Territory in 1787, St. Clair was named the first governor and served until 1802. Autograph letter, by an unknown citizen, signed (“W-H”), 3 pages octavo, Fredericksburg, [Virginia], 12 April 1787, to Jer[emia]h Fogg, near Newbury Port; crude tape repair to upper horizontal fold, page fold completely split with crude tape repair, seal tears affecting several words. An important and impassioned contemporary account of the issues and feelings of one of the citizens of the newly formed and ‘almost’ United States of America. The letter reads in part: ...the Wind can rise only by selling a Negro. I mentioned in my last the Apprehensions of the people were from the Rage of the Shays.’ Too true, all is Confusion throughout–Mobs rioting, Seats & Britons laughing, & the Patriot moaning–much feared here.... Trade ruined by injudicious Laws, Paper Money still undecided–is thought next Sessions will determine its Fate. Great things are expected from the Convention at Philadelphia. Gen[era]l Washington has been here to see his Mother who has been ill, their Excellencies Washington & Randolph...are the delegates from this State. The Gen[era]l is much altered his person, one arm swung with Rheumatism–his whole conversation is upon Agriculture. The general Cry is ‘Congress with Power’ or the Game will soon be up. I have done my Best. How matters may turn I cannot positively say. The Last are the two most unhappy years of my Life. Pride & ill nature is too much for a labouring man to grapple with. But rely upon it, I have done my Best... The present letter by an unknown American is a summation of all the pressing issues weighing on the young country. The Rage of the Shays’ refers to the infamous Shays’ Rebellion that occurred in central and western Massachusetts from August 1786 to June of 1787. The direct result was a renewed focus of the problems linked to the Articles of Confederation spurring the consideration and direction of a new constitution. The letter also mentions a person the author knows who fought in the war who is still owed back pay. A fine pair of letters providing valuable insights into the Constitutional Convention of 1787. $5,000 - $8,000

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Custer, George Armstrong. Pair of letters--1 by Custer as a student-- another written as Lieutenant

Lot 36: Custer, George Armstrong. Pair of letters--1 by Custer as a student-- another written as Lieutenant

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Description: 36. Custer, George Armstrong. A pair of letters––one by Custer as a student at West Point writing about his studies––and the other, a later note written as a young Lieutenant giving orders. 1-Autograph letter signed (“Armstrong”), 4 pages quarto, West Point, New York, 25 June 1859 to Minnie St. John, Buffalo, New York with original envelope. The young Custer writes in part: I received and read your welcome letter with great pleasure, and as you accuse me of writing short letters I concluded to commence one on as large a sheet of paper as I could find in my portfolio, but whether I shall fill it remains to be seen. Although as I (as usual) am enjoying the best of health, I have been very down hearted for a few days and not only myself but every Cadet in the Corps, are my compare was in distress, the cause of it is this. I do not remember whether I told you or not last fall that the Secretary of War has changed the course here from five to four years early last fall, we were all very much pleased with that change but day before yesterday the Secretary of War transmitted the order to change the course back again to five years notwithstanding the academic Board were strongly in favor of the four years course. Several cadets are going to resign in consequence of this change…we are still hoping that the War Department will be induced to change the course again as the Professors are going to enter a protest against it…Our examinations will commence upon the first day of June, my time now employed in studying French, Rhetoric, Drawing & Painting, together with Riding at Cavalry drills, Fencing, and Infantry and Artillery drills, we drill every evening with cannon that will carry balls three miles and a half. We will commence with the flying artillery in a few days…I will expect a “real long” letter in answer to this, which will contain all the news of the young folks, enough to keep me in a ‘brown study’ a week. But as you left it to me whether I should write a long letter or not, I will do the same with you, trusting to your generosity to send me a long one. Hoping to hear from you soon I remain—truly your friend. Custer’s letter shows his great concern on his studies at West Point. Ironically, he graduated last in his class. It is interesting to note his early passion for Cavalry skills. One day he would take these skills learned at West Point, refined in the Civil War, to the Black Hills and suffer one of the most remembered massacres at The Little Big Horn. 2-Autograph letter signed (“G.A. Custer”) 1 page octavo, [no place], July 1861 to an unidentified correspondent. General Custer writes in full: Major Dunbar paymaster is ordered to the front—if you have no order from my superior authority to refuse passes to citizens you may give Mrs. D. a pass to accompany her husband. $5,000 - $8,000

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Edison, Thomas Alva. An interesting collection of fourteen letters regarding his famed inventions.

Lot 37: Edison, Thomas Alva. An interesting collection of fourteen letters regarding his famed inventions.

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Description: 37. Edison, Thomas Alva. An interesting collection of fourteen letters regarding his famed inventions. Highlights in the group include:Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, Paris, 27 September 1889 to Mr. W. M. Stewart.He writes in full: Referring to our conversation of last night, I take pleasure in advising you that should your South American friends decide upon extending the existing Edison electric-light work in Chile and Peru that you may depend upon every facility being offered you on my part and that of the New York Co. Your long experience in So. America in electrical undertakings and knowledge of the language and people should assist you greatly in this work, and you have my best wishes for your entire success. This letter is written during the time that Edison attended the Paris Exposition and toured Europe with his second wife.Typed letter signed, 1 page quarto, Orange, New Jersey, 31 October 1911 on imprinted stationery From the Laboratory of Thomas A. Edison, to Harry V. Herrmann, New York. Together with two typed letters signed to Herrmann, 4 and 13 December 1911, bearing secretarial Edison signatures; and the carbon copy of a letter from Herrmann to Edison dated 6 December 1911. Edison’s letter of October 31 answers Herrmann’s response to a recent advertisement by the Edison Co., explaining the brevity of his reply. A form letter of December 4, signed for Edison by a secretary, explains that his …recent advertisement for men with a small capital… drew such a large nationwide response that he cannot reply individually to each candidate or interview anyone at this time. He continues to say that all the advertisement will permit you to judge whether or not it is a desirable project for you to engage in. The business I refer to which is now ready is the Electric Lighting of Country Estates lying beyond the lines of the Lighting Companies in towns and cities. This unoccupied territory is very great and the present systems of kerosene, gasoline or acetylene are undesirable. The invention and introduction of the high economy Tungsten lamp, in combination with the new storage battery brought out by me, has reduced the cost of electric lighting for country residences so much that a given house plant to produce the required lighting, formerly costing $1500.00, can now be furnished for $500.00… The Edison-Herrmann correspondence ends abruptly here, for Herrmann informs the New Jersey inventor that an impending financial necessity prevents my accepting but asks that you will send me details of your other three inventions, as a favor… Edison’s secretarial acknowledgement is likewise brief and simply states that his name is on the mailing list. Autograph draft of a letter signed with initials (“T E”), 1 page octavo, [8 December 1911]. Edison has written his response, in pencil, on the top portion of the first page of a three-page letter from William, Edison’s son, who made a proposition to the inventor regarding the purchase of a piece of property and his future. Edison simply states that he is not willing to purchase property.Autograph letter signed with initials (“T E”), 2 pages octavo, undated to Billy, his wife.He writes in full: Everything going along slowly but all right. Today is very cold here, there being a fog all the morning; this pm it has cleared a little & is somewhat warmer, Sheolish-like so to speak. My cold is about the same; it doesnt trouble me however. Dont fail to send those cigars. I will try 417 times harder to think to bring those new stockings down with me Saturday. I have thought 40 times since Monday of you and the children at the depot. You 3 are just the loveliest crowd of human mortals I ever saw and that Mommy, I’m more in love with her every day. The mail is ready to close so much stop. Million kisses.Typed letter signed (“Thos A Edison”), 1 page quarto, Orange, New Jersey, 31 May 1927 on his imprinted stationery From the Laboratory, to the College of Agriculture, University of Vermont. He writes in part: I am conducting an investigation and a series of experiments looking towards the production of rubber in the United States from vines, plants, bushes, etc., which can be grown in fields and harvested by reapers. Edison goes on to ask the university of they know some enthusiastic young botanists who would work for the summer at a reasonable salary and expenses. This collection features Edison’s important invention and quest to find additional materials for his brilliant ideas. Additional letters include personal correspondences to his wife and matters of money and materials for his inventions. $8,000 - $12,000

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Edison , Thomas A. Autograph manuscript laboratory notebook with eight sketches.

Lot 38: Edison , Thomas A. Autograph manuscript laboratory notebook with eight sketches.

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Description: 38. Edison , Thomas A. Autograph manuscript laboratory notebook with eight sketches, [West Orange, New Jersey, or Fort Meyers, Florida] (6 75 x 4.25 in; 170 x 108 mm) with original flexible black leather covers, 121 pages featuring experimental notations in Edison’s hand, including several pencil drawings also in his hand. Edison logs his experiments from October 1927 through January 1928 to find alternate organic sources for the production of rubber for automotive tires. Edges occasionally rubbed with slight handling.At the request of industrialists Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone, Thomas Edison’s 121-page laboratory notebook documents his last experiments of his fabled career of discovery to find a substitute source of rubber for automobile tires.Some excerpts from Edison’s writings: When get to Ft. Myers examine roots of Caster oil plant for latex, has rhizomes, it’s like gatropha [jatropha]–I only examined stalk. The seeds are just like Gapatha Texania I got. Try weak Hevea latex & coarse boneblack–also Japata Tex latex–with boneblack to repeat other results. Possibly Rubber is in a transparent latex in some plants & boneblack is a ‘polymerio.’ Make separate Latex Resin then Rubber about same strength boneblack separately see if clear if one clears & not the other, mix a new lot together & boneblack, best rubber for both. Schmerka to test 3 checks Hevea in Benzol, Chloroform Bisulphide, Petroleum Ether & Ethyl Acetate in comparison with Dichloroethylene 3 checks. Try saturated sol[ution] of Barium Bromide 150 to 100 water cold. Idea being to coagulate Hevea latex. There is a Rubber plantation at Cocoanut Grove Fla. owned by Mr. Keyes has 120 species of rubber trees under cultivation. Can learn more of him from Dr. MD Cody, University of Fla. Have written him for a list. Use thermometers on platter & keep constant heat of 135°F & press plates - from these results will know temp we can constantly use on press test the acetates on hot plate see if sticky at any temp. If MGD we have is too soft from not having been burnt at high enough temperature we can get an Electric & burn some higher. It looks as facetate soda is best bet, it melts in water of crystalinon at 136°Fahr. - Can keep press that warm. Probably sticky below that temp. See if it is Alkaline or Acid to test paper -ask Schmerka if good test for it & if it affects our C02 from hot say 212°FIt is probable that something put in Electrolyte on an old cell & both N[egative] & Positive poles connected together as cathode. The can being positive that a small current density over a long time or a high density over a short time will reduce the Fe203 hydrox to lower hydrate or Fe - to renew contacts & bring cell back.Take all the samples of various rubbers sent to me by Firestone. From Montair one wedgewood Montair - set of screens. Supply of screen cloth - 3 oz bottles filled with the different reagents, 1 gross of the bottle corks to suit. Rubber corks for Reflex Condenser & bottles to suit, petcocks for lapper & vent tubing. Select 3 kinds beakers & send: 15 each large, 20 of medium, 30 smaller, 40 of the small size. I use 2 spatulas, 2 Racks with test tubes. Assorted glass tubing from 1/8, 1/4, 3/8, 1/2 1-inch thru & thick walls ...Sclunerka to make full list of chemicals he needs. Also of all apparatus, fusion cups, plating crucibles & all appliances.Ford starter - The best method of making the MgO etc. granule separation plate to get maximum big porosity would be to use say Sulfate Soda to water & add 100 mesh to the MgO. Then when heated they would melt & lock together the adjacent MgO particle which would leave large spaces which use other MgO would be in contact where there were no sulfate pieces & would not be able to soften as a whole. Try this. It is said that Dr. Osius of Pasadena had obtained fine rubber from the milk of the Panache the French fig tree. The common California variety Kadota & the Adriatic are being investigated. All our rubber will probably before purification be tacky. Perhaps a dry grind will ball the rubber, if so the powder can be blown with a powerful air jet against hardened steel or Silica the rubber will bounce.[Beneath this notation, Edison has sketched the schematic for this process with the air nozzle directing the ground rubber toward the steel or silica plate with the balled rubber settling below.]In addition to the his notations, Edison has drafted eight sketches of various plants used in his experiments, including Goldenrod, Sonchus Arvensis, Sonchus Oleraceus, Lettuce, Sonchus Asper, Solidago Caesia, Sempervirens, Juncea, Serafina and Laceolota.The last experimental work of Edison’s life was done at the request of Edison’s good friends Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone in the late 1920s. They asked Edison to find a substitute source of rubber for use in automobile tires. The natural rubber used for tires up to that time came from the rubber tree, which does not grow in the United States, and was becoming increasingly expensive. Edison tested thousands of different plants to find a suitable alternative, eventually finding a type of Goldenrod weed that could produce enough rubber to be practicable. Edison was still working on this at the time of his death. Edison began keeping a systematic record of his experiments in 1871. The Thomas Edison National Historic Park administered by Rutgers University holds an extensive collection of these laboratory notebooks. Direct from the collection of Edison’s grand-daughter, this represents one of the few manuscript notebooks in private hands recording Edison’s experiments. A highly important scientific journal accomplished in the hand of one of the greatest and prolific scientific minds in America. $50,000 - $75,000

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Hammett, Dashiell. Group of 4 letters from the creator of 'hard-boiled' school of detective fiction

Lot 40: Hammett, Dashiell. Group of 4 letters from the creator of 'hard-boiled' school of detective fiction

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Description: 40. Hammett, Dashiell. Fine group of four letters from the creator of ‘hard-boiled’ school of detective fiction, which included novels that were made into movies such as The Maltese Falcon and The Thin Man, including:Autograph letter signed (“Dash”), 2 pages (9.87 x 8 in.; 251 x 203 mm.), [Aleutian Islands], Alaska, 30 August 1943, to Florence [Monash]. He writes in full: You can be my pin-up girl, all right, all right! My Quonset hut was rocking from side to side for two days after that photo arrived. When I say it was a sensation I’m putting it mildly. I’m just through a couple of rugged weeks of tundra-hopping and mountain climbing and mud-crawling and thisa and thata with rifles and machine guns and bayonets and hand grenades and God knows what all. I ought to be a soldier by now, but I feel a lot more like the tired and battered old gent I actually am. She’s a tough war! The best way to send mail here- and I hope you’ll write and write and write- is by air. Air mail arrives fairly fast and with some regularity; other mail comes weeks and weeks apart, if at all. I’m glad Paul likes his new setup, if he hasn’t stopped liking it by now. Give my best to him the next time you’re on speaking terms. And tell him I was borrowed by TS to write an orientation film just before I left the East -and Sean Dillon was then replacing little apple-arse as head of TS. My army won’t let me tell you much more than that I am in Alaska -as a matter of fact I don’t know much more than that. Now that Kiska is reoccupied there are a great many rumors about what’s going to become of Alaska Defense Command personnel, but none of us has any real knowledge. Take care of yourself and that man [Paul] and write. Love, DashAutograph letter signed, (“Dash”), 3 pages (10.5 x 8 in.; 267 x 203 mm.), [Aleutian Islands] Alaska, October 15, 1943. To Paul [S. Monash].He writes in full: You make life back in New York sound pretty complicated, what with world series and foreigners cutting up at the Owl and plays about Quislings. Thank God and Major Brown things are simpler here and I am snug in my barabara with an Aleutian squaw - though I’ll still trade her for Aorence and give you, to boot, pads enough of Local Delivery List forms to write plays and short stories on the backs of for the rest of your life - reading engraved tusks by the light of a whale-oil lamp and munching bits of seal, occasionally [sic] reaching down to scratch the ear of my pet blue fox Tchirkey. And stop asking me what a Signal Service Detachment is. I don’t know. It ‘s a detachment of a Signal Service Company, in this case the 14th Signal Service Company. In the Army a great many people keep sending or wanting to send messages. Some of these messages are important, but in any event it is thought desirable that some attempt be made to transmit the ones addressed to actual people or organizations. This brings into being a vast welter of wire and wireless, lights and flags and noises and messengers and Christ only knows what all. It’s pretty hard to explain, but in there somewhere are men with soiled orange and white piping on their caps -unless they sent them to the cleaners and got back one that don’t fit them and belongs to a Coast Artilleryman -stringing wire and installing phones and tampering with the guts of radios and routing messages and encoding already unintelligible messages and having one hell of a time in general, besides sweating out furloughs and promotions. And that ‘s -oh, to hell with your questions! New York news as it reaches me here: The Kobers are back from the coast and Arthur has finished the first act of a new play about, or at least purporting to take place in, the Bronx. Lillian [Hellman] has finished the first act of a new play. The Kronenberger baby has four teeth -or so its mother claims. Local news: I lost $50 on the world series. I have a sore thumb. My love to Florence. Yours, DashTyped letter signed, (“SDH”), 1 page (10.5 x 8 in.; 267 x 203 mm.), Aleutians, 10 October 1944, to Pru darling; with a few handwritten corrections. Hammett writes in full: We got away yesterday afternoon on the second leg of our trip here, but not by plane. It was a day when planes weren’t taking off, so we had twenty-four brutal hours on a small freight boat, and when I say brutal I’m not kidding. When that Bering Sea feels like tossing you around it just goes ahead and tosses you around, and from 4 p.m. yesterday till 4 p.m. today that’s what it felt like doing. The boat was a new one. This was its second trip, its first in heavy going, and so we found out where its leaks were. One of them was over my berth, which, by the time we pulled in at the landing here this afternoon, had as much water in it as the pond where they rent boats in Central Park. But it was strictly a matter of getting up and getting sick or sticking to the bed no matter how wet, so I compromised to the extent of rising to put on a by no means waterproof parka and then crawling back into my berth-puddle with the hood up over my head to keep cold water from splashing down on my face and weathered it out, coming out of my bath wet but hale and hungry when we hit the dock to find that I’d played it right. Those who had been up -­ crew as well as passengers, of which there were only eight -- had been sick, those who had lain abed had got by fairly all right. So I ate some bacon and eggs and came ashore in time to pick up another meal an hour and a half later at the mess hall here. No more am I one who says, ‘I never get seasick,’ with the implication that the rougher it is the better I like it. I can still say, ‘I have never been really seasick,’ but with no implications at all. I was too close to it to feel like daring nature. I’ll take it smooth and mill-pondish after this. And that’s the story of my little adventure. Next week, The Aleutian Boys at Yale. Waiting here were your first two letters from New York and I don’t know what better anybody could find waiting for them anywhere, or maybe I’m prejudiced. It’s late and I want to get up early in the morning, so I won’t do anything about answering the letters tonight beyond saying that if you figure on omens at all you should read the loss of the return ticket as a good one and at the moment I can’t think of anybody I’d rather share a bubble bath with. Beyond that all I say is, ‘Good night, darling’ and I’ll write you tomorrow. Much love, SDHTyped letter signed (“SDH”), 1 page (9.37 x 7.25 in.; 238 x 184 mm.), Aleutians, 22 October 1944. On imprinted airmail stationery, to Pru[dence Whitfield]; with marginal ink notation in another hand; bottom inch of letter detached and repaired.Hammett seeks to reassure a woman with whom he was involved in an intimate, illicit love affair. He writes in full: This borrowed typewriter -- mine hasn’t had time to turn up yet even if it intends to -­ seems to leave something to be desired in the way of clear impressions around the top of the letters, but I guess this is still far from being a perfect world and there are many things in it that aren’t all they should be. We flew over to this island -- another one that I’ve not visited before -- this morning and will be here till the middle or early-later part of the week. There was a letter from you waiting for me when we got in, so to that extent I’m prejudiced in the island’s favor; but to be honest I’d have to say that it seems to be a nice enough spot in its own right. By now surely you should have been flooded by letters from me and any worries you may have had over that I was up to should be over, and so your LONG letter ought to be on its way to me. I’m still sorry about that gap. But you’ve been nice about it -- not sulking in silence -- and I am grateful to you. I’ve never read The Searching Wind in its final form -- my copy of it went astray -- but your criticism is fair as far as the first version was concerned. Most people seem to think the acting -- with two exceptions -­ pretty dull. The chances are against my ever seeing it, I suppose, since -- though it is making a little money -- it will hardly run very far into the new year. When I got in here today I received a week-old wire from Lillian, who is on her way to Moscow, and who is probably there by now, asking if I could meet her in Fairbanks, where she was to be picked up by a Russian plane. But Fairbanks, alas, is a long way from me at the moment. Much love, SDHWhen Hammett wrote the present group of letters, he was in the army. He had been stationed in the Aleutian Islands with the 14th Signal Service Company since 31 July 1943. His biographer, Diane Johnson, writes, “Here in remotest Alaska, the new calm life suited him. He noticed that he was sleeping less but not missing the sleep, was stronger, and had gained weight. At the end of August he realized that he had had only one drink since the tenth of July. He lived in a Quonset with men he didn’t much like; he worked at the post radio station and did book reviews, and was contented.” The American forces were in the Aleutians to prevent the Japanese from using the Islands as a bridge to the mainland, and they succeeded in doing that in early 1944 when the Japanese withdrew. $5,000 - $8,000

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Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Paris, 15 May 1925.

Lot 41: Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Paris, 15 May 1925.

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Description: 41. Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Paris, 15 May 1925 to his American publisher, [Horace] Liveright, concerning the progress of his forthcoming book, In Our Time; overall browning.It was seeing son of a bitch in the proofs of Harold Loeb’s book that prompted my original remark about it. Since then I have noticed it in Scott Fitzgerald’s last book and imagined it was getting so people did not mind seeing it in print.Hemingway writes in full:Thanks so much for your letter of May 1st and for the check. I was worried when I heard nothing from you and wrote the note you doubtless received a few days ago. It was seeing son of a bitch in the proofs of Harold Loeb’s book that prompted my original remark about it. Since then I have noticed it in Scott Fitzgerald’s last book and imagined it was getting so people did not mind seeing it in print. I am awfully glad you like the story and I’m anxious to see the galley proofs. There is no use talking about changes till I see what they are. I dont want it suppressed any more than you do. I have great admiration and confidence in you as a property builder. That goes without saying. Sherwood Anderson writes me he has gone over to you and am very happy about it. He deserves it. We are going off to Spain the latter part of next month and I would like very much to get the first proofs boxed up before then. Stamp collectors in the government service are always liable to steal your letters there. I remember one time finding where the post office had opened up some magazines and cut a lot of the pictures out and pasted them up on the walls over the telegraph ticker. You’ll have to go down there with us sometime. [Robert] Benchley and Don[ald Ogden] Stewart and a good gang are going down this year. After I get to be a property I’ll take you on a grand tour of Spain to keep down my income tax. Thanks again for the letter and check. Yours always, Ernest Hemingway. $6,000 - $8,000

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Hemingway, Ernest. A fascinating pair of letters by Hemingway to an unidentified friend named

Lot 42: Hemingway, Ernest. A fascinating pair of letters by Hemingway to an unidentified friend named "Pete"

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Description: 42. Hemingway, Ernest. A fascinating pair of letters by Hemingway to an unidentified friend named “Pete” in which he expresses his feelings about his son, Bumby, in combat during World War II in addition to finances and bird hunting. Included herewith:Typed letter signed (“Papa”), 1 page large quarto, Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 22 March 1948 to Dear Pete. He writes in part: Book went sort of to hell for me after they picked Dimick up after he was wounded. I could tell you just how and why but imagine you know much better than I could tell you. When it came alive again and was as good as it ever was to me was when they ran into that street fighting at the end. Bumby was very impressed with the melicien too. He and Mary and I have all read book and wish you would have been here for discussion unless that bores you bad. Bum had such different experience with the Krauts. Many were so kind and good to him. But then he look like an Alpenkorps kraut so that is different. All the time I was killing krauts, many of them probably the best and nicest krauts, because Mr. Bumby was in their hands, the krauts were being good to Mr. Bumby.Mostly we discussed how good you did the old soldiers, the experienced combat infantrymen, the worthlessness of Dimick in combat, and that awful patrol. I know there must have been such a thing. But Jesus. It is hard to figure one of those good divisions doing such a thing. For me was a hell of a good book from getting to Nancy through him being wounded and captured. After that something seemed to happen to it and you probably know what it was better than I do. Anyway you can write really well and no I want to read the first one. Excuse me writing so much about it. I was sweating it out because I wanted it to be so god-damned good. Actually, for me, it ran a hell of a good race, weakened in the stretch and didn’t win although came again and finished strong…Hemingway goes on to write that they are experiencing a drought but everything is fine with the family. Hemingway’s comments on the World War II experiences of his son, Bumby, refer to his capture and internment in 1944, when he was first missing in action since October 28. Bumby was in France making a reconnaissance along the Rhône Valley with Capt. Justin Green and a French partisan. The enemy opened fire and Bumby was hit in the right arm and shoulder by grenade fragments. Under interrogation, the Americans discovered that their captors were an Alpenjäger unit. When the officer in charge, an Austrian, realized Bumby was Ernest’s son, the officer ended his interrogation and shipped the boy to the hospital. [Carlos Baker, Ernest Hemingway: A Life Story].Typed letter signed (“Papa”), 2 pages large quarto, 13 December 1948 to Pete. He writes in part: …Day before yesterday we shot 331 ducks to six guns daylight to dusk. Mostly widgeon, teal, some red-heads (the red-head here is about ¾ the size of a canvas-back), a few mallards and pintails and one full snipe and a big goose…Now my lawyer is dead and office just being run by a nominal lawyer, believe he’s really just Maury’s old clerk, Govt. socking in for an extra income assessment on, of all years 1944, probably because I was in NY for a week waiting to get flown over by the RAF. My expenses were way over what I got from Colliers and Colliers never paid them. Hemingway continues to mention an old 4th infantry division gentleman he ran into and mentions Irwin Shaw’s book, Young Lions Roar. If you see Irwin and he feels he’s really beat Tolstoi congratulate him for me especially as Tolstoi was a gunner officer who fought very will at Sevastopol and as far as I know Irwin has never killed an armed kraut, jap, Cuban, spainard, Italian, Greek Moro…Well the hell with it: he can’t write as awful a book as Wolfram. $5,000 - $8,000

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Hemingway, Ernest. A archive of eight letters, documents and a publication.

Lot 43: Hemingway, Ernest. A archive of eight letters, documents and a publication.

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Description: 43. Hemingway, Ernest. A literary genius, Hemingway was fraught with an array of personal problems that can be seen in the present archive of eight letters, documents and a publication. An extraordinary archive capturing some turbulent moments of Hemingway’s life including divorce and a harrowing boat accident. A meticulous literary craftsman, this present archive includes exceptional letters documenting Ernest Hemingway’s personal life including his divorce from Martha Gellhorn. Extreme tension existed between Hemingway and Gellhorn, his third wife, in large part because they were both successful writers. She was considered to be one of the best war correspondents of the 20th century by the London Daily Telegraph. Highlights of the archive include a typed letter signed from Gellhorn, (“Marty”), to close friend George Brown describing a grand party but hints that Hemingway’s debauchery is leading them toward divorce. Ernest gave a terrific male dinner party at the pigeon shooting club for the Basques and other allied crazies and it turned into the biggest drunken riot within the memory of man. Everyone was very happy throwing bottles and chairs and hard rolls. Winston tore all the ligaments of his left knee jumping over a small fence. Ernest got a beautiful bruise over the heart when one nameless friend took a loving poke at him, and received a hard roll thrown by Patchy on the bridge of my nose, which cut my nose and forehead so that it looked as though I had been boxing in a crooked fight…This business of running a boarding house for insane, cheerful, muscular gents is too much work. Please write to us when you have time. The rowdy men Martha speaks of were men recruited by Ernest’s “Operation Friendless” scheme. Hemingway was heading an anti-fascist spy ring for an American ambassador. He volunteered the Pilar for sub-chasing duty in an attempt to catch Germans. He recruited these well-trained men to arm the boat. Martha mentions Winston Guest, a millionaire athlete and executive officer of Pilar, and Patchy or Paxtchi, a tennis player who was recommended by Colonel John W. Thomason for the job. It was Hemingway’s antics at this time that led to their estrangement and divorce. Martha became disconcerted at Ernest’s innumerable noisy friends, hunting parties, amateurish Q-boat cruising and all-hour drinking parties. She often retreated to her mother’s home in St. Louis, which she also mentions in the letter. In an undated typed letter signed in pencil (“Papa E. Hemingway”), to friends Jane and Bob, Hemingway mentions how Martha’s frequent departure saddened him: Seriously, just for fun, am fairly gloomy. Miss the Marty so bad that am punchy with it. I raise a little hell because is good for the troops. After spring or before see no future here. There never was any really. Only chance for a wonderful past. But if that gone will have to do something. Even write I suppose…In spite of late night fights, everybody gay and all it hasn’t been gay. As matter of fact isn’t gay at all. I peck away at my small problems and keep every body good and bad and careless and each day is a new day and every one you draw new cards. After five years, Ernest began drinking heavily and Martha left in 1943, determined to be a war correspondent for Collier’s Magazine. They officially divorced on 21 December 1945. The letters go on to discuss his writing endeavors. In a typed letter signed (“Ernest”), dated 7 May 1950 to Dear Milt, Hemingway mentions the amount of work he has put into his book. I am sorry about everything in general and you know that does no good. On the day you guys had your meeting I did 306 pages of page proof working all the day before, until 0300, and all the next day. Working on a deadline. It can be assumed that the work Hemingway speaks of is Across the River and into the Trees, his most poorly received work, published in September 1950. The recipient of the letter is friend Milton Wolff, an American veteran of the Spanish Civil War and the last commander of the Lincoln Battalion. Hemingway goes on to say that I will do anything to help any members of the Lincoln Battalion that are in the can. I will do anything I can for Eddy Barsky who was my good friend in Spain, and who I consider to be a saint, and who never denounced me after Spain under orders as some did. Hemingway’s bad luck appears toward the end when he mentions slipping on a fly bridge on his boat, Pilar, and becomes quite injured. Caught most of the fall with my shoulders but hit th[e] big gaffs with my spine and the back of my head on a big clamp. Cut an artery etc. but made it ok and they have dressed it and cleaned it for times now and it ought to be a fuera de peligro. The spine is ok. Just swollen. While Across the River and into the Trees was ill-received, just two years later, Hemingway crafted one of his best works, Old Man and the Sea. He won a Pulitzer Prize in fiction in 1953 and the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1954 for the novel. A portion of the story was featured in Life magazine on 1 September 1952, of which this archive contains a copy. The work of fiction was Hemingway’s final work published while alive. Also included in the archive is a Christmas card inscribed and signed Just sent a letter, pal. Best always from Mary and me. Ernesto, to George Brown along with a typed letter signed from Gene Tunney to George Brown regarding Brown’s relocation. It was George Brown who introduced Tunney to Hemingway in the winter of 1940-1941. Tunney began boxing lessons with Hemingway at his New York City gym. The archive holds a final letter, a typed letter signed with autograph postscript, written about a year before his suicide in 1961. He mentions to an editor at Life on 31 March 1960, that he has not yet finished his contracted story. The story is very difficult to write as I explained in the letter to Will Lang. It would have been simple if either Luis Miguel or Antonio had been killed. The story is most likely The Dangerous Summer, which was featured in Life magazine. The story was later published posthumously in 1985 and was his last work. A significant archive that reaches into the personal tumult of an iconic American writer who so influenced the world of literature. $12,000 - $18,000

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Hemingway, Ernest. A personal account between his son & brother are enclosed in this grouping

Lot 44: Hemingway, Ernest. A personal account between his son & brother are enclosed in this grouping

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Description: 44. Hemingway, Ernest. A personal account between his son and brother are encapsulated in this two-letter grouping. Hemingway, illustrious American writer, wrote classics such as For Whom the Bell Tolls. His eclectic life and tragic suicide have been chronicled extensively. Included in this lot:1-Typed letter signed, twice, (“Stein” and “EH”), 1 page large quarto, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 27 July 1949, to his brother L[eicester] C. Hemingway at the American Embassy in Bogota, Columbia. With fourteen words in his holograph and a handwritten postscript in ink, and with the original envelope. He writes in part:: Thanks very much for the birthday letter with so much interesting information on your new country. Know how much you wanted to get down there and hope everything is working out fine…About Irwin Shaw: I think it is best to let him fall of his own weight. If I see him I’ll clip him anytime until I’m 70. After that will hit him with a blunt instrument…If you need dough write me. I never mean to be a bad brother. Hemingway’s discussion of Irwin Shaw’s book was in reference to The Young Lions, which was published to great acclaim the previous year. Hemingway thought the book was a disgrace.Carlos Baker and Denis Brian, two of Hemingway’s biographers, explain the origin of Hemingway’s nicknames, such as Stein. Baker states that the author first used them in 1917 when he worked for the Kansas City Star. Brian, in The True Gen, says that Hemingway adopted the use of nicknames in adolescence when he and his friends were pretending to be Jewish pawnbrokers.2-Typed letter signed (“Papa”), 2 pages quarto, Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 28 November 1955, on his imprinted stationery to his son, John H. (“Bumby”) Hemingway in Portland, Oregon. With a postscript and four corrections in his hand. The author writes in part: Please forgive me for not writing as soon as your letter came but I was jamming on the book and then caught a cold at the Sports Palace which, as you remember, is a very hot place…Will be able to start writing on the book with a writing board and pencil sometime this week; maybe day after tomorrow. The book is at page 694 and I think that jamming so hard on the book was one thing that made me tired enough to catch that kind of cold…It was so much fun being with you but I guess you know that…The book that Hemingway was jamming on was a book about Africa; he started work on it toward the end of the summer in 1954, but put it away several months after this letter was written. By November 1955, his book was approaching 700 pages. Shortly after 17 November 1955, he developed a cold. Two days later, his right foot swelled and a severe infection developed in his right kidney. The other kidney and the liver were soon involved, with symptoms denoting nephritis and hepatitis. $5,000 - $8,000

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Hemingway, Ernest. A collection of three letters written to Sidney Franklin.

Lot 45: Hemingway, Ernest. A collection of three letters written to Sidney Franklin.

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Description: 45. Hemingway, Ernest. A collection of three letters written to Sidney Franklin, the first successful American matador, and great friend of Hemingway until an extramarital affair drove a wedge between the two. The collection includes:Typed letter signed (“Ernest”), 1 page large quarto, Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 13 May 1953 to Sidney with handwritten corrections. Hemingway writes in part: Thank you very much for the cable and for what you said about the prize in the magazine. It was strange enough hearing it on the evening news-cast when we were laying off the coast of Pinar Del Rio in a really wild squall. We had a couple that are a minor maritime equivalent of twisters; blowing full hurricane force in the gusts……LOOK has been wanting me for a long time to make a picture story out there. Bill Lowe an editor of theirs was here yesterday and I explained to him the sort of thing I could do and the sort of thing I would not care to do. Mary and I want to go there for a vacation and to live a good healthy life and see old friends and well loved country and study. If I am there four months I could spend two or three weeks with a photographer if I directed him instead of him directing me…Hemingway mentions he would like to be in Africa for August and stay until the fall rains. He then mentions his win of the Pulitzer Prize. Wasn’t it strange the play that Pulitzer prize had? I had no idea I would get it and had not thought about it at all. Certainly, I had no idea there would be such a strong re-action. It was sort of like the legitimizing of the bastard pretender. I have never been present at any such ceremony but it was a very strange mass re-action. You and I always knew there was something odd enough about The Old Man and The Sea but it was very strange to see the magic work in all countries. In Italy, in Germany and France it is the same way and in the Northern countries too. Hemingway writes the present letter just eight days after he won the Pulitzer for Old Man and The Sea. Finished the year before, Hemingway’s novel was his lengthiest and the last work published while he was alive. Typed letter signed twice (“Ernest” and “Ernest Hemingway”), 2 pages large quarto, Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 26 May 1953 to Sidney with handwritten corrections. The author writes in part: I am going to do a 3500 word piece for Look and work with a photographer for three weeks out of what I hope will be a four month trip. I don’t think you will have to worry that I will write just another African hunt story. Hemingway’s letter continues with discussion on Africa and his safari’s with good friend Philip Percival, who guided Teddy Roosevelt and other famous men in Kenyan safaris. He continues: Africa is a bitch as the sea. Take the Mau-Mau terror. As far as I know to date 18 whites have been murdered in a year out of a White population of 28,000 say in possible Mau-Mau country…The trouble in all journalism is that people take the quick look and then write the Profound Piece…When people walked across a country on foot they heard things and saw things. They should also stay put a while and, if they do not have native friends, or the natives do not accept them, they never learn anything more than white-man stuff.Typed letter signed (“Ernest”) 2 pages large quarto, Finca Vigia, San Francisco de Paula, Cuba, 11 February 1955 to Sid with handwritten corrections. Hemingway writes in part: Luis Miguel Dominguin (his close friends call him Miguel and women call him LUIS Miguel) had invited me on the shoot he is on so I was maybe too sceptical of the Maracay fights. He is a very strange and wonderful guy; very ill understood. He was badly spoiled for a while. I can unspoil him easy and he likes that and his present major project is for us to hunt together in Africa where we hope to be able to kill the major beasts with the spear, with some modifications on weight of haft, tempering etc. L.M. was 13 as I told you before he learned to read or write and now he wants to be a writer and writes wonderfully but not for too long. His theory is that he and I as writers could really write. His other theory is that I waste too much of my time writing when we could be having fun…Sid, the trouble with me making these jaunts is that there is no dough that can pay for what it takes out of you. First: most of your friends are in jail in the country you visit. You have to meet the President who is almost always a shit. The Chief of the Secret Police becomes your intimate friend and afterwards figures to visit you at the Finca (He is probably in exile by then) and the visit may be prolonged. If you do not see the intellectuals, and God save us from them, you are a shit. You have to drink with everybody, especially with the Chief of the Secret Police, and are provided with truly beautiful whores freshly recruited from the Provinces by the Chief’s farm system. The expenses exceed any possible profit and I could never even try to get them past an auditor…Luis Miguel Dominguin was also a bullfighter and socialite running around with the likes of Pablo Picasso and Ava Gardner. Later in the letter, Hemingway continues with his bawdy comments regarding his heavy partying, a partial reason his third wife divorced him.This fine collection documents a close relationship between Hemingway and the bullfighter, which became fodder for Hemingway’s novel, Death in the Afternoon. $8,000 - $12,000

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Hearst, William Randolph. A fascinating series of four letters and documents.

Lot 46: Hearst, William Randolph. A fascinating series of four letters and documents.

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Description: 46. Hearst, William Randolph. A fascinating series of four letters and documents mostly written to famed gossip columnist Walter Winchell. This collection includes: 1-Typed letter signed (“W R Hearst”), 2 pages quarto, Los Angeles, 31 October 1930, on imprinted stationery of the Los Angeles Examiner to Louella O. Parsons. This is the formal permission that you have requested to write a motion picture for Warner Brothers, it being understood that you will use some name other than your own as the author.2-Typed letter signed (“WR Hearst”), 1 page quarto, Los Angeles, 2 April 1937, on imprinted stationery of the Los Angeles Examiner to the columnist Walter Winchell at the New York Daily Mirror. Hearst mentions that one must be patient with folks as I would hate to be punished for every time I have made a damned fool of MYSELF…Your ‘future’ is assured with us as long as you want it to be.3-Typed letter signed (“WR Hearst”), 1 page quarto, Los Angeles, 16 April 1937, on imprinted stationery of the Los Angeles Examiner to the columnist Walter Winchell at Twentieth Century-Fox Film Corporation, Beverly Hills, California. Hearst thanks Winchell for his kind words and wishes him success on his picture. Winchell became a famed gossip columnist, one of the first, while working for Hearst’s Mirror in New York.4-Autograph letter signed, 2 pages octavo, writes in the front of a printed volume containing An article by WILLIAM RANDOLPH HEARST Reprinted From His Column ‘IN THE NEWS’ of 24 June 1940, [letter dated] 7 November 1940. He writes in full: To Michael Germonprez—Dear Michael: Here is a little story and a true one about the lemmings. Let us hope its application will prove true too. It is strange what urge inherited from bygone times impels people as well as animals to their destruction. War is such an inherited urge. It does not belong in our day and those that yield to its impulse descended to us from a preexistent savage state will find that it drives to their extinction. The open seas of liberty and enlightenment are too wide today. The lemmings cannot cross them. In the futile and fatal attempt they will sink to their doom. Faithfully yours William Randolph Hearst November 7, 1940. The original article appeared in the New York Journal-American, which compares the advance of the lemmings, small Norwegian animals, to the advance of Hitler across Europe. Hearst created the largest newspaper empire, whose journalistic methods greatly influenced the industry. Touted as the one who began “yellow” journalism, much of his papers sensationalized news stories. $5,000 - $8,000

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Hoover, Herbert. A remarkable archive of over 500 letters, speeches, memos and notes.

Lot 47: Hoover, Herbert. A remarkable archive of over 500 letters, speeches, memos and notes.

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Description: 47. Hoover, Herbert. A remarkable archive of over 500 letters, speeches, memos and notes spanning from February 1918 to June 1964, no less than 46 years.An economic and policy wonk, Hoover enjoyed a successful career as businessman. He took to the details and inner workings of economics like few other politicians would or could then or now. Trusted by many future Presidents, both Republican and Democrat, Hoover may indeed have been one of the most honest and hardest working Presidents of the modern era. Some letters reflect his view that the press did not always treat him fairly or complain of mudslinging by political operatives, but it seems to be well tempered and he did not fixate on it. A substantial portion of the archive centers on Hoover’s correspondence to Lewis Strauss. Strauss’s rise to prominence in American politics and nuclear science began with his years as Hoover’s private secretary. Strauss proceeded to enjoy many highly successful years as an investment banker in New York. World War II brought Strauss to public service in the Navy Department where he attained the rank of Rear Admiral. In 1946, Harry Truman appointed Strauss to the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). In 1953, Dwight D. Eisenhower made Strauss chairman of the AEC. As a result of his achievements, in his successive positions, Strauss counted among his friends and colleagues many of the leading politicians and scientists of his time. As evidenced by this archive, Strauss’s friendship with Hoover was a strong one that endured for almost a half century. The archive consists of mostly letters from Hoover to Strauss with other associated correspondence. The vast majority are typed letters, but many have handwritten emendations, notes and postscripts by Hoover himself. Most have his full signature, but there are some signed with just initials. Some of the correspondence to Mr. & Mrs. Strauss and a few of a lighter tone to just Strauss are signed (“Herbert”) demonstrating the deepening of their friendship, generally after the 1940s. Although many of the letters are on policy and political matters, the correspondence over the decades clearly shows a growing, deep friendship between, at first, Hoover and Strauss and then to include both spouses. It becomes apparent there is deep loyalty between the two men right to the end.Highlights of the archive include:A long series of letters relating to the gold standard and economic recovery during the Depression. Includes a long 1933 memorandum proposing the restoration of the gold standard as a means of recovery. Excerpts from these letters include:Typed letter signed, 27 November 1933. In part: …The holding up of the bond market by government purchases only means they will have to issue that many more securities later on, and if I recollect the tradition of the stock exchange correctly, the one thing that people naturally do in a supported market is to sell against it…Typed letter signed 5 December 1933. In part:…So far as the commodity dollar or any other form of unstable currency is adhered to we will have a prolongation of large-scale unemployment by just that length of time…Typed letter signed, 25 August 1933. In part:… I am enclosing herewith a memorandum of a tentative proposal of mine for restoration of the gold standard. I have no gold experts here to check up with me on this proposal. I am wondering if you would check it up (with yourself and [in Hoover’s hand]) with some of the experts around New York and if you find that they agree with it I think it might be a good idea to take it to Mr. Ochs and ask him if he would run it in the Times as a letter from a subscriber…The four-page memorandum accompanying the 25 August letter has several handwritten emendations by Hoover.Typed letter signed, 4 October 1933. In part:I also have a statistical department, consisting of the leading brokerage houses in San Francisco who out of patriotism (they certainly get no income) send me this data every morning, often by telephone. They seem to have a desire to keep me in economic trend and I read all of the personal dispatches that come over their private wires feel at times that I sit in with the New York Stock Exchange. I recognize the validity of part of the criticism which you found on my gold scheme [see 25 August 1933]. I am wondering if it could be made workable if we added to it the provision that the American government should sell gold at the rate of $25,000,000 a month for two years in the open market and if possible that the French government should do the same?Two detailed, apparently unpublished Hoover memoranda on the state of the American economy.Typed letter signed, 4 March 1937The other day in order to save myself a lot of conversation, I dictated some views on the immediate economic situation. This is not intended for publication, a speech, or anything much, but just to give a little relief to the safety valve. I thought you might be interested in it.Excerpts from the accompanying 12-page document:…There are eleven inflationary policies of the Roosevelt Administration in action…Prices of most stocks are at ranges unwarranted by their earnings. They are being purchased in some degree out of fear of inflation. Prices of bonds are artificially high as the result or artificially low interest rates and some day will fall 20 or 30%. For the first time in American history there is no island of safety for investment or savings…Again, there is a flood of foreign investment in American securities. The total is new estimated as high as $7,500,000,000. This arises partly from the belief abroad that we are headed for inflation, partly because of our business recovery, and partly because of the debacle in currency ratios. These investments comprise a great danger for any attempt to realize on a large scale and will produce a debacle in the American markets. The capapcity [sic] of the New York market to absorb selling is probably not one-third of that of 1929…Hoover concludes:…The practical question is when is the smash coming? Nobody knows. One practical suggestion can be made. The Roosevelt Administration will try to stave it off with more inflation. If they administer enough inflation to stave off all these destructive forces, it may take us down the German alley. In the meantime, we are likely to be artificially happy during 1937.Indeed, the American economy and stock market took a sharp downturn in mid-1937, lasting for 13 months through most of 1938. Typed letter signed, 31 July 1933. In part:…as I am the sole occupant of this industry of being and Ex-President…The memorandum which I gave to Wiley was part of the enclosed memorandum. The basis of it was prepared by a former employee in the Budget Bureau…Excerpts from the accompanying 4-page document:President Roosevelt’s method of balancing the budget is finally made clear by the provisions in the Industries Control Bill by which all public works are to be charged to bond issues and only the interest thereon charge to the current account…It has also been provided that the cost of agricultural relief will be met by a sales or “processor” tax on food payable to the Secretary of Agriculture and not to the treasury so that agricultural relief will not be a charge on the budget. Furthermore, the statutory retirement of the capital of the national debt is to be suspended. Whether the budget will be balanced after this, which the New York Times calls “painless arithmetic,” remains to be seen. It is interesting to note what the effect of this sort of bookkeeping would have been had it been pursued by the Hoover Administration…After a listing of expenditures for fiscal years under Hoover and the probable results for Roosevelt’s first year under the new rules Hoover concludes that …On this basis of accounting, the Hoover Administration would have shown not only a balance budget but a surplus of about one billion. Such are the wonders of bookkeeping.Typed letter signed, 11 May 1943. In part: I receive constant demand or expression of hope for the formulation of more adequate, more realistic and more definite bases of peace policies…Some twelve months ago Mr. Gibson and I published a book advancing some new ideas upon the subject…We proposed wholly new approaches to the machinery for making lasting peace so as to avoid another debacle like Versailles. And we proposed new approaches to the long-view peace settlements…The road to lasting peace is one of harsh realism with foundations of experience and ideals…An autograph letter signed being a cover note accompanying a four-page memo dated 5 June 1919 discussing issues of the draft treaty. Hoover was part of the American Delegation to the Paris Peace Conference because of his role as Director General of Relief he was one of seven technical advisors to the American Commission to Negotiate Peace. Hoover’s central role in every economic issue made him, after Wilson and House, the most important American at Paris and a major figure at the peace conference. As Hoover established the Hoover War Collection at Stanford University and donated all the documents from the Commission for Relief in Belgium, the US Food Administration and the American Relief Administration, there are few documents outside institutions available to collectors.A signed draft copy of his 23 January 1919 letter of resignation from the US Food Administration to President Woodrow Wilson while Wilson was staying at the Hotel Murat in Paris. The Paris Peace Conference opened on 18 January 1919. In part: …It is an impossible conception that the personality of any one man should be allowed to retard measures of this character upon which such a mass of human life and the hope of peace depends. This work must be done for the honor of the United States and I have no wish to show so little patriotism as to embarrass you or your supporters…An autograph letter signed to Hoover from John Maynard Keynes announcing his resignation from the British Delegation in Paris in June of 1919 negotiating the Paris Peace Conference leading to the Treaty of Versailles and accompanied by a typed copy of Hoover’s response of the same day. Keynes writes in part: You are the only man in Paris in my judgment who has come through this tragedy without discredit and has accomplished some part at least of his aims. The rest has been all wickedness, greed, meanness, smallness and failings…There is nothing but shame behind and misfortune in front. How it will all end God knows…A large group of 78 typed letters signed to Lawrence Richey from 1933 to 1955. Richey was the closest, personally, to the President, and his tasks were the most diverse, sometimes confidential. A former detective and Secret Service agent, he managed the Secret Service, supervised the office, answered Hoover’s personal correspondence, and provided instant information. He was on call for any task. Richey had Hoover’s complete confidence; and serving Hoover was his purpose in life.A typed letter signed from General John (Blackjack) Pershing to Lewis Strauss. 8 letters from Edgar Rickard and others to Hoover and to Rickard related to the American Relief Administration (ARA).A letter signed from Hoover as President on 8 March 1930, thanking a group for their support and noting a tragic event of that very day: the death of former President Howard Taft.4 signed pamphlets2 signed imagesA typed letter signed to Lewis informing him of a copy of the Congressional Act establishing the Commission on Organization of the Executive Branch of the Government, the so-called “Hoover Commission”, and a memorandum as to the method of work which has been adopted by the Commission as well as a recent statement of the organization of this Commission.Later letters show his continued involvement with the Republican Party up to 1960. Hoover actually spoke at the Republican National Convention on 25 July 1960. A copy of his speech is included in the archive with a letter to Strauss and his wife.Even at 88, Hoover remained active in public life. Hoover sends Strauss a copy of his letter to William F. Buckley, Jr. He writes in part: I am still a trustee, director or chairman of nine educational, scientific, or charitable institutions, and have definite responsibilities to them…I have the personal responsibility to raise constant financial support for five institutions of which I had a part in founding or reorganizing in years gone by…Every time I lend my name to some righteous movement, the public holds me responsible – even if my associates have guaranteed that I do not need to think about the organization again. And they load my days with letters about it…I have two little books on the stove…and they require constant attention while cooking…A rich archive providing extraordinary insights into the public life and the private life of America’s 31st President. $20,000 - $30,000

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Hughes, Howard. An archive of six letters from the eccentric American industrialist and aviator

Lot 48: Hughes, Howard. An archive of six letters from the eccentric American industrialist and aviator

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Description: 48. Hughes, Howard. An exceptional archive of six letters from the eccentric American industrialist and aviator that begins to show a timeline of his financial endeavors ending with a final letter that begins to capture his psychotic break-down. An extraordinary archive capturing major events in Howard Hughes’ eccentric life, including his bizarre behavior with his final wife, Jean Peters. The present archive consists of letters regarding business and personal life of Howard Hughes. Hughes’ rise to prominence came when he dove into the aircraft industry. He flew and commissioned the engineering of a variety of aircraft. However, investing in aircraft was not his only project. Hughes was involved in several business ventures. One of his first was the Hughes Tool Co., which he maintained control over after his father died. At the age of 18, Hughes inherited the company, which provided much of the oil drilling equipment for the industry in Texas and worldwide. While it was a lucrative business, it did suffer during the Great Depression. Reflected in a typed letter signed on 16 July 1937 to Col. R.C. Kuldell, Howard discusses options: As I stated in my recent wire, I cannot tell you how happy I am over the fine business being done. I am particularly pleased at the news of your legal victories and the fact that this should solidify the foundation of our present position. I hope you will keep me informed of progress resulting from these legal decisions in the direction toward a substantially increasing percentage of the total business and dominance over competitors…In other words, we may not have another chance like this to knock our competitors out. We had better do it before they regain strength. I think our weakest position seems to be in California. Don’t you think it would be well worth your while to come out here personally, study the situation carefully and find out why we are not getting anywhere near the percentage of business we used to? If it is purely a sales problem, you could certainly determine this after being here and making survey of the situation…The recipient of the letter, Col. R.C. Kuldell, a former Army Colonel whom Hughes Sr. recruited after World War I, was the executive who ran the Hughes Tool Company and he was a family fisture. Kuldell is credited with administering the Hughes Sr. estate, negotiated with Howard’s relatives when he acquired the remaining stock from them and successfully guided the tool company during the Depression’s darkest hours. Kuldell supplemented the tool company by building a brewery on the grounds after prohibition. Even though Kuldell remained loyal to the Hughes’ family, Noah Dietrich drove a wedge between Kuldell and Hughes. In an effort to gain more power within in the Hughes Empire, he began to influence Hughes to look closely at the management in the tool company. Hughes sent Dietrich to live in Houston to keep close watch over the tool company’s balance sheet. In an autograph letter signed to Colonel [R.C. Kuldell] Hughes writes diagonally and vertically along the first page of a two page typed letter signed by Noah [Dietrich] that reports on the profits, sales, and net income from the Gulf Brewing Company. The startling results of Noah’s study show an increase in sales in Hughes’ competitor, Magnolia Beer, and by comparison, a decrease in those of Gulf Brewing. Hughes writes in part: What do you think is the cause, and what if anything do you think should be done? Eventually, Kuldell was forced out by the corporate power struggle and Dietrich came into power with Hughes’ support. Hughes cannot be mentioned without discussing aviation, Hughes’ love. In a typed letter signed, New York, on 7 July 1938 Hughes obtains a note of credit from Russia before his record setting flight around the world. The letter states: This is to introduce MR. Howard Hughes, Chariman of the Board of the Hughes Tool Company of Houston, Texas, who in his current flight over Soviet territory expects to make major stops at Moscow, Novosibirsk and Yakutsk, U.S.S.R. At each of these stops and any other in the U.S.S.R that may be necessary or desirable, Mr. Hughes and his crew will require various supplies, such as gasoline, oil, hot coffee, pasteurized milk, pure spring water, telegraphic facilities, stamps, dried ice and various services…For the purpose of facilitating his drawings against this letter of credit, we hereby certify that the signature of Mr. Howard Hughes appearing below, is his correct and true signature…After taking off from New York on 10 July 1938, Hughes landed in Paris in less than half the time it took Lindbergh a decade before. He flew over Russia, Siberia, Fairbanks, Alaska and finally New York where he was greeted by Mayor LaGuardia. To complete the archive, the final letter reaches into Hughes’ personal life with wife, Jean Peters. In an autograph letter signed, Hughes writes to his wife while they reside in the same home at the same time. During his marriage to Jean Peters, actress, he was at the height of the TWA anti-trust suit against him. He writes in full: My adorable Dearest Love, the Dr. is not coming. I have taken something new to do away if possible with regular visits. I don’t know what the result will be, but it has made me (temporarily I hope) a little dizzy. Anyway, I love you devotedly and I want to see you before you go to bed. What time do you think that will most likely be? I will send up a flare beforehand. I love you encore et encore. Hughes and Peters married in January 1957, but lived separately until December 1960, when they set up in Rancho Santa Fe. It was said that Hughes hired people to stand outside each of their bedrooms in order to send these hand written messages, their means for communication. It was around this time that Hughes suffered two mental break downs, his second triggered his well-known fear of bacteria and illness and the couple moved to Bel Air in 1961. The bulk of this correspondence was destroyed, at Hughes’ order making this letter excessively rare. $8,000 - $12,000

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James, Frank. A group of two letters to his wife discussing how much he misses his family.

Lot 49: James, Frank. A group of two letters to his wife discussing how much he misses his family.

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Description: 49. James, Frank. A group of two letters to his wife discussing how much he misses his family while sitting in jail. James writes as he awaits trial in a Gallatin, Missouri prison.Autograph letter signed (“F.J.”), 2 pages quarto, Gallatin, Missouri, 24 February 1883 to his wife, Annie James. He writes in full: The package, via Express, O.K. I have not been feeling well to day. There has been quite a change in the weather, it is very cold and has been snowing; I hope you and Robie are well and doing well. Would to God we were able to board you and be here it would afford me so much pleasure to see you both every day. But as this cannot be we must rest content, feeling that in the end we will be permited to enjoy each others society without any interruption. I received a letter from ‘Col Sampson’ and he informed me that Miss Ruth had been quite sick. I regreted to hear as much for she is a noble woman and I think a true friend of ours. I wrote to Capt Gregg to day telling him to give you all funds he had received for us. Tell my little man to be a good boy and mind Mamma and when papa gets out we will have a ‘boss time’. Write me as often as twice a week and tell my friends I will be glad to hear from them at any time. I must say now say Good bye.Autograph letter signed (“Alexander”), 2 pages quarto, Gallatin, Missouri, 3 March 1883 to his wife Annie James. He writes in full: Your letter of 1st was handed me this morning and you just ‘bet your boots’ I was glad to hear from you. I am a little bit mad at you for asking me if ‘that was right’. Dont you know any thing you do is right with your ‘hubbie’. I hope you will enjoy your visit I know you will I wish I was with you. Tell Rot Tim & Sister not to forget Uncle Ben. I hope you will write me as often as you can find it convenient to do so. I appreciate your letters so much. Hope you will answer Mr. Bronaughs letter and others that is necessary to do so. The people still comes. I think I am making some friends. Be of good cheer I hope to be with [you] one of these days. I wrote you yesterday and mailed the letter this morning so I expect you will get both at the same time. If you do I will expect to get a long letter in reply. Ask my little man if he ever thinks of his papa. Tell him I think of my baby 40 hundred times a day. I had a nice Oyster supper sent me last night by a Mr. Williams of Texas who is now visiting here and a friend of ‘Old Dave Pools’. I have just this moment had my attention called to the door, to receive some eggs sent by some kind lady from the country, and last but not least I am now wearing a beautiful button hole boquet sent by the belle of Gallatin I am dressed up and you ‘bet’ I am looking mighty fine, so the gals say. Of course they do not tell me so but I hear it all the ‘samie’. Well now my deal ‘old flitter’ I must kiss you good bye.James uses his alias, Alexander, to prevent the letter from falling into reporters’ hands or into wrong hands. Both letters are written from prison, where he awaited trial for the pilfering of a train line where subsequently the driver and a passenger were murdered. $5,000 - $8,000

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James, Frank. A collection of three letters, written from jail, regarding his trial.

Lot 50: James, Frank. A collection of three letters, written from jail, regarding his trial.

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Description: 50. James, Frank. A collection of three letters, written from jail, regarding his trial for robbing the Rock Island Line train at Winston, Missouri where the train engineer and a passenger were killed. A fascinating account from the soldier and bandit himself. Two autograph letters signed (“Frank”) on same leaf, 2 pages octavo, [Gallatin, Missouri], 18 December 1883 on recto and 19 December 1883 on verso, in purple pencil to his wife Annie James. He writes in full: I have friends here whoes society is extremely agreeable to me but it is in the presence of my little family where true happiness only abound. There I can find the true wife into whoes heart I can tell my joys my sorrows, what a consolation it is to know she is waiting watching and praying no doubt she has a heavy heart. I am grieved far more than she can possibly be on account of having disappointed her by not writing yesterday. I do hope she saw Mr. Slover so she will then know why I did not write. Good bye until tomorrow. I hope you read my letter today. I am waiting very impatiently to hear from Judge Goodman. Should he decide in our favor I hope I will have the pleasure of spending the holidays with my dear one. I would enjoy a breathing spell about this time and to be with you once more. I feel as I would forget my long suffering. You would be delighted to see me and I imagine so any way. Surely Judge G will dispose of my case one way or the other day. Let it come. I am anxious so Good bye until the morrow. Frank James wrote this letter while in the Gallatin jail awaiting trial for the murder of Frank McMillan, a stone quarry laborer. He was a fugitive of justice for six months until he surrendered. In the ensuing trial, the state sought to prove that Frank was seen near the scene of the crime, masquerading under the name of Woodson, and that he had fatally shot McMillan. However, they had to contend with a formidable witness, Confederate General and peerless rebel cavalry leader, Joseph O. Shelby, who was known for his sincerity and earnest convictions. The James boys had, at various times, served under William Clarke Quantrille, the notorious guerilla, who operated under Shelby’s command. The James boys therefore fought and campaigned for Shelby on several occasions. In addition, there was a special reason he felt close to the boys. At the Battle of Lonejack, Shelby’s body servant, a faithful Negro named Billy Hunter, was captured by the Yankees and it was the James boys who recovered him for Shelby. When he was called to the stand, Shelby testified at the time of the train robbery, he met Jesse James, Dick Liddil and Bill Ryan at his home in the South. The General’s testimony held tremendous weight with the people and created a sensation resulting in Frank’s acquittal. In these letters, he mentions Mr. Slover, or James H. Slover of Independence who was one of his defense attorneys. In the second letter, he mentions the trial judge, H.C.S. Goodman. James would later be acquitted and went to live in Oklahoma with his mother. He resumed a normal life working middle class jobs.Autograph letter signed (“Frank James”), 2 pages quarto, Huntsville Jail, Alabama, 23 February 1884 to his wife and son, Annie and Robie James, in Kearney, Missouri. With original envelope. He writes in full: Your letter of the 18th and 20th has just been received. I was glad to hear from you but sorry to hear Fannie was so sick. Hope she may recover. I have written you three letters and one for Ma, all of which I hope you have received by this time. I had a long letter from Col Philips yesterday and informed me that my friends in Mo. Would leave no stone unturned. He also stated the papers were giving Wallace the devil. I am getting on splendid feeling all right with the exception of a violent headach[e]. I keep a good fire all the time, although we have no ice. I believe I told you I had employed Walker to defend me here. Every one that comes expresses great sympathy for me. I have just had a letter from Mr. Rush. He said he wrote me about the first of this month while at Independence warning me of what has been done by Wallace and Hamilton, I have no recollection of receiving such a letter, do you? I hope you will be contented to remain with Ma, she is much abler to keep you than Mamma. I had a letter from Mr. Glover and he is doing what he can. I have no idea they will get me out before the April term of Court. They are so everlasting slow, I am going to keep pressing the matter. My mail is not inspected at all. The Jailor does all he can for me, I have no room for complaint. I will now say good bye Hoping to hear from you at once. In this letter, James attacks the fiery crusading prosecuting attorney of Jackson County, William H. Wallace, who was attempting to find evidence against him for possible retrial. W.D. Hamilton was another prosecuting attorney; John F. Philips of Kansas City, William Rush of Gallatin, and James H. Slover of Independence were his defense attorneys; and the General Walker to whom he refers is none other than the famous Confederate General Leroy Pope Walker, the first Confederate Secretary of War. $6,000 - $8,000

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James, Henry. A significant collection of eleven letters documenting important events in history.

Lot 51: James, Henry. A significant collection of eleven letters documenting important events in history.

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Description: 51. James, Henry. A significant collection of eleven letters documenting important events in history through personal letters to friends and family members. A prolific writer and born to a prominent American family, James’ letters clearly reveal his exemplary writing style. Highlights include:Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Rye, Sussex, 17 April 1912, on black-bordered stationery with envelope to Dearest Alice. Henry James writes to his brother’s wife, Alice, regarding the Titanic. Frank Millet was a sculptor and painter who perished on the RMS Titanic on 15 April 1912. Clearly, James is still emotional over the loss of his friend. James writes in full: Just a word, late tonight, to thank you for your good letter, & Bill for his note about his coming up on Thursday. Kindly say to him for me that I count on his lunching with me on Thursday, but that if he will make it 1.45 I shall have had a little more time to get back from my Chelsea working-place, where I shall have spent the morning. Let him come in & sit down & wait, I shall not try his patience, & shall be so delighted to see him. I am also so glad you are going to lunch with the Arthur Butlers. This black horror of the Titanic almost crushes one with the tragedy of it. It haunts & dismays, sickens & overwhelms. I knew but one of the victims, dear Frank Millet, yet it is too horrible. But I shall see you right soon, I have been intending Friday. But I will settle it with Bill. All my love, I’m so glad your Father recuperates. Ever your affectionate… Autograph letter signed, 2 pages quarto, Pall Mall, S.W., 29 April 1912 to Dearest Bill. James writes in full: I have your good note, as I had a dear genial letter from Alice on Saturday & I shall tenderly welcome you tomorrow. Your mother’s letter is a blessing as always, though she does want you to go furniture-hunting in bleak Lancashire or Yorkshire or wherever it is; & I shall bring it back to you. I shall have you alone tomorrow till 7:45, when I shall call for you promptly & take you to dinner. I shall want to know all about Brickwall & the dear Prother’s (who will greatly feel your absence, but I suppose they also are all but back here,) & everything else. Let your journey be placid & your circulation (here) cautious. My Army & Navy store number is: 37098… Dearest Bill is the brother of Henry James and also a talented philosopher, psychologist and trained physician.Autograph letter signed, 1 page quarto, Carlyle Mansions, Cheyne Walk, 20 August 1915, on black-bordered stationery with envelope. The author writes in full: I ought before this—much before—to have thanked you for your greeting, but I have had such a high tide of warm friendliness to breast—great is the luxury of being kept so afloat, or made so to feel that one will be fished up again if one sinks! It was extraordinary that there was still so much of me left outstanding to be absorbed, but I feel absolutely engulfed and assimilated now…A significant letter written a month after James made an important personal decision. He was living in England since 1869 without becoming a citizen, but his adopted country’s entry into the First World War called forth his patriotism. He became a naturalized British subject in July 1915. The present letter, in characteristically convoluted style, is evidently James’ reply to Russell’s letter of welcome and congratulation. Typed letter signed, five pages quarto, [London], 29 May 1915 on his imprinted stationery to Dearest Alice. James comments on America’s position after the Lusitania horror. One aches with envy of any other possible view than the one assaulting us in this distracted hemisphere. Of course we are at my present writing as much in the dark here about Germany’s possible black designs upon the U.S. as you were twelve days ago, and even this new assault, the apparent torpedoing of the Nebraskan, of such recent occurrence, does as yet little to illuminate. If it shall truly appear, on complete investigation, that it is really the atrocious torpedo act that it seems, it will be conclusive to my poor mind that those blackguards do wish to drag us into the War by planned outrage, in order to impair the tremendous financial solvency that we enjoy and the sight of which, in her own virtually bankrupt state, fills her with rage and hate, as representing a command of the situation on our part at the design of diminishing so far as possible. However, these next days will show something, and odious, verily hideous, as it may be to have up to a certain point to temporize with the brutes, I can’t but be considerably affected by what I believe to be true here, viz: the fact that the Allies really for their own sakes want America to keep out far more than they want her to come in, believing that she can, for months to come, help them much more. It is all very dark and mixed and portentous—but part of it will be ancient history by the time you get this; so I won’t say more...In closing, James notes about family matters and the battle wounds which his housekeeper, Burgess Noakes, sustained during World War I. Within the collection are two letters from Burgess Noakes on 21 and 28 May 1915 where he gives a vivid account of fighting in the trenches, and of Noakes’ wounding and hospitalization. The collection of letters has recipients such as Roger Quilter, the English composer and additional letters to his sister-in-law. He continues to mention dinners while listening to Percy Granger perform or commenting on the perils of war. $8,000 - $12,000

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