The world’s premier auctions
 
 
WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
WE'VE CHANGED OUR NAME
is now
 
To celebrate, we’ve enhanced our site with
larger images and browsing by category to help
you easily find what you’re passionate about.
Remember to update your bookmarks.
Get Started »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options
Auction Description for Marc Arthur Kohn Paris: Collection Fayez Barakat, Antiques, Art Islamique, Art Préco
Viewing Notes:
KOHN
HÔTEL LE BRISTOL
SALON CASTELLANE
112 RUE DU FAUBOURG SAINT HONORÉ
75008 PARIS

Date : 23 Juin 2014
Horaire : 17h
COLLECTION FAYEZ BARAKAT
ANTIQUES
ART ISLAMIQUE
ART PRÉCOLOMBIEN
EXTRÊME-ORIENT
ART AFRICAIN
APPARTENANT À DIVERS AMATEURS LES LOTS :
5 - 21 - 33 à 35 - 41 - 52 - 58 - 59 - 62 - 65 à 71 - 78 à 83 - 87 - 90 - 91 - 106 - 108 - 110

Pour tous renseignements, veuillez contacter la Maison de Ventes au +33 (0) 1 44 18 73 00.
Sale Notes:
KOHN
HÔTEL LE BRISTOL
SALON CASTELLANE
112 RUE DU FAUBOURG SAINT HONORÉ
75008 PARIS

Date : 23 Juin 2014
Horaire : 17h
COLLECTION FAYEZ BARAKAT
ANTIQUES
ART ISLAMIQUE
ART PRÉCOLOMBIEN
EXTRÊME-ORIENT
ART AFRICAIN
APPARTENANT À DIVERS AMATEURS LES LOTS :
5 - 21 - 33 à 35 - 41 - 52 - 58 - 59 - 62 - 65 à 71 - 78 à 83 - 87 - 90 - 91 - 106 - 108 - 110

Pour tous renseignements, veuillez contacter la Maison de Ventes au +33 (0) 1 44 18 73 00.

Collection Fayez Barakat, Antiques, Art Islamique, Art Préco

by Marc Arthur Kohn Paris


118 lots with images

June 23, 2014

Live Auction

112 rue du Faubourg Saint Honoré

Paris, 75008 France

Phone: +33(0)1 44 18 73 00

Email: auction@kohn.fr

118 Lots
Sort by:
Lots with images first
Next »
Per page:
VASE CYLINDRIQUE  Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C.  Matériau  Chlorite  H. 7,5 cm, Diam. 10,6 cm

Lot 1: VASE CYLINDRIQUE Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C. Matériau Chlorite H. 7,5 cm, Diam. 10,6 cm

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: VASE CYLINDRIQUE Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C. Matériau Chlorite H. 7,5 cm, Diam. 10,6 cm € 8 000 - 10 000 CHLORITE CYLINDRICAL VESSEL Origin: Near East Circa: 3000 BC to 2000 BC Medium: Chlorite Dimensions : 2.61" high, 4.17" wide Chlorite is a distinctive gray-green stone that was utilized during antiquity for the fabrication of luxurious containers in the greater Gulf region as well as southern Iran. Excavations at the archeological site of Tepe Yaya, dated to the mid-third millennium B.C., in Iran unearthed the ruins of workshops where such vessels were discovered. As well, raw materials used for their manufacture, chlorite as well as steatite, quarried from the nearby hills were also present. On the island of Tarut, in the Gulf close to the Arabian coast, over six hundred complete and fragmentary vessels and weights have been unearthed. Because many partially formed objects found on Tarut were discovered next to chunks of unworked chlorite, it has been surmised that this island was once a center of production for these works. Found throughout the ancient Near East, from Syria to the Indus Valley, revealing the extensive trade routes of the time, these works are classified by modern historians as belonging to the "Intercultural Style," called so because they derive iconographical elements from both Near Eastern and Harappan traditions. Much like the written cuneiform alphabet was used by several distinct cultures throughout the ancient Near East to dictate their individual spoken languages, so such vessels were created by various cultures, each adorning the works with their own distinct aesthetic style. Many examples were discovered in the ruins of palace and temple structures or entombed in the graves of the nobility, including Sumerian Mesopotamia. Clearly these vessels were among the most precious luxury items that could only be afforded by the ruling elite.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
COUPE CYLINDRIQUE  Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C.  Matériau  Chlorite  H. 8,5 cm, Diam. 13,7 cm

Lot 2: COUPE CYLINDRIQUE Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C. Matériau Chlorite H. 8,5 cm, Diam. 13,7 cm

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: COUPE CYLINDRIQUE Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C. Matériau Chlorite H. 8,5 cm, Diam. 13,7 cm € 8 000 - 10 000 CHLORITE CYLINDRICAL CUP Origin: Near East Circa: 3000 BC to 2000 BC Medium: Chlorite Dimensions : 3.34 " high, 5.39" wide

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
VASE CYLINDRIQUE  Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C.  Matériau  Chlorite  H. 19 cm, Diam. 15 cm

Lot 3: VASE CYLINDRIQUE Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C. Matériau Chlorite H. 19 cm, Diam. 15 cm

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: VASE CYLINDRIQUE Proche Orient, vers 3000-2000 avant J.C. Matériau Chlorite H. 19 cm, Diam. 15 cm € 20 000 - 25 000 CHLORITE CYLINDRICAL VESSEL Origin: Near East Circa: 3000 BC to 2000 BC Medium: Chlorite Dimensions: 7.48" high, 5.9" wide

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
GRANDE TÊTE D'IBEX  Asie centrale, Elam, entre 2000 et 1500 avant J.C.  Matériau  Bronze

Lot 4: GRANDE TÊTE D'IBEX Asie centrale, Elam, entre 2000 et 1500 avant J.C. Matériau Bronze

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: GRANDE TÊTE D'IBEX Asie centrale, Elam, entre 2000 et 1500 avant J.C. Matériau Bronze H. 41,5 cm, L. 22,9 cm € 300 000 - 400 000 BRONZE IBEX HEAD Origin: Central Asia Circa: 2000 BC to 1500 BC Style: Elamite Medium: Bronze Dimensions: 16.35'' high, 9'' wide Elam was an ancient kingdom of Asia, situated north of the Persian Gulf and east of the Tigris River, and corresponding approximately to the present-day province of Khuzistan in Iran. The capital of Elam and its most fabled city was Susa, today the city of Shush. This powerful empire has been overshadowed in history by the rival kingdoms of Babylon and Assyria. However, the Elamite Empire deserves to be placed in a list of the world's most important and influential ancient cultures. Archaeological signatures for the area exist as far back as the sixth millennium B.C. The empire itself was founded in around 3200 B.C., and it lasted - in various guises - almost continuously until the mid first millennium B.C.; much of its history is also documented using the world's earliest deciphered alphabet, which makes it of extraordinary value to historians and archaeologists. The earliest phases are somewhat unclear. The most extensively researched portions of the sequence start with the Old Elamite Period (OEP), which began around 2700 B.C. and saw the conquest of Elam by Enmebaragesi of Kish. King lists indicate a temporary domination of Sumer (Iraq) by later dynasties within the OEP, although Elam was herself briefly dominated by strong Sumerian rulers. Struggles with the Akkadians and repeated conquests in both directions characterized much of the Avan Dynasty; diplomatic relations between the Sumer and Elam improved, but perhaps only because the former's power was wanin. The Elamites sacked Ur in 2004 BC, and led Ibbi Sin into captivity. Later dynasties in the OEP saw burgeoning power structures throughout the Elamite Empire, leading to the rise of the Anshanite dynasties around 1500 B.C. and the arrival of the Middle Elamite Period (MEP). Akkadian influence waned during this period, and Elamite gained strength; Elamite influence likewise burgeoned, capturing and sacking cities and artworks from the Babylonians and other neighbours. The power of the empire waned dramatically towards the end of the MEP with the inbred king Khutelutush-In- Shushinak, who was the product of his father and sister. Under his unsteady rule, the Elamite Empire fell into obscurity for almost three centuries, allowing their foes to reclaim their territory and plunder. The rise of the Neo- Elamite period is little understood, but in time the empire regained its former strength.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ROI TRÔNANT  Art mésopotamien, vers 2600-2350 avant J.C.  Matériau  Calcaire ou albâtre

Lot 5: ROI TRÔNANT Art mésopotamien, vers 2600-2350 avant J.C. Matériau Calcaire ou albâtre

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ROI TRÔNANT Art mésopotamien, vers 2600-2350 avant J.C. Matériau Calcaire ou albâtre H. 25 cm, L. 8 cm aux épaules, L. 11 cm à la base Etude faite par le professeur W.G. Lambert € 50 000 - 70 000 MESPOPOTAMIAN STATUETTE OF A SEATED KING Origin: Mesopotamian art Circa: 2600 BC to 2350 BC Medium: Limestone or alabaster Dimensions: 9.84'' high, 3.15'' wide at shoulders, 4.33'' wide at base Elam was an ancient kingdom of Asia, situated north The stool is angular with extension serving as a foot-rest at the base. The sides of the stool are hollowed out with crossing struts visible, but presumed original inlay is now lost. The man wears a plain robe from waist to ankles, with a wide decorative sash from waist to ankles. This too was meant for now lacking inlay. The man has massive ankles and thick arms while the chest is more naturalistic with male breasts and nipples marked. The head is tilted backwards a little, is shaven on the top and back, has huge eyes with some inlay still preserved, grooves for inlaid eyebrows, a heavy moustache and full beard. The beard is braded and ends in two pairs of big curls, each for lapis inlay (like the breasts). This statuette is mesopotamian and dates to c. 2600-2350 B.C. It was made to be deposited in a temple. However, the general appearance of the face and the four beard curls with inlay are distinctive and cannot be paralleled in published examples. Study by Professor W.G. Lambert Literature: A very good general survey of such objects is given by Agnès Spycket, La Statuaire du Proche-Orient Ancien (E..J. Brill, Leiden-K��ln, I98I), pp. 75-121. A detailed study and collections of full details of all such known objects to the date of pubrication is: E.A. Braun-Holzinger, Frühdynastische e Beterstatuetten (Gebr. Mann, Berlin, I977) .

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
PRINCESSE BACTRIANE  Asie centrale, vers 2500 - 1800 avant J.C.  Matériau  Stéatite ou chlorite

Lot 6: PRINCESSE BACTRIANE Asie centrale, vers 2500 - 1800 avant J.C. Matériau Stéatite ou chlorite

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: PRINCESSE BACTRIANE Asie centrale, vers 2500 - 1800 avant J.C. Matériau Stéatite ou chlorite H. 9,9 cm, L. 9,9 cm € 90 000 - 120 000 BACTRIAN PRINCESS COMPOSITE STONE Origin: Central Asia Circa: 2500 BC to 1800 BC Medium: Steatite or Chlorite Dimensions: 3.9" high, 3.9" wide The now-extinct country of Bactria spread across what are now Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Northern Afghanistan. It was one of many economic and social entities in the vicinity, and was a powerful country due to the exceptional fertility and wealth of its agricultural lands. This in turn gave rise to a complex and multifaceted set of societies with specialist craftsmen who produced luxury materials such as this for the ruling and aristocratic elites. For this reason, the area was fought over from deep prehistory until the mediaeval period, by the armies of Asia Minor, Greece (Macedonia), India and the Arab States, amongst others.This piece pertains to a civilisation referred to as the Oxus (or the BMAC). Flourishing between about 2100 and 1700 BC, it was contemporary with the European Bronze Age, and was characterised by monumental architecture, social complexity and extremely distinctive cultural artefacts that vanish from the record a few centuries after they first appear. Trade appears to have been important, as Bactrian artefacts appear all over the Persian Gulf as well as in the Iranian Plateau and the Indus Valley. Pictographs on seals have been argued to indicate an independently-developed writing system. Religion may have been based around deities represented by pieces such as this. However, they are extremely rare. A 2003 inventory calculated that there were at least thirty-eight examples of such Bactrian idols known, and although the number of examples discovered since has increased, the total number of such Bactrian idols remains relatively small. Nine examples have been found in southeastern Turkmenistan and two more in Pakistan. Their significance is unclear. Some scholars identify them as elite members of this early society, while others consider their compelling monumentality to signify that these female figures are depictions of one (or more) goddesses. Recent Carbon 14 dating of the organic material found in association with some of the excavated examples suggests a chronological position for the group in the early second millennium BC about 2000-1800 BC, and the use of different coloured stone is apparently consistent with this dating. The technique appears to be used for the creation of composite figures of approximately the same dimensions excavated at Ebla. As one of less than fifty such examples in the world, this piece has the quality of rarity as well as an intensely powerful presence out of all proprtion to its size. In its simplicity and its inherent monumentality, the figure resonates with contemporary aesthetic taste. This is a remarkable and fascinating piece of ancient art, and a credit to any collection fortunate enough to contain it. COLLECTIONS DE TABLETTES CUNEIFORMES Le cunéiforme sumérien est une des plus anciennes forme d'expression écrite. Il apparaît au 4e millénaire avant J.C. sur le territoire de l'Irak actuelle et prit le nom de cunéiforme en raison de la forme de coins ou clou des lettres, créées en pressant un calame dans l'argile humide. Les écrits sumériens précoces utilisaient essentiellement des pictogrammes qui furent simplifiés et réduits en nombre au cours du 3e millénaire jusqu'à devenir une série de signes composés de traits. Ce système écrit fut utilisé par les sumériens ainsi que par d'autres peuples tels que les Assyriens, les Elamites, les Akkadiens et les Hittites pendant près de trois mille ans. Certains signes et références phonétiques sont toujours utilisés dans les langues du Moyen-Orient et de l'Extrême-Orient mais le système écrit a disparu. C'est pourquoi le déchiffrage par des assyriologues français, anglais et allemands au milieu du XIXe siècle du code de l'ancien cunéiforme a été une avancée importante qui a permis l'accès à une source d'information inestimable sur ces groupes anciens sur lesquels les données étaient limitées jusqu'alors. L'écriture cunéiforme était utilisée sur les monuments dédiés à des figures héroïques, souvent royales, mais sa fonction la plus importante était la tenue de registres. Les centres urbains importants tels qu'Ur étaient constitués autour d'un palais dans lequel s'organisait une administration complexe et sophistiqué conduite par des fonctionnaires et des prêtres qui répondaient tous au contrôle de la cour centrale. L'essentiel de nos connaissances sur le fonctionnement interne de ces sociétés vient des tablettes qui enregistraient les affaires quotidiennes des temples et des palais dans leurs moindres détails. Le Professeur Lambert de l'Université de Birmingham, expert renommé du déchiffrement et de la traduction du cunéiforme a procédé à l'analyse des tablettes. Sumerian cuneiform is one of the earliest known orms of written expression. First appearing in the 4th millennium BC in what is now Iraq, it was dubbed cuneiform ('wedge- shaped') because of the distinctive wedge form of the letters, created by pressing a reed stylus into wet clay. Early Sumerian writings were essentially pictograms, which became simplified in the early and mid 3rd millennium BC to a series of strokes, along with a commensurate reduction in the number of discrete signs used (from c.1500 to 600). The script system had a very long life and was used by the Sumerians as well as numerous later groups - notably the Assyrians, Elamites, Akkadians and Hittites - for around three thousand years. Certain signs and phonetic standards live on in modern languages of the Middle and Far East, but the writing system is essentially extinct. It was therefore cause for great excitement when the 'code' of ancient cuneiform was cracked by a group of English, French and German Assyriologists and philologists in the mid 19th century AD. This opened up a vital source of information about these ancient groups that could not have been obtained in any other way. Cuneiform was used on monuments dedicated to heroic - and usually royal - individuals, but perhaps its most important function was that of record keeping. The palace-based society at Ur and other large urban centres was accompanied by a remarkably complex and multifaceted bureaucracy, which was run by professional administrators and a priestly class, all of whom were answerable to central court control. Most of what we know about the way the culture was run and administered comes from cuneiform tablets which record the everyday running of the temple and palace complexes in minute detail, as in the present case. The Professor Lambert (University of Birmingham), a renowned expert in the decipherment and translation of cuneiform, has examined and processed the information on these tablets.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, entre 2080-2010 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 7: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, entre 2080-2010 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, entre 2080-2010 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 8,2 cm, L. 5,1 cm € 7 000 - 8 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: from Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2080 BC- 2010 BC Dimensions: 3.22'' high, 2" wide The tablet is complete, with 13 lines on the obverse, three on the reverse, the first of these three a little damaged, the rest complete. The text is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, c. 2080-2010 B.C. It is not self-explanatory, but lists plots of irrigated arable land with quantities of barley for each. A iku was a measure of area of land, about 3530 square meters; sila and gin were measures of capacity used for barley, the sila about .85 of a litre and a gin 1/60 of a sila. Translation: 12 iku: 13 1/2 sila, 5 gin each. 24 iku: 20 1/2 sila each. 12 iku: 19 1/3 sila each. 2 iku 6 1/2 sila each. 24 iku: 10 sila each. 17 1/2 iku: 5 sila each. 25 iku: 12 1/3 sila each. 24 iku: 9 1/2 sila each. 26 iku: 2 2/3 sila each. 12 iku: 12 2/3 sila each. 14 iku: 4 1/2 sila each. 14 iku: 8 sila 10 gin each. 18 iku: 2 5/6 sila each. 10 1/2 iku: (.......sila) each Field of Ashgi-amah. Ilushu-re'i manager. The background of this document is the following. Arable land had to be irrigated, and that meant communal direction. In fact most land was owned by the state, big temples, or big private land-owners. Since the state controlled the temples it was by far the largest landowner, and it had a huge bureaucracy to manage the land. There were three well-used methods of exploiting the arable land for the state: to work it with servants of the state, who had then to be paid in some form, to assign small plots to individual men who worked for the state in other capacities and who worked their plots privately and took the crops as wages, to lease out small plots to private men who worked them and at harvest time handed over an agreed percentage of the crops as rent for the past season. This document offers statistics for one harvest in "the Field of Ashgi-amah". Ashgi-amah is a personal name, but here it is the name of a piece of irrigated land, not of the owner. This piece of land had been divided into plots which had been cultivated and the barely measured at harvest. This is a statistical record since it gives the yield of each iku for each plot, but does not name the men who had cultivated each plot. That information would have been recorded elsewhere.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, 2027 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 8: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 2027 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 2027 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 6,6 cm, L. 4,7 cm € 8 000 - 10 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: from Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2027 BC Dimensions: 2.59'' high, 1.85'' wide Clay Tablet with a total of 29 lines of Sumerian Cuneiform This is a complete tablet in very good condition. It is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, dated to the 2nd day of the month "Barley Harvest" of the second year of Ihbi-Sin, last king of the dynasty, c.2027 B.C. It lists the rations issued to servants of the king to sustain them on official journeys: Translation: 10 sila of beer, 10 sila of bread: Laqipum, butler, king's messenger. When he went to the king's offering. 30 sila of beer, 30 sila of bread: Lu-gina, groom, king's messenger. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Ir-Nanna king's messenger. When they went from Der to the king. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Awilum-shalim, king's messenger. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Libur-Amar-Sin, king's messenger. When they went to Der. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Nur-ili, king's messenger. When he went to Diniktum. 5 sila of beer, 5 sila of bread: Zallum, king's messenger. When he went to call up the .....men. 5 sila of beer, 5 sila of bread: Nanna-shagga, king's messenger. When he went for shoes. 2 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Pulullu, groom. When he went to the.....Donkey. A disbursement: month Barley Harvest. Year: the high priestess of Inanna of Uruk was chosen by divination. (on left edge): 2nd day. A sila was a measure of capacity, about .85 if a litre. This is entirely clear when applied to beer, but bread is not obviously measured by bulk. Perhaps the flour used is meant, which was later baked to make the bread. The journeys alluded to are not all clear. Der was a town in the Diyala valley, so that is clear, but "shoes" is hardly a place. While the wording is generally very clear and simple, the reality is often unclear. One man received ten times the quantities of beer and bread as the next one. Why�� And would a messenger take a long 25 litres of beer with him on the journey�� If not, what happened to it�� These are practical documents of administration and the ancients certainly knew what they were doing, but they had no interest in passing on their knowledge to us. The tablet is complete, with 13 lines on the obverse, three on the reverse, the first of these three a little damaged, the rest complete. The text is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, c. 2080-2010B.C. It is not self-explanatory, but lists plots of irrigated arable land with quantities of barley for each. (A iku was a measure of area of land, about 3530 square meters; sila and gin were measures of capacity used for barley, the sila about .85 of a litre and a gin 1/60 of a sila.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, vers 2027 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 9: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2027 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2027 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 7,9 cm, L. 4,6 cm € 2 000 - 3 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2027 BC Medium: Clay Dimensions: 3.1'' high, 1.8'' wide 'The tablet is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, dated to the second year of Ibbi-Sin, last king of the dynasty, c. 2027 B.C. It lists rations issued to official messengers: Translation : 15 sila of beer, 15 sila of bread: Puzur-Sin, son of the Grand vizier. 5 sila of beer, 5 sila of bread: Puzur-Mamma, king's messenger. 5 sila of beer, 5 sila of bread: Sharrum-bani, king's messenger when they went to call up workers for thrashing sesame. 5 sila of beer, 5 sila of bread: Elumma'e, king's messenger when he went from Kimash to the king. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Baya, king's messenger when he went to Kimash. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Ahuni, [king's messenger] when [he went] for barley .... [....]. 3 silaof beer, 2 sila of bread: Erra-..... [.....]. when he went from Der to the king. 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Dadamu, king's messenger when he went for fine copper. 2 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Lugal- amarku, the ..... when he went for spices. 12 sila: offerings: the ........ men when they went to Anshebaranzikum. Disbursement of the month of the Plow. Year: the highest priestess of Inanna of Uruk was chosen by divination. 6th day. This tablet is important for giving the purpose of many of these trips, since previously published tablets of this kind do not give such details.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, vers 2032 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 10: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2032 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2032 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 7,4 cm, L. 4,6 cm € 1 000 - 2 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2032 BC Medium: Clay Dimensions: 2.9'' high, 1.8'' wide 'The tablet is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, dated to the 6th year of Shu-Sin, fourth king of the dynasty, c. 2032 B.C. It is a record of three ox-herders in the government employ being struck off the list of such workers. Translation: [1........].....]...[.....] ox herder. 1. [.........]........, son of a prostitue. 1. Buzalum, brother of Puzur-Kesh, house of the vizier. Not present: they have been deleted from the document, at the order of Ashgi-bani, administrator. Total: 3 men, ox-herders, not present. Reckoning of oxherders, .......... ............ Ashgi-bani the administrator took (the tablet) Via Ur-Mes, governor. Month: the plow. ��ear Shu-Sin, king of Ur, erected a magnificent stele for Enlil and Ninlil. The Sumerian scribes did not spare words. It was nothing unusual in a government bureaucracy of the Sumerians for a few men to disappear and be struck from the register. Legally they were not free to leave their employment, so some took the matter in their own hands and simply fled and tried to escape detection.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, 2028 avant J.C.  Matériau  Terre cuite

Lot 11: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 2028 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 2028 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 7 cm, L. 4,4 cm € 5 000 - 6 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2028 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: 2.75'' high, 1.75'' wide With 28 lines of Sumerian Cuneiform. This is perfectly preserved and contains an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty or Ur, dated to the 27th day of the month Kirsi-ak (not yet identified within the calendar) of the second year of Ibbi-Sin, last king of the dynasty, c. 2028 BC. It is a list of rations issued to the king's messengers to assist them on their travels and missions. Translation: 10 sila of beer, 10 sila of bread: Laqipum, butler, king's messenger When he went to the king's offering 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Ilum-dan, king's messenger When he went from Der to the king 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Nahshum, king's messenger 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Nur-Eshtar, king's messenger 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Shalim-ahum, king's messenger 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Iddish-Shamash, king's messenger 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Daya, king's messenger When they went to Der 3 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Abum-ilum, king's messenger When he went to the proclamation of the viceroy 2 sila of beer, 2 sila of bread: Pululu, the groom When he went to the... donkey. A disbursement: month Kirsi-ak Year: the high priestess of Inanna of Uruk was chosen by divination. (Left edge of tablet) 27th day. Der was a town in the Diyala valley, and important economically, since Sumer lacked most natural resources, such as metals and stone, and had to import them. Products such as lapis lazuli and tin could reach Sumer down the Diyala valley.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, vers 2027 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 12: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2027 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2027 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 8,1 cm, L. 4,6 cm € 7 000 - 9 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2027 BC Medium: Clay Dimensions: 3.2'' high, 1.8'' wide The following is a transcription of his analysis of this tablet: 'The tablet is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, dated to the second year of Ibbi-Sin, last king of the dynasty, c. 2027 B.C. It is a list of rations issued to official messengers: Translation: 1 sila of soup, 1 fish: Lugal-kuzu, king's messenger when he went from Der to the king. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Nabnis-Ea, king's singer. 1 sila of soup, 1 fish: Shatti-ilum, barber when they went to Der. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Mazzati, vizier, king's messenger when he went to ...... the beer and bread of Nur- Shamash. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Imtida, king's messenger. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Kuku, rider, king's messenger. 1 sila of soup, 1 fish: Dandashasha, king's messenger when they hurried to Der for cattle for the king's offering. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Girini-isha, king's messenger when he went for the household utensils of the high priestess of Inanna. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Ahuni, king's messenger when he went for sesame. 2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Ur- mes, king's messenger when he went for malt.2 sila of soup, 2 fish: Zallum, king's messenger when he went to pluck sheep. 1 sila of soup, 1 fish: Pululu, groom, when he went to Anshe-baran-zikum. Disbursement of the month Barley Harvest. ��ear: the high priestess of Inanna of Uruk was chosen by divination. 13th day. A sila was a measure of capacity, about .85 of a litre. This tablet is important for information it gives on the purpose of many of these official journeys. Previously published tablets of this kind do not have this important information.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, entre 2040-2020 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 13: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, entre 2040-2020 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, entre 2040-2020 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 10,6 cm, L. 5,1 cm € 12 000 - 15 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORMTABLET Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2040 BC to 2020 BC Medium: Clay Dimensions: 4.17" high, 2" wide This is an administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, dated only by the month, but c. 2040-2020 B.C. It is a list of boots assigned to named persons, and a rare and important document for its kind. One word, erina, cannot yet be translated with any assurance, so it is left untranslated. Translation: 1 pair of street boots: Ur-Shaga, cook, 1 Ur- Shu-Sinaka, 1 Abilumma. 1 pair of erina boots: Girini-isha, 1 irnanna, 1 Erra-qarrad, 1 Lu-Ishtaran, 1 Mamma'ish-tikal, 1 Nin- baragesi, 1 Kinana, 1 E'eda, 1 Mamma- dannat, 1 Baba-nuri, 1 Zi-mudagal, 1 Amma. 1 pair of small erina boots: Ahushuni, 1 Kudanum, 1 Shat-Shulgi, 1 Shat-Ea, 1 Shat- ..... 1 Geme-Nanna, 1 Nin-hedu, 1 Mamma-Sharrat, 1 Ashgi-nirgal. 1 pir of small, nice boots. 1 pair of small erina boots: Shat-......... Total: 3 pairs of street boots. Total: 12 pairs of erina boots. Total: 1 pair of nice small boots. Total: 10 pairs of small erina boots. A disbursement: month of Kirsi'ak. This is a record from a government bureaucracy, the leather boots being handed out as payment or reward for services. The names beginning Shat- and Geme- are certainly women's names, and those beginning Ur- and Lu- are certainly men's names, also Ahushuni is a man's name, but many names are ambiguous as to gender of their holders.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, vers 2030 avant J.C.  Matériau  Argile

Lot 14: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2030 avant J.C. Matériau Argile

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, vers 2030 avant J.C. Matériau Argile H. 8,9 cm, L. 5,21 cm € 4 000 - 6 000 SUMERIAN CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 2030 BC Medium: Clay Dimensions: 3.50'' high, 2.05'' wide The following is a transcription of his analysis of this tablet: Clay tablet, 89 x 52 mm., with 26 lines of Sumerian cuneiform on obverse and reverse, written in a large, fine scribal hand, and excellently preserved. An administrative document from the period of the Third Dynasty of Ur, dated to the 8th year of Shu- Sin, fourth king of the dynasty, c. 2030 B.C. It is an account of the expenditure of barley. A gur was a measure of capacity, used for barley, and about 250 litres. Barley was the regular crop on the irrigated land of Sumer, and served in most cases for our money. Translation: 190 gur of barley: a consignment of barley from it: Seed grain for 60 iku f land: 6 gur fodder for cattle: 6 gur wages for hired men: 12 gur 1 ox for sale: 6 gur 80 sheep for sale: 40 gur expenditures for 1 year 10 gur for beer and bread: the gods' banquet 1 gur: payment to the priest 72 gur: barley rations for temple slaves 2 talents of wool in 12 mina bundles: sale value 10 gur wool rations for temple slaves 12 gur barley rations for Mashtum, house- born slave Total: 174 gur A disbursement: 44 gur surplus Accounts for priestly goods, via Ili-bitim Year: Shu-Sin, king of Ur, built a magnificent barge for Enil and Ninlil The arithmetic is not quite accurate. The total adds up to 175, not 174 as stated. The priest's 1 gur was apparently forgotten. And 175 subtracted from 190 yields 15, not 44! Since only scribes could read and write, perhaps they relied on professional loyalty to avoid exposure of such errors. But the details of kinds of uses for barley do look entirely correct for Sumerian life at this time.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CÔNE DE FONDATION CUNÉIFORME  Asie centrale, vers 2000 avant J.C.

Lot 15: CÔNE DE FONDATION CUNÉIFORME Asie centrale, vers 2000 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CÔNE DE FONDATION CUNÉIFORME Asie centrale, vers 2000 avant J.C. Matériau Terre-cuite H. 11,7 cm, L. 5,1 cm € 3 000 - 4 000 FOUNDATION CONE WITH CUNEIFORM INSCRIPTION Origin: Central Asia Circa: 2000 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: 4.60'' high, 2'' wide The Sumerian civilization was an extremely advanced and complex society situated in modern day Iraq. Lasting for some four thousand years, the Sumerians were among the first cultures to develop most of what we now take for granted, from complex economies to advanced record keeping, literature, international trade and recorded mythologies. Thanks to the Sumerian habit of recording everything on clay tablets using cuneiform - one of the first complex writing systems - we can infer a great deal about their society. We know that Sumer was characterized by various city-states, running in competition with one another for wealth and conquest, while sharing similar characteristics and material goods. They used slave labor, based around large temples and palaces, and were keen to form alliances and thus push out the boundaries of their nation into Central Asia and Turkey. Their trade networks were extensive, and colonies of Sumerian peoples have been identified all across the region. Rule was by kingship; rulers varied considerable in their methods although extreme cruelty and martial law (such as that exercised under Eannatum of Lagash) was the exception rather than the rule. Temples were the mainstay of local economies. It was here that produce was brought as tax, legal proceedings carried out and deals were struck. Records of this period are almost exclusively written by scribes who lived within the temple walls and worked under the auspices of the administrators, who were themselves under the authority of the priests. Dedicatory inscriptions by rulers of the Neo- Sumerian period commemorating the construction of a building were written on clay in the form of thick cones, also called "nails" because of their flat heads. Multiples were produced with identical inscriptions and were embedded into the walls of the new buildings they memorialize.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
IDOLE BACTRIANE  Asie centrale, Afghanistan, vers 2100 - 1700 avant J.C.

Lot 16: IDOLE BACTRIANE Asie centrale, Afghanistan, vers 2100 - 1700 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: IDOLE BACTRIANE Asie centrale, Afghanistan, vers 2100 - 1700 avant J.C. Matériau Stéatite ou chlorite H. 14,6 cm, L. 8,9 cm € 50 000 - 70 000 BACTRIAN COMPOSITE STONE IDOL Origin: Afghanistan Circa: 2100 BC to 1700 BC Style: Bactrian Dimensions: 5.75'' high, 3.5'' wide This piece pertains to an ancient culture referred to both as the Bactria-Margiana Archaeological Complex (BCAM) or as the Oxus Civilisation. The Bactria-Margiana culture spread across an area encompassing the modern nations of Turkmenistan, Tajikistan, Uzbekistan and Northern Afghanistan. Flourishing between about 2100 and 1700 BC, it was contemporary with the European Bronze Age, and was characterised by monumental architecture, social complexity and extremely distinctive cultural artefacts that vanish from the record a few centuries after they first appear. Pictographs on seals have been argued to indicate an independently-developed writing system. It was one of many economic and social entities in the vicinity, and was a powerful country due to the exceptional fertility and wealth of its agricultural lands. This in turn gave rise to a complex and multifaceted set of societies with specialist craftsmen who produced luxury materials such as this for the ruling and aristocratic elites. Trade appears to have been important, as Bactrian artefacts appear all over the Persian Gulf as well as in the Iranian Plateau and the Indus Valley. For this reason, the area was fought over from deep prehistory until the Mediaeval period, by the armies of Asia Minor, Greece (Macedonia), India and the Arab States, amongst others. Small stone composite figurine portrayed squatting, wearing a robe decorated with a low relief abstract wavy pattern, perhaps imitating sheep's fleece, with a limbless body. This figurine could be ascribed to a group of composite statuettes made of soft black steatite or chlorite and alabster unearthed prevalently in Bactria- Margiana and dating to the early 2nd millennium BC. Western Central Asia or Bactrio-Margiana, now known as Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and northern Afghanistan, has yielded objects attesting to a highly developed civilization in the late third and early second millennium B.C. Artifacts from the region indicate that there were contacts with Iran to the southwest. As clay copies of such statuettes have also been found in burial contexts, it is likely that they would have been made of various materials. Unfortunately the archaeological evidence is still lacking, as many of the statuettes from excavated sites are either incomplete or shattered. Such composite statuettes, always carefully executed, have been generally associated with burials and probably portrayed the women buried in the grave. Yet, the standardisation of their shapes would seem to point to an ideal rather than a real person, including the fact that some of the best representations of squatted ladies in compartemented seals from the same area and time featured also wings or animals suggesting a divine connotation. For examples of composite female figurines see: J. Aruz ed, Art of the First Cities, New York, 2003: pp. 367-368, and V. Sarianidi, Margus, 2002: 138-145

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BAS-RELIEF GRAVÉ D'UNE BANDE HIÉROGLYPHIQUE  Figurant les titres d'un notable  Egypte, Moyen Empire

Lot 17: BAS-RELIEF GRAVÉ D'UNE BANDE HIÉROGLYPHIQUE Figurant les titres d'un notable Egypte, Moyen Empire

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BAS-RELIEF GRAVÉ D'UNE BANDE HIÉROGLYPHIQUE Figurant les titres d'un notable Egypte, Moyen Empire Matériau Calcaire H. 119,4 cm, 22,9 cm € 40 000 - 50 000 LIMESTONE WALL PANEL INSCRIBED WITH AN ELITE OFFICIAL'S AUTOBIOGRAPHY Origin: Egypt Circa: Middle Kingdom Medium: Limestone Dimensions: 47'' high, 9'' wide Sculpted in classically-designed sunken hieroglyphs, this single column of inscription, oriented to the left, contains a partial string of titles belonging to the cursus honorum of a highly placed official in pharaoh's court. The inscription as preserved may be translated as, ".,..the oldest official of [pharaoh's] senut-palace, the one who is over particular offerings, the one who presides over the secrets..." The exact nature of a senut-palace remains enigmatic, but was ostensibly the administrative branch of the bureaucracy in which senior officials exercised their duty and in which the owner of this inscription served as "the eldest statesman." The owner was also in charge of special offerings, which, although not specifically enumerated, comprised both victuals and other products. And finally, this owner was charged with rituals, the practice of which were kept secret and hidden from the uninitiated. From these titles and from the style of the sculpting of the signs and their shapes, one can confidently date this panel to Dynasty XII and suggest that it once adorned the tomb of an elite official. This rectangular panel is beautiful in its own right and serves to point up some often over-looked aspects of ancient Egypt's culture during Dynasty XII of the Middle Kingdom. It was during this period that the classics of ancient Egyptian literature, such at The Tale of Sinuhe and The Shipwrecked Sailor to name but two, were composed. These classics were used in later periods, particularly during the time of the New Kingdom, as teaching aids for learning the Egyptian language in much the same way that Caesar's De Bello Gallico has been used for the teaching of Latin. Moreover, the style and form of the individual hieroglyphs used during Dynasty XII became models for the "penmanship" of Egyptians scribes of later periods. As a result the hieroglyphs on this panel represent examples of the very best writing from Egypt's classical period. The signs on this panel can be admired in much the same way that connoisseurs admire Arabic written in Kufic and the calligraphic style of Oriental suibokuga.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, 1900 - 1700 avant J.C.

Lot 18: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 1900 - 1700 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 1900 - 1700 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 7,3 cm, L. 4,7 cm € 3 000 - 4 000 OLD BABYLONIAN TERRACOTTA CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Mesopotamia Circa: 1900 BC to 1700 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: 2.87'' high, 1.87'' wide 28 Lines of Old Babylonian Cuneiform This tablet contains a letter between two men in a business relationship. The one is senior to the other, so he addresses him as father and calls himself son, terms not to be taken literally. The tablet is well preserved, and save for a few line-ends which are obscured due to heavy incrustation (which could be removed) the text is clear. Translation: Speak to my father and my Lord, «Thus says Bali-ilim your son: 'May Shamash and Tishpak keep my father and my lord in good health for eternity. Who have I been able to trust from the beginning, and but for you I have no father or lord. Now, yesterday, when my father went for his health, Nur-Shamash tried to block my nostrils. My father wrote saying, "I will send a full report from the Forest of Barqu." I will pay attention to that matter as to your health. Nur- Shamash, now, has departed for my father. Nur- Shamash should write for you a full report, so that my father will act to spare me. I would raise my hands day and night in the presence of Tishpak and bless my father. Then my father should put his name on me.'" The tablet dates to c. 1900-1700 B.C. As to area, the god Shamash, the sun-god, was popular everywhere, but the other god invoked, Tishpak was only at home in the Diyala area, so most likely this letter comes from there. Clearly the writer, Bali-ilim, was in a difficult position and another man in this affair, Nur-Shamash, was a rival. Baliilim is trying to get his senior to take his side.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME  Art sumérien, 1900 - 1700 avant J.C.

Lot 19: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 1900 - 1700 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TABLETTE CUNÉIFORME Art sumérien, 1900 - 1700 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 8,6 cm, L. 7,7 cm € 4 000 - 6 000 OLD BABYLONIAN TERRACOTTA CUNEIFORM TABLET Origin: Mesopotamia Circa: 1900 BC to 1700 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: 3.37'' high, 1.87'' wide This tablet has a total of 37 lines on obverse, lower edge and reverse. There is a little damage to the two right-hand corners, and a few spots of surface damage elsewhere, but the greater part of the script is well preserved and clear. The letter dates to c. 1900-1700 B.C. and comes from a man Shamash-nasir who is writing to "my lord". This lord was either the king or a high official in view the report on the state of the area which is sent, and in view of the authority which this lord had no matter of substance. Translation: Speak to my lord, "Thus says Shamash-nasir your servant: 'The land and the district is secure. Cutting has taken place for the harvest of the palace: there has been no laziness. About the linseed field of Munanum and Lirbisumu on the Harirtum canal, which they have controlled and planted with linseed, about which my lord wrote to me. When I heard the tablet of my lord, I summoned the military officers. They assembled and in their assembly they heard the tablet of my lord, and the farmers gave the order from it and confirmed it, that Lirbi-sumu had control and had planted that field ... Mashum, my lord's servant ..., and when that linseed had been planted, Munanum ... the tablet of Awi[l-...] in the coach house, and they imposed the penalty. Many people spoke their witness before Mashum, my lord's servant. I sent scribes to measure that field, and there were 8 iku of field watered by the Harirtum canal, and 10 iku watered by the Kabliya canal. 10 iku of field which Lirbi-sumu planted, and 2.50 iku of field which Rish-Shamash planted, I held back for the palace. Now, Munanum, Lirbi-sumu and the farmers who are in control and planted that linseed I have entrusted to the control of Mashum [and] I have sent (them) to my lord. An iku was a measure of area of land, about 353 square meters. The two canals named seem not to be known elsewhere so far.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
IBEX  Perse, entre 1900 et 1300 avant J.C.

Lot 20: IBEX Perse, entre 1900 et 1300 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: IBEX Perse, entre 1900 et 1300 avant J.C. Matériau Bronze H. 18,4 cm € 15 000 - 20 000 PERSIAN BRONZE FIGURE OF AN IBEX Origin: Persia Circa: 1900 BC to 1300 BC Medium: Bronze Dimensions: 7.25'' high The Achaemenid Empire (559-330 BC) was one of the most dynamic and historically significant socio-political entities of the first millennium BC. Originally based in Persia, their borders extended eastwards and also into the Mediterranean region, where they were the notable foe of the ancient Greeks. The founder (the mythological founder of the Achaemenid empire was called Achaemenes) Cyrus, following an abortive raid on the Peloponnese, besieged and captured Babylon in 539 BC; his release of Jews who had been held captive there earned him immortality in the Book of Isaiah. The empire continued to grow until Cyrus' death in 529 BC, by which time the kingdom extended as far as the Hindu Kush in present-day Afghanistan. However, his successors were less successful and the empire was gradually eroded as intrigue and corruption threatened court stability. Darius, beaten at the battle of Marathon in 490 BC, led the Achaemenids back to Asia Minor where they attempted to consolidate the remains of their power. While successful in his lifetime, the court and empire returned to their usual downward cycle until the death in 330 of the last of the Achaemenids, Darius III, at the hands of his own subjects. The cultural achievements of the Achaemenids were considerable, for although somewhat despotic in the technical sense, free trade and social tolerance went to provide a comparatively enlightened environment in which the arts flourished. The economy was healthy, fuelled by Darius' introduction of stable gold currency, and the road system allowed the spread of trade, luxury items and ideas. As a result the artists and craftsmen of the time were extremely attuned to neighbouring and distant polities, and were able to produce a wide variety of elite items such as this. Most iconography of the time was based around enormously ornate zoomorphic statuary and architectural design as seen in Persepolis, and smaller items retain much of their grandiose monumentality.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
STÈLE OU PAROI DE TEMPLE Gravée en larges hiéroglyphes sur deux registres verticaux : Le nom d'Horus du roi dans la colonne de droite est celui de Ramsès II, « Le taureau puissant qui apparaît à Thèbes et fait vivre les Deux- Terres». D'après la

Lot 21: STÈLE OU PAROI DE TEMPLE Gravée en larges hiéroglyphes sur deux registres verticaux : Le nom d'Horus du roi dans la colonne de droite est celui de Ramsès II, « Le taureau puissant qui apparaît à Thèbes et fait vivre les Deux- Terres». D'après la

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: STÈLE OU PAROI DE TEMPLE Gravée en larges hiéroglyphes sur deux registres verticaux : Le nom d'Horus du roi dans la colonne de droite est celui de Ramsès II, « Le taureau puissant qui apparaît à Thèbes et fait vivre les Deux- Terres». D'après la colonne de gauche on pourrait lire.. que le souverain a bâti «pour son père Ptah maître de Maât» une «belle porte... » Egypte, Nouvel Empire Matériau Calcaire dur H. 70 cm, L. 42 cm € 30 000 - 40 000 TEMPLE RELIEF PANEL Origin : Egypt Circa : New Kingdom Medium : limestone Dimensions : 27.56'' high, 16.53'' wide

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
DIGNITAIRE AVEC LES CARTOUCHES DU PHARAON AMENHOTEP III  Dignitaire, vêtu d'un pagne, marchant sur  un socle quadrangulaire gravé des cartouches  d'Amenhotep III  Egypte, Nouvel Empire

Lot 22: DIGNITAIRE AVEC LES CARTOUCHES DU PHARAON AMENHOTEP III Dignitaire, vêtu d'un pagne, marchant sur un socle quadrangulaire gravé des cartouches d'Amenhotep III Egypte, Nouvel Empire

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: DIGNITAIRE AVEC LES CARTOUCHES DU PHARAON AMENHOTEP III Dignitaire, vêtu d'un pagne, marchant sur un socle quadrangulaire gravé des cartouches d'Amenhotep III Egypte, Nouvel Empire Matériau Bois H 27,9 cm € 300 000 - 500 000 STATUE INSCRIBED WITH THE CARTOUCHES OF PHARAOH AMENHOTEP III Origin: Egypt Circa: New Kingdom Medium: Wood Dimensions: 11'' high The image is that of a corpulent, aged individual striding forward with his left leg advanced. That corpulence is conveyed by the modeling of the upper torso with its subtly protruding pectoral muscles rising to each side of the sternal notch which terminates in a narrow, tear-drop shaped, depressed navel. The corpulence is extended to his face which exhibits fleshy, full-cheeks and a mouth with full lips, the corners of which are drilled. His large, circular eyes still retain traces of their original black paint. He is shown wearing an undecorated, belt-less, wraparound kilt with its central flap beneath the fold-over. Both of his arms are held parallel to the sides of his body; his left hand with its open palm is pressed against his thigh. His right hand clasps an ankh, or sign of life. His hair is styled in a series of distinctive waves which run parallel to one another and lay flat on the top of his head. This treatment of the hair is stylistically similar to that found on a wooden statuette, inscribed for the young lady Nebetya, which was formerly in the collection of Martine, Comtesse de Béhague. Such a coiffure may also quite possibly be a variant in sculpture in the round of the so-called Nubian wig which was repeatedly depicted in two-dimensional representations of the period. The rectangular base on which the figure stands, and which appears to be original to the statuette, is inscribed with two columns of hieroglyphs. These contain the nomen and prenomen of the pharaoh Amenhotep III introduced by their respective epithets. These can be translated into English as, "The King of Upper and Lower Egypt, Neb-maat-re, the Son of the Sun God, Re, Amenhotep, the Ruler of Thebes, may he be granted life like Re [forever]." There was an intense production of wooden figures during the reign of Amenhotep III, as is evidenced by the numerous surviving examples of statuettes of members of his harem discovered in the Faiyum at Medinet Ghurab. These all stand on similar rectangular bases and are distinctive in regard to their facial features since no two of their physiognomies are alike. None of these statuettes exhibits royal insignia as part of their regalia. The statuette of Nebetya, mentioned above, belongs to this series. Wooden statuettes were also created for Amenhotep III himself as the examples in Hildesheim and Brooklyn demonstrate. The example in Brooklyn is particularly interesting inasmuch as it, too, rests on a rectangular base inscribed for this pharaoh, and portrays him as a corpulent, aged individual. His arms which are now missing were separately made as was his still preserved crown. The absence of any royal insignia on the head of our statuette seems to conform to the known predilection of the ancient Egyptians to modify wooden images of their royals. The modification to the small wooden head of Queen Tiye in Berlin is perhaps the best know example of this practice. It is also possible that the ankh-sign alone sufficed to indicate the royal status of our figure. One is reminded of the fact that numerous statuettes in small scale were created for this pharaoh which stand outside of the traditional repertoire, and these include the serpentine statuette, unfortunately without its head, now in the collections of The Metropolitan Museum of Art. It is, therefore, possible that this interesting statuette represents the king himself or one of his extremely close and trusted courtiers. References: A. P. Kozloff and B. M. Bryan, Egypt's Dazzling Sun. Amenhotep III and his World (Cleveland 1992), pages 194 and 210 [for the inscribed, wooden image of the corpulent and aged Amenhotep III in The Brooklyn Museum; pages 211-212, no. 27 [for the wooden statuette of Amenhotep III in Hildlesheim]; pages 257- 260 [for the wooden statuettes of the members of his harem from the Faiyum, including the image of Nebetya]; pages 209-210, no. 26 [for the reworked wooden head of Queen Tiye]; and 102, figure IV.23 [for a two-dimensional representation of Amenhotep III weaing the Nubian wig, of which the hair style of our statuette may possibly be a variation].

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
SETI I FAISANT L'OFFRANDE DE L'ENCENS Bas relief finement sculpté figurant le roi de profil, coiffé du Némès et paré du collier Ousekh, accomplissant le rituel divin de l'encens purificateur. Il présente un encensoir orné d'une tête d'Horus. Egypte,

Lot 23: SETI I FAISANT L'OFFRANDE DE L'ENCENS Bas relief finement sculpté figurant le roi de profil, coiffé du Némès et paré du collier Ousekh, accomplissant le rituel divin de l'encens purificateur. Il présente un encensoir orné d'une tête d'Horus. Egypte,

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: SETI I FAISANT L'OFFRANDE DE L'ENCENS Bas relief finement sculpté figurant le roi de profil, coiffé du Némès et paré du collier Ousekh, accomplissant le rituel divin de l'encens purificateur. Il présente un encensoir orné d'une tête d'Horus. Egypte, Nouvel Empire Matériau Calcaire avec traces de polychromie H. 36,8 cm, L. 70,4 cm Légères restaurations € 100 000 - 150 000 LIMESTONE FRAGMENT OF A RELIEF PANEL DEPICTING SETI I OFFERING INCENSE Origin: Egypt Circa: New Kingdom Medium: Limestone Dimensions: 14.5'' high, 27.7'' wide Restorations Seti's father, Ramesses II, began the 19 Dynasty during Egypt's New Kingdom period. His brief two-year reign allowed his son to take the throne and formally begin one of the most important periods in all Egyptian history. Seti instituted massive building and restoration projects throughout Egypt. These monuments are covered with relief sculpture of exquisite style. Seti's was the father of Ramesses II, who built the great complex at Abu Simbel and is believed to have been pharaoh at the time of the Hebrew exodus from Egypt. This scene is simple, yet profound. Here, a dignified male figure, identified as Seti I, piously extends his offering of incense toward an unseen deity, immediately taking his place beside those who have performed this act in the past and those who will do so in the future. The pharaoh is depicted in a composite pose so characteristic of Egyptian art: his face is shown in profile while his torso is shown from the front. Rather than disrupt the flow of the figure, Egyptian artists used this arrangement to present the fullest or most typical features of each part of the human body. A delicately carved incense burner, which terminates in the head of a hawk, is held in the left hand. The right arm is positioned lower than the left as indicated by the curve of the right shoulder. Perhaps Seti I is actually making a double sacrifice. Might he possibly be pouring sacred water or oil from his unseen arm�� He wears a wonderfully carved striped cloth nemes headdress flanked by two large uraei cobras, indicative of his royal stature. The depiction of ritual acts in Egyptian art centers on a set of highly codified poses, gestures, and implements. Many of these were developed over centuries of use and related to Egyptian hieroglyphs as well. From the pose of Seti I on this relief panel, we can conjecture that he stood before a deity at his left, extending the incense burner with his left hand and simultaneously making another offering with his right. Offering incense was more than an act of devotion. Ancient Egyptians believed that the essence of the deity resided in the fragrant smoke; the god's presence was as real as in the smoke as it was in the statue Seti faced. Related examples: Seti offering a libation, Temple of Seti I, Abydos, Nineteen Dynasty in Wilkinson, Reading Egyptian Art, New York, 1992: p.204. For further discussion on this theme see: Davis, W. The Canonical Tradition in Ancient Egyptian Art, Cambridge, 1989. Robins, G. The Art of Ancient Egypt, Cambridge, 1997 and Wilkinson, R.H., Symbol and Magic in Egyptian art, New ��ork, 1994.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
DÉESSE DE LA FERTILITÉ  Yémen, Royaume de Saba, entre 1200 et 600 avant J.C.

Lot 24: DÉESSE DE LA FERTILITÉ Yémen, Royaume de Saba, entre 1200 et 600 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: DÉESSE DE LA FERTILITÉ Yémen, Royaume de Saba, entre 1200 et 600 avant J.C. Matériau Marbre H. 68,8 cm, L. 27,3 cm € 35 000 - 45 000 SABEAN MARBLE FERTILITY GODDESS Origin: Yemen Circa: 1200 BC to 600 BC Medium: Marble Dimensions: 27.1'' high, 10.75'' wide The ancient kingdom of Saba ruled over the lands of southern Arabia, centered in modern day Yemen. Saba is perhaps better known as Sheba, the Hebrew word for the kingdom, whose famous Queen was recounted as having visited Solomon in the pages of the Old Testament. Biblical accounts speak of the wealth of this ancient civilization of traders and merchants, and modern archaeological excavations confirm these reports. Ruins of fortresses and walled towns are evident and remnants of their extensive irrigation system that turned the desert into a paradise still cover the land. Although gold and silver deposits were present, the chief source of their vast wealth was derived from their veritable monopoly of two of the most coveted materials in ancient times: frankincense and myrrh, resinous gums obtained from certain trees that only grow in Southern Arabia and were literally worth their weight in gold. There was not a temple or wealthy house in the ancient world, from Babylon to Rome, where one would not smell the fragrant scents of these incenses. In addition, a trade route that connected India to Egypt that passed through their capital of Marib was another major source of wealth. Perhaps their greatest accomplishment was the Great Dam of Marib, a monumental construction that brought w ater from the mountains both to the city and to the crop fields. The dam was in continual use (accounting for timely repairs) until the 6th Century A.D. and its ultimate destruction is detailed in the Koran as the end of the old world and a turning point in history. However, the civilization that created this wonder fell apart long before the damn did. In the 1st Century A.D., the Ptolemaic Greeks discovered a sea route from India directly to the port of Alexandria, eliminating Saba from this lucrative trade and ushering in the decline of Sabean prosperity. This fertility goddess stands with her arms crossed ever so humbly underneath her bust. Her pronounced single eyebrow, which is common in Sabean art, gives the fertility goddess an air of maternal wisdom. Her sympathetic eyes greet us with a mother's welcoming spirit such that we long for her embrace. Although her facial structure seems rather masculine, her femininity is accentuated through her defined breasts and wide hips. The viewer may wonder 'What is the importance of a fertility goddess'�� Her vital role lay in aiding to perpetuate procreation, civilization; simply stated: humanity. This fertility goddess reveals her tenderness just through her gaze, leaving the viewer assured of her care andconcern.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
GRAND OSIRIS  Debout, coiffé de la couronne de Haute-Egypte  et paré de la barbe postiche  Egypte, Basse Epoque

Lot 25: GRAND OSIRIS Debout, coiffé de la couronne de Haute-Egypte et paré de la barbe postiche Egypte, Basse Epoque

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: GRAND OSIRIS Debout, coiffé de la couronne de Haute-Egypte et paré de la barbe postiche Egypte, Basse Epoque Matériau Bronze H. 40,6 cm Restaurations € 45 000 - 50 000 EGYPTIAN BRONZE STANDING FIGURE Origin: Egypt Circa: Late Period Medium: Bronze Dimensions: 16'' high Restorations Although not inscribed, this remarkably large figure can be identified as a depiction of Osiris, god of the Hereafter, on the basis of his costume and attributes. That costume is designed as a tightly-fitting garment, doubtless intended to represent the fine linen bandages in which his mummy was enveloped. A slit in the bandages permits the god's left hand to protrude so that he can hold the flail, one of his traditional attributes. The flail, used by ancient farmers for the threshing of grain, associates Osiris with the agricultural cycles of the land and reinforces his authority as the lord of resurrection. Just as wheat grows anew after a winter of dormancy, so, too, will the deceased be resurrected in the Hereafter. The face of Osiris is characterized by idealizing features consistent with the principle that he will be physically fit and free of all physical defects forever. A false beard, originally associated with goats, is attached to his chin. By means of the principles of sympathetic magic, the sexually charged associations of the goat are metaphorically transferred to Osiris. The White Crown of Upper Egypt, his traditional headdress, completes his costume and this is fronted by a uraeus, or sacred cobra. The scale and technique of our image of Osiris suggests that it was created during the Third Intermediate Period (Dynasty XXI-XXV), roughly 1000-650 B.C. The missing left arm was apparently accidentally destroyed and not restored in modern times.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BRIQUE ASSYRIENNE PEINTE  Buste de génie féminin ailé, coiffé de cornes,  les seins nus, tenant des serpents  Mésopotamie, art assyrien, début du Ier millenaire  avant J.-C.

Lot 26: BRIQUE ASSYRIENNE PEINTE Buste de génie féminin ailé, coiffé de cornes, les seins nus, tenant des serpents Mésopotamie, art assyrien, début du Ier millenaire avant J.-C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BRIQUE ASSYRIENNE PEINTE Buste de génie féminin ailé, coiffé de cornes, les seins nus, tenant des serpents Mésopotamie, art assyrien, début du Ier millenaire avant J.-C. Matériau Terre cuite peinte H. 27,9 cm, L. 33,5 cm € 60 000 - 80 000 ASSYRIAN GLAZED BRICK TILE DEPICTING A MYTHOLOGICALCREATURE Origin: Mesopotamia Circa: Beginning of 1st Millenium Medium: Glazed Terracotta Dimensions: 11'' high, 13.2'' wide Although archaeological excavations reveal that the land of the Assyrians had been inhabited as early as 5000 B.C., it was not until the reign of King Sargon of Akkad in 2371 B.C. that the Assyrians first rose to glory. Under Sargon, the kingdom rapidly expanded north to the city of Ashur and as far west as the Mediterranean, controlled by a central government based in Akkad. By 1813 B.C., King Shamshi-Adad I united the cities of Ashur, Nineveh, and Arbel into one cohesive administrative unit. These three cities, as well as Arrapkha and Kalhu (later known as Nimrud), form the historical core of the Assyrian Kingdom which would remain a credible force throughout the Mediterranean world for the next millennium. While various parts of Assyrian territory were annexed for brief periods of time by neighboring civilizations, this core remained firmly intact. The Assyrians experienced another Golden Age, lasting from the 9th until the 7th Century B.C. (this period is referred to as "Neo- Assyrian"). During this period, the kingdom grew to its largest extent, encompassing the lands from parts of modern Iran to the Mediterranea, from Anatolia to Egypt. However, it proved difficult even for the powerful Assyrian monarchs to maintain control over this vast territory for very long. By the end of the 7th Century, the Assyrian Kingdom began to collapse underthe weight of assaults from the Babylonians to the south and the newly founded Medes Kingdom to the east. In 612 B.C., Nimrud burned for the second time in three years, followed by the sacking of Ashur and Nineveh, effectively ending Assyrian control of the ancient Near East. Throughout the past, great civilizations have decorated their constructions with sumptuous paintings and tiles. Many remarkable examples survive today from the wall paintings and mosaics of Pompeii to the glazed tiles of the Ishtar Gate in Babylon. The tradition of glazed terracotta brick as adornments began in southern Iran in the 13th century B.C. This Assyrian glazed brick tile would have adorned the walls of a temple or palace structure. The tiered tile is decorated with the representation of a mythological creature based on the form of a female human. However, this woman is winged and has the arms of a lion. A slight relief of a brown glaze delineates the outlines of her body as well as the simulated feathers of the wings. A headband crowns her head and her curly lucks fall over the back. Seen in profile, her one ovular eye is fully open and alert. This fantastical remnant of a lost age reveals the extreme sophistication and elegance of the Assyrian civilization.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ASSIETTE EN ARGENT ÉLAMITE  Perse, Entre 900 et 700 avant J.C.

Lot 27: ASSIETTE EN ARGENT ÉLAMITE Perse, Entre 900 et 700 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ASSIETTE EN ARGENT ÉLAMITE Perse, Entre 900 et 700 avant J.C. Matériau Argent H. 4,3 cm, diam. 18,2 cm € 60 000 - 80 000 ELAMITE SILVER PLATE Origin: Persia Circa: 900 BC to 700 BC Style: Elamite Dimensions: 1.69'' high, 7.16 wide In the Bronze Age, while cultural centres existed in various parts of Persia (e.g. Astrabad and Tappeh Hissard near Damghan in the north-east), the kingdom in Elam in the south-west, was the most important. Metal-work and the art of glazing bricks particularly flourished in Elam, and from inscribed tablets we can deduce that there was a great industry in weaving, tapestry, and embroidery. Elamite metal-work was particularly accomplished. This beautiful silver plate is ornamented with the standing figure of a woman, wearing a long sheepskin robe that resembles the Mesopotamian style. Mesopotamia played a major role in Elam art; however, Elam still maintained its independence especially in the highland areas, where the art can be sharply differentiated from that of Mesopotamia.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
OSIRIS  Egypte, Basse Epoque  Matériau  Bronze

Lot 28: OSIRIS Egypte, Basse Epoque Matériau Bronze

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: OSIRIS Egypte, Basse Epoque Matériau Bronze H. 18,4 cm € 25 000 - 35 000 BRONZE SCULPTURE OF OSIRIS Origin: Egypt Circa: Late Period Medium: Bronze Dimensions: 7.25'' high At first glance, this bronze statuette of Osiris appears to be very unassuming. The god of the Hereafter is represented in the time-honored manner as a figure standing upon an integral base from which protrudes a tang for insertion into a now-missing base. We can, therefore, suggest that this figure was part of a larger group composition which may have included a depiction of an elite member of Egyptian society, in smaller scale, kneeling in obeisance before this god. Osiris is represented as a mummiform figure with his hands protruding from beneath his stylized mummy bandages in order to hold the crook and flail, his traditional attributes. His accessories include a plaited beard which slips down under his chin and an atef-crown, the White Crown of which is flanked on each side by a single ostrich feature representing "truth." This crown is fronted by a uraeus, or sacred cobra. This object is separated from more routine depictions of Osiris in bronze by the attention paid to the depiction on its back. There in raised relief, is a depiction of his sister and wife, Isis, facing right. She is shown standing on a tall, reticulated base, perhaps intended to suggest her throne. Her striated headdress supports her attribute in the form of a pair of cow's horns framing a solar disc. Her tightly fitting sheath is ornamented with linear detail, suggesting the pattern textile from which it was woven. She is equipped with wings which she spreads out over the back of her husband in an eternal gesture of protection. Such depictions are exceedingly rare in the repertoire of ancient Egyptian bronze representations of Osiris, but a good parallel is provided by a similarly designed statuette in a private collection in Belgium. On the basis of their styles, such images can be dated to the Late Period. References: For the example in Belgium, see, J. F. and L. Aubert, Bronzes et or Egyptiens (Paris 2001), pages 215and 446, plate 30.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
MASQUE DE MOMIE  Egypte, époque gréco-romaine

Lot 29: MASQUE DE MOMIE Egypte, époque gréco-romaine

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: MASQUE DE MOMIE Egypte, époque gréco-romaine Matériau Cartonnage de toile stuquée, peinte et dorée H. 43,8 cm, L. 27,9 cm Restaurations € 30 000 - 40 000 EGYPTIAN CARTONNAGE MASK Origin: Egypt Circa: Greek or Roman Period Medium: Cartonnage Dimensions: 17.25'' high, 11'' wide Restorations This well-preserved mummy mask was created from cartonnage, a kind of ancient Egyptian papier mâché in which layers of linen or recycled papyrus were combined with gesso, a type of plaster, in order to be modeled into a mummy mask used to cover the head and neck of the deceased's mummy. Ours is a particularly fine example which is virtually intact and extremely well-executed. In keeping with ancient Egyptian religious conventions, the deceased is depicted with idealizing facial features in order to be appear to be symbolically in perfect, physical health for eternity. To that end, the eyes are designed as hieroglyphs with raised paint stripes articulating their lids, the upper lid overlapping the lower and trailing off toward the side. In like manner, the eye brows are plastically rendered as raised ridges and these come together and merge into the bridge of the nose which is thin and ends in a well-modeled nostrils. The small mouth is characterized by full lips over a protruding chin. The ears are prominent. The entire face and neck of the mask has been gilded to signify that the deceased is in the company of the deities of the land, because the ancient Egyptians maintained that the flesh of their gods was gold. The deceased is shown wearing a tripartite wig, the lappets of which fall behind the ears to the level of the chest. These lappets, now painted a lapis lazuli blue with gilded ends, are decorated with identical scenes of the god Osiris, wearing the White Crown, seated atop a shrine the double-leaved doors of which are sealed closed with double bolts, one on top of the other. The shrines may represent the tomb of the deceased which is now eternally under the protection of Osiris, the god of the dead. The motifs above the head of Osiris may have originally been intended to contain inscriptions which were, however, not added to this example. A reticulated pattern to the left and right and a horizontal frieze of flowers complete the bottom half of the mask's decoration. The top of the mask is decorated with a winged scarab pushing a sun disc which is crafted in raised relief in the center of the gilded hair band which holds the wig in place. Such cartonnage masks are generally dated to the late first century BC into the first century AD, but recent finds seem to suggest that the type represented by our example may have appeared as early as the second century BC.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
MODÈLE DE FAÇADE DE TEMPLE  Disque solaire ailé, flanqué d'uraeus, gravé sur le linteau. Frise d'ouas et ankh alternés gravé sur la base  Egypte, Basse Epoque

Lot 30: MODÈLE DE FAÇADE DE TEMPLE Disque solaire ailé, flanqué d'uraeus, gravé sur le linteau. Frise d'ouas et ankh alternés gravé sur la base Egypte, Basse Epoque

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: MODÈLE DE FAÇADE DE TEMPLE Disque solaire ailé, flanqué d'uraeus, gravé sur le linteau. Frise d'ouas et ankh alternés gravé sur la base Egypte, Basse Epoque Matériau Pierre calcaire H. 32,1 cm € 15 000 - 20 000 EGYPTIAN SANDSTONE MODEL OF A TEMPLE FACADE Origin: Egypt Circa: Late period Medium: Limestone Dimensions: 12.62" high Carved from limestone, this magnificent model of atemple façade appears to rise from the desert dunes. The architecture consists of four columns mounted over a fairly large base with a lintel above. Compared to the size and complexity of some Egyptian temples, this one appears to be quite modest. It might also reflect the influx of Greek ideals as related to architecture. However, despite the similarities to Greek buildings, this temple is purely Egyptian. The lintel is decorated with a central winged solar disk flanked by two rearing uraei cobras, typical Egyptian symbols. The base features a central plaque into which a symbol has been etched three times. The symbol consists of an ankh resting in what appears to be a shallow basket flanked by two staffs. A column of pseudo-glyphs has been inscribed on either side of this central panel. As well, two of the columns have been decorated with empty cartouches. Might this temple model have once served as a soviegner for a foreign merchant to take home with him. Perhaps it was a model of a famous temple. Perhaps it was used as a building model to show the patron before construction began. This temple façade is a stunning work of art in itself, but it also symbolizes the glories of Egyptian architecture and this civilization as a whole.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
OSIRIS  Debout dans sa position momiforme  Egypte, XXVIe dynastie, vers 664-525 avant J.C.

Lot 31: OSIRIS Debout dans sa position momiforme Egypte, XXVIe dynastie, vers 664-525 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: OSIRIS Debout dans sa position momiforme Egypte, XXVIe dynastie, vers 664-525 avant J.C. Matériau Bronze à patine verte H. 20,3 cm € 5 000 - 8 000 BRONZE SCULPTURE OF OSIRIS Origin: Egypt Circa: Dynasty 26th, 664 BC to 525 BC Medium: Bronze Dimensions: 8'' high The 26th Dynasty, also known as the Saite Period, is traditionally placed by scholars at the end of the Third Intermediate Period or at the beginning of the Late Dynastic Period. In either case, the Saite Period rosefrom the ashes of a decentralized Egyptian state that had been ravaged by foreign occupation. Supported by the assistance of a powerful family centered in the Delta town of Sais, the Assyrians finally drove the Nubians out of Egypt. At the close of this campaign, Ashurbanipal's kingdom was at the height of its power; however, due to civil strife back east, he was forced to withdraw his forces from Egypt. Psamtik I, a member of the family from Sais, seized this opportunity to assert his authority over the entire Nile Valley and found his own dynasty, the 26th of Egyptian history. Known as the Saite Period due to the importance of the capital city Sais, the 26th Dynasty, like many before it, sought to emulate the artistic styles of past pharaohs in order to bolster their own claims to power and legitimize their authority. et despite that artist sought to replicate models of the past, Egyptian art of this era was infused with a heightened sense of naturalism. This fact is likely due to the influx of Greek culture. The Saite rulers recognized that Egypt had fallen behind the rest of the Mediterranean world in terms of military technology. Thus, they were forced to rely upon foreign mercenaries, many of whom were Greek. With ties between these two cultures firmly established during the 7th Century B.C., commercial trading quickly blossomed. Special entrepots for foreign traders were established, including the famed center of Naucratis, a Delta town in which Greek merchants were permitted access. During the Saite Period, two great powers of the Mediterranean world became intimately linked, commercially and culturally. As the exchange of ideas flowed across the sea, the Greeks began to experiment on a monumental scale while the Egyptians began to approach art with an enhanced sense of realism. The legend of Osiris states that his brother Seth, overcome by jealousy, murdered him and tore his body into fourteen parts, scattering them across Egypt. Isis, the faithful wife of Osiris, traversed the land and gathered all the parts of his body. She then cast a spell that resurrected her deceased husband for one night, during which their child, Horus, was conceived. Thus, Osiris was the central figure of Egyptian religion, the god who had triumphed over death and therefore offered the hope of rebirth and resurrection to all men. This striking image of the god in his royal mummiform speaks of a universal mystery, the unanswered questions for which no living man has a sure answer. This magnificent bronze votive sculpture represents Osiris, god of fertility, king of the dead, and ruler of eternity. Many centuries ago, it might have been found inside a temple, placed as an offering to the mighty deity. He is depicted wrapped as a mummy, holding a crook and flail. These two attributes act as scepters symbolic of his divine authority over the forces of nature. He wears the double-plumbed atef crown, featuring a uraeus cobra slithering down the front and a false braided beard with a curved tip. This type of beard is a symbol of divinity while the headdress associates the god with the ruling pharaohs.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ANUBIS  Dieu à tête de chacal représenté debout tenant le sceptre de la main droite  Egypte, Basse Epoque

Lot 32: ANUBIS Dieu à tête de chacal représenté debout tenant le sceptre de la main droite Egypte, Basse Epoque

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ANUBIS Dieu à tête de chacal représenté debout tenant le sceptre de la main droite Egypte, Basse Epoque Matériau Bronze H. 13 cm € 12 000 - 15 000 BRONZE SCULPTURE OF ANUBIS Origin: Egypt Circa: Late Period Medium: Bronze Dimensions: 5.10" high Anubis is the Greek name for a jackal-headed god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion. According to the Akkadian transcription in the Amarna letters, Anubis' name was vocalized in Egyptian as Anapa. The oldest known mention of Anubis is in the Old Kingdom pyramid texts, where he is associated with the burial of the pharaoh. At this time, Anubis was the most important god of the dead but he was replaced during the Middle Kingdom by Osiris. He takes names in connection with his funerary role, such as He who is upon his mountain, which underscores his importance as a protector of the deceased and their tombs, and the title He who is in the place of embalming, associating him with the process of mummification. Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumes different roles in various contexts. Anubis also attends the weighing scale in the Afterlife during the «Weighing Of The Heart» Anubis' wife is a goddess called Anput. His daughter is the goddess Kebechet.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ISIS-HATHOR  Grande amulette en faïence émaillée verte;  elle est coiffée d'une frise de cobras surmontée de la couronne Hathorique et vêtue d'une robe moulante et «transparente»   Sculpture d'une rare finesse  Egypte, Epoque saïte

Lot 33: ISIS-HATHOR Grande amulette en faïence émaillée verte; elle est coiffée d'une frise de cobras surmontée de la couronne Hathorique et vêtue d'une robe moulante et «transparente» Sculpture d'une rare finesse Egypte, Epoque saïte

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ISIS-HATHOR Grande amulette en faïence émaillée verte; elle est coiffée d'une frise de cobras surmontée de la couronne Hathorique et vêtue d'une robe moulante et «transparente» Sculpture d'une rare finesse Egypte, Epoque saïte Matériau Faïence émaillée verte H : 11,5 cm € 10 000 - 15 000 ISIS-HATHOR AMULET Origin: Egypt Circa: Saïte Period Medium: glazed earthenware Dimension: 29.21 high

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
THOT IBICOCÉPHALE  Fine représentation du dieu lunaire, patron  des scribes, nu, marchand sur une plate-forme rectangulaire. Il est représenté sous sa forme humaine à tête d'Ibis  Egypte, Epoque saïte

Lot 34: THOT IBICOCÉPHALE Fine représentation du dieu lunaire, patron des scribes, nu, marchand sur une plate-forme rectangulaire. Il est représenté sous sa forme humaine à tête d'Ibis Egypte, Epoque saïte

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: THOT IBICOCÉPHALE Fine représentation du dieu lunaire, patron des scribes, nu, marchand sur une plate-forme rectangulaire. Il est représenté sous sa forme humaine à tête d'Ibis Egypte, Epoque saïte Matériau Faïence égyptienne émaillée verte H : 12,5 cm € 10 000 - 15 000 IBIS-HEADED THOT STATUE Origin: Egypt Circa: Saïte Period Medium: Glazed earthenware Dimensions: 31.75'' high

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
PETIT MASQUE EN FAÏENCE JEUNE PRÊTRE  Egypte, Basse Epoque

Lot 35: PETIT MASQUE EN FAÏENCE JEUNE PRÊTRE Egypte, Basse Epoque

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: PETIT MASQUE EN FAÏENCE JEUNE PRÊTRE Egypte, Basse Epoque Matériau Fritte émaillée verte H. 8 cm, L. 5,5 cm, P. 5 cm € 10 000 - 15 000 SMALL MASK YOUNG PRIEST Origin: Egypt Circa: Late period Medium: Glazed earthenware Dimensions: 3.15'' high, 2.17'' wide

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
STATUETTE VOTIVE PHÉNICIENNE  Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C

Lot 36: STATUETTE VOTIVE PHÉNICIENNE Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: STATUETTE VOTIVE PHÉNICIENNE Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C Matériau Terre cuite H. 43,8 cm € 3 000 - 5 000 PHOENICIAN VOTIVE FIGURE Circa: 600 BC to 400 BC Medium: Terracota Dimensions: 17.25'' high This imposing ceramic sculpture is a votive figure from the middle of the first millennium BC, and represents a deity in the Phoenician pantheon. It shows a goddess standing on an ornate double integral pedestal base, dressed in a long robe that covers the back of the ornate hair and stretches down to the ground. Her face has been eroded with t passage of time, but still retains the graceful lines of forehead, eyes and jawline. An eminence on her left arm suggests that she was originally depicted as carrying a child; her right hand is raised in benediction. Her upright stance and austere pose are reminiscent of the Archaic Period Greek statues which the Phoenicians inspired, and with which this piece is roughly contemporary. The back of the piece is almost completely plain, implying that it was always meant to be viewed from the front rather than in the round, which is appropriate for figures destined for shrines. The piece retains some calcareous concretions from its long interment in the Mediterranean. The Phoenicians were one of the most important civilisations of the ancient world, and flourished from around 1500 to 300 BC. Their world was centred on Northern Israel, Lebanon and Syria, while their sphere of conquest and influence extended throughout the Mediterranean and even beyond the Pillars of Hercules (the Straits of Gibraltar) and into the Mediterranean-Atlantic. Their power was due primarily to their mastery of seamanship - which they developed to a whole new level during their pre-eminence - and extremely well-organised administration which was strengthened by extensive use of the alphabet. Indeed, it was the Phoenicians who introduced the alphabet to the Greeks, who in turn passed it onto the rest of the Western World. They were essentially Canaanites, to whom they were identical in sociocultural and material terms, the only difference being the massive range over which their cultural remains and heritage can be found. Phoenician society was comparatively stable when compared to the changeable fortunes of other Eastern Mediterranean cultures, primarily due to its broad royal, political and religious foundations. The town of Byblos became a major hub for trade all over the Fertile Crescent, followed by Tyre and Sidon; overseas territories notably included Carthage (founded 814 BC), but they either took over or culturally dominated trading ports from Cyprus to Malta, Spain, Portugal and Sardinia. They traded in purple dye ("Tyrian Purple"), textiles, luxury ceramics, silver, tin (with England) and glass, explored down the west coast of Africa as far as the Gulf of Guinea, and may even have circumnavigated Africa in around 600 BC. Their artistic output is usually on a small scale - enabling it to be easily transported and traded - and made of high-value materials such as glass and precious metal. Phoenician styles are largely derivative, being informed by sources as varied as Cyprus, Egypt, Assyria and Greece, and has been described as an amalgam of pre-classic models and perspectives, often with regionalised local stylistic variants. The use of ceramic figures seems to have been religious in origin, with shrine figures (or baetyls) depicting a wide range of the deities and legendary figures from Mediterranean mythology. Clay tableaux show these figures being displayed in niches, worshipped at a familial or group level, and they were also sometimes interred with the dead. Depictions range from the classical-naturalistic to the schematic or even grotesque. Specific members of the pantheon include Baal (or Baal-Hammon, to whom children were sacrificed), Eshmun (god of healing and the arts), Melqart (the Phoenician equivalent of Poseidon/Neptune) Bes (an Egyptian household god resembling an ugly dwarf), Tanit (the patron goddess of Carthage) and Astarte (an indigenous Phoenician goddess). Various other deities cannot be specifically identified. It is notable that the gender bias is very strong towards goddesses. The significance of individual gods or figures cannot be ascertained in most cases. As with most societies, any figure with greatly exaggerated sexual characteristics is usually associated with fertility, although most figures are likely to represent personages whose significance has been lost to us. The current piece was recovered from the floor of the Mediterranean; the manner in which it and associated pieces were found suggests that it might have been part of a naval shrine aboard the doomed vessel, although it is also possible that it was being taken to a Phoenician outpost in order to form part of a shrine for a prosperous household. In either case, this is an exceptionally attractive and historically fascinating piece that would take pride of place in any collection of the genre. Moscati, S. (ed.). 1988. The Phoenicians. John Murray Publishers, London

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
STATUETTE PHÉNICIENNE FIGURANT UN ORANT  Entre 600 et 500 avant J.C.

Lot 37: STATUETTE PHÉNICIENNE FIGURANT UN ORANT Entre 600 et 500 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: STATUETTE PHÉNICIENNE FIGURANT UN ORANT Entre 600 et 500 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 44, 5 cm € 2 500 - 3 500 PHOENICIAN VOTIVE FIGURE Circa: 600 BC to 500 BC Style: Phoenician Medium: Terracota Dimensions: 17.5'' high

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
OFFRANT OU ORANT PHÉNICIEN  Debout, sur un piédestal circulaire  Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C.

Lot 38: OFFRANT OU ORANT PHÉNICIEN Debout, sur un piédestal circulaire Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: OFFRANT OU ORANT PHÉNICIEN Debout, sur un piédestal circulaire Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 43,2 cm € 7 000 - 9 000 PHOENICIAN VOTIVE FIGURE Circa: 600 BC to 400 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: 17'' high This outstanding ceramic sculpture is a votive figure from the middle of the first millennium BC, and represents a deity in the Phoenician pantheon. It is unusually large, detailed and well-preserved. It shows a male figure standing upon a tall, tiered pedestal base, decorated with a double ring at the bottom and another single at the top. The figure is unusually tall, wearing a tunic-like garment covered with a long, flowing robe that reaches to the feet and is gathered over the left wrist. The detailing of the textile is good. The pose is relaxed, even casual, with the weight taken on the left leg and the right bent at the knee as is strolling. The face is strongly-modelled and wellpreserved, with high brows, pointed-oval eyes, a long nose and a gentle smile. The coiffure is unclear - it may be gathered back, or covered by the upper end of the robe. The right hand is truncated in the mid forearm, but it is likely that he was originally holding it up in benediction (a not uncommon pose for pieces such as this). The piece is certainly formal, but it is also more fluid in terms of composition than is usual for these sculptures, which are contemporary with the Archaic Period Greek statues which the Phoenicians helped to inspire. The back of the piece is almost completely plain, implying that it was always meant to be viewed from the front rather than in the round, which is appropriate for figures destined for shrines. The piece retains some calcareous concretions from its long interment in the Mediterranean, and a large shell attached to the left foot.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
DÉESSE OU ORANT PHÉNICIEN  Debout sur un socle, drapée dans un long manteau  Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C.

Lot 39: DÉESSE OU ORANT PHÉNICIEN Debout sur un socle, drapée dans un long manteau Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: DÉESSE OU ORANT PHÉNICIEN Debout sur un socle, drapée dans un long manteau Entre 600 et 400 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 45,1 cm € 12 000 - 15 000 PHOENICIAN VOTIVE FIGURE Circa: 600 BC to 400 BC Medium: Terracota Dimensions: 17.75'' high This beautiful ceramic sculpture is a votive figure from the middle of the first millennium BC, and represents a deity in the Phoenician pantheon. It shows a goddess standing on a plain integral base, a receptacle at her feet, and dressed in a long toga-like robe with acentral wide sash. The head is very finely rendered, with large, almond-shaped eyes, a long nose and a slight smile on finely-modelled lips. The style is reminiscent of the Archaic Period Greek statues with which it is roughly contemporary. The back of the piece is almost completely plain, implying that it was always meant to be viewed from the front rather than in the round, which is appropriate for figures destined for shrines. The condition of the piece is excellent, and it retains some calcareous concretions from its long interment in the Mediterranean.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
COUVERCLE DE SARCOPHAGE ANTHROPOMORPHE  Phénicie, 600 - 400 avant J.C.

Lot 40: COUVERCLE DE SARCOPHAGE ANTHROPOMORPHE Phénicie, 600 - 400 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: COUVERCLE DE SARCOPHAGE ANTHROPOMORPHE Phénicie, 600 - 400 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 71,8 cm, L. 45,7 cm € 25 000 - 35 000 PHOENICIAN ANTHROPOMORPHIC COFFIN LID Origin: Eastern Mediterranean Circa: 600 BC to 400 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimensions: 28.25'' high, 18'' wide The Phoenician homeland was a coastal strip roughly corresponding to modern day Lebanon. 'Phoenicia' is a Greek word meaning red/purple and was used to refer to the people of the Levantine coast because the inhabitants of Tyre were renowned for their ability to produce fine purple dye. The dominant influence in the area lay with the city-states, especially Sidon, Byblos and Tyre. These cities were ruled separately but- despite their often hostile relations- their common maritime interests held the area together as a recognisable political entity. From the ninth century BC overseas colonies, at Carthage and Cyprus (Kition), reinforced the Phoenicians' trade in the Mediterranean. Over the following centuries they established outposts further afield in Sicily and Spain. This expansion was motivated by the desire to find new markets for their goods and sources of precious metals which were particularly plentiful in the African interior and the Iberian coast. The maritime success of the Phoenicians had two consequences for the arts. Firstly it provided the material wealth to support a large community of craftsmen. Secondly it brought the Phoenicians into contact with the visual arts of other cultures, especially the Egyptians and the Ionian Greeks. An Egyptian influence is particularly apparent in this magnificent terracotta coffin lid. The idea of creating a coffin in shape of a human being gradually evolved in Egypt as a result of the practice of mummification. From the late 3rd millennium BC masks were placed over the mummy's face and gradually extended to cover the whole body. This example depicts the face and bust of a woman. The features are highly stylised with large almond shaped eyes, thick parted lips and a heart-shaped face. Several rows of round curls run along the top of the forehead and frame the large ears, which are depicted frontally. Long strands of hair, terminating the same style of round curls, frame the face and may represent a wig of some kind. The neck is only faintly indicated in the surface of the terracotta and there is no attempt to suggest the woman's arms. The only feature on the bust itself is a pair of small cone-shaped breasts. The contrast between the level of detail on the face and the relatively plain body is a feature of Phoenician funerary sculpture in other media. The famous marble tombs found at Sidon, which date from the 5th-4th centuries BC, feature extremely sophisticated carving on the face but the shape of the body is only hinted at or ignored completely. The Phoenicians excelled in the production of terracotta figurines and masks which were exported all over the Mediterranean. As a material terracotta is both economical and malleable- yet it can be used to create extremely sophisticated works of art. This life-size coffin lid may well have been painted originally as there are traces of black pigment in the curls of the hair. There is a similar sarcophagus fragment in the Louvre, dated between the sixth and the fifth centuries BC.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
TÊTE DE PRÊTRE DOLYCHOCÉPHALE  Art égypto-phénicien

Lot 41: TÊTE DE PRÊTRE DOLYCHOCÉPHALE Art égypto-phénicien

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: TÊTE DE PRÊTRE DOLYCHOCÉPHALE Art égypto-phénicien Matériau Calcaire H. 19 cm € 30 000 - 40 000 DOLICHOCEPHALIC HEAD OF A PRIEST Egytian - Phenician art Medium: Limestone Dimension: 7,48'' high

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
DIVINITE TRÔNANT  Les avant-bras tendus. Socle gravé d'inscriptions.  Yémen, royaume de Saba, entre 600 et 100 avant J.C.

Lot 42: DIVINITE TRÔNANT Les avant-bras tendus. Socle gravé d'inscriptions. Yémen, royaume de Saba, entre 600 et 100 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: DIVINITE TRÔNANT Les avant-bras tendus. Socle gravé d'inscriptions. Yémen, royaume de Saba, entre 600 et 100 avant J.C. Matériau Albâtre H. 20,3 cm € 12 000 - 15 000 SABAEAN SEATED STATUETTE OF A WOMAN Origin: Yemen Circa: 600 BC to 100 BC Style: Sabean Medium: Alabaster Dimension: 8'' high The goddess is represented seated on a throne, outstretched forearms, with parallel feet standing on an inscribed base.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CRATÈRE ATTIQUE  Attribuable au peintre de Boréas, vers 460 avant J.C.

Lot 43: CRATÈRE ATTIQUE Attribuable au peintre de Boréas, vers 460 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CRATÈRE ATTIQUE Attribuable au peintre de Boréas, vers 460 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 40 cm € 30 000 - 40 000 ATTIC RED-FIGURED KRATER Can be attributed to the boreas painter Circa: 460 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimension: 15.75'' high Before the modern advents of trains and automobiles, trade between civilizations concentrated around the Mediterranean moved foremost by sea. Commodities such as spices, wine, and grain needed to be packed in individual containers for transport and to prolong their lifespan. Pottery was first created in order to fulfill these practical needs. Over time, the art form evolved from large, unadorned commercial transport vessels to refined, specialized works in elegant shapes used to hold precious substances such as perfume or oils. An entire retinue of terracotta vessels dedicated to the rites of the dinner table began to appear. These pieces were based on the luxurious bronze and silver vessels that could only be afforded by the wealthy elite and were decorated with fanciful natural motifs and painted scenes of everyday life and celebrated myths. These wares were of such beauty that they themselves became prized commodities and were traded throughout the Mediterranean world; perhaps even for the very substances they were created to contain. These works are individually classified by their shapes and their form was inherently linked to their function, be it preparation, dispensation, or consumption. One of these specific types, kraters are large bowl-shaped vessels with wide mouths and two handles that stand on footed bases. Column kraters, named after their column-shaped handles, are the earliest style of kraters that were introduced into Athens from Corinth. Kraters were an integral piece of equipment used during the symposium, an ancient Greek dinner and drinking banquet immortalized by Plato. Symposia were hosted inside the private residences of the upper classes. Wine would be diluted with water inside the krater before the mixed concoction would be dispensed to the individual revelers. Kraters were often decorated with painted scenes depicting groups of figures dining and relaxing, activities that paralleled the festivities of the symposia during which the vessels were actually used. Before the 6th Century B.C., the island of Corinth, with their distinctive black-figure wares that first appeared in the 7th Century, dominated the lucrative pottery export trade. However, by around 525 B.C., the city of Athens, with their varied styles of vessel shapes and painted scenes, had wrested control from the Corinthians and established a firm monopoly in luxury wares. Pottery production in Athens was concentrated in the northwestern area known as the Kerameikos. The majority of the pots were thrown on a manually driven potter's wheel and fired in a woodburning kiln where the artist could determine the color of the vessel by controlling the oxygen flow within. While many potters threw and painted their own works, certain potters excelled in producing specific shapes, and other artists specialized in painting. At first, the Attic painters emulated the black- figure style employed by the Corinthians. In black-figure technique, the vase surface was covered with a diluted wash of clay. A thicker solution of iron-rich clay formed the «glaze» used to paint on figures in solid silhouette. Intricate details were then incised onto the figures. Finally, painted red and white highlights were added before firing. However, by 480 B.C., the black-figure style would be effectively replaced by red-figure wares which first appeared around 530. In the red-figure technique, the process was reversed and the figures appeared in red against a black background. Liquid glaze was used to outline the figures. Contours and inner lines were then added. The painted lines could be diluted to a golden brown or left jet black. After the figures were drawn, the background was added in black and the pot fired. Although the red-figure technique lacks the sharpness of black-figure painting, the increased painterly effects, the greater sense of movement, and the heightened emotions more than make up the difference. During the 5th Century B.C., Athens was the nexus of a veritable Golden Age of artistic creation and intellectual enlightenment. In fact, most of the statues and buildings we now associate with ancient Athens were created during this dynamic period: the temples on the Acropolis, the Theater of Dionysus, and the Athenian Agora were all erected in this era. The political developments of this period were equally remarkable: not only did Athens become the first fully developed democracy, but it was also an important imperial power guided by the skillful politician and orator Pericles. His imperial ambitions brought Athens great prestige and wealth, enhanced by the funds he embezzled from the Delian League to pay for his ambition construction projects. However, imperial ambition would ultimately doom Athens, eventually leading to the ill-fated Peloponnesian War. This long, drawn out was against Sparta ultimately ended in a costly defeat, resulting in the loss of the islands Athens had earlier wrested from the Persians and effectively bringing an end to one of the great cultural outpourings of the Classical era. This column krater can be attributed to the artist known as the Boreas Painter, column kraters being the earliest form of the krater first imported from Corinth in the 6th Century B.C. A painted departure scene decorates one side of this vessel. Here, a woman wearing a chiton and himation offers a sip from a phiale to a youth wearing a chlamys over his shoulder and holding a staff. These two central figures are flanked on either side by a bearded man. The opposite side of the krater is adorned by a scene depicting three youths, each holding a staff and wearing a long himation. Similar vessels were believed to be used as cinerary urns, and surely this piece would have made a splendid memorial if that was the case. Considering the theme of the two scenes, it appears quite likely that this vessel might have played a funerary role, providing an opportunity for the deceased to continue the festivities of the symposium in the afterlife.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CRATÈRE APULIEN A FIGURES ROUGES  Apulie, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C.

Lot 44: CRATÈRE APULIEN A FIGURES ROUGES Apulie, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CRATÈRE APULIEN A FIGURES ROUGES Apulie, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 28,6 cm € 25 000 - 35 000 APULIAN RED-FIGURE BELL KRATER Circa: 400 BC to 300 BC Style: Apulian Medium: Terracotta Dimension: 11.25'' high The obverse of this animated krater depicts a standing draped female, holding a wineskin in her outstretched left hand. A pestering satyr stands to the right with his body turned away from the female, as if repelled by the object in her hand. His left hand is held across his chest, while his right is outstretched towards the female, running parallel with the direction of his right leg. The female's outstretched left arm also runs in parallel to this leg producing a wonderfully balanced composition. The reverse shows two draped young men facing one another, separated by a staff held by the figure to the viewer's left. A laurel motif encircles the krater beneath the rim, whilst a meander motif runs in a band beneath the figures.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
PELIKE APULIEN À FIGURES ROUGES  Apulie, Art classique, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C.

Lot 45: PELIKE APULIEN À FIGURES ROUGES Apulie, Art classique, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: PELIKE APULIEN À FIGURES ROUGES Apulie, Art classique, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 35,1 cm € 15 000 - 20 000 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PELIKE Circa: 400 BC to 300 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimension: 13.8'' high A Pelike is a type of amphora with two handles, where the broadest part of its body is below the mid-point of its height. The shape of the vessel was originally designed as a storage receptacle for liquids, particularly oil and wine, but it is likely that elaborately decorated examples such as this one served a funerary purpose. Indeed, the excellent level of preservation suggests this also. The obverse depicts a seated draped female, with her hair pulled high beneath a sakkos. Her left foot is raised slightly in front of the right and she holds a mirror in her raised right hand. This is a common motif on funerary vessels. In her left hand she holds a phiale in a movement of gesture towards a winged representation of Eros. The god wears a similar sakkos, clutching a fan in his right and a tambourine in his left. A fillet is depicted in the field above the female and a rosette hovers above the god of love. As is typical for South Italian vases, details are added with white paint to accent the decoration. The figures are flanked on either side by a palmette design. Around the rim of the neck is a band of rosette and dotted ovolo motifs, whilst the base is encircled by the meander design. The reverse depicts two draped males facing one another with a possible shield between them. The figure on the left holds a staff in his right hand, while the figure on the right has both his arms wrapped in the drapery. It could be that this is the deceased figure, for bodies would be completely wrapped in their cloaks prior to their cremation or interment. It could be that the figure on the left is a depiction of him in his life, and now he faces his death - with the addition of the shield, it could be that he died in war. The damage to this vessel is minimal. There is only one slight crack on the rim. The quality of the obverse painting is wonderful and highly detailed. It was usual for two artists to work on a vessel, one senior and one junior. The different hands can be seen when comparing both sides of this vessel making it very interesting. It was also crafted by a master potter, for the shape is smooth and regular and the foot is completely flat. It is a striking piece both in terms of its decoration and shape, but especially more so due to its near perfect preservation.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
PELIKE APULIEN À FIGURES ROUGES  Art hellénistique, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C.

Lot 46: PELIKE APULIEN À FIGURES ROUGES Art hellénistique, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: PELIKE APULIEN À FIGURES ROUGES Art hellénistique, vers 400 - 300 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 35,6 cm € 15 000 - 20 000 APULIAN RED-FIGURE PELIKE Circa: 400 BC to 300 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimension: 14'' high Pelike is the term used to describe a type of amphora with two handles, where the broadest part of the body is below the mid-point of its height. The shape of the vessel was originally designed as a storage receptacle for liquids, particularly oil and wine, but it is likely that elaborately decorated examples such as this one served a funereal purpose. The obverse depicts a seated female wearing a belted peplos. In her right hand she holds a thyrsus with a fillet attached and in her left hand a wreath. A winged figure of Eros stands opposite, holding a phiale in his outstretched left hand and a bunch of grapes in his right hand. His hair is secured under a sakkon. These figures are flanked on both sides by a palmette design. The upper register, beneath the rim, is adorned with a rosette and dotted ovolo motif. The lower section is encircled by a meander design, typical of Apulian production. The reverse shows two young draped males facing one another. The figure on the viewer's left holds a staff in his right hand. Between them hang a pair of weights, a symbol of the palaestra, or wrestling school. Again, the figures are flanked on either side by a palmette design, but the design of the upper register is different from that on the obverse. It consists of a laurel wreath pattern, while the meander design is continued in the lower register.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
AMPHORE APULIENNE À FIGURES ROUGES  Art classique, entre 400 et 300 avant J.C.

Lot 47: AMPHORE APULIENNE À FIGURES ROUGES Art classique, entre 400 et 300 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: AMPHORE APULIENNE À FIGURES ROUGES Art classique, entre 400 et 300 avant J.C. Matériau Terre cuite H. 33,7 cm € 8 000 - 10 000 APULIAN RED-FIGURE AMPHORA Origin: Mediterranean Circa: 400 BC to 300 BC Medium: Terracotta Dimension: 13.25'' high Pelike is the term used to describe a type of amphora with two handles, where the broadest part of its body is below the mid-point of its height. The shape of the vessel was originally designed as a storage receptacle for liquids, particularly oil and wine, but it is likely that elaborately decorated examples such as this one served a funereal purpose. The obverse depicts a draped female with her hair elegantly arranged beneath a sakkos. In her right hand she carries a mirror, whilst her left holds a kettledrum in a movement of gesture towards the naked male standing to the right. This figure wears only thronged sandals and a chlamys draped over his left arm. This cloth billows in the direction of his right leg which runs parallel to the figure's outstretched right arm, clutching a bunch of grapes. The interplay of such parallels is widely observed on pottery from this period. A rosette and dotted ovolo motif runs above the figures, whilst a meander pattern is visible beneath. The reverse shows two draped males facing one another, the figure to the right clutching a staff. A rosette and possibly a votive plaque are visible in the field. The figures are framed on both sides by a palmette complex. The same meander motif appears on the reverse but a laurel band above the figures replaces the rosettes on the

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
STÈLE ANTROPOMORPHE  yémen, ère Qataban, entre 400 et 200 avant J.C.

Lot 48: STÈLE ANTROPOMORPHE yémen, ère Qataban, entre 400 et 200 avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: STÈLE ANTROPOMORPHE yémen, ère Qataban, entre 400 et 200 avant J.C. Matériau Albâtre-calcite H. 18,4 cm, L 13,2 cm € 10 000 - 15 000 ANTROPOMORPHUS PANEL Origin: Yemen Circa: 400 BC to 200 BC Style: Qatabanian Medium: Calcite-Alabaster Dimensions: 7.25'' high, 5.2'' wide The ancient kingdom of Saba ruled over the lands of southern Arabia, centered in modern day Yemen. Saba is perhaps better known as Sheba, the Hebrew word for the kingdom, whose famous Queen was recounted as having visited Solomon in the pages of the Old Testament. Biblical accounts speak of the wealth of this ancient civilization of traders and merchants, and modern archaeological excavations confirm these reports. Ruins of fortresses and walled towns are evident and remnants of their extensive irrigation system that turned the desert into a paradise still cover the land. Although gold and silver deposits were present, the chief source of their vast wealth was derived from their veritable monopoly of two of the most coveted materials in ancient times: frankincense and myrrh, resinous gums obtained from certain trees that only grow in Southern Arabia and were literally worth their weight in gold. There was not a temple or wealthy house in the ancient world, from Babylon to Rome, where one would not smell the fragrant scents of these incenses. In addition, a trade route that connected India to Egypt passing through the capital of Marib was another major source of wealth. In the 1st Century A.D., the Ptolemaic Greeks discovered a sea route from India directly to the port of Alexandria, eliminating Saba from her lucrative trade and ushering in the decline of Sabean prosperity. Portrait of a bearded man, featuring long incised slightly arched eyebrows, elongated eyes, straight vertical nose and small serrated lips, the beard contouring the face ear to ear, the ears, small and perfectly alligned shaped as a semicircle. The beard is similar to the piece TC 2043 from the Heid bin-Aqil cemetery of Qatabanian Timna. On the chest surface below the beard runs a brief five-letter inscription, presumably a personal name, that (despite the poor lettering) could be translated as Sha'wum. As a name, this is attested once in Safaitic, North-Arabian, though South-Arabian are yet to be found. The style of some of the letters would place its dating to the 4th-3rd centuries BC. For a comparable example see R.L.Cleveland, An Ancient South Arabian Necropolis, 1965: pl.21. For a discussion on the name cf., Harding G.L., Index and Concordance of Pre-Islamic Arabian Names and Inscriptions, Toronto, 1971: p.337.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
STÈLE SABEENNE ANTHROPOMORPHE  Visage ovale, yeux évidés, inscription sudarabique.  Yémen, royaume de Saba, fin du 1er millenaire av. J.C.

Lot 49: STÈLE SABEENNE ANTHROPOMORPHE Visage ovale, yeux évidés, inscription sudarabique. Yémen, royaume de Saba, fin du 1er millenaire av. J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: STÈLE SABEENNE ANTHROPOMORPHE Visage ovale, yeux évidés, inscription sudarabique. Yémen, royaume de Saba, fin du 1er millenaire av. J.C. Matériau Calcaire H. 40,9 cm € 15 000 - 18 000 SABEAN FUNERARY STONE PLAQUE Origin: Yemen Circa: End of the 1st millenium B.C Medium: Limestone Dimension: 16.1'' high The ancient kingdom of Saba ruled over the lands of southern Arabia, centered in modern day Yemen. Saba is perhaps better known as Sheba, the Hebrew word for the kingdom, whose famous Queen was recounted as having visited Solomon in the pages of the Old Testament. Biblical accounts speak of the wealth of this ancient civilization of traders and merchants, and modern archaeological excavations confirm these reports. Ruins of fortresses and walled towns are evident and remnants of their extensive irrigation system that turned the desert into a paradise still cover the land. Although gold and silver deposits were present, the chief source of their vast wealth was derived from their veritable monopoly of two of the most coveted materials in ancient times: frankincense and myrrh, resinous gums obtained from certain trees that only grow in Southern Arabia and were literally worth their weight in gold. There was not a temple or wealthy house in the ancient world, from Babylon to Rome, where one would not smell the fragrant scents of these incenses. In addition, a trade route that connected India to Egypt that passed through their capital of Marib was another major source of wealth. In the 1st Century A.D., the Ptolemaic Greeks discovered a sea route from India directly to the port of Alexandria, eliminating Saba from her lucrative trade and ushering in the decline of Sabean prosperity. This magnificent stone funerary plaque is a stunning example of the sophistication of Sabean art. The following is a transcription of the analysis kindly provided by Professor Kitchen (University of Liverpool). 'This 'headpiece' was originally inserted into a matching rectangular recess, cut into a tall stela (like a narrow quadrangular pillar), to form a tombstone plus 'formal' portrait. For intact examples, cf. St. John Simpson (ed.), 'Queen of Sheba, Treasures from Ancient Yemen,' (London, British Museum, 2002), p. 198, nos. 277-278. Facial tombstone in high relief, with top hair- fringe, rigorously semi-circular ears, level eyebrows, long triangular nose, slit mouth, plain 'fringe' beard and a slight squared chin. The 5- letter name, G w t - ' l - Ghawth-il - is well attested (cf. R. L. Cleveland, 'An Ancient South- Arabian Necropolis...Timna Cemetary,' (Baltimore, 1965), p. 459), so in both Minean and Qatabanian, besides the north. Perhaps broadly c.3rd-4th centuries BC. Facial tombstone in high relief, with top hair- fringe, rigorously semi-circular ears, level eyebrows, long triangular nose, slit mouth, plain 'fringe' beard and a slight squared chin. The 5- letter name, G w t - ' l - Ghawth-il - is well attested (cf. R. L. Cleveland, 'An Ancient South- Arabian Necropolis... Timna Cemetary,' (Baltimore, 1965), p. 459), so in both Minean and Qatabanian, besides the north. Perhaps broadly c.3rd-4th centuries BC.

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
STÈLE SABEENNE ANTHROPOMORPHE  Visage ovoïde, yeux évidés, trois lettres sudarabiques gravées.  Yémen, royaume de Saba, fin du Ier millenaire avant J.C.

Lot 50: STÈLE SABEENNE ANTHROPOMORPHE Visage ovoïde, yeux évidés, trois lettres sudarabiques gravées. Yémen, royaume de Saba, fin du Ier millenaire avant J.C.

Estimated Price: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: STÈLE SABEENNE ANTHROPOMORPHE Visage ovoïde, yeux évidés, trois lettres sudarabiques gravées. Yémen, royaume de Saba, fin du Ier millenaire avant J.C. Matériau Calcaire H. 30,5 cm, L. 17,3 cm € 10 000 - 15 000 SABEAN FUNERARY STONE PLAQUE Origin: Yemen Circa: End of the 1st millenium B.C Medium: Limestone Dimensions: 12'' high, 6.80'' wide The ancient kingdom of Saba ruled over the lands of southern Arabia, centered in modern day Yemen. Saba is perhaps better known as Sheba, the Hebrew word for the kingdom, whose famous Queen was recounted as having visited Solomon in the pages of the Old Testament. Biblical accounts speak of the wealth of this ancient civilization of traders and merchants, and modern archaeological excavations confirm these reports. Ruins of fortresses and walled towns are evident and remnants of their extensive irrigation system that turned the desert into a paradise still cover the land. Although gold and silver deposits were present, the chief source of their vast wealth was derived from their veritable monopoly of two of the most coveted materials in ancient times: frankincense and myrrh, resinous gums obtained from certain trees that only grow in Southern Arabia and were literally worth their weight in gold. There was not a temple or wealthy house in the ancient world, from Babylon to Rome, where one would not smell the fragrant scents of these incenses. In addition, a trade route that connected India to Egypt that passed through their capital of Marib was another major source of wealth. In the 1st Century A.D., the Ptolemaic Greeks discovered a sea route from India directly to the port of Alexandria, eliminating Saba from her lucrative trade and ushering in the decline of Sabean prosperity. This magnificent stone funerary plaque is a stunning example of the sophistication of Sabean art. The following is a transcription of the analysis kindly provided by Professor Kitchen (University of Liverpool). 'This 'headpiece' was originally inserted into a matching rectangular recess, cut into a tall stela (like a narrow quadrangular pillar), to form a tombstone plus 'formal' portrait. For intact examples, cf. St. John Simpson (ed.), 'Queen of Sheba, Treasures from Ancient Yeen,' (London, British Museum, 2002), p. 198, nos. 277-278. Facial tombstone in high relief and with a slightly less conventional face than most. Here, the ears are more lozenge-shaped with sharp, not smoothly curved, angles. A stronger hairline also has a central quiff pointing onto the brow. Other features (brows, eyes, nose) are standard but a small slit mouth is encased all round by prominent, rounded lips. The 3-letter name, S l m, is a simple Salim, a very common Arabic name at any time (cf. R. L. Cleveland, 'An Ancient South-Arabian Necropolis... Timna Cemetary,' (Baltimore, 1965), p. 325, but more common up north as in Safaitic, with some examples in Minean and Sabean. Again, three-letters are a precarious dating-base but probably somewhere broadly within the 4th-1st centuries BC.' -

View additional info »
Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Per page:
1
2
3
Next »