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Asian Art from China, Japan and Southeast Asia

by Auctionata


120 lots with images

October 18, 2013

Live Auction
120 Lots
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Rare Table in Form of a Niō with a Drum, Japan, Meiji

Lot 1: Rare Table in Form of a Niō with a Drum, Japan, Meiji

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Description: Wood, cinnabar lacquer, brass, glass Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Figural table support in form of a grim Niō Table top in form of a temple drum Elaborate lacquer work Expressive wood carving Height: 78 cm, Diameter: 79,5 cm Good condition Provenience: From a German Private Collection This unusual and rare table in the form of a Niō, carrying a temple drum, was crafted in Japan in the Meiji Period. The Niō, whose name literally means „merciful kings", are nowadays mostly found in front of temples that they are guarding, armed with a Vajra. The Niō is expressively carved, with a focus on his chest, his muscular arms and his grim facial expression. His aggressive look is underlined by the fierce green glass eyes. The table top is shaped like a temple drum and its apron is decorated with meanders in cinnabar lacquer carvings and decorative brass rivets. Two drawers are placed inside it, each one of them equipped with fine brass fittings. The table plate itself is adorned with lacquer paintings in green, red and blue on a black fond; the yin and yang motif is in its center. This rare and unusual piece of furniture combines the traditional Asian artisan craftworks lacquer carving and wood carving on a very high level and at the same time presents a traditional motif in a new usage. The condition of the table is good, with usual traces of wear and age. The table top as well as the drawers have a few minor scratches as well as some flaking, notches, and age cracks. The table support in form of the Niō shows a bit of colour abrasion, minimal material loss and a few fine age cracks. The height of the table is 78 cm, the diameter is 79.5 cm. Niō Niō are the two awesome guardians of the Buddha that one can nowadays find in front of temple entrances. They are manifestations of the protector deity Bodhisattva Vajrapāni. According to Japanese tradition, they accompanied the historical Buddha on his travels and protected him. Even though Buddhism is a traditionally pacifist religion, the stories of the Niō justified the use of force in order to protect values and beliefs against evil.

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Bronze Ikebana Planter with Iro-e Inlays, Meiji Period

Lot 2: Bronze Ikebana Planter with Iro-e Inlays, Meiji Period

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Description: Bronze, dark patina Fine silver, copper and gilt silver inlays Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) Fine Iro-e Takazogan technique Partly reticulated Measurements: 18 x 19 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection This Ikebana planter was crafted from bronze in Japan during the Meiji period (1868-1912). It is designed in imitation of a pile of narrow bamboo sticks bound together. In the upper area these sticks are bundled into individual sheaves. The bronze work is partly reticulated in this area and shows a structured relief throughout. The planter is decorated with copper inlays in the form of birds in different positions. Below the cord there are some stalks accentuated in gold.The bronze planter is in good condition with a natural patina and light traces of age and wear, such as minimal paint abrasion, minor dents as well as some scratches here and there. The planter measures 18 cm in height and 19 cm in diameter.

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Pair of Red Lacquer Flower Stands & Bronze Pots, Meiji

Lot 3: Pair of Red Lacquer Flower Stands & Bronze Pots, Meiji

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Description: Carved wood with cinnabar lacquer; patinated bronze Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Rich carving full with details Figural dragon bodies as stool legs Bronze flower pots with dragon relief and phoenix with peonies Dimensions: height 41 cm; max. width approx. 33 cm Dimensions of the pots: height 26 cm; Diameter approx. 36 cm Good condition Provenience: From a German Private Collection This lot comprises two carved and lacquered flower stands from Japan as well as two bronze cachepots. The two carved flower pedestals from the Meiji Period faszinate thanks to their form and their rich carved décor in Chinese manner. Two curved, scaled, dragon bodies form the legs of these stools and their finely carved heads function as the feet, resting on the base plate. The dragons who are turned towards each other, snarl at each other in a fierce manner. Their bodies end in split tails that blend into the carved cloud décor that surrounds the presentation platforms of the stools in a ten centimeter broad relief. Contrasting with this lively design is the symmetry of the presentation platform and the bas plate that are nearly identical in their shape. Instead of resting directly on the ground, the base plate stands on four flat, carved feet. Matching the stools with the dragon motifs are the two bronze cachepots. One of them even features a dragon relief with engraved clouds on its wall whereas the other one shows a relief of phoenixes and peonies. Both have a minimal foot rim and a bulbous-oval shape with a simplistic mouth. They are patinated in black on the inside but feature a red-brown patina on the outside, with a copper tone shimmering through now and then. The cachepots are in a good and used condition. Smaller scratches and stains give proof of earlier usage; the cachepot with the dragon relief has a visible dent in its wall. The bottom of the cachepot with the phoenix relief is broken out, but at hand, and the bottom of the other cachepot is also rather corroded. The bottoms are marked with a Japanese mark. Their dimensions are: height 26 cm; Diameter approx. 36 cm. The stands are in quite good condition, with traces of age and use. The lacquer layer on the presentation surface chips off at some parts and is scratched as well as stained. The carved cloud relief has minor cracks and nicks on its edge. The dragons are screwed onto the base plate, but loose on one of the stools. Here, the flat feet are also a bit loose. The undersides of the base plates and the stools' surfaces are lacquered in black. The height of the stools is 41 cm, their maximal width is about 33 cm.

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Large Lacquer Panel with Ivory & Mother of Pearl Inlays, Meiji

Lot 4: Large Lacquer Panel with Ivory & Mother of Pearl Inlays, Meiji

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Description: Root wood, lacquer Ivory and mother of pearl inlays Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Finest carving and lacquer work Portrait of two Sennin Dimensions: 74 x 82 cm Good condition This elaborately carved root wood wall panel was crafted in Japan during the Meiji period. It features fine ivory, mother of pearl, lacquer and wood inlays in high relief depicting two Sennin in a garden, surrounded by delicate flowers. Their noble robes are richly decorated with a floral pattern and the shoes as well as the decor of the clothes feature gold accentuations. One is holding a rabbit - as symbol for fertility - and the other one is holding a reishi mushroom as a symbol of eternal life. In Japanese mythology Sennin are immortals said to hold magical powers who live a reclused life on the Cosmic Mountain. An ornate lacquer artwork with a great richness of detail! The panel is in good condition with signs of age and use. The frame shows few cracks, small breakages and traces of glue. The image shows fine cracks and small notches here and there. On the back an eyelet is attached for display on the wall. The panel (including frame) measures 74 cm in height and 82 cm in width.

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Fine Iro-e Taka Maki-e Lacquer Box with Rooster and Hen, Meiji

Lot 5: Fine Iro-e Taka Maki-e Lacquer Box with Rooster and Hen, Meiji

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Description: Black lacquered wood Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Iro-e Taka Maki-e technique (multicolored high relief) Crafted by a master of lacquer art Rooster as a symbol of pride and renown Dimensions: 9 x 24.5 x 17.5 cm Good condition This Japanese lacquer box features a gorgeously ornate lid. The latter shows a strutting rooster and hen in polychrome lacquer. The plumage is depicted in different gold, silver and bronze nuances in incredibly delicate high-relief - every single feather seems to be accurately rendered. The cockscombs are designed in a bold shade of red. Only a true master of the lacquer technique would have created an object with a motif as fine as this. The rooster is the tenth animal in the Chinese zodiac and symbolises pride and renown. The box is in good condition with light signs of age and use. One corner shows a little notch, there are minor lacquer chips here and there. The box measures 9 cm in height, 24.5 cm in length and 17.5 cm in width.

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Scroll Painting

Lot 6: Scroll Painting "Winter Landscape" after Tomioka Tessai, Meiji

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Description: Scroll painting Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) Mounted on paper with a silk brocade frame; lacquer (imitating ivory) handles Seal mark and characters on the left In the style of Tomioka Tessai (1836-1924) - Japanese painter and calligrapher Two characters on the upper edge on the back Overall measurements: 184 x 43 cm (height x width) Painting: 112 x 29 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection This work in the style of the Japanese artist Tomioka Tessai (1836-1924) shows a winter landscape with wayfarers. The work is executed in ink and mounted on paper with a blue silk brocade frame. The works of Tomioka Tessai were influenced by Chinese and Japanese masters, the artist's special interest in calligraphy led to his unique style.This work, inspired by Tessai (1836-1924), shows several wayfarers in the mountains in the lower right area. They are probably on the way to the nearby cabin in the left centre of the scroll painting. High mountains are seen in the background. Calligraphy and a seal are seen in the left upper area, and two characters are seen on the upper edge on the back.The work is in good condition hardly any traces of age and wear, such as minor creases and minimal stains on the back. There is a wall hanging element with bands on the upper end of the mounting. The overall measurements are 184 x 43 cm and the painting measures 112 x 29 cm.

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Scroll Painting

Lot 7: Scroll Painting "Lucky Gods Ebisu and Daikoku", Taisho

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Description: Ink and watercolour on silk Japan, Taisho period (1912-1926) Artist seal and signature "Gessen" lower right in the picture Colourful depiction of the Gods of Fortune Ebisu and Daikoku Mounted on paper with a silk brocade frame, bone handles Labels and inscription on the back on the mounting Overall measurements: 205 x 52 cm (height x width) Painting: 119.5 x 40 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection This Japanese scroll painting originates from Taisho period (1912-1926). It shows two of the Seven Lucky Gods (Shichi Fukujin). Daikoku, the god of wealth, is wearing a blue garment and carrying his luck hammer over his right shoulder. Ebisu, the god of fishers, stands in front of Daikoku with a big smile on his face. Daikoku and Ebisu are often paired together as they are regarded as father and son. Both gods have long earlobes, a mark of the immortal. The upper area of the painting shows a branch, with the sun rising in the background. The gods are performing a good-luck dance known as manzai, dancing into the morning hours.The scroll painting is mounted on paper with a silk brocade frame. The artist's seal and signature "Gessen" are found lower right. Labels and inscriptions are seen on the back on the mounting.The work is in good condition with merely light traces of age and wear, such as minor stains on the back, creases, torn edges and small imperfections here and there. The upper mounting is slightly torn and partly restored around the hanging mount. The overall measurements are 205 x 52 cm and the painting measures 119.5 x 40 cm.

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Coloured Woodcuts, Ukiyo -e Artists, Japan, 18th /19th C

Lot 8: Coloured Woodcuts, Ukiyo -e Artists, Japan, 18th /19th C

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Description: Coloured woodcuts Japan, 18th/19th Century One work by Utagawa Hiroshige II (1829-1869) - Japanese Ukiyo-e Designer and woodcut artist Three works by Gekko Ogata (1859-1920) - Japanese painter and woodcut artists of the Ukiyo-e One work by Utagawa Kunisada II (1823-1880) - Japanese Ukiyo-e artist Four works by Utagawa Toyokuni II (1777-1835) - Japanese Ukiyo-e artist One work by Utagawa Toyokuni- (1769-1825) - Japanese woodcut artist and painter of the Ukiyo-e Matted and framed Dimensions, framed: 50-54 x 38-42 cm (height x width) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection These ten Japanese coloured woodcuts with different imagery were created by five famous woodcut artists and Ukiyo-e painters of the late Edo Period (1615-1867) and of the Meiji Period (1868-1912). One woodcut is by Utagawa Hiroshige II (1829-1869) and shows a landscape with peasants. This image is part of the series "53 stations of the Tokaido Street". Three further wood cuts are by the painter and woodcut artist Gekko Ogata (1859-1920). They are figural and humoristic illustrations. One woodcut is by Utagawa Kunisada II (1823-1880) and shows a court lady in a boat. The work by Utagawa Kunisada II shows the red and round Toshidama stamp mark on the lower right. Four other woodcuts were created by Utagawa Toyokuni II (1777-1835).These show Kabuki artists and an elegant lady. The tenth work of this collection is by Utagawa Toyokuni I (1769-1825) and shows two women in traditional gowns. All the woodcuts are executed in bright colours and are provided with either seals or signatures. They are allmatted and framed. The woodcuts are in good condition with traces of age and wear. The colour of some woodcuts is faded and there is some foxing on the images and the matts. The edges of the frames are partly damaged. The height of the frames differs between 50 and 54 cm and the width between 38 and 42 cm. The height of the woodcuts is between 35 and 36 cm, the width between 23.5 and 25 cm.

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Paul Jacoulet, Woodblock Print „La lettre du fils

Lot 9: Paul Jacoulet, Woodblock Print „La lettre du fils", Korea, 1938

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Description: Coloured woodblock print on handmade paper Seoul, Korea, 1938 Title: La Lettre Du Fils ou la Demande D'Argent (The Son's Letter or the Plea for Money) Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960) - French woodblock print artist Artist signature and seal lower right Water mark "JP" and paper manufacturer's mark top left Carved by Maeda Kentarô and printed by Ogawa Fusakichi Edition number on the back: 125/350 Woodblock prints by Paul Jacoulet fetch up to 19,000 euros on the international art market Measurements: 36 x 47 cm (height x width) Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection This coloured woodblock print was done by the French artist Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960) in 1938 in Seoul, Korea. It is titled "La Lettre Du Fils ou la Demande D'Argent" and shows a married couple in their home. The husband on the left is reading a letter from his son, asking for money. He is wearing a traditional garment, called han-bok, and a transparent black hat. His wife is sitting opposite from him, sewing her han-bok skirt, the traditional garment for women.The woodblock print in bold colours shows the artist's signature and a seal lower right. The title is seen in the lower right below the image. The paper manufacturer's monogram and the artist's monogram "JP" are seen in the water mark in the top left corner. The edition number "125/350" is found on the back.The coloured woodblock print is in very good condition with hardly any traces of age and wear. The edges are slightly abraded and show two former mounting holes. There is a small crease and minor discolouration on the lower edge. The measurements are 36 x 47 cm.Paul Jacoulet (1896-1960) Paul Jacoulet was born 1896 in Paris. He was known as a woodblock print artist, spending most of his life in Japan. During the Second World War, he first moved to Karuizawa and later worked at the Tokyo Army College. Jacoulet is one of the few Western artists who found recognition as a woodblock print artist in Japan. His work almost exclusively consists of figural depictions and portraits.

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Large signed Ryuzan Satsuma Porcelain Show-Piece Vase, Meiji

Lot 10: Large signed Ryuzan Satsuma Porcelain Show-Piece Vase, Meiji

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Description: Satsuma Porcelain, coloured with gold and multi-colored enamels Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912), around 1890 From the famous Ryuzan manufactory Artist's signature „Dai Nippon Satsuma Ryuzan no Zou" on the underside "Kinkozan" blue glaze Magnificent decor Rare size Height: 46.5 cm Very good condition This breath-taking Japanese porcelain vase dates back to the Meiji period (1868-1912) and was made by the Ryuzan manufactory in Kyoto of which it boasts the signature on the underside. The vase shows two large scenes painted in the most delicate manner. One image depicts a group of court ladies in a garden whilst the other shows fighting samurai warriors. The various faces, the noble robes and the picturesque surroundings are elaborately portrayed with an incredible richness of detail. An imposing gold decor with chrysanthemums - a symbol of longevity - and meander trims shimmers magnificently against the distinctive royal blue glaze. The fine craquelure, characteristic of Satsuma ware, is clearly visible. An extraordinary work of art very rare in this size and condition! The vase is in very good condition with only slight signs of age and use. There is only minor abrasion to the gold and colour here and there. The vase measures 46.5 cm in height.

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Boxwood Carving with a Sennin, Japan, 19th Century

Lot 11: Boxwood Carving with a Sennin, Japan, 19th Century

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Description: Boxwood and inlaid glass eyes Japan, 19th Century Figure of a Sennin in a boxwood root Elegant polish Dimension: approx. 30 cm broad, 42 cm high, 20 cm deep This boxwood figure of a sennin, as the immortals are called in Japan, was carved there in the 19υth Century. The sennin is placed to the right inside a naturally left and gnarled knot. His figure has been carved directly out of the boxwood and parts of his body are still covered with the knobby wood knots. Legs, upper body, head and especially his hair have been carved with a lot of attention to detail and finely polished, thus contrast nicely with the untreated wood. Back and neck are still left in the natural structure of the boxwood - creating the impression of a composite creature between tree and man. His wide opened black glass eyes add an extra bid of tightness to his already intense and strained posture. This elaborate boxwood carving with a sennin is in a condition befitting its age. It is put together out of three parts. The legs of the immortal are a bit loose and his right foot is missing some of its outer toes. A part of his garment has also broken off. Several rough nails can be seen mainly on the back of the carving and some additions in the wood are also recognizable. The dimensions are: approx. 30 cm broad, 42 cm high, 20 cm deep.

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Signed Ivory Okimono with Apes and Kappa, Meiji Period

Lot 12: Signed Ivory Okimono with Apes and Kappa, Meiji Period

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Description: Ivory with wooden core Japan, Meiji Period (1862-1912) Humoristic depiction of apes and Kappa Partly reticulated Signed at the back "Nagaunsai" and "Fumin" Underneath with red seal mark Fine patina Dimensions: 11.5 x 6 cm (height x width) Provenance: from a German private collection This humoristic ivory Okimono dates back to Japan of the Meiji Period (1868-1912). Shown are mythical creatures, the Kappa, who are in the lower part of the Okimono. The water Lillie décor and the thinness of the wall that creates a blue tone create the impression a river. A Kappa is a water creatur and belongs to the group of Yōkai daemons. Here, the Kappa are shown, trying to steal the so called Shirikodama, situated at the anus. The theft of the Shirikodama is believed to lead to an instantaneous death. While one Kappa already holds a Shirikodama of an ape in its hands, another is about to reach for a further one. Another iconographical story, incorporated into the design is that of the five apes, which try to catch the reflection of the moon. Four of the monkeys gaze devoutly at the moon, while the fifth monkey shockingly witnesses the robbery attempt by the Kappa. This is a very charming Okimono with a fine patina and with delicate, partly reticulated carving. The Okimono is in rather satisfying condition with traces of age and wear. There are small age-related cracks and a notch shown in the lower area. The integrated base is slightly loose. The Okimono has a wooden core. It is signed at the back with "Nagaunsai" and "Fumin" and shows a red seal mark underneath. The height measures 11.5 cm, the width 6 cm.

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Ivory Brush Cup with Base, Japan, Meiji Period

Lot 13: Ivory Brush Cup with Base, Japan, Meiji Period

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Description: Ivory, finely carved Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Finely chiselled and fine carving work Base with gold painting Small sticker with four Japanese symbols on underside of base Partial honey-yellow patina 22 cm (total height including base) This richly decorated brush pot was made in Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912). The bush pot is of exquisite quality and shows a partial honey-coloured patina. There are precisely executed ornamentations, demonstrative of the artist's great carving ability. The wall is decorated with finely carved monk and scholar figures in fine dress. They are grouped around one of their peers - a dragon to his feet.The brush pot is in age-related condition. Small repairs on the base; several hairlines and a gap in the bottom half of the pot. The lower edge of the pot (which is glued to the base) shows glue marks and a small repair. One foot on the base has been glued. The pot is a little loose on the base and measures 22 cm (height) total. There is a small sticker on the underside with four Japanese symbols.

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Large silver-plate Okimono by Hideano with Cranes, Meiji

Lot 14: Large silver-plate Okimono by Hideano with Cranes, Meiji

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Description: Silver, with Shakudo, Sentoku, copper and silver plating Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) One marked with the artist signature "Hidenao" On a wooden base Dimensions of one crane: approx. 21 cm height; approx. 5 cm body width Length of the base approx. 37 cm; height: 5 cm Very good condition Note: An almost identical pair was sold on 18 May 2012 at Christies South Kensington for GBP 17,500.- / see screenshot at the pictures of this lot These fine two silver cranes were made in Japan during the Meiji period and boast the artist signature of Hidenao. Both figures are very delicately worked. The structure of the plumage is clearly different from that of the legs or the smooth beaks. Additionally the differences are underlined by the partial use of the black Shibuichi alloy - necks and tail feathers are darkened. The eyes bear golden inlay and on the top of the heads have a copper finish. Both birds are mounted onto a naturally formed wooden base with a fine polish. Both cranes are in very good condition with only slight traces of wear and age. The silver is slightly tarnished. The standing crane has a height from about 21 cm up to the beak; the one with his head lowered measures approx. 12 cm in height. Both have a body width of about 5 cm. The base is approx. 37 cm long, 15 cm broad and 5 cm high.

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Porcelain Snuff Bottle

Lot 15: Porcelain Snuff Bottle "Boys & Scholars", Qianlong Mark

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Description: Porcelain, hand painted with gold and multicolored enamels China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Underglaze blue four-character Qianlong mark on the underside Flattened ovoid form Golden handles in the shape of dragon ring masks With glass stopper Height with stopper: 6,8 cm Good condition This charming Chinese snuff bottle made from hand painted porcelain features a flattened ovoid form with an accentuated foot rim and neck. A depiction with court boys and scholars can be seen of the richly decorated walls and gold coloured handles in the shape of stylised dragon ring masks adorn the sides of the little bottle. A meander trim decorates the short round neck. The semicircular orange stopper, imitating a carnelian, sets a noble accentuation in terms of colour. The pretty snuff bottle is in good condition with light signs of age and use. The spoon is missing and there is minor colour loss here and there. The foot rim shows tiny notches. Underneath there is an underglaze blue four-character Qianlong mark. The snuff bottle measures approximately 6.8 cm including the stopper. Chinese Snuff bottles Chinese snuff bottles were used to store snuff tobacco powder. Besides this function, they were also decorative and served as a representative symbol of status. The small masterpieces reveal great craftsmanship and were made from various materials such as glass, porcelain, jade, quartz, ivory, coral, lacquer, amber or wood. In the late 16th century, tobacco was imported to China from Europe and was initially smoked in pipes. The use as snuff began only after the start of the Qing dynasty in 1644. During this time, smoking tobacco was forbidden, whereas the use of snuff as a remedy for common illnesses like colds, headaches or stomach trouble, was accepted. At first, snuff was only accessible to the elites of the dynastic household, but towards the end of the 17th century it became popular at the Beijing court and developed into a social ritual among the upper classes. By the end of the late 18th century, this trend had spread to the rest of the country, permeating all social strata. It was considered polite to offer a pinch of snuff to friends on the street or house guests. As a result, the elaborately made snuff bottles were constantly hand-held and display softly rounded edges. The great popularity of snuff found its peak during the Qing dynasty and ended after the revolution and subsequent foundation of the republic in 1912.

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Carved Moss Agate 'Floater' Snuff Bottle, China, Qing

Lot 16: Carved Moss Agate 'Floater' Snuff Bottle, China, Qing

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Description: Moss agate China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), around 1800 With dragon ring masks in bas-relief Agate stopper with a bone spoon Very well hollowed A so-called 'floater' Height with stopper: 9 cm Very good condition This moss agate snuff bottle with a slightly widening neck was crafted in China around 1800 and charms with its naturally mottled and partially translucent body. The inclusions have a light turquoise luster and the sides are adorned with a dragon ring mask carved in bas-relief. A bone spoon is attached to the stopper of contrasting colour. The snuff bottle is a so-called 'floater' with a very light weight and of exceptional quality. The snuff bottle is in very good condition with only minor signs of age and use. The bottle measures approximately 9 cm in height including the stopper. Chinese Snuff bottles Chinese snuff bottles were used to store snuff tobacco powder. Besides this function, they were also decorative and served as a representative symbol of status. The small masterpieces reveal great craftsmanship and were made from various materials such as glass, porcelain, jade, quartz, ivory, coral, lacquer, amber or wood. In the late 16th century, tobacco was imported to China from Europe and was initially smoked in pipes. The use as snuff began only after the start of the Qing dynasty in 1644. During this time, smoking tobacco was forbidden, whereas the use of snuff as a remedy for common illnesses like colds, headaches or stomach trouble, was accepted. At first, snuff was only accessible to the elites of the dynastic household, but towards the end of the 17th century it became popular at the Beijing court and developed into a social ritual among the upper classes. By the end of the late 18th century, this trend had spread to the rest of the country, permeating all social strata. It was considered polite to offer a pinch of snuff to friends on the street or house guests. As a result, the elaborately made snuff bottles were constantly hand-held and display softly rounded edges. The great popularity of snuff found its peak during the Qing dynasty and ended after the revolution and subsequent foundation of the republic in 1912.

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Fine Carved Jade Snuff Bottle, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 17: Fine Carved Jade Snuff Bottle, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Jade, hand carved China, Qing Dynasty (164-1912), 19th century Crab and bird in bas-relief Irregular ovoid shape Stopper made from coral branch; metal spoon Small opening Very well hollowed Height with stopper: 9 cm Good condition This jade snuff bottle, hand carved in China during the Qing Dynasty, features an irregular ovoid shape. The partially reddish mottled body is delicately carved in bas-relief. One side shows a crab surrounded by reed, the other side shows two birds in a bamboo thicket. In Chinese symbolism bamboo is a symbol for longevity whilst the crab signifies prosperity, success and high status. The stopper is made from a coral branch and holds a fine little metal spoon. The snuff bottle is in good condition with only minor signs of age and use. It shows a few fine natural inclusions. The jade has a shiny and slightly oily surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The bottle measures approximately 9 cm in height including the stopper. Chinese Snuff Bottles Chinese snuff bottles were used to store snuff tobacco powder. Besides this function, they were also decorative and served as a representative symbol of status. The small masterpieces reveal great craftsmanship and were made from various materials such as glass, porcelain, jade, quartz, ivory, coral, lacquer, amber or wood. In the late 16th century, tobacco was imported to China from Europe and was initially smoked in pipes. The use as snuff began only after the start of the Qing dynasty in 1644. During this time, smoking tobacco was forbidden, whereas the use of snuff as a remedy for common illnesses like colds, headaches or stomach trouble, was accepted. At first, snuff was only accessible to the elites of the dynastic household, but towards the end of the 17th century it became popular at the Beijing court and developed into a social ritual among the upper classes. By the end of the late 18th century, this trend had spread to the rest of the country, permeating all social strata. It was considered polite to offer a pinch of snuff to friends on the street or house guests. As a result, the elaborately made snuff bottles were constantly hand-held and display softly rounded edges. The great popularity of snuff found its peak during the Qing dynasty and ended after the revolution and subsequent foundation of the republic in 1912

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Rotating Jade Pendant 'Wheel of Life', China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 18: Rotating Jade Pendant 'Wheel of Life', China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Celadon coloured jade China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th / 19th Century Elegant carving Pierced décor With rotating centre section Fine polish Wheel of Life as a symbol of the Buddha's teachings Ruyi and meander decoration Diameter: 6 cm Very good condition This appealing jade pendant was crafted in China in the 18υth or 19υth Century during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). It shows a so-called dharmachakra, one of the oldest known Buddhist symbols. The Wheel of Life, usually shown with eight spokes, symbolises the teachings of Buddha. The spokes illustrate the Noble Eightfold Path to salvation (nirvana). The ornament shows a pierced décor with ruyi and meander motifs and the centre section can be rotated. The pendant is in very good condition with only minor signs of age and use. The jade has a homogenous surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The ornament measures 6 cm in diameter.

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Archaic Jade Ring with Burl Decor, China, Ming Dynasty

Lot 19: Archaic Jade Ring with Burl Decor, China, Ming Dynasty

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Description: Celadon coloured jade China, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644), 16th/17th Century Fine polish and oily surface Archaic decor with tiny burls Beautiful Celadon colour Diameter: 5.5 cm Good condition This archaic ring dates back to the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and was hand carved in the 16υth or 17υth Century from celadon coloured jade. It features a particularly appealing colour luster and is decorated all around with a restrained archaic pattern of tiny burls. The ring is in good condition according to its age with signs of use. There are small notches around the inner rims. The jade has a shiny and slightly oily surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The ring has an outer diameter of 5.5 cm.

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Eight Jade Pendants with Reticulated Decor, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 20: Eight Jade Pendants with Reticulated Decor, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: White and celadon coloured jade China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th/19th Century Elegant carving Fine polish Beautiful translucence Figural and ornamental décor in reticulation Height: 5 to 8.5 cm Good condition This appealing collection comprises eight jade amulets. Five pendants in ovoid shape are made from celadon coloured jade and feature a figural decor with court ladies and lucky boys as well as a butterfly surrounded by a delicate floral open-work ornamentation. A small square pendant made from fine mottled jade displays a similar decor. Two charms are made from white jade. One square-shaped piece shows two stylised dragons, symbols of power and strength, the round talisman features an ornamental decor with tow archaic bats and the symbol of the five good fortunes (health, longevity, wealth, virtue and love). The pendants exhibit fine carving and an appealing translucence. The pendants are in good condition and show only slight traces of age and use. Some pieces show tiny notches. In some areas the jade has a shiny and slightly oily surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The pendants measure between 5 and 8.5 cm in height.

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Two Jade Pendants with Dragon Decor, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 21: Two Jade Pendants with Dragon Decor, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: White and celadon coloured jade China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th / 19th Century Elegant carving Fine polish Beautiful translucence Dragon decor as a symbol of power and strength Dimensions: 7.6 x 3 cm; 4.2 x 5.5 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a Berlin private collection These two jade pendants date back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The white jade pendant in the shape of a Chinese padlock is chased on both sides with a stylised dragon decor. On one side it features a four-character inscription 'Chang Ming Fu Gui' meaning longevity, luck and prosperity. The other pendant is hand carved from celadon coloured jade. The upper open-work ornamentation shows a dragon with the magical pearl. In Chinese symbolism the dragon is a sign of the emperor and stands for power and strength. The pearl signifies wisdom and truth. The two jade pendants are in very good condition and show only slight traces of age and use. The jade has an even surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The celadon coloured piece shows a tiny notch along the edge. It measures 7.6 cm in height and 3 cm in width. The padlock measures 4.2 cm in height and 5.5 cm in width.

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Figural Jade Toggle 'Boy with Lingzhi', China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 22: Figural Jade Toggle 'Boy with Lingzhi', China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Celadon coloured jade China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th / 19th Century Fine polish Beautiful Celadon colour Lingzhi mushroom as a symbol of eternal life Dimensions: 5.7 x 3.1 cm Very good condition This figural toggle, made from celadon coloured jade, dates back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) and was hand carved in the 18υth or 19υth Century. It is carved all around and modelled in the shape of a seated boy. The latter is holding a goose in his lap and carries a lingzhi mushroom on his back. In China the goose is a symbol for marriage and the lingzhi mushroom signifies eternal life. The toggle is in very good condition and shows only slight traces of age and use. The jade has a shiny and homogenous surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The toggle measures 5.7 cm in height and 3.1 cm in width. Chinese Toggles Chinese Toggles serve the same purpose as their equivalent, the Japanese Netsuke. As a counterweight to a carrying pouch the small carvings were attached with a cord to the belts of the pocketless Asian clothing. Thus, it was possible to carry smaller items such as pipes, tobacco, money or other personal belongings. Most often toggles were made of wood, but many other materials like ivory, jade, agate, glass, metal, porcelain, shells or amber were used as well. The motifs were very varied including different Buddhist symbols and themes from Chinese mythology such as Lotus, monkeys, bamboo, falcons, bats, pumpkins, peaches, plums, or butterflies. Over time, the meaning of toggles transformed from a basic commodity to an object of personality and status. They were worn as symbolic amulets, which when rubbed should help to longevity, fertility, happiness and health.

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Two Jade Figures 'Ox and Crane', China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 23: Two Jade Figures 'Ox and Crane', China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: White and celadon coloured jade China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th / 19th Century Elegant carving Fine polish Ox figure as a symbol of peace and success Crane figure as a symbol of prosperity and longevity Dimensions: 3 x 5 cm; 4.5 x 4 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a Berlin private collection These two jade sculptures date back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) in the 18υth or 19υth Century. The white jade figure shows a curled up ox. Horns, hooves, tail and face have been sculpted with precise craftsmanship. The ox is a symbol of peace and success. The celadon coloured crane figure also demonstrates exquisitely fine carving. It is shown with a turtle and a lingzhi, the mushroom of eternal life. In Chinese symbolism the crane and turtle both signify longevity. The figures are carved all around, partially pierced and can thus also be worn as pendants or toggles. The two jade figures are in very good condition and show only slight traces of age and use. The jade has an even surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The ox measures 3 cm in height and 5 cm in length, the crane measures 4.5 cm in height and 4 cm in length.

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Two Delicate Jade Carvings, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 24: Two Delicate Jade Carvings, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: White and celadon coloured jade China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th / 19th Century Elegant carving Fine polish and even surface Wearable as pendants Dimensions figure: 6 x 2.5 cm Diameter ornament: 5.8 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a Berlin private collection These two jade carvings date back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The white jade figure is chased all around and shows a monk with a prayer necklace and a fly whisk. It features a polished surface and a slightly translucent luster. The floral ornament is hand carved from celadon coloured jade. It features an extremely fine open-work shape which perfectly exhibits the virtuoso craftsmanship of Chinese jade carvers of the period. Both pieces can be worn as pendants. The two jade pendants are in very good condition and show only slight traces of age and use. The jade shows an even surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The monk figure measures 6 cm in height and 2.5 cm in width. The flower ornament has a diameter of around 5.8 cm.

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Two Jade Figures 'Monkey' and 'Young Dragon', Qing Dynasty

Lot 25: Two Jade Figures 'Monkey' and 'Young Dragon', Qing Dynasty

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Description: White and celadon coloured jade - with mottled ochre colored inclusions China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), 18th and 19th Century Elegant carving Fine polish and oily surface Monkey figure to drive away evil spirits Dragon figure as a symbol of power and strength Dimensions: 3.5 x 3.5 cm; 2.5 x 8 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a Berlin private collection These two jade figures date back to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912), the dragon Jade possibly even earlier. The white jade figure, hand carved in the 19υth Century, shows a small monkey carrying a peach. Whilst the monkey is believed to drive away evil spirits, the peach is a symbol of longevity. The little talisman features an exquisitely polished and very oily surface. A little gold loop allows it to be worn as a pendant. The young crouched dragon is crafted from celadon coloured jade and it features a naturally mottled surface. In Chinese symbolism the dragon is the sign of the emperor and signifies power and strength. The figure has a small drilling and can thus also be worn as a pendant. Both figures exemplify the fine craftsmanship qualities of Chinese jade carvers of the period. The two jade figures are in very good condition and show only slight traces of age and use. The jade has a shiny and slightly oily surface - a sign of authenticity - which brings to bear the exceptional polish of the stone. The monkey measures 3.5 cm in height and length, the dragon measures 2.5 cm in height and 8 cm in length.

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Large Marble Buddha Shakyamuni with Mandorla, China, Qing

Lot 26: Large Marble Buddha Shakyamuni with Mandorla, China, Qing

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Description: White marble; modern wooden base China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Exceptional sculptural work Buddha and the surrounding, decorated mandorla are hewn of one piece Happy facial expression Modern, grey wooden base Weight: approx. 300 kg Dimensions of the statue: 116 x 67 x 32.5 cm (h x w x d) Very good condition Provenience: From a German Private Collection, bought at the Dorotheum Vienna in the sale on September 28th, 1992, lot no. 10220/4 - see invoice with the pictures of this lot This large and exceptionally well preserved marble statue represents a Shakyamuni Buddha and was crafted during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) in China. The figure of the Buddha and the mandorla surrounding it are hewn from one block and in the highest sculptural quality. The Enlightened sits on a lotus throne in the virasana position that is also known as the Hero Pose. His left leg is underneath the right one and the sole of his right foot is facing upwards. He forms theabhaya mudra with his right hand, the gesture of reassurance and safety: his hand is lifted in front of his breast and the palm of the hand is turned towards the beholder. The left hand shows thevarada mudra, meaning the favourable mudra. His index finger is touching his toes while the other fingers are slightly bent. The body of the deity is covered by the floating folds of his garment. His facial expression is a happy one; he has long earlobes and an adorned ushnisha. A large mandorla, rich in decoration, surrounds the figure of the Shakyamuni Buddha and reaches down to the ground. The outer border shows a flaming aureole. Behind the Buddha's head, the mandorla is decorated with round reliefs. The central one of these shows an opened lotus blossom; it is surrounded by a circle of lotus flowers and tendrils which again is surrounded by a circle showing more Buddha figures and deities. The magnificent marble statue comes with a modern, grey base made from wood. The marble figure is in a very good condition with hardly any traces of age and use. Some material losses and minor nicks on the back, and some scratches and notches can be seen. The wooden base shows traces of use. The height of the statue is 116 cm, the width is 67 cm, the depth is 32.5 cm. The figure weighs 300 kg. The base has the dimensions: 22 cm high, 97 cm wide and 22 cm deep.

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Fire-gilt Sino-Tibetan Chakrasamvara Bronze, 17th Century

Lot 27: Fire-gilt Sino-Tibetan Chakrasamvara Bronze, 17th Century

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Description: Bronze, fire-gilt bronze attachment and attributes, turquoise and coral inserts Tibet / China, 17th century Original expressive cold-paint Rich in detail Fine facial features, hands and feet Custom-made pedestal (recent) Measurements (excl. pedestal): 24.5 x 24.5 x 17 cm (height x width x depth) The weight of the bronze is 1195 grams Very good condition Provenance: from a private owner in Lithuania This partly fire-gilt Sino-Tibetan bronze figure of the Tantric deity Chakrasamvara was partly crafted in Repoussé technique and dates to the 17υth century. The expressive figure shows original, expressive cold-paint and is decorated with turquoise and coral inserts. Chakrasamvara is seen in a dynamic seating position, with his right leg stretched forward and the other stretched back. His arms are stretched out to both sides. He is holding a gri-gug, a crescent-shaped flaying knife with a handle in the form of a vajra, in his right hand and a filled kapala ritual bowl in his left. His body is adorned with precious jewellery and the dharmacakra, the Wheel of Life, is seen as a large pendant on his belly. The garment flows around his body and is finely chased on the edges. His costume, which is tied around his neck and hangs over his back, contains human limbs and a head. Chakrasamvara's face, with sharp fangs, piercing eyes and heavy eyebrows, is quite frightening. His hair is erect with two skulls in the centre. This work is rich in detail with a finely crafted face and mouth.The figure is in very good condition with hardly any traces of age and wear. A few turquoises and corals are missing and some paint abrasion is visible. The figure alone measures 24.5 cm in height, 24.5 cm in width and 17 cm in depth. Including the wooden pedestal, the figure measures 26 cm in height.Chakrasamvara Chakrasamvara translates in English to "The Wheel of Bliss", and is a wrathful deity of Tibetan Buddhism, often surrounded by a wreath of flames. He is often depicted with blue skin and several hands and arms. Chakrasamvara is one of the Eight Great Heruka deities, which represent the embodiment of indivisible bliss and emptiness. A popular form of depiction is in yab-yum with his consort Vajravahari, who is known in Tibet as rDo rje phag mo.

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Gilt Sino-Tibetan Figure of Bodhisattva Mañjuśrī, 17th / 18th C

Lot 28: Gilt Sino-Tibetan Figure of Bodhisattva Mañjuśrī, 17th / 18th C

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze, turquois and coral inserts Tibet / China, 17th / 18th century Meditative facial expression Partly reticulated Finely chased details Sealed base plate with double vajra symbol Measurements: 23 x 17 x 12 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: from a private collection in southern Germany This Sino-Tibetan bronze figure of the bodhisattva Mañjuśrī was crafted during the 17υth or 18υth century. Mañjuśrī is one of the oldest bodhisattvas, his name translates to "Gentle Glory". This bronze shows him sitting in Padmasana with the soles of his feet turned upwards on a lotus pedestal in high relief. His right hand forms the Varada mudrā, the gesture of bestowal, and his left hand forms the Prithvi mudrā. Attributes are seen on the lotus flowers, which grow out of the throne. A sword, which cuts through the veil of ignorance, is seen to the right and a book lies on the removable lotus stalk to the left.Mañjuśrī has a peaceful expression. His body is decorated with small turquoise and coral inserts, and he is wearing a partly reticulated five-leaf crown on his head. The finely chased topknot is cold-painted in blue and the back of the crown is painted red.The bronze figure of the bodhisattva Mañjuśrī is in very good condition with light traces of age and wear, such as hairline scratches here and there as well as minor paint abrasion. The tip of the left middle finger has broken off. The pedestal has a sealed base plate with a large double vajra symbol. The figure measures 23 cm in height, 17 cm in width and 12 cm in depth.

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Gilt Sino-Tibetan Bronze Figure of Vajrasattva, 18th / 19th C

Lot 29: Gilt Sino-Tibetan Bronze Figure of Vajrasattva, 18th / 19th C

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze, corals Sino-Tibetan, 18th / 19th century Bodhisattva with vajra (thunderbolt) and ghanta (bell) Double lotus throne Sealed bronze base plate Measurements: 8.5 x 6.5 x 4.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a Danish private collection This Sino-Tibetan fire-gilt bronze figure of the bodhisattva Vajrasattva was made during the 18th or 19υth century. The bodhisattva is seated in Padmasana on a double lotus throne with a sealed bronze base plate. In his crossed hands he is holding a vajra and a ghanta, the most important elements of Vajrana Buddhism, which represent the male and female principles, method and wisdom, leading to the path to enlightenment.Vajrasattva is adorned with precious jewellery with small coral inserts. He is also wearing a crown on his head, covering the high topknot. His face shows a smile and soft, fine features.The fire-gilt bronze is in good condition with light traces of age and wear, such as some gold abrasion, minimal dents and a few missing corals. The deity sits slightly crooked on the throne. The figure measures 8.5 cm in height, 6.5 in width and 4.5 cm in depth.

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Fire-gilt Bronze Figure of Amitāyus with Qianlong Mark, 1770

Lot 30: Fire-gilt Bronze Figure of Amitāyus with Qianlong Mark, 1770

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Description: Fire-gilt copper bronze China, Qianlong (1735-1795) - dated to 1770 Finely incised period mark of the Qianlong Emperor (1735-1795) and date "1770" Reticulated, finely chased pedestal with Chinese characters on the inside and outside Rich in detail Measurements: 18.5 x 11 x 9 cm (height x width x depth) This fire-gilt copper bronze of Amitāyus was crafted in China in 1770, during the reign of the Qianlong Emperor (1735-1795). Amitāyus is "The Buddha of Boundless Life" and is an emanation of Amitābha. The deity is sitting in Padmasana on a reticulated, finely chased pedestal. The soles of his feet are turned upwards with his hands resting on them, forming the Dhyāna mudrā, the gesture of meditation.Amitāyus is wearing precious jewellery and a five-leaf crown, the symbol of mastery of the elements, behind which a topknot is seen. The face has finely crafted features and a peaceful expression.The copper bronze is in rather satisfying condition with minor traces of age and wear, such as hairline scratches, small dents, some notches here and there and gold abrasion. The mandorla on the back, one leaf of the crown and the bowl in the right hand are missing. The figure measures 18.5 cm in height, 11 cm in width and 9 cm in depth.

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Fine Silk Embroidery with Guardian of Heaven, Qing China

Lot 31: Fine Silk Embroidery with Guardian of Heaven, Qing China

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Description: Silk, with silk and brocade threads China, late Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Fine embroidery Heaven guardian with Dao sword and shield Decorated with Buddhist symbols of good fortune Dragons with pearl and archaic bats Elegant brocade bordure Measurements: 140 x 74 cm (height x width) Good condition Provenance: from a Swiss private collection This silk embroidery was crafted in China during the late Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). Several motifs are seen on the red background. A guardian is seen in the centre holding a Dao sword in his raised left hand and a shield decorated with the face of a tiger in his right hand. The guardian is standing on a lotus flower, surrounded by Buddhist symbols of good fortune, such as the eternal knot and different animals. Dragons are playing with a pearl and archaic bats are seen throughout. Below the guardian there is another lotus flower with several objects on top, including a crown, an ostrich feather, prayer beads and a vase. Some elements are embroidered in small circles, giving the piece a special look and feel. The work is framed by an elegant gold bordure.The wall embroidery is in good condition with light traces of age and wear, such as a few loose seams, minor tears in the silk, missing metal inserts on the prayer beads and minimal soiling. The piece measures 140 cm in height and 74 cm in width. Including the mountings, the work measures 145 cm in height, the (recent) iron and synthetic mounting is 90 cm long.

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Embroidered Wall Tapestry with Playful Fu Dogs, Qing China

Lot 32: Embroidered Wall Tapestry with Playful Fu Dogs, Qing China

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Description: Silk, selenites, brocade threads, metal settings China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Fine embroidery Rich in detail Decorated with Buddhist symbols of good fortune on the edge Measurements: 100 x 102 cm (height x width) Provenance: from a German private collector This Chinese wall hanging from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) was made from silk with richly detailed brocade embroidery. A Fu dog is seen with four cubs, joyously playing around with their mother. Each animal has an elaborate fur and eyes in the form of green rhinestones. The red-coloured background is decorated with floral patterns and the edge is decorated with small selenites in patinated metal settings. The edges are decorated with Buddhist symbols of good fortune, such as the endless knot, as well as tendrils and flowers.The wall tapestry shows traces of age and wear as well as small holes and signs of restoration. Some threads are loose, the fabric is torn in some areas, selenites are missing and soiling is seen on the back. The tapestry measures 100 cm in height and 102 cm in width.

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Large Silk Embroidery with Court Procession, 18th/19th Century

Lot 33: Large Silk Embroidery with Court Procession, 18th/19th Century

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Description: Hand-embroidered silk China, 18th or early 19th century during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Fine and detailed work Lively colours on sand-coloured background Measurements: 182 x 130 cm (height x width) In need of restoration work Provenance: from a German private collection This Chinese silk embroidery was made during the 18υth or early 19υth century and shows a procession on their way to a temple. This fine and detailed work delights with its lively colours on a sand-coloured silk background. People are carrying different flags, pennants, drums or lances and some are riding on elephants or horses. Each person in this ritual procession has a unique facial expression, garment and headpiece.The landscape shown here is very rich in detail with many different trees on hills, patches of grass and small bushes. The bold colours give the work a lively atmosphere. The variety found in this work invites the viewer to explore and wonder.The silk embroidery shows traces of age and wear. The support material is brittle and torn and should be professionally stabilised. The embroidery itself is in very good condition with only few loose threads and measures approximately 182 cm in height and approximately 130 cm in width.

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Two Exceptional Cloisonné Enamel Qilin, Qing Dynasty, China

Lot 34: Two Exceptional Cloisonné Enamel Qilin, Qing Dynasty, China

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Description: Cloisonné on copper bronze body, partly gilt China, 18th / 19th Century, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Gilt body parts Almost graphic scales High quality cloisonné and metal work Dimensions: 21 cm high, 28 cm long, 9 cm broad Good condition Provenance: Canadian Private Collection Note: An almost identical pair was sold on 30 May 2012 at Christies Hong Kong for HK$ 620,000.- / see screenshot at the pictures of this lot This pair of cloisonné Qilin was crafted in the 18υth or 19υth Century in Qing Dynasty China. The bulky beasts stand on four sturdy legs with gilt hooves, their heads raised high and their tails up in the air. Manes, whiskers and beards, eye brows, horns and tails are gilded, same as the emphasized joints. The scales of the beasts are formed out of delicate gold threads filled with green and red enamels. From the chin down to the belly and on to the tail runs a small stripe in a different pattern in light green and white. The faces of the Qilin are in a different pattern again, showing light blue squares on a dark blue ground. The facial hairs are not only gilt, but also engraved with fine lines and beard and eyebrows stick out in curvy bushes. The jaws are open and give way to the gilt teeth and the animals´ tongues. Another very fine detail is the light rose enamel colour used for ears and noses. Both Qilin are in good condition, with traces of age and use. The gilding is partially somewhat abraded. A green patina can be seen in the fine grooves of the tails and manes. Stronger traces of use are recognizable underneath the hooves. Here and there minimal flaws in the cloisonné work are to be found. The dimensions are: 21 cm high, 28 cm long, 9 cm broad. Qilin The Qilin is known as one of the four Chinese miracle creatures. It is a chimera animal - a sort of stag with a dragon's head and ox hooves combined with a lion's head and a carp's beard. Even though the beast is thought to be rather large, it is known to be able to walk on grass without breaking it or crushing bugs. Fitting this, the Qilin is also known to live off a strict vegetarian diet. Its name is a combination of the maleQi and the female Lin and thus incorporates the principle of Yin and Yang and the dualism of the sexes. According to Chinese mythology, Qilins can turn thousand years old. The first Qilin was apparently caught back at Confuzius' time, but was immediately killed - much to the philosopher's disappointment. Lacking any comparable animals, the Chinese called the first giraffe they saw a Qilin - it was brought to China by the famous seafarer Zheng He (1371-1433/35) who brought the animal from one of his journeys to his emperor Yongle (1360-1424). Until today, giraffes are actually calledkirin in Japanese and Korean.

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Two Lidded Cloisonné Vases in the Form of Rams, Qing China

Lot 35: Two Lidded Cloisonné Vases in the Form of Rams, Qing China

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Description: Gilt copper, cloisonné China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) - 19th century Archaic decorations Jingtai blue, excellent quality Measurements: 15 x 18.5 x 8.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection This pair of Chinese lidded cloisonné vases in the form of rams were made during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) in the 19υth century. The pieces are made from gilt copper and cloisonné, and show archaic decorations of tendrils and stylised dragons, phoenixes and other fabulous creatures. The opened mouths of the rams, as well as their hooves and horns are emphasised by the gilding. The Jingtai blue paint on the inside and outside of the vases is very elegant.The cloisonné vases are in good condition with light traces of age and wear. Minimal scratches and dents on the underside as well as minor manufacturing imperfections on the lower rims and the insides. Each vase measures 15 cm in height, 18.5 cm in width and 8.5 cm in depth.

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Pair of Large Cloisonné Garlic Vases with Dragons, late Qing

Lot 36: Pair of Large Cloisonné Garlic Vases with Dragons, late Qing

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Description: Fire gilded copper bronze with cloisonné China, late Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Archaic garlic shape Precious decorations in rare combination of colours Height: 50 cm each Good condition This impressive pair of garlic shaped cloisonné vases date to the 19h century in the Chinese Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The vases each feature a round, fire gilded foot rim, a bulbous body with a slim neck that takes up the shape of a garlic clove in the upper area. Both vases have a small opening at the top bearing another fire-gilded rim. The decorations are made with ornamental cloisonné work. Imperial five-clawed dragons of red and blue are shown on the body, fighting for a pearl, surrounded by flames. On the vases' necks, there are birds of yellow and blue enamel colours, sitting on green branches. The two animal motifs are divided by a bordure and the entire depiction is surrounded by colourful floral garlands. The foot rim is decorated by a meandering bordure with blue accentuations; above, colourful leaf decoration.The pair of vases is in good condition with some traces of age and wear. Few small touch ups, as well as a larger dent on one vase, are almost indiscernible because of the rich ornamentation. The vases each measure 50 cm (height) by 25 cm (width).

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Double Gourd Cloisonné Vase with relief ribbon, around 1800

Lot 37: Double Gourd Cloisonné Vase with relief ribbon, around 1800

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Description: Cloisonné; enamel colours on bronze body China, around 1800, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Rare green colour Figural relief décor in shape of a ribbon Dimensions: Height 21.5 cm, Diameter approx. 12 cm Good condition This fine vase in double gourd hulu form was crafted during the heydays of the Qing Dynasty in China, around 1800. Between thin bronze threads, enamel colours have been filled onto the body of the vase, thus giving it its colour. Especially noticeable is the intense green, a rather rare colour that has been used here as the background on which bats and flowers in several other colours can be seen. The narrowed center of the vase is emphasized by a bronze relief imitating a ribbon whose bands swing below the lower part of the vase's body. Four blue medallions adorn the vase, all filled with archaic bats in several colours. The slim foot rim is decorated by a pattern of rose and blue dots. The vase is in good condition with minor traces of age. One notch, the size of a thumbnail, near the right ribbon can be seen, where the cloisonné has broken out and has been repaired. Smaller manufacturing flaws are there but hardly recognizable. The dimensions of the vase are: height 21.5 cm, diameter approx. 12 cm.

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Canton Enamel Box & Cover in Imperial Yellow, China, Qing

Lot 38: Canton Enamel Box & Cover in Imperial Yellow, China, Qing

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Description: Canton Enamel an copper body China, 19th Century, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Magnificent imperial yellow Inside in a rare green Dimensions: Height: 11 cm, Diameter of the cover: 12.5 cm Good condition This fine box and cover from the Qing Dynasty was crafted in China in the technique of the so-called Canton enamel. In contrast to cloisonné, the enamel colours were painted freely by hand onto the metal ground - a technique that requires high precision and a superior artistic level. This box and cover has a bright background in imperial yellow onto which a fine pattern of flowers and tendrils has been painted. These shine in rose and green tones. Emphasizing the box's and the cover's shape, blue wave bands surround the knob, the cover's edge and the upper rim of the box. Shortly above the foot rim, a frieze of broad blossoms gives the decoration a finishing touch. In contrast to the colourful outside, the inside of box and cover are painted in a rare monochrome bright green. The box and cover are in good condition. Small manufacturing flaws can be seen now and then as well as minor signs of age. Some minimal notches on the transitions between the copper borders and the enamel can be seen. Thanks to the very rich decoration of the box and cover, none of the above described flaws are really significant. The height is including the cover 11 cm, the diameter of the cover is 12.5 cm.

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Large Huanghuali Storage Chest, China, 17th Century

Lot 39: Large Huanghuali Storage Chest, China, 17th Century

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Description: Huanghuali wood, bronze China, 17th Century Beautiful, original patina Original bronze fittings Two locks and one key Beautiful ornamented handles to either narrow sides Dimensions: 151.5 cm Width x 75 cm Height x 70 cm Depth Good condition Provenience: From a Private Collection This exceptional Huanghuali storage chest was crafted in China in the 17υth Century. It still has its original bronze fittings and impresses by its rare size and the wonderful grain of the wood. The huanghuali wood has an especially nice patina and is finely polished and shiny. The lid can be held by two props that are swung out from the inside of the chest. The inside has been reinforced and lined with red wallpaper, bearing fine ornamentation, from the Qing Dynasty. Its modest and rectangular form is without frills and is only adorned with its simplistic, original bronze fittings in order to let the beautiful wood stand out. This rare and beautiful chest is in good condition, considering its age. The wood has a very nice patina and so do the bronze fittings. Small notches and scratches give proof of the chest's already long life. A small area on the lid's border has been restored. Two of the base fittings of the back are loose, but included. The chest has two locks, one key is at hand. The paper inside shows visible traces of use. Smaller parts have been added later. The dimensions are: 151.5 cm width x 75 cm height x 70 cm depth. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare rosewood type, which was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The colour varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Archaic Bronze Vase, China, Ming Dynasty

Lot 40: Archaic Bronze Vase, China, Ming Dynasty

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Description: Bronze China, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Natural patina in green and red Archaic form Matching wooden base from the 1920s Height incl. base: 20 cm Good condition This archaic bronze vase from the Ming Dynasty impresses with its simplistic form and the especially beautiful, naturally coloured green and red patina. On a square foot rim arises the bulbous body with its corners rounded. It becomes narrower towards the neck until it reaches the mouth of the vase that picks up the foot rim's square shape with the rounded corners once more. Two stylized handles adorn the vase on two sides. Here, and on the vase's mouth, the gold shimmer of the bronze shines through. The vase is in a good condition, considering its age. Irregularities on the foot rim and the mouth give proof of its age, as well as the dark patina on the body that transitions into a natural red and green on some parts. The rather uneven surface of the vase is also a sign of its age. The vase has a height of about 20 cm including the base and 16.5 cm without it. The base is made from wood and an addition from the 1920s.

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Archaic Bronze Vase from the Ming / Qing Dynasty, 17th C.

Lot 41: Archaic Bronze Vase from the Ming / Qing Dynasty, 17th C.

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Description: Bronze China, 17th Century, late Ming or early Qing Dynasty Archaic in form and décor Carved wooden base from the 19th Century Ruyi bordure with attached pearls and plastic animals Dimensions: Height: 52 cm, approx. 33 cm diameter Provenance: Danish Private Collection This archaic bronze vase convinces thanks to the elaborate chasework on its surface. Neck and foot rim are kept relatively plain with simple grooved bordures and a graphic meander on the mouth whereas the bulbous body is far more richly adorned. A broad band with meanders, regularly interrupted by taotie masks, decorates the body on its broadest area. The transition from body to neck is highlighted by a relief with ruyi-forms, attached bronze pearls and three sculptural, lying bucks. These can also be used as handles. The vase is standing on an elegantly carved wooden base from the 19th Century. The archaic bronze vase is in a condition befitting its age. The bronze has an authentic, dark patina that partially turns into green. There is evident corrosion; underneath one of the bucks is a hole in the wall. Some flaws can be seen on the entire body, but they are just adding to its sublime and ancient appearance. The bottom is again very much corroded and the lower, outer bottom plate is mostly missing. The dimensions are: height: 52 cm, approx. 33 cm diameter.

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Large Iron Bell with Figural Dragon, China, Ming Dynasty

Lot 42: Large Iron Bell with Figural Dragon, China, Ming Dynasty

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Description: Auction announcements 17 October 2013 Lot 42: The diameter is 50 cm, not 148 cm. Iron China, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Mark and date (Jiajing era 1521-1566), 1549 Inscription in relief, floral decorations Handle in the form of a stylised dragon Four sound holes Measurements: 64.5 x 148 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: from a Danish private collection This large iron bell was crafted in China during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). The relief inscription indicates it was made during the Jiajing era (1521-1566) and the date indicated is the year 1549. The bell has a handle in the form of a stylised dragon, which allows it to be attached to a mount. Four sound holes are seen in the upper area between stylised floral decorations, above more inscriptions. Several names and the date to "the first month of the 28υth regnal year of the Jiajing Emperor (1521-1566)" are seen. The lower part is decorated with floral ornaments. Ruyi motifs, appearing like arrows, each point to a pearl, found in each of the eight segments of the bell.The bell is in good condition with a natural patina and age-related traces of wear, such as minor corrosion. The bell measures 64.5 cm in height and 148 cm in diameter.

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Two Three-legged Jue Ritual Bronzes, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 43: Two Three-legged Jue Ritual Bronzes, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Bronze China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Archaic style Based on old Shang Dynasty models Fine patina One piece with inventory number and unidentified mark on the side. Measurements: 12.5-15 x 14 x 7.5-8.5 cm (height x width x depth) These two Chinese ritual bronzes from the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) are so-called Jue vessels, which are used as wine pitchers. Each vessel stands on three legs and has a handle on the side. One Jue has two mushroom-shaped protuberances. Both vessels show fine, geometric decorations partly in high relief.Jue vessels were originally used to warm wine and could be lifted out of heat with the small protuberances. These two vessels exhibit an archaic style based on old Shang Dynasty models. They both have fine patinas. One of the vessels has an inventory number on the underside.The ritual bronzes display considerable traces of age and wear such as scratches and dents. The protuberances of one vessel are missing. An unidentified mark is seen on the side underneath the handle of one vessel. The height measures 15 and 12.5 cm, both vessels measure 14 cm in width and the depth is 7.5 and 8.5 cm, respectively.

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Original Chinese Bronze Vessel Jue, Ming Dynasty

Lot 44: Original Chinese Bronze Vessel Jue, Ming Dynasty

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Description: Bronze China, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) or even earlier In the style of the Shang Dynasty (1523-1028 BC) ¬ Archaic decorations Beautiful malachite green patina Measurements: 17.5 x 15.5 x 8.5 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition This bronze Jue ritual vessel was crafted in China during the Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) or even earlier. Boasting classical Shang Dynasty style, it stands on three downward-tapered legs. There is a crescent-shaped handle on one side as well as two protuberances on the upper rim. The Jue vessel shows archaic decorations in relief and is covered in a beautiful malachite green patina. Jue vessels were originally used to warm wine and could be lifted out of heat with the small protuberances.The bronze vessel is in very good condition with hardly any traces of age and wear but a striking, authentic patina. Minor scratches and small dents are seen here and there. The bronze measures 17.5 cm in height, 15.5 cm in width and 8.5 cm in depth.

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Fine Bronze Censer with Fo Lion, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 45: Fine Bronze Censer with Fo Lion, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Patinated bronze China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) In the classical style of the Ming Dynasty Archaic decor Knob in the shape of a Fo lion Open-work handles Height: 33 cm Beautiful authentic patina This censer dates back to the Qing Dynasty and is modelled after similar works from the Ming Dynasty. Three pointy feet support a bulbous body, which is decorated all around with dragon ring masks and meander patterns in relief. The open-work lid and the handles feature a ruyi motif. An expressive Fo lion thrones on top of the lid. Its stylised fur is beautifully wrought demonstrating a fine craftsmanship quality. The pearl held in the lion's left paw symbolises the unity and power of the empire. In Chinese culture censers have always been of great importance and have been manufactured since the Zhou Dynasty (ca. 1046-256 BC). They served to perfume clothes and rooms and were also used during spiritual ceremonies. The censer is in good condition with signs of age and use. It shows a beautiful authentic patina. A small piece of the lion's tail is missing. There are a few tiny holes and small cracks in the open-work décor. The vessel measures approximately 33 cm in height. Fo Lions Fo lions, also known as guardian lions, enjoy high popularity in Chinese art. In their appearance they are part dragon part lion. These mythical creatures usually come in pairs and were originally positioned to guard the entrance of Buddhist temples. In the arts and crafts, they are often manufactured in the shape of doorknockers or decorative vessels made from ceramic, marble, or bronze.

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Standing Guardian Lion from Bronze, Ming Dynasty, China

Lot 46: Standing Guardian Lion from Bronze, Ming Dynasty, China

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Description: Bronze China, late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Archaic form Natural patina Dimensions: 35 cm long, 23 cm high, approx. 11 cm broad Good condition This archaic guardian lion from bronze was made during the reign of the late Chinese Ming Dynasty. The beast combines archaic forms - as for example on the rather roughly treated head - with delicate engravings on the saddlecloth and is an impressive example of Chinese bronze art. Finely worked curls from the lion's mane on its back head, whereas the bald forehead and the wide opened mouth make it look almost humorous. The bushy tail is threateningly erected. The peculiar form of the guardian lions, that are also known as Shi in China or Foo Dogs in the West, have originally been created after the example of the Chinese Pekinese in the 3υrd Century AD - as there were no real lions in China. The guardian bronze lion is in good condition with usual traces of wear and age. It has a very beautiful patina and only minimal flaws. Superficial scratches and especially the red patina on its belly are further proof of its age. The dimensions are: 35 cm long, 23 cm high, approx. 11 cm broad.

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Extravagant Chinese Kang Table, Qing Dynasty

Lot 47: Extravagant Chinese Kang Table, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Wood with a fine grain China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Beautiful design with reticulated apron Ruyi motif Dimensions: 32.5 x 85 x 49 cm This Chinese kang table features a distinctive design contrasting straight and curved lines. The open-work apron and the inwardly curved feet lend this piece of furniture its extravagant look. The ruyi motif, often used to decorate vases, pendants and ivory figurines, symbolizes the fulfilment of all wishes. Kang table were originally designed to be placed on akang, a sort of platform that was used for sleeping. The table is in good condition with signs of age and use. The table top shows few age cracks. The feet show minor abrasions here and there. The table measures 32.5 cm in height, 85 cm in length and 49 cm in width.

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Tall Chinese Flower Stand, Qing Dynasty

Lot 48: Tall Chinese Flower Stand, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Rosewood, marble inlay China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Tall and slender form Used as a flower or display stand Dimensions: 34 width x 34 cm depth; 99 cm height Good condition Provenience: From a South German Private Collection This Chinese flower stand, made from rosewood, was crafted during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The four high and round legs are connected by horizontal stretchers shortly above the ground and blend into the slightly setback tabletop with its square marble inlay. This modest piece of furniture is enhanced by its curved and reticulated apron. Tall and slim stands such as this were immensely popular in China, especially during the latter part of the Qing Dynasty. They were used as flower stands but also for the display of objects of art. The slim form gives them a high elegance and lightness, as is typical for Chinese furniture. The flower stand is in good condition with minor traces of age and use. The marble inlay on the tabletop shows traces of use in form of scratches and notches. There are slight gaps to the joints as well as minor scratches and traces of use on the wooden surface. One of the horizontal stretchers is slightly loose. The dimensions are: 34 width x 34 cm depth; 99 cm height.

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Very fine Huanghuali Altar Table, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 49: Very fine Huanghuali Altar Table, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Huanghuali China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Very beautiful patina Elegant form Dimensions: 85 cm height x 100 cm width x 50 cm depth Visually very fine condition Provenience: From a German Private Collection This elegant altar table crafted from huanghuali wood originates from China, presumably in the 18υth Century. The four broad round legs are connected with two horizontal stretchers on the narrow sides of the table and with one stretcher on the long sides. The broad table plate with its stepped edge rests on these legs. The apron underneath is broad and has rounded corners. It extends down to the legs and thus adds to the table's solid appearance. Altar tables, also known as Temple Tables, were used as a place of worship in honor of the ancestors. These tables were usually placed in front of a shrine and used for the preparations of offerings or incense burners. The huanghuali altar table is in optically very good, professionally restored condition. The table top has an older discoloration in one corner underneath the polish as well as a small fissure in one joint and one repaired spot. An older, unobtrusive notch can be seen on the table's edge. The dimensions are: 85 cm height x 100 cm width x 50 cm depth. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare rosewood type, which was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The colour varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Four Nesting Table with Carved Aprons, China, Qing Dynasty

Lot 50: Four Nesting Table with Carved Aprons, China, Qing Dynasty

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Description: Rosewood China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Four different sized tables Richly carved aprons Dimensions, min.: 58 cm height; 24.5 cm width x 24.5 cm depth Dimensions, max.: 74 cm height; 40 cm width x 40 cm depth Good condition These four fine tables were crafted in China during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). In identical design, these four tables have been made in different sizes and thus fit into each other in a perfect manner. They all feature horizontal stretchers connecting their legs, whose stepped form is typical for traditional Chinese furniture design. The legs blend into the framing of the square, slightly immersed tabletops. The most salient adornment of the tables are their lusciously carved aprons: leaves, fruits and on all sides a central flower form a reticulated and elaborate pattern, that appears especially lush when all tables are piled onto each other. The four tables are in good condition, with light traces of age and use. All surfaces show traces of former usage, such as scratches, stains or tarnishing. The aprons are all in good condition without any material loss, but there are few age cracks. The dimensions are (from the smallest to the tallest): 58 x 24.5 x 24.5 cm; 62 x 29 x 29 cm; 68 x 34.5 x 34.5 cm; 74 x 40 x 40 cm (Height x Width x Depth).

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