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Auction Description for Auctionata Paddle8 AG: 715: Important Gandhara and Early Buddhist Sculptures from an European Collection
Auction Description:
Auctionata is honored to present a unique and exceptionally rare group of approximately 40 early Buddhist sculptures with outstanding provenance. The family’s collection was founded in the 19th century by an art-loving industrialist and very open-minded entrepreneur. The family established its exquisite and comprehensive collection in cooperation with an extensive network of private and commercial contacts. The Gandhara lots have been anchors of the collection since the 1930s, as proven by the thorough handwritten inventory. The vast majority of the documented artworks were acquired with the assistance of several notable advisors who shared close personal ties with the family. Among them are celebrities from the early 20th century, including former Iranian prime-minister Ebrahim Hakimi, and Spanish-born art dealer Lucas-Moreno, who managed a renowned art gallery in fin-de-siècle Paris. Gandhara became a prominent ancient hub for trade, religion, and art, revealing Indo-Parthian, Indo-Scythian, Indo-Greek and Hellenistic influences alike. Life-sized representations of the Fasting Buddha (lot no. 7) inhabit a distinct position in Gandharan Buddhist art with only a few images of the Emaciated Buddha remaining. Gandharan figures of the Winged Atlas ((lot no. 3) are regularly composed in a leisurely seated position. They functioned as epistyle figures on architectural friezes. The female deity Hariti (lot no. 8) was largely popular in Gandhara, and appears to be well established by the Indo-Greek and Kushan times. Images of the future Buddha Maitreya (lot no. 13) became increasingly popular when Buddhist art spread from Gandhara to China and allude to Greco-Roman imagery. The Sinification of Buddhist art by the late fifth and early sixth centuries is evident in the magnificent limestone figure of a standing Guanyin of the Northern dynasties of the 5t/6th centuries (lot no. 28). For further information about this auction: https://auctionata.com/en/s/905/auction-important-gandhara-and-early-buddhist-sculptures-from-an-european-collection-december-2016  
Viewing Notes:
Preview: Special Preview in Paris: Dec 14 + 15, 2016, 10am-6pm CET, Vernissage: Dec 13, 2016, 5pm CET Hotel Westminster, 13 Rue de la Paix, 75002 Paris, France
Sale Notes:

Auction announcements
12th December 2016
The objects are in France. The shipment will now be sent from France.

Auctionata is honored to present a unique and exceptionally rare group of approximately 40 early Buddhist sculptures with outstanding provenance. The family’s collection was founded in the 19th century by an art-loving industrialist and very open-minded entrepreneur. The family established its exquisite and comprehensive collection in cooperation with an extensive network of private and commercial contacts. The Gandhara lots have been anchors of the collection since the 1930s, as proven by the thorough handwritten inventory. The vast majority of the documented artworks were acquired with the assistance of several notable advisors who shared close personal ties with the family. Among them are celebrities from the early 20th century, including former Iranian prime-minister Ebrahim Hakimi, and Spanish-born art dealer Lucas-Moreno, who managed a renowned art gallery in fin-de-siècle Paris. Gandhara became a prominent ancient hub for trade, religion, and art, revealing Indo-Parthian, Indo-Scythian, Indo-Greek and Hellenistic influences alike. Life-sized representations of the Fasting Buddha (lot no. 7) inhabit a distinct position in Gandharan Buddhist art with only a few images of the Emaciated Buddha remaining. Gandharan figures of the Winged Atlas ((lot no. 3) are regularly composed in a leisurely seated position. They functioned as epistyle figures on architectural friezes. The female deity Hariti (lot no. 8) was largely popular in Gandhara, and appears to be well established by the Indo-Greek and Kushan times. Images of the future Buddha Maitreya (lot no. 13) became increasingly popular when Buddhist art spread from Gandhara to China and allude to Greco-Roman imagery. The Sini?cation of Buddhist art by the late ?fth and early sixth centuries is evident in the magnificent limestone figure of a standing Guanyin of the Northern dynasties of the 5t/6th centuries (lot no. 28).

715: Important Gandhara and Early Buddhist Sculptures from an European Collection (38 Lots)

by Auctionata Paddle8 AG


38 lots with images

December 16, 2016

Live Auction

Berlin, Berlin, Germany

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Terracotta Head of a Buddha, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta Ancient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryThe ovoid head of a Buddha shows a fleshy faxe with well-defined features and a serene facial expressionThe heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes are finely arched beneath sharp-edged brows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lips and a broad neck with deep wrinklesThe hair expression of this buddha image is highly stylized with deep waves arranged in rows pulled over a high bun-shaped ushnishaThe urna in the center of the forehead The head combines a fresh naturalism of portraiture with idealized stylization which are typical features of the art of Gandhara, distinctly characterized by Hellenistic influencesAn investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090702, dated 18.10.2016) and a Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n7, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height: 35.5 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Comparable pieces are in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, published in: Kurt A. Behrendt, The Art of Gandhara in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 2007, p. 73, fig. 55, furthermore in the collection of the Asian Art Museum, Berlin, Ident.Nr. I 121 and  I 129.Condition:The head in good condition, consistent with age and wear. The surface is treated with a layer of wax. The ears in parts restored? Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bearded Man, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta, traces of cold paintAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryNaturalistically carved head of a bearded man with wavy hair, the full beard is built up of several vertical rows of curls each arranged of horizontal linesBelow the definfed hair line, an oval face with deep wrinkles above the robust chiselled nose, wide eyes with shaped lids below angular carved eyebrows, even cheekbones, a mouth with full lipsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n15, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090710, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a base (later)Total height: c. 40 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryTypical for sculptures of the ancient region of Gandhara, this head features a combination of portrait-like naturalism with idealized stylization, obviously influenced by Hellenistic depictions The representation of this head is not fully clarified. Despite its idealizing style, the head exhibits individual features and might well be based on Hellenistic portrait sculptures. Its distinct Greco-Roman features and the noble impression point to depictions of Hellenistic deities. Compare the terracotta head of a Dionysos from Gandhara, 4th/5th century, in particular the hair and beard, in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (Acc. No. 1979.507.2). Also, a related schist head of a Dionysos from Gandhara was sold at Christie's Amsterdam, 7-8 May 2002, lot 503. Condition The head is in good condition, consistent with age. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Gray Schist Figure of a Winged Atlas, Gandhara, 2nd-4th C.

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Description: Highly polished gray schist with age-related patinaAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryFrontal-viewed sculpture of a Winged Atlas in crouching position with his outward-turned feet firmly based on a plinth; the arms bend and his hands resting on the kneesThe most expressive figure has been very well carved out of the stone, catching both the athletic bone structure and the carnose musculature of the Atlas with great naturalistic plasticity and detailed accuracyThe pronounced rounded belly points to its function as central seat of the physical energy distributed in the body; the genitals of the naked Atlas are placed on a folded garmentThe layout of the rounded head reflects the sculptural tradition of Gandhara, apparent in features like the distinct wrinkles above the arched, angular carved eye brows leading into a sturdy nose, the wide eyes with pronounced lid contours, the high cheek bones and the fleshy chin, and the wavy hair arranged in horizontal linesThe facial expression of the bearded, elderly Titan shows intense concentration, in particular, the eyes-wide look below deep wrinkles and the slightly opened mouth revealing the front teeth give evidence of utmost mental and physical exertion of the TitanThe flattened cranium of the Atlas figure points to a former heavy burden placed on top of his head – in accordance to the classic iconographyTwo wings are visible in the back of the figureHeight: 53 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Sculptural depictions of the Winged Atlas from the ancient region of Gandhara can be found in various important museum collections. They show diverse formal layouts. In difference to the Greco-Roman tradition which knows the standing Titan holding up the heavens with his hands, Gandharan figures of the Atlas are regularly depicted in a leisurely seated position. However, due to their function as epistyle figures on architectural friezes, as is known from stupas in Taxila and Hadda in Pakistan, the sculptural layout always underlines their visual support of the superstructure. Here, this is further indicated by the frontal, rectilinear layout of the torso and a slightly forward-leaning, compressed posture of the head with a flattened cranium. It is well imaginable that this figure once was part of an arrangement of similar figures lined up in an architectural frieze. Usually, the genitals of Atlas figures are depicted unveiled. The facial appearance of this Atlas is that of an elderly, bearded man. The figure is exceptionally well carved exhibiting excellent sculptural plasticity and expression. A figure of a Winged Atlas in a similar naturalistic carving style was sold at Bonhams New York, 17 March 2014, lot 66. Similar gray schist sculptures of the winged and bearded elderly Atlas originating from Jamalgarhi and Gandhara are (amongst other museums) in the collection of the British Museum (OA 1880-181; OA 1914.5-2.2), illustrated in: Wladimir Zwalf, A Catalogue of the Gandhara Sculpture in the British Museum, vol. II, London 1996, cat.no. 363 and 377. Also comparable with a small schist figurine of a Winged Atlas in the collection of the Viktoria & Albert Museum (IS.55-1948), which is said to come from the Charsada-Mardan region in Pakistan (2nd-4th century). A small schist figure of a bearded, unwinged Atlas from Swat in Pakistan and now in the collection of the British Museum (OA 1904.12-17.37) exhibits the same unusual potbellied body posture, illustrated in: Zwalf 1996, cat.no. 376. Small clay figurines excavated at the Buddhist site Tapa Sardâr, Afghanistan, chapel 23 (2nd/3rd century) and following the Greco-Buddhist tradition of Gandhara sculptures, exhibit a very similar layout (although with raised arms), illustrated in: M. Taddei, G. Verardi, "Tapa Sardâr: second preliminary report", in: East and West 28. 1978, fig. 25 and 45. Furthermore, compare with a terracotta relief figure from Gandhara (4th century) and now in the collection of the museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri (acc. no. 70.180), illustrated in: S.D. Nagar, Gandharan Sculpture: A Catalogue of the Collection in the Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Missouri-Columbia, 1981, cat.no. 56. Condition: The head in good condition, consistent with age and wear. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Gray Schist Figure of Seated Buddha in Meditation, Gandhara

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryFinely carved figure of the meditating Buddha seated in dhyanasana with his hands in dhyanamudra resting in his lap, he is clad in a voluminous sanghati draped over both shoulders with its folds forming large concentric curves The face is elongated, the chin pronounced, arched eyebrowns and downcast eyes under heavy lids, with an aquiline nose and a bow-shaped mouthThe hair finely parted in waves and tied in a bun over the ushnisha, backed by a nimbusHis low throne embellished with carved drapery and foliage at the sides, Height of the figure: 65 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the beginning of the 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com In Gandharan art, during the first century AD, anthropomorphic representations of the Buddha as savior and god first appear. Signifying his divine nature, he was backed with a nimbus, The Gandharan Buddha is seated in the lotus position (padmasana), with his hands in the gesture of meditation (dhyanamudra), referring to the Buddha’s periods of meditation during his quest for enlightenment. Gandharan sculptors drew on provincial Roman sources, as well as the Hellenistic influence that resulted from Alexander the Great’s conquests in the region. Such influence can be seen in this Buddha’s monastic robe, which is rendered like a Roman toga, covering both shoulders, while the auspicious mark of superior intelligence, a cranial protuberance, is depicted naturalistically as a topknot. While the fire altar is relatively prevalent in the Gandharan sculptural context, this example is rare in that there are neither donor figures included nor the fire altar. Compare a related seated figure of the meditating Buddha from the same region and period in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne (AS12-1982) A very similar Gandharan schist figure of a seated Buddha was sold Christie's New York, 13 September 2011, lot 237, and also in the same rooms, 16 September 2014, lot 212. Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. Some restorations at the neck, the nose, rihght hand, the robe and at the plinthe. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Buddha, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryAn ovoid head of a Buddha with well-defined features and a serene facial expressionThe heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes are finely arched beneath sharp-edged brows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lips and a broad neck with deep wrinkles, the urna in the center of the foreheadThe hair expression of this buddha image is highly stylized with crisply carved snail-shaped curls rising to a dome-shaped ushnisha The head combines a fresh naturalism of portraiture with idealized stylization which are typical features of the art of Gandhara, distinctly characterized by Hellenistic influencesA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n8, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090703, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a base (later)Height: 34 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century A stucco head of a Buddha (Gandhara, 2nd/3rd century, 62.233) with a similar serene expression is in the collection of National Museum, New Delhi.Condition:The head in good condition, consistent with age. One restored part at the cheek. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Schist Figure of a Standing Buddha, Gandhara, 2nd-4th C.

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryFinely carved figure of the standing Buddha, his hands formerly performing the abyahamudry, now missingHe is clad in a voluminous sanghati draped over both shoulders with its folds forming large concentric curvesThe face is elongated, the chin pronounced, arched eyebrowns and downcast eyes under heavy lids, with an aquiline nose and a bow-shaped mouthThe hair finely parted in waves and tied in a bun over the ushnisha, backed by a nimbusOn wooden base (later)Height: 99 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryGood condition consistent with ageThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com In Gandharan art, during the first century AD, anthropomorphic representations of the Buddha as savior and god first appear. Signifying his divine nature, he was backed with a nimbus, The Gandharan Buddha is seated in the lotus position (padmasana), with his hands in the gesture of meditation (dhyanamudra), referring to the Buddha’s periods of meditation during his quest for enlightenment. Gandharan sculptors drew on provincial Roman sources, as well as the Hellenistic influence that resulted from Alexander the Great’s conquests in the region. Such influence can be seen in this Buddha’s monastic robe, which is rendered like a Roman toga, covering both shoulders, while the auspicious mark of superior intelligence, a cranial protuberance, is depicted naturalistically as a topknot. Compare similar examples in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (accession no. 67.154.5; 2014.188), in the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco (accession no. B60S593) and in the British Museum in London (reg. no. 1898,0913.4; 1880.104; 1880.73; 1889,1109.1) Literature: For related examples in the Peshawar Museum, see H. Ingolt, Gandharan Art in Pakistan, 1957, figs. 206 and 215. Condition: The sculpture is in visually good condition with wear consistent with age such as traces of weathering and some notches. Arms and legs missing. The dimensions are 97 cm. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Very Rare Schist Figure of the ‘Fasting Buddha’, Gandhara

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryVery expressively carved figure of the seated Buddha in dhyanasana on an indicated grass mat on a pedestal, dressed in a thin, long Dhoti and scarf with deep folds sticking tightly over his body and ankles, flowing into a large loop in front of his legsDue to the fasting, his emaciated, ascetic torso revealing his ribcage, bony shoulders, tendons, and veins, his viscera at the flat, sunken plane for the abdomen becoming visibleThe Buddha's wavy hair with bun-shaped Ushnisa and the full beard framing the face with expressive, emaciated features, like gaunt cheeks and deep-set eyes, his veins and tendons visible and pointing to the strong mental and physical struggle the Buddha perfomsThe pedestal with a frieze centered by a stupa and flanked by six adorantsHeight of the figure: 103 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com The figure of the 'Emaciated Buddha' depicts the historical Siddhartha Gautama during his seven-week meditation in the moment of his enlightenment. It is worked in extraordinary detail, employing a kind of uncompromising realism of the body and the face. This feature stands in great contrast to the more stylized treatment of the garment and the overall calm expression of the Buddha, thus congenially reflecting both the intense mental and physical struggle of Siddhartha and his spiritual transcendence as the Enlightened One. The brilliant representation also gives evicence of the extraordinary carving skills of the artisans employed, who would equally apply their mastership as artists and devote believers. Representations of the Fasting Buddha must be considered a distincttive feature of Gandharan Buddhist art and are iconic depictions taking up a similar distinct position in Gandharan Buddhist art as the formula of the idealized anthropomorphic image of Buddha. We know of only very few images of the Emaciated Buddha, the reference sculpture being the famous example in the Lahore Museum, Pakistan, illustrated in: Masterpieces of the Lahore Museum, Lahore 2006, p. 125. A second figure, though more fragmented, belongs to the collection of the Peshawar Museum, Pakistan. It seems that very few sculptures of the Emaciated Buddha were ever made, especially of such large size. Images of this size have been dated to the later phase of Gandharan art, cf. K. Behrendt, The Art of Gandhara at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y., New York 2007, p. 57, and Fasting Buddhas, Ascetic Forest Monks, and the Rise of the Esoteric Tradition, in: Coins, Art and Chronology II, Vienna 2010, p. 301f. A very similar figure of the Emaciated Siddhartha of the same region and period was sold at Christie's New York, 22 March 2011, lot 240. Another important and similar example was exhibited as 'Bumper Emaciated Buddha' at Nancy Wiener Gallery, New York, March 2011. Furthermore, a gray schist sculpture of the Fasting Siddhartha from Shotorak, Kapisa, Afghanistan, former collection of the Kabul Museum, now missing, illustrated in: Marylin M. Rhie, Early Buddhist art of China and Central Asia, Leiden 2002, fig. 3.45b. Also, a small Gandhara figure of the ‘fasting Buddha’ from the same period in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (accession no. 1987.218.5). Further Literature: Elizabeth Errington and Joe Cribb (Eds.), The Crossroads of Asia: Transformation in image and symbol in the art of ancient Afghanistan and Pakistan, London 1992, p. 227ff. Condition: The figure is in good condition consistent with age. The forearms and hands are missing. Right eyebrow and nose with some restorations. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Schist Figure of Seated Hariti with Children, Gandhara

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Description: Gray schist Ancient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryFigure of the goddess Hariti seated in European fashion, her feet carried by two lotus cushions, in her lap a naked child, wearing a armlets and anklets, her right angled arm with open hand revealing a pomegranateOn Hariti's right a second naked child with armlets and anklets is standing next to her, with the left arm raised and pointing to her sideThe crowned head with wavy hair arranged in vertical rows at the fronthead and hanging down sidewards in undulating rowsIt frames the oval face with harmonious features and gently rounded chin, the heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes with long narrowing corners are finely arched beneath sharp-edged brows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lipsThe goddess wears a tight-fitting tunic of thin fabric with a collar with floral motifs, the garment with undulating grooves sharply revealing the bodily proportions of the goddess underneathA beaded necklace of many strands falls between her breasts, the earrings and bracelets are also strings of dense pendant beadsThe most expressive figure has been very well carved out of the stone, catching both the bone structure and the bouffant femineity of the figure with great naturalistic plasticity and detailed accuracyTypical for sculptures of the ancient region of Gandhara, this Hariti features a combination of portrait-like naturalism with idealized stylization, obviously influenced by Hellenistic depictionsWith pedestal (later)Height of the figure: 97 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com Hariti is a female deity which after her conversion to the Buddhist faith transformed from being a devourer of children into a protector of children. As as it is indicated by archaeology and preserved sculptures, her cult enjoyed great popularity in Gandhara, and seems to have been well established by the Indo-Greek and Kushan times. She appears to have been associated with the Greek and Roman personifications of abundance and good fortune. In art, Hariti is shown together with some of the highest Buddhist deities, like Panchika (Vajravana), the god of wealth, but can also linked to north Indian goddesses such as the Yakshis who brought fertility and agricultural prosperity. Hariti regularly is depicted as nursing a child in her arms, with further children surrounding her. This lot correlates stylistically very precisely to sculptures of the ancient Gandhara region (modern Pakistan) of the 3rd-4th centuries, compare for example with the sculpture of Bodhisattva Shakyamuni at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (1987.218.10), illustrated in: Kurt A. Behrendt, The Art of Gandhara in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y., New York 2007, p. 52, fig. 41. Compare a similar seated figure from Gandhara (1st-3rd century AD) in the collection of the British Museum (accession no. Asia OA 1886.6-11.1) A standing Hariti with three children in the collection of the Lahore Mueseum, Pakistan (G-102) and from Gandhara (2nd/3rd century), also shows very similar features. Literature: Wladimir Zwalf, A Catalogue of the Gandharan Sculpture in the British Museum, vol. 2, London 1996. Condition: The figure is in good condition consistent with age. The head of the child in her lap being restored Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Gray Schist Head of Fasting Buddha, Gandhara, 2nd-4th C.

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryExpressive carved head of the fasting Buddha with a halo behindThe head exhibits a sharp delineation of the gaunt face and lean cheeks, with sunken eyes with rounded brow ridges which continue into the cheek-bones almost to the ears, and furrowed brows and a long pointed noseThe hair is carved in dense undulating lines which cover also the domed ushnisha, and come to a point over the middle of the forehead just above the circular urna in relief which is further pronounced by two prominent undulating veins rising and forming a 'V' above itRevealing only parts of the torso, the neck is defined by visible spines and tendons indicating an extraordinary strong bodily tension and concentrationWooden base (later)Height of the head: 52,5 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com The subject of the emaciated Buddha enjoyed great popularity in ancient Gandhara. Before enlightenment, Siddharta performed a long meditation during which he even denied food for himself. This moment of strong asceticism, being a symbol of both mental and physical struggle for enlightenment, is shown here. The head all likely was once part of a large almost life-size figure of the Emaciated Buddha, a subject that was particularly prominent in late Gandharan art. The lot clearly shows that the master sculptors of Gandhara preferred strong naturalistic representations combined with deliberately stylized features reminiscent of the Hellenistic aesthetic tradition that lingered on. Compare a similar head of the Fasting Buddha from the Kushan period and in the collection of the British Museum, London (Acc.No. 1907,1228.1), illustrated in: Zwalf, Wladimir, A Catalogue of the Gandhara Sculpture in the British Museum, Vol. II, London 1996, fig. 182. A further related smaller head is in the collection of the Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Süd-, Südost- und Zentralasien (MIK 1 75.5) A similar expressive head of the Emaciated Siddharta from Gandhara (2nd/3rd century) was sold at Christie’s New York, 18 March 2015, lot 4012. Condition: The head is in good condition, consistent with age. Some restorations below the chin, behind the ears, at backside of the head and at the halo. Both earlobes restored. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Gray Schist Figure of the Godess Yakshi, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryFinely carved figure of a standing Yakshi with legs crossed on a base with lotus frieze, her right arm raised but broken, formerly grasping a tree or holding a flower, the left resting on her hip, she wears a pleated sari held together by an elaborate belt, with collar, and a shawl wrapped around her shouldersBeneath a curling hairdress her wavy hairs becomes visible, framing her face with serene expression, arched eyebrows above heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes, aquiline nose, smiling lips, elongated earlobes with ear ringsShe is backed by an arched Bodhi Tree, large parts of which are broken Height: 80 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century A Yakshi is a female earth spirit, accepted as a symbol of fertility by the Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain faiths alike. She is usually portrayed as a wide-hipped, voluptuous woman, who can cause a tree to bear fruit simply by touching it with her foot. Sculptures of Yakshi are often seen in elaborate architectural contexts on the façades of temples and stupas. In Gandharan art depictions of Yakshis were conflated with the image of Maya, Buddha's mother, also grasping a tree and crossing her feet. This figure clearly shows how the Hellenistic influence lingered on in Central Asia long after Alexander's demise. Its distinct Greco-Roman features and the noble impression point to earlier depictions of Hellenistic deities, like Athene. Compare a schist figure of a Kushan period Yakshi grasping a tree (2nd/3rd century) in the collection of the Art Institute Chicago (1923.316) Further, a Gandharan figure of a Yakshi was sold at Christie's Amsterdam, 21 November 2001, lot 21. Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. Left arm restored Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Gray Schist Figure of a Winged Atlas, Gandhara, 2nd-4th C.

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Description: Gray schist Ancient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryFrontal-viewed sculpture of a Winged Atlas composed in a leisurely seated position firmly based on a plinth; the arms bend and his hands resting on the knees, in the back a fragmented haloThe layout of the Atlas as a muscular elderly man reflects the sculptural tradition of Gandhara, apparent in features like the distinct head with wavy hair framing the oval face with carved eyebrows, a sturdy nose, wide eyes with pronounced lid contours, high cheek bones and a prominent moustacheThe expressive figure has been skillfully carved out of the stone, catching both the athletic bone structure and the carnose musculature of the Atlas with great naturalistic plasticityThe genitals of the bare Atlas are covered by a draped stoleTwo wings are visible in the back of the figureHeight: 49 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Sculptural depictions of the Winged Atlas from the ancient region of Gandhara can be found in various important museum collections. They show diverse formal layouts. In difference to the Greco-Roman tradition which knows the standing Titan holding up the heavens with his hands, Gandharan figures of the Atlas are regularly depicted in a leisurely seated position. However, due to their function as epistyle figures on architectural friezes, as is known from stupas in Taxila and Hadda in Pakistan, the sculptural layout always underlines their visual support of the superstructure. Similar gray schist sculptures of the winged and bearded elderly Atlas originating from Jamalgarhi and Gandhara are (amongst other museums) in the collection of the British Museum (OA 1880-181; OA 1914.5-2.2), illustrated in: Wladimir Zwalf, A Catalogue of the Gandhara Sculpture in the British Museum, vol. II, London 1996, cat.no. 363 and 377. Small clay figurines excavated at the Buddhist site Tapa Sardâr, Afghanistan, chapel 23 (2nd/3rd century) and following the Greco-Buddhist tradition of Gandhara sculptures, exhibit a very similar layout (although with raised arms), illustrated in: M. Taddei, G. Verardi, "Tapa Sardâr: second preliminary report", in: East and West 28. 1978, fig. 25 and 45. Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age and wear. Some restorations at the right side of the head, the left arm and at a vertical fracture at the left Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Buddha, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta with traces of paint at the eyebrowsAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryThe ovoid head of a Buddha shows well-defined features like fleshy cheeks and chin, heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes beneath finely arched, sharp-edged brows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lips, the urna in the center of the forehead, the face with serene expressionThe hair expression of this Buddha image is highly stylized with circular arcs arranged in rows pulled over a high bun-shaped ushnishaThe head combines a fresh naturalism of portraiture with idealized stylization which are typical features of the art of Gandhara, distinctly characterized by Hellenistic influencesA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n6, dated 19.10.2016)  and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090701, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height: 35 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Comparable pieces are in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, published in: Kurt A. Behrendt, The Art of Gandhara in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 2007, p. 73, fig. 55, furthermore in the collection of the Art Institute Chicago (1931.269; 2015.441)A related head of a bodhisattva from Gandhara (3rd/4th century) was sold at Christie's New York, 19 March 2013, Lot 212Condition:The head in good condition, consistent with age and wear. Both ear lobs are restored. The head is treated with a wax-like coating. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Gray Schist Figure of Seated Maitreya, Gandhara

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centuryFigure of the seated future Buddha Maitreya as bodhisattva, cross-legged with his soles pointing upwards resting on a draped plinth, his hands performing the dyanamudra, behind his head a circular haloHis wavy hair is bound into a topknot and falls down sidewards across his shoulders in undulating rowsHis face with harmonious features and a gently rounded chin, the heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes are finely arched beneath sharp-edged brows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lips, a prominent urna at the foreheadPrincely bejewelled, his breast is bare with indicated ribcage, his stole is draped in folds across his left shoulder, and flowing into a large loop in front of his legsHe is richly bejewelled with heavy bracelets and earrings, a collar round his neck and heavy chains falling between his breasts and across the right shoulder with a third diagonal cord running across his chest and below his armpitThe draped plinth with a carved frieze in relief of the future Buddha Maitreya seated in European posture flanked by six worshippers Wooden base (later)Height of the figure: c. 85 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com Images of the future Buddha Maitreya, who will be born to teach enlightenment in the next age, became increasingly popular when Buddhist art spread through Gandhara to China. Endowed with a similar narrative and iconography as the historical Buddha, Maitreya is regularly depicted as a bodhisattva seated on a raised plinth with adorants, the hands in the gesture of meditation, wearing long flowing robes and armlets, his hair tied in a topknot and backed by a nimbus. The deeply carved lines of the drapery, the hairdo, and jewelry often found in Gandharan depictions of Maitreya, are reminiscent of Hellenistic sculptures in the naturalistic attention to anatomical details. These features are also direct references to Greco-Roman imagery. A schist figure of the seated Maitreya of the same region and period was sold at Christie's, New York, 20 September 2006, lot 36, a further related figure at Bonhams, New York, 18 September 2013, lot 60. Also, compare a similar seated figure of the Bodhisattva Maitreya from the Swat Valley, Pakistan in the collection of the Victoria & Albert Museum, London (IM.4-1911) from the same period. For another related example, see H. Ingholt, Gandharan Art in Pakistan, 1957, cat. no. 302, p. 137. Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age and wear. A vertical tension crack on the left side of the body running from the armpit down to the left knee. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bearded Man, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta with traces of cold paintAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryPowerfully and naturalistically carved head of a bearded ascetic man with his wavy hair pulled sideward into a knot on top of the headDeep wrinkles above the finely chiselled noseSunken eyes with shaped lids below angular carved, raised eyebrows, gaunt cheeks, and a bow-shaped mouth with full lipsPresumably a representation of a bearded Brahman or a Buddhist figureMounted on a base (later)A Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n9, dated 18.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090704, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotHeight without base: c. 34 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century The representation of this head is not fully clarified. The furrowed brows indicate age and the piercing gaze reflects powerful strenght, thus, the head may represent a bearded Brahman. With its distinct Hellenistic features, the aristocratic bearded figure also exhibits a distinct resemblance to the Greek god Dionysos. It further strongly resembles Gandharan depictions of the Bodhisattva Vajrapani, the spiritual guide of the Buddha. Typically portrayed as a wild man, his appearance is inspired by Hellenistic images of Herakles and offers a dramatic counter conception to that of the serene Buddha. Vajrapani’s powerful physique is indicative of his role as a defender of Buddhism. Comparable Gandharan heads supposed to be depictions of Brahmans are (amongst others) in the collection of the Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin, Sammlung Süd-, Südost- und Zentralasien (Ident.No. I 119) and the Linden-Museum, Stuttgart (SA 03775). Furthermore, a Gandharan head of a Brahman showing very similar iconographic idioms is in the collection of the Musée Guimet, Paris. A related terracotta head of Vajrapani from the Kingdom of Nagarahara, Hadda style, 4th/5th century, was exhibited at John Eskenzai, New York, March 2009. For a further similar example, see Harold Ingholt, Gandharan Art in Pakistan, New York 1957, fig. 54. Condition: The head is in good condition, consistent with age. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Gray Schist Figure of Maitreya under the Bodhi Tree, Gandhara

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 2nd-4th centurySeated figure of Maitreya, the Future Buddha seated in meditiation on a throne under a Bodhi TreeHis wavy hair, bound with a high hairdress, frames his face which has harmonious features and a gently rounded chin, the heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes are finely arched beneath sharp-edged brows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lips, a prominent urna at the foreheadPrincely bejewelled, his breast is bare with indicated ribcage, his stole is draped in folds across his left shoulder, and flowing into a large loop in front of his legsHe is richly bejewelled with heavy bracelets and earrings, a collar round his neck and a heavy chain that falls between his breasts and a third diagonal cord running across his chest and below his armpitHeight: 79 cmProvenance: from an old European collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Images of the future Buddha Maitreya, who will be born to teach enlightenment in the next age, became increasingly popular when Buddhist art spread through Gandhara to China. Endowed with a similar narrative and iconography as the historical Buddha, Maitreya is regularly depicted as a bodhisattva seated under the Bodhi tree on a raised plinth with fire altar and adorants, The deeply carved lines of the drapery, the hairdo, and jewelry often found in Gandharan depictions of Maitreya, are reminiscent of Hellenistic sculptures in the naturalistic attention to anatomical details. These features are also direct references to Greco-Roman imagery. Compare a schist head of Siddhartha (meditiating under a tree) from Gandhara (3rd century) in the collection of the Hirayama Ikuo Silk Road Museum in Hokuto, Japan. Also, a related figure of Siddhartha meditating under the Jambu tree (Gandhara 3ed century) from the Norton Simon Museums, Pasadena (F.1975.17.29.S) Furthermore, a similar figure of Maitreya sold at Bonhams, New York, 18 September 2013, lot 60. Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. Restorations at the plinthe, knees and the tree. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta Ancient Gandhara region, 3rd-5th centurySmall ovoid head of a bodhisattva with slender cheeks and a rounded chin below finely arched, incised brows leading into a fine aquiline modelled noseOpen eyes below heavy eye lids, a bow-shaped mouth with full lipsA high three-parted diadem embellished with precious stones covers almost entirely the hair that runs in small curls along the forehead and in wavy patterns downward along the sidesThe ears with heavy earringsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n12, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090707, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height: 30 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century The head reveals stylistic influences of classic Indian art, like the Gupta style, and might come frome the Kashmiri region of Gandhara Condition: The head in good condition, consistent with age and wear. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta with traces of cold paintAncient Gandhara region, 3rd-5th centurySmall ovoid head of a bodhisattva with slender cheeks and a rounded chin below finely arched, incised brows leading into a fine aquiline modelled noseOpen eyes with indicated pupils below eye lids, a bow-shaped mouth with full lipsThe hair runs in wavy patterns arranged in single horizontal rows and flows into a high tapering hair turban embellished with a slim coronet with pearls and a central lotus flower, the ears with heavy hair earringsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n14, dated 18.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090709, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height: 29 cmProvenance: from old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century The head reveals stylistic influences of classic Indian art, like the Gupta style, and might come from the Kashmir region of GandharaCondition:The head in good condition, consistent with age. Some restoration at backside The surface is treated with a wax-like coating. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Terracotta with traces of cold paintAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centurySmall head of a bodhisattva with a round faceThe heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes are finely arched beneath sharp-edged brows, a fine modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lips A high tapering, precisely carved turban embellished with precious stones covers almost completely the hair that runs in wavy patterns down along sidesThe ears with heavy earringsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n11, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090706, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height: 24 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Similar heads are, amongst others, in the collection of the Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin, Sammlung Süd-, Südost- und Zentralasien (Ident.Nr. I 137 and Ident.Nr. I 162). Compare also a very similar head of a bodhisattva in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, published in: Kurt A. Behrendt,The Art of Gandhara in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York 2007, p. 73, fig. 55. Condition: The head in good condition, consistent with age and wear. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bearded Man, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryNaturally carved head of a beared elderly man with hatBelow the wavy hair a slender face with deep wrinkles, high cheekbones, sharp-edged brows with wide eyes and indicated pupils below eye lids, a robust chiselled nose, and a fullbeard with vertical rows of curlsTypical for sculptures of the ancient region of Gandhara, this head features a combination of portrait-like naturalism with idealized stylization, obviously influenced by Hellenistic depictionsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n17, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090712, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height of the head: c. 30 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Condition: The stone head is in age-related condition. The surface is treated with a wax-like layer. The height without socket of approx. 29 cm. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bearded Man, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryNaturallistaclly carved head of bearded man with turbanThe small face with slender eyes and a robust nose, deep wrinkles A Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n19, dated 18.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090714, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lot.Mounted on a base (later)Height: c. 18 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Condition: The head is in good condition consistent with age. The height measures c. 18 cm. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Bearded Man, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryNaturalistically carved head of a bearded man with a capBelow the curly hair an oval slender face with high cheekbones and robust chiselled nose, wide eyes with shaped lids below angular carved eyebrows, a full beard arranged in vertivals rowsTypical for sculptures of the ancient region of Gandhara, this head features a combination of portrait-like naturalism with idealized stylization, obviously influenced by Hellenistic depictionsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n18, dated 18.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090713, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a base (later)Height: c. 32 cmProvenance: Provenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Condition Condition consistent with age. The surface with a wax layer. The height without base is c. 32 cm. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Stone Relief Nude Female Deity, Central Asia, 1st Mill. BC

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Description: StoneCentral Asia, 1st Mill. BCStone relief panel depicting in full frontal view a standing nude female figure with tapering feathered wings and large talonsSimilar to Gandharan depictions, her wavy hair frames the oval face with gently features, the heavy-lidded almond-shaped eyes below finely arched eyebrows, a fine aquiline modelled nose and a bow-shaped mouth with full lipsShe has an elaborate necklace and bracelets on each wrist, also very prominent heavy earrings, similar to Gandharan Buddhist figuresHer hands raised to the level of her shoulders, each holding a rod-and-ring, the figure is supported by a pair of lions and flanked by a pair of standing owls, all in full frontal reliefWith wooden base (later)Height: 54.5 cmProvenance: from an old European collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com Undoubtedly, this relief panel relates strongly to the famous 'Burney Relief' which is also commonly known as 'Queen of the Night', and in the collection of the British Museum. It is made of baked clay and originated in southern Mesopotamia (modern day Iraq), most probably in Babylonia around 1800 BC. The figure is acknowledged to be a goddess, as she wears the horned headdress of a deity and holds the sacred rod-and-ring symbol in her raised hands. The nude woman motif was popular throughout Mesopotamia and scholars generally believe the 'Burney Relief' to be a depiction of either the Mesopotamian goddesses Inanna (Ishtar), Lilith, or Ereshkigal. The best candidate is Ereshkigal, the Queen of the Great Below. Her name means “Lady of the Great Place” referring to the land of the dead, and there are a number of aspects of the plaque which suggest Ereshkigal being the depicted figure. This deity was considered the Queen who lived in the underworld palace of Ganzir, she had wings, was depicted frontally, stood on lions and was connected with owls. The 'Burney Relief' plaque probably stood in a shrine, This relief panel of a nude female deity exhibits the same composition as the 'Queen of the Night'. Although the panel here is extremely similar iconographically, there are some distinct differences. This panel is carved out of stone, the figure wears no headdress consisting of four pairs of horns topped by a disc like the 'Queen of the Night'. Furthermore, this figure has wavy hair and is adorned with jewelry in the manner of Gandharan depictions of Buddhist figures. A feature that coincides with the overall feeling of a rather naturalistic rendering of the figure's body which looks in effect Ghandharan. This applies also to the depiction of the lions, the layout of which reflects the sculptural tradition of Gandhara, apparent in the rounded features of the animals carved with great naturalistic plasticity and detailed accuracy. The relief panel, therefore, might constitute a rare evidence of a subject's topographical and historical migration, thus forming a 'missing link' between Mesopotamia and Gandhara, before the formative period of Gandharan art. Compare with the 'Burney Relief' (BM, London, 2003,0718.1), for the academic discurse on the relief, see: Dominique Collon, 'The Queen under Attack', in: Iraq, vol. 69, 2007, pp. 43-51. For further discussion of origins of early Mesopotamian and Levantine female deities and their iconography, see: Izak Cornelius, The Many Faces of the Goddess, Fribourg/Göttingen 2004. Condition: The relief is in good condition consistent with age. Some minor restorations at the nose, at the thighs, at the head of the left owl and at the backside. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Marble Figure of a Standing Hariti, Gandhara, 3rd-6th C.

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Description: White MarbleAncient Gandhara region, 3rd-6th century Very small  figure of the standing goddess Hariti in tribhanga posture on a base, bearing a basket with fruits in her raised hand and protecting a child to her side with her left handShe is shown adorned with a crown-like cap with lotus flower and fillet covering her wavy hair, she has crisp facial features with large almond-shaped eyes and an aquiline slender nose, heavy ear rings and sets of chains and bangles Her tight-fitted robe with scarf underlines her female body features and the round breastsThe figure reveals stylistic influences of classic Indian art, like the Gupta styleHeight: 24 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Schist Relief Panel of Goddess Parvati, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: Gray schistAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryFinely carved relief panel with the goddess Parvati and accompanying figures on double lotus bases on a pedestal with a lotus friezeHere, the four-armed Parvati stands in a formal position holding attributes in her raised hands, accompanied by her sons, the elephant-headed god Ganesha and Skanda, the Hindu god of warParvati is shown with with a benign facial expression, large eyes, round breasts and a narrow waist, wearing a diaphanous dhoti with schematized folds at the lower part and is richly bejewelled, her hair in an elaborate coiffureMounted on base (later)Dimensions of the figure: 74 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Parvati is a Hindu goddess and the daughter of Himavat, the embodiment of the Himalayan Mountains. She is also the consort of Shiva, one of Hinduism’s most important gods. In the art of Gandhara she is regularly depicted as a pair with Shiva Compare a stone panel with the Hindu deity Parvati with her sons Ganesha and Skanda from 11th century Pala (Bangladesh) in the collection of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco (object no. B64S6) showing the same compositional concept and iconography Condition: The lot is good condition consistent with age Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Terracotta Head of a Young Man, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryHead of a young man with ovoid face with distinct features, a low forehead with a chaplet of wavy hair curling out from under the hatLarge almond-shaped open eyes below arched brows, an aquiline nose and a mouth with full lipsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n10, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090705, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a base (later)Height of the head: 23 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Compare a similar head of a young man in the collection of the Museum für Asiatische Kunst, Berlin, Süd-, Südost- und Zentralasien (Ident.Nr. I 233).Condition:The head in good condition, consistent with age. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Small Terracotta Head of a Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centurySmall head of a bodhisattva with moustacheThe hair runs in wavy patterns across the forehead and down the shoulders, with a a high tapering tiara embellished with pearls and lotus flowers, the ears with heavy hair earringsA Thermoluminiscence Analysis from the Oxford Authentification Ltd., Oxford (Sample No. N116n16, dated 19.10.2016) and an investigation report from the Institute for Material Science and Authenticity Testing, Wiesbaden (No. 16090711, dated 18.10.2016) are consistent with the dating of this lotMounted on a metal base (later)Height: 16 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Condition: The head in good condition, consistent with age and wear. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Small Terracotta Head of a Bodhisattva, Gandhara, 3rd-5th C.

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Description: TerracottaAncient region of Gandhara, 3rd-5th centuryVery small head of a bodhisattva with rounded features and a high-tapering crown above the wavy hairPossibly a figure of Maitreya as bodhisattvaHeight: 15 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Condition: The head in good condition, consistent with age. Restoration at the hair, earlobes missing. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Limestone Figure of a Guanyin on a Lotus Base, China, 5th/6th C

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Description: LimestoneChina, 5th/6th century, possibly Shandong provinceFigure of a standing bodhisattva Avalokitesvara (Guanyin) on a lotus base with two flanking lions, in her left hand a kundika, the right arm missingThe face serene with downcast eyes and a gentle smile, wearing a tiara with lotus disc and a medium-relief figure of the Amitabha BuddhaThe fully formed fleshy head stands on a slender body, the shoulders draped with a pleated shawl falling over the arms and sides, all rendered with intricate and rich details of softly modeled drapery folds and elaborate jewelryHeight: 100 cmProvenance: from an old European private collectionThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com The development of Buddhist art in China was dependent not only on an original transmission from India, but also on the creative adaptations and inventions by Chinese artists and patrons. The Sini?cation of Buddhist art by the ?fth and sixth centuries is based on native Chinese taste that gradually transformed Buddhist art into something speci?cally Chinese, represented, for example, by the more familiar Chinese style of robe and facial type.The limestone statue represents an appealing image of the bodhisattva type fashioned during the Wei dynasties through the Northern Qi and early Sui periods. With fine even features, the body in the classic, slightly swaying pose, this figure exhibits the outstanding carving quality of the Chinese sculptures of the Northern periods. Particularly noteworthy is the shallow relief of the multi-layered drapery with flat linear and highly stylized folds ending in rhythmical wave-like edges.Compare two related figures of a standing Guanyin from the Sui dynasty (6th century) in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York ((Acc. No. 42.25.3a, b; 29.100.32a, b).Furthermore, a related Stone figure of a bodhisattva from the Northern Qi dynasty (550-577) was sold at Sotheby's London, 15 May 2013, lot 147.Condition:The figure is in good condition consistent age and restorations. Restored fractures at the neck and above the feet. Some resored parts at the hairdress. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Roman Gray Marble Portrait Head of Caesar, Republican, 1st C.

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Description: Gray marble Roman, Republican style, first century or laterGray marble portrait head of Caesar with precisely carved individual featuresThe hair carved into a sharp pattern of flat intertwined strands, the face with wide eyes, a prominent nose and distinct wrinkles and a resolute mouthIn the aesthetic parlance of the Late Roman Republic, the physical traits of this portrait image of Caesar are meant to convey seriousness of mind and the virtue of his eminent public career by demonstrating the way in which the subject literally wears the marks of his endeavorsHeight: 26 cmMounted on a base (later)Provenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com Condition: The head in good condition, consistent with age Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Figure of 'Bactrian Princess', Central Asia, c. 2300-1700 BC

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Description: Chlorite and calciteCentral Asia, Oxus civilization, late third to early second millennium BCSmall composite figure consisting of detachable parts Statuette of a rounded figure of a seated female deity with only schematized antropomorphic featuresThe small head is detachable and was carved from a block of white calcite, contrasting with the deliberately and delicate carving of the hairdress and clothes made of green chlorite, the thick cloak entirely covers the body, parts of the garment are made of a stylized fleecy material of superposed stripes and are reminiscent of the kaunakes, a woolen garment of Sumerian originWith base (later)Height of the Figure: 28 cmProvenance: from an old European collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Small statuette like this have been produced by the Oxus civilisation, which flourished between 2300 and 1700 BC in Central Asia. This culture produced a very unusual type of female statuary known as 'Bactrian princesses'. Most of the Bactrian princesses are seated composite figures, As the Oxus civilisation had intense links with neighbouring civilisations due to its strategic position in Central Asia, these small figures reveal a strong Mesopotamian influence, In spite of the name, the 'Bactrian princesses’ are nowadays believed to be depictions of a female deity who in Central Asian mythology plays a regulatory role in the natural order, pacifying the untamed forces embodied by lions, snakes, or dragons, rather than being portraits of members of the noble elite. A related seated Bactrian stone female statuette was sold at Christie's New York,13 June 2000, lot 440. Similar statuettes are, amongst other museums, in the collection of the Musée Barbier-Mueller, Geneve (Inv.no. 241-13) and in the Louvre, Paris (Inv. no. AO 22918). Compare similar statuettes illustrated in: Aruz, Joan/Wallenfels, Ronald (Eds.), Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Exhib. Cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y, New York 2003, p. 335-339. Literature: Mousavi, Ali, Ancient Near Eastern art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, exhib. cat., Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2012 Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Three Chlorite Vessels, Animal Fight Design, 3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray Chlorite, some vessels with inlays of white shellBactrian regionMid-third millennium BC, Intercultural Style1. Small cylindrical vessel on a flat base with slightly inverting wall and rounded mouth rimThe exterior with a combined snake-leopard design in relief with leopard and two snakes in profile, the animal bodies with drilled whole décorHeight: 10 cm, Diameter at mouth rim: 10 cm 2. Cylindrical vessel on a flat base with slightly flaring wall and flat mouth rimThe exterior with a combined snake-leopard design of two snakes and leopards in profile, die animal bodies with drilled whole décor, die round eyes formerly filled-in with white inlaysHeight: 12. 5 cm, diameter at mouth rim: 19 cm3. Large vessel with lid and convex-shaped base, with steep rising slightly inverted wall below a flat projecting mouth rim with four small handle-like elementsThe exterior with a combined snake-bird design of six snakes in profile and three birds of prey with outstretched wings in full-frontal view, the heads in profile; the animal bodies with drilled whole décor, the eyes filled-in with white inlaysCircular flat lid with handle, at the outside two curled snakes in reliefHeight: 15 cm, diamter at mouth: 23.5 cm, diameter lid: 20 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the middle of the 20th century Vessels carved of a gray-green stone - either chlorite or steatite - in what is called the 'Intercultural Style' were frequently produced between 2600 and 1700 BC in workshops principally of two regions, southeastern Iran and southeastern Arabia, with the main production site of Tepe Yahya in Kerman province, Iran. Recently, a third production site has been located in Jiroft, southeastern Iran, leading to the conclusion of the existence of a 'Jiroft culture' which is still a controversial issue. The most well-known chlorite vessels appear in temples around the middle of the third millenium BC and are normally quite large with deeply carved patterns. Vessels decorated in the Intercultural Style were found across the ancient Near East from Syria to the Indus Valley, evidence of the flourishing long-distance trade of the times. The function of these vessels is still unclear; theiy might have stored aromatic substances (oil, perfume). More likely, the containers were used as luxury commodities of the privileged classes in major urban centers, including Sumerian Mesopotamia. Since vessels of Jiroft are known to have come from tombs, their function and ornamentation may also relate to funerary rites. The chlorite objects have geometrical patterns, plant motifs, especially date palms, also architectural representations. The most common motifs consist of an animal repertory of scorpions, snakes, leopards, and birds which are repeated several times. The fights most regularly exhibited on chlorite vessels are between leopards and snakes. The meaning of the animal fight is the snake's submission to the grip of the leopard, a mythological spirit that regulates the forces of nature. Compare similar pieces illustrated in: Aruz, Joan/Wallenfels, Ronald (eds.), Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Exhib. Cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y, New York 2003, p. 335-339. Condition: The vessels are good condition consistent with age. Some restorations on the the wall and the base, in parts covered with a wax-like layer Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Bactrian Chlorite Vessel with Scorpion-Man Design, 3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray Chlorite, inlays of white shellsBactrian regionMid-third millenium BC, Intercultural StyleCylindrical vessel on a flat base with slightly inverting wall and flat molded mouth rim, with two flat side handles The exterior with a combined scorpion-man design in relief with six standing figures with long hair, the body in full-frontal view, the head in profile, each figure with half-stretched and raised arms holding two scorpions hanging downBelow the mouth rim a frieze border of eight scorpions in profileThe eyes of the figures with inlays, possible of white shellDiameter at mouth rim: 23 cm, Height: 22,5 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Vessels carved of a gray-green stone - either chlorite or steatite - in what is called the 'Intercultural Style' were frequently produced between 2600 and 1700 BC in workshops principally of two regions, southeastern Iran and southeastern Arabia, with the main production site of Tepe Yahya in Kerman province, Iran. Depictions of scorpions are regularly found on ancient Iranian chlorite vessels, The are embodiments of evil, but are also considered to be magical protectors counteracting evil powers. The theme of the combined scorpion-man design might further symbolize the scorpions's submission to the grip of the man, who as the 'master of the animals' regulates the civilized and cultured world. Condition The vessel is in good condition consistent with age Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Clorite Vessel, Man-Animal Fight Design, Mid-3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray ChloriteBactrian regionMid-third millennium BC, Intercultural StyleVessel with a convex-shaped base and steep rising slightly inverted wall, the rounded mouth rim with two flat side handles below, all with criss-cross decorationThe exterior with a combined leopard-man design in relief with two standing figures, their bodies in full-frontal view, the heads with long hair in profile, each figure with half-stretched and raised arms holding two leopards hanging downBelow each handle two confronting scorpions carved in relief in combined top view and in profileThe eyes of the figures and animals formely filled-in with shell inlaysHeight: 26 cm, diameter at mouth rim: 22.5 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Compare similar objects illustrated in: Aruz, Joan/Wallenfels, Ronald (eds.), Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Exhib. Cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y, New York 2003, p. 335-339. Condition Condition consistent with age, one hole in the wall Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Figure of 'Bactrian Princess', Central Asia, c. 2300-1700 BC

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Description: Chlorite and calciteCentral Asia, Oxus civilization, late third to early second millennium BCSmall composite figure consisting of detachable parts Statuette of a rounded figure of a seated female deity with only schematized antropomorphic featuresThe small head and arms are detachable and were carved from a block of white calcite, contrasting with the deliberately and delicate carving of the hairdress and clothes made of green chlorite, the thick robe entirely covers the body, parts of the garment are made of a stylized fleecy material of superposed stripes and are reminiscent of the kaunakes, a woolen garment of Sumerian originWith a wooden baseTotal height of the figure: 24 cmProvenance: from an old European collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th centuryThis object requires additional verification by a deposit. Please contact verification@auctionata.com Small statuette like this have been produced by the Oxus civilisation, which flourished between 2300 and 1700 BC in Central Asia. This culture produced a very unusual type of female statuary known as 'Bactrian princesses'. Most of the Bactrian princesses are seated composite figures. As the Oxus civilisation had intense links with neighbouring civilisations due to its strategic position in Central Asia, these small figures reveal a strong Mesopotamian influence. In spite of the name, the 'Bactrian princesses’ are nowadays believed to be depictions of a female deity who in Central Asian mythology played a regulatory role in the natural order, pacifying the untamed forces embodied by lions, snakes, or dragons, rather than being portraits of members of the noble elite. A related seated Bactrian stone female statuette was sold at Christie's New York,13 June 2000, lot 440. Similar statuettes are, amongst other museums, in the collection of the Musée Barbier-Mueller, Geneve (Inv.no. 241-13) and in the Louvre, Paris (Inv. no. AO 22918). Compare similar statuettes illustrated in: Aruz, Joan/Wallenfels, Ronald (Eds.), Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Exhib. Cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y, New York 2003, p. 335-339. Literature: Mousavi, Ali, Ancient Near Eastern art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, exhib. cat., Los Angeles: Los Angeles County Museum of Art, 2012. Condition The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. The detachable head restored. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Bactrian Chlorite Vessel with Man-Animal Design, 3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray Chlorite, white shellBactrian regionMid-third millennium BC, Intercultural StyleVessel with a convex-shaped base and steep rising slightly inverted wall, the rounded mouth rim with profiled band below and a further profiled band with two flat projecting side handlesThe exterior with a combined snake-man design in relief with two standing figures, their bodies in full-frontal view, the heads with long hair in profile, each figure with half-stretched and raised arms holding two snakes, below each snake a leopard in profile, at one side a palm tree in reliefBelow the mouth rim a frieze border in relief of two pairs of confronting intertwined snakes in profileThe animal bodies with drilled whole décorThe eyes of the figures and animals filled-in with shell inlaysHöhe: 26 cm, Durchmesser oben: 22 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the beginning of the 20th century Compare similar objects illustrated in: Aruz, Joan/Wallenfels, Ronald (eds.), Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Exhib. Cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y, New York 2003, p. 335-339. Condition Good condition consistent with age, some restorations at the sides Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Bactrian Chlorite Vessel, Animal Fight Design, 3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray ChloriteBactrian regionMid-third millennium BC, Intercultural StyleCylindrical vessel on a slightly convex base with flat pronounced mouth rimThe exterior with a combined snake-bull design of two bulls entwined by a snake in profile, their heads in frontal view, and architectural elements with date palm twig, the snake's bodies with drilled whole décor, die eyes formerly filled-in with white inlaysDiameter at top: 21.5 cm, Height: 15.5 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Das Gefäß ist in gutem, altersgemäßen Zustand Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Baktrian Chlorite Plate, Animal Fight Design, 3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray ChloriteBactrian regionMid-third millennium BC, Intercultural StyleDiameter: 28 cm, Height: 5.5 cmLarge plate with flat base, rounded sides and a pronounced, slightly inverted rimThe interior completely covered with décor in reliefTwo rows with depictions of fighting bulls in profile in front of a stylized date palm; the central section with a combined wolf-bull design in profileDiameter: 28 cm, Height: 5.5 cmProvenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Good condition consistent with age. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Bactrian Chlorite Vessel with Man-Animal Design, 3rd Mill. BC

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Description: Gray ChloriteBactrian regionMid-third millennium BC, Intercultural StyleCylindrical vessel on a flat base with slightly flaring wall and flat mouth rimThe exterior with a combined snake-man design in relief with two standing figures, their bodies in full-frontal view, the heads with horns, each figure with half-stretched and raised arms holding two snakes in profileThe animal bodies with drilled whole décorHeight: 13 cm, Diameter at mouth rim: 14 cm Provenance: from an old European private collection, documented in the estate of the family since the early 20th century Compare similar objects illustrated in: Aruz, Joan/Wallenfels, Ronald (eds.), Art of the First Cities: The Third Millennium B.C. from the Mediterranean to the Indus. Exhib. Cat. Metropolitan Museum of Art, N.Y, New York 2003, p. 335-339. Condition: The vessel is in a good condition consistent with age. The wall with some restorations. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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