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Historic Autographs, Coins, Currency & Americana

by Early American


557 lots with images

December 7, 2013

Live Auction

P. O. Box 3507

Rancho Santa Fe, CA, 92067 USA

Phone: 00 1 858 759 3290

Fax: 00 1 858 759 1439

Email: auctions@earlyamerican.com

557 Lots
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JOHN QUINCY ADAMS Signed Superb Autograph Letter, Freemason and Masonic Content

Lot 1: JOHN QUINCY ADAMS Signed Superb Autograph Letter, Freemason and Masonic Content

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Description: AutographsSuperb John Quincy Adams Autograph Letter Signed Simply Outstanding Personal Freemason and Masonic ContentJOHN QUINCY ADAMS (1767-1848). 6th President of the United States.December 8, 1832-Dated, Superb content Autograph Letter Signed, "J. Q. Adams" as Representative from Massachusetts, measuring 8" x 9.75", 4 pages, at Washington, Choice Extremely Fine. This deeply personal and philosophical Letter is written to journalist William Leete Stone of New York. Stone was newspaper editor of the Herkimer "American," the "Northern Whig" (Hudson, NY), the Albany "Daily Advertiser," the Hartford "Mirror" and the New York "Commercial Advertiser." An active Freemason, Stone was also one of the editors of two literary periodicals, "The Knights of the Round Table" and "The Lounger."In his retirement after leaving the Presidency in 1829, John Quincy Adams took an interest in the Anti-Masonic movement, and William Stone wrote to Adams on the subject and published a 556-page book in 1832 entitled "Letters on Masonry and Anti-Masonry, addressed to the Hon. John Quincy Adams. By William L. Stone." Stone had published some of the letters he had received from Adams in his New York newspaper, "Commercial Advertiser."In 1847 Adams published a 284-page book entitled, "Letters on the Masonic Institution" which included eight letters he wrote to Stone dating between December 24, 1831 and September 4, 1832. (This specific letter offered here in our sale was not included.) To our knowledge, there is no record of any Anti-Masonic John Quincy Adams letters having sold at a major public auction in the past 35 years! This beautifully penned, easily readable letter written fully in John Quincy Adams hand, reads in full:"William L. Stone, Esqr. New York. --- Washington 8, Decr. 1832Dear Sir ----I promised a further reply to your Letter of the 30th ulto. but before commencing upon it must say a word more upon matters antecedent.In a note appended to your publication of my first letter, you observe that eight or ten years ago, before you ever heard of Morgan, you proposed a revisal of the obligations, and that the barbarous penalties and language, complained of by me should be expunged. This is another Evidence to me of that rectitude of principles and soundness of judgment, which have preserved your heart and mind, from that almost universal depravation which it is the character of the Masonic Oaths, Obligations and Penalties generally to produce. It is known to be one of the most ordinary phenomena of insanity, that the sufferer is perfectly rational and intelligent upon every subject but one; and wherever that is touched upon, raving distracted. The Masonic History of the last seven years, has abundantly proved, that the Oaths, Obligations and Penalties, of that Institution, produce upon the immense majority of the men to whom they are administered, and by whom they are taken, a similar partial aberration from moral principle.They lose the moral sense in every thing relating to their Masonic Obligations, and retain it entire, or perhaps little impaired with respect to every thing else. This appears to me to account for the fact so portentously proved in the Morgan Murder transactions, that multitudes of men otherwise of fair characters and blameless lives were deeply and awfully implicated in that horrible Calendar of Crimes. It accounts also for the fact of that desperate adherence of so many otherwise honest men to those barbarous, absurd and abominable Oaths, Obligations and Penalties. For it is to them that the high minded men of the fraternity now declare that they will cling to the last gasp of their existence.To this fact I wish to point your special attention. It is against these Oaths, Obligations and Penalties, and against them alone, that the pure and disinterested Spirit of Anti Masonry is arranged. The abolition of them is the great moral reformation which Anti Masonry has undertaken to accomplish, and from which I trust it will not swerve. With the Oaths and Obligations, the Secrets fall of course, and all those being abandoned if the Free Masons wish to continue as a charitable, benevolent and convivial fraternity, no mortal on earth will object to their so doing.The Oaths, Obligations and Penalties therefore now constitute the only matter at issue between Masonry and Anti Masonry. And I ask you if an aberration of intellect, as well as of moral feeling more monstrous can be imagined, than the inflexible adherence to the determination that they will continue to swear men upon the penalties of having their throats cut from ear to ear--of cutting open the left breast and tearing out the heart and vitals, of severing the body in two, and of smiting off the skulls that they will never reveal to any one under the Canopy of Heavens Secrets, which have been divulged and proclaimed on the housetops. And this, in the name of the living God! I have endeavored to show that the administration of these Oaths was vicious, when it was to keep secrets that were secret. But now -- that they are known to every one who will read--what is it but a blasphemous taking of the name of God in vain?In your letter of the 28th ulto. you do emphatically declare it as still your earnest desire to destroy this wretched structure of Free Masonry, and I give you the most unqualified credit for sincerity in this declaration. But will you allow me in friendship and in confidence to say, that some of your strictures in your paper, upon the Anti Masons, since the disappointment of the late Elections [Anti Masonic presidential nominee William Wirt won only 7.8% of the popular vote], has led not me but some of them, to doubt your attachment to their cause. I do earnestly wish them to be sensible as I am that your book is the best Anti Masonic book that ever was published. They differed from you with regard to the Candidates for the Presidency and Vice Presidency; but now that the Election is over, cannot you pursue with them the common object; which is to prevail upon the Free Masonry to do, that which you urged them to so, even before the fate or the offence of Morgan, had arisen in the series of events.Remember that it is in the power of the Masonic Fraternity to demolish the whole system of political Anti Masonry forever. To effect this object the single thing they have to do, is to cease administering the entered Apprentice's Oath. It would follow of course that they would administer none of the others. Let them do this, and they will never again have an Anti Masonic Candidate to oppose or defeat them.To come now to your letter of the 30th ulto. I have not received from the Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge, a copy of the printed minutes of their proceedings in June last. In the great object of prevailing upon the Masons voluntarily to abandon their Idol, I have felt curiosity to ascertain how far it has a prospect of success.Having left your Book at my residence at Quincy I am not able from more recollection to refer to the several circumstances mentioned in your narrative whereas I drew the inference that (the conspiracy for the kidnapping and murder of Morgan, originated in the Chapter at Rochester). But I think you say that (it was there, Morgan had been admitted to the Royal Arch degree) at the proposal of James Ganson. You say it was there also that on the formation of the Chapter the forms of admission had been introduced from the old manuscript of which you gave me a copy. Being the forms which had been used by judge Hosmer, in Connecticut. You intimate also that it was from there that Morgan had copied the obligations as they are published in his book. It occurred to me then that (the Chapter at Rochester was the one that he had specially offended) and that which in Masonic Law was responsible for the suppression of his Book.The Masons at Batavia had discovered that he and Shiller were preparing for the publication of the Book, which it was their great object to suppress. But Morgan was not one of them. They had excluded him from their Chapter, in a most offensive manner, by getting up a second Petition, without his name, and without assigning any reason for his exclusion after having obtained a Charter for a Chapter by a petition in which he had joined. He did not belong therefore to the Chapter at Batavia, nor was it there that he had obtained the means of divulging the Secrets, but at Rochester. It was then the Chapter at Rochester which became responsible for the suppression of the Book and for the punishment of the proposed publisher (It was the obligation administered to him by them that he was about to violate, and it was for them and them along to convict and punish him).Hence also I inferred the extraordinary agency of James Ganson in the conspiracy--he having been the Sponsor of Morgan at his admission to the Royal Arch degree. The conspiracy embraced two objects--the suppress the Book and to punish the author. It is apparent that the transportation of Morgan to Niagara had been previously concerted at the Chapter in Rochester. That by their direction he had been seized at Batavia by a party from Canandaigua, carried there and lodged in prison, to be exactly in such position that he might at the moment of his liberation, be unlawfully seized and transported whither they should direct. For this direction the nightly journey of Loton Lawson from Canandaigua to Rochester, and his return early the next morning was affected. He was followed by men charged with executing the Instruction of the Chapter; and the carriages for his transportation to the fort of Niagara had been all prepared and arranged before hand. The Chapters at Batavia and LeRoy were the informers against Morgan (The Lodge at Canandaigua undertook to arrest, and deliver him up to the Chapter at Rochester, and they were to consummate the Punishment precisely because it was to and by them that his Masonic vows had been made). Mr. Whittlesey informs me of another fact not noticed in your book -- That (after Morgan was lodged in the fort at Niagara; another messenger was sent to Rochester and returned thence before he was put to death. That the messenger bore this Order from the Chapter I cannot doubt.)From the annunciation in your book that you was authorised to state that the Grand Encampment at New York had taken measures for ascertaining what charges had been made in the forms of admission in the Western Encampments subordinate to them, I had hoped that an authentic disclosure of the result would before this have been published. Why you was authorised to excite the expectation of such disclosure, unless with the intention to fulfill the expectation, I do not enquire. Your book I think mentions some of the innovations as having been introduced from Vermont by a number of the present Congress. May I enquire who that is, and what the precise terms which he introduced into the obligations were? --- I am very respectfully, your friend --- (Signed) J. Q. Adams."This absolutely remarkable content Letter is in extraordinary, clean and pleasing quality. The writing is very precise and remains is deep rich brown upon high quality period paper. The spine has some fine archival reinforcement. The signature, "J. Q. Adams" is exceptionally fresh and distinct at its conclusion. Such important Letters with great content as found here typically carry a huge premium with collectors. Our modest estimate range should prove an attractive guide.It is believed that Freemason William Morgan of Batavia, New York was murdered in 1826 for planning to reveal the secrets of their order. In 1882 a monument to Capt. William Morgan was placed in the Batavia City Cemetery. It reads:"Sacred to the memory of Wm. Morgan, a native of Virginia, a Capt. in the War of 1812, a respectable citizen of Batavia, and a martyr to the freedom of writing, printing and speaking the truth. He was abducted from near this spot in the year 1826, by Freemasons and murdered for revealing the secrets of their order. The court records of Genesee County, and the files of the 'Batavia Advocate,' kept in the Recorders office contain the history of the events that caused the erection of this monument."It was said that Morgan was abducted and murdered and his body thrown into the Niagara River. In 1827 a body was washed ashore. The first inquest decided that it was Morgan. A trial was held and Freemasons were convicted of abducting Morgan, yet there wasn't enough evidence for a murder conviction.A subsequent inquest identified the body as a Canadian, though, it did not matter. The story of Morgan's murder frightened the public and America's first third political party, the Anti-Masonic Party, was organized in New York in 1827.

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JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 1846 Autograph Letter Signed. St. Patrick's Day Dinner Invite

Lot 2: JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 1846 Autograph Letter Signed. St. Patrick's Day Dinner Invite

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Description: Autographs"John Quincy Adams" 1846-Dated Autograph Letter Signed Adams Responds to a Saint Patrick's Day Dinner Invitation JOHN QUINCY ADAMS (1767-1848). 6th President of the United States.March 16, 1846-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "John Quincy Adams," measuring 8" x 10", 2 pages, at Washington, Very Fine. Here, Adam's provides his written response to an invitation to a Saint Patrick's Day celebration. Completely in Adam's own hand, the writing is very fine and appears a bit light as such with just a few tone areas near the upper portion. This wonderful Irish American related historic Letter reads, in full:"Gentlemen --- I have received, your very obliging invitation, of the 13th inst., in the name of the friends of Ireland, in this City to be present as their guest, at a Gallic Dinner, to be given at Carnsis Saloon, tomorrow, at 4 o'clock p.m., in honor of Irelands patron Saint. The very flattering manner in which you have been pleased, to convey to me this invitation, increases the regret with which our infirm state of health, and a recent domestic affliction, compel me to decline it. I cannot however deny myself the pleasure of thanking you for the testimonial which you have borne to my long cherished, and deeply rooted respect and affectionate attachment to the People of Ireland, and the cause of their National Independence.A respect and attachment coequal with the fall of Montgomery before the walls of Quebec, in the War of our Independence; confirmed, and cemented, by the virtues which I have witnessed, through the course of a long life, by personal acquaintance, with numerous natives of the Emerald Isle. Your allusion Gentlemen, to my sentiments formed my reflections, upon the Historic, and prophetic, fortunes of Ireland, many years since, recorded in the poetical pastime of literary leisure, have suggested to me a sentiment which I then expressed, and which I now offer you with a slight modification as a substitute, for my presence at your festival. 'Soon! Soon! May dawn the day, as dawn it must --- When Erin's Falchion, shall be Erin's trust!' --- I am with great respect Sirs, Your humble and Obedt. Serv. --- (Signed) John Quincy Adams".John Quincy Adams (July 11, 1767 - February 23, 1848) was the sixth President of the United States (1825-1829). He served as American diplomat, Senator, and Congressional representative. He was a member of the Federalist, Democratic-Republican, National Republican, and later Anti-Masonic and Whig parties. Adams was the son of former President John Adams and Abigail Adams.As a diplomat, Adams played an important role in negotiating many international treaties, most notably the Treaty of Ghent, which ended the War of 1812. As Secretary of State, he negotiated with the United Kingdom over the United States' northern border with Canada, negotiated with Spain the annexation of Florida, and authored the Monroe Doctrine. Historians agree he was one of the greatest diplomats and Secretaries of State in American history.

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(BENEDICT ARNOLD, III)  Legal Document 1754 Signed by the Judge Isaac Huntington

Lot 3: (BENEDICT ARNOLD, III) Legal Document 1754 Signed by the Judge Isaac Huntington

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Description: AutographsFather of the American General and Historic Traitor Benedict Arnold III Seeks Restitution Legal Document(BENEDICT ARNOLD, III), The Father of American Revolutionary War General and Famous Traitor, Benedict Arnold.January 3, 1754-Dated, Partially-Printed Document, Signed by the Judge, Isaac Huntington, Choice Very Fine. This original document regards legal claims made in court at Norwich, Connecticut by Benedict Arnold (the Father of the historic American Revolutionary War General and Traitor Benedict Arnold). It is boldly printed upon clean period laid paper in deep black and has fully completed manuscript portions, measures 6" x 7" and is in choice, clean overall condition. It reads, in part:"These are therefore in His Majesty's Name to command you, that of the money of the said Daniel Cuttler, or his goods or chattels within...".This is a legal order to arrest and take the goods and property of a debtor, and to find him and bring him to the front for judgment. It is extremely rare to find anything at all on Benedict Arnold III (the father). This Document refers to the FATHER. His young son will be only 15 years old when he joins the Army during the French and Indian War. Later, his son's Revolutionary War exploits are profound, and his history at that time well known and documented. Benedict Arnold's father's name is written within this document three times, and once again upon the reverse side docket as the plaintiff in this court case. It does not bear his actual autograph. A long notation from the Sheriffs Deputy on the upper reverse describes that the payment was not made and he had the Daniel Cuttler, "committed unto the Keeper of the Goal (prison) in Windham" for nonpayment of the debt due to Benedict Arnold.General Benedict Arnold was born the last of six children to Benedict Arnold III (1683-1761) and Hannah Waterman King in Norwich, Connecticut, in 1741.He was named after his great-grandfather Benedict Arnold, an early governor of the Colony of Rhode Island, and his brother Benedict IV, who died in infancy before Benedict Arnold V was born.Only Benedict and his sister Hannah survived to adulthood; his other siblings succumbed to yellow fever in childhood. Through his maternal grandmother, Arnold was a descendant of John Lothropp, an ancestor of at least four U.S. Presidents.The Arnold family was well off until the future general's father made several bad business deals that plunged the family into debt, and became an alcoholic, forcing his son to withdraw from school at 14 because the family could not afford the expense.His father's alcoholism and ill-health prevented him from training Arnold in the family mercantile business, but his mother's family connections secured an apprenticeship for Arnold with two of her cousins, brothers Daniel and Joshua Lathrop, who operated a successful apothecary and general merchandise trade in Norwich.

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IRA ALLEN's Official Vermont State Military Commission Appointed Major General

Lot 4: IRA ALLEN's Official Vermont State Military Commission Appointed Major General

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Description: AutographsIra Allen's Official State of Vermont Military Commission Appointed As "Major General" 3rd Division Vt State Militia(IRA ALLEN) (1751-1814). One of the Founders of Vermont, and Leaders of the "Green Mountain Boys." The brother of Ethan Allen.THOMAS CHITTENDEN (1730-1797). Founding figure of Vermont, and served as the First Governor of the State of Vermont (1790-1797).October 25, 1790-Dated Federal Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Thos. Chittenden" as Governor, State of Vermont, Official Military Commission Appointment for Ira Allen, Fine. This is an original Military Commission where Vermont Governor Thomas Chittenden appoints Ira Allen, as Major General of the Third Division of the Militia of Vermont (Green Mountain Boys). This remarkable Document measures 12.5" x 7.25", the reverse has some strips of archival fiber reinforcement repairs to the split vertical centerfold and other folds. The signature "Thos. Chittenden" is clearly readable yet somewhat light at the lower right. Boldly printed in black upon laid period paper, the engrossed manuscript portions are bold brown and easily readable. The Embossed Official Vermont State Seal remains fully intact at the left side central margin. This historic Document reads, in full:"By his EXECELLENCY --- THOMAS CHITTENDEN, Esquire, --- Captaingeneral, Governor and Commander in Chief, in and over the State of Vermont. -- To the Honorable Ira Allen Esquire... Greeting. --- You being elected Major General -- of the Third Division of the Militia of this State; and reposing special Trust and Confidence in your Patriotism, Valour and good Conduct, I DO, by Virtue of these Presents, in the Name and by the Authority of the State of Vermont, fully authorize and empower you the said Ira Allen to take Charge of said Division as their Major General. You will therefore carefully and diligently discharge the said Duty by doing and performing all and every Matter and Thing thereunto relating: You will observe and follow such Orders and Directions as you shall from Time to Time received from me, the Governor of this State: And all Officers and Soldiers under your Command, are to take Notice hereof, and yield due Obedience to your Orders as Major General in pursuance of the Trust in you reposed. --- GIVEN under my Hand, and the Seal of this State, in Council, dated the 25th Day of October, 1790. --- By His excellency's Command, -- (Signed) Joseph Fay Secy. --- (Signed) Thos. Chittenden".Docket notation upon the blank reverse reads: "Major Genl Allen -- 1790". The star shaped embossed paper Seal firmly affixed at left depicts the Great Seal of Vermont, which was designed by none other than Ira Allen. That Official State Seal is still used today. Upon the Seal, located beneath the name "Vermont" is the State Motto, "Freedom & Unity". A remarkable Document Signed by Two highly important, historic Founders of VERMONT.In 1771, Ira Allen left his native Connecticut for the New Hampshire Grants as a surveyor for the Onion River Land Company, which he and his brothers had established for buying lands in the area. He soon became involved in the settler's dispute with New York over conflicting land claims, and was an early member of the Green Mountain Boys militia along with brother Ethan Allen and others. In French, "green mountain" is "vert mont" pornounced "ver mont".He was a member of the Vermont Legislature, in 1776-1777, and was a leading figure in the declaration of the Vermont Republic in 1777. The Green Mountain Boys were organized to resist and evict those who supported New York's claims. During the American Revolution, the Green Mountain Boys militia fought against the British, capturing Fort Ticonderoga in 1775. In 1777, Ira Allen was one of the delegates to the convention held in Windsor Vermont declaring Vermont not only seperated from New York, but as an independent state.He helped draft a Vermont Constitution, the first Constitution anywhere to outlaw Slavery and grant universal male suffrage. These laws governed Vermont until it was admitted to the Union as the 14th State on March 4, 1791, five months after that document was signed.

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1877 Autograph Album Decorated With Ornate Original Art Works

Lot 5: 1877 Autograph Album Decorated With Ornate Original Art Works

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Description: Autographs1877 Autograph Album with Original Ornate Art Work1877, Autograph Album with Ornate Gold Embossing, Containing Scores of Autographs and some Original Art Work, Choice Extremely Fine.This is an original Autograph Album, with scores of Handwritten notes, poems, autographs and four pencil or ink drawings, spanning the years 1877 to 1883, mostly from Lancaster, Ohio and Cedar Rapids, Iowa. This Album contains 67 pages and measuring 5" x 7.75". The spine is cracked yet the contents are in overall superb condition. There is a waterstain inside the front cover which does not affect the contents. Its front page has an awesome Pen and Ink Drawing by Charles L. Schneider, showing Charles reviewing the buttermilk content of his glass, while flanked by a cow and a woman churning milk. This drawing was a gift to Jan Schneider, whose name is penciled in near the milkmaid. Also included within this Album are many signatures of family and friends, mostly during the years 1877-1880. A little farther into the book is a lovely pencil sketch of two sailing ships at sea and some people in a rowboat, Signed: "Frank E. Morris, Sept. 10th 1880 - Westwood, O(hio)."

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SIR FRANCIS BERNARD, 1766 Signed French and Indian War Military Commission

Lot 6: SIR FRANCIS BERNARD, 1766 Signed French and Indian War Military Commission

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Description: Autographs1766 Signed French and Indian War Military Commission of Samuel Barton: Pioneer & American Revolution Patriot SIR FRANCIS BERNARD, 1st Baronet (1712 - 1779). British Colonial Administrator who served as Governor of the Provinces of New Jersey and Massachusetts Bay. His policies and tactics in the governance of Massachusetts were instrumental in the building opposition to the rule of Parliament, leading towards the American Revolution. Including: Issuing Writs of Assistance; the Townshend Acts and requesting the presence of the British Army Troops in response to protests in 1768January 8th, 1766-Dated French and Indian War Period, Partially-Printed Military Appointment Signed, "Fra.(ncis) Bernard," as "Captain General and Governor in Chief, in and over His Majesty's Province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New England, and Vice-Admiral of the Same," Very Fine. This original Military Commission measures 12.5" x 14.75" is 1 page, very clean, even in tone with some folds with archival tape reinfocement on the reverse, ink smudges from when issued. This impressive, ornately designed Document is printed in black upon laid period paper and completed and signed in dark brown. Also Signed by "Jno. Cotton" as Deputy Secretary.It provides: "... His Majesty's Royal Commission ... To Samuel Barton ... to be Captain of the Third Military Company of Foot in Salem, in the First Regiment of Militia, in the County of Essex, whereof Benjamin Pickmam Esquire is Colonel." The blank reverse has an added manuscript statement as follows, in full: "Province of Massach. Bay --- Salem, Feby 4th, 1766 --- Hon. Captn Samuel Barton Esq took the Oath appointed by the Act of Parliament to be taken instead of the (oath) of Allegiance & Supremacy repeated & Subscribed to Declaration together with the Oath of a byie-- also the Oaths relative to the Bills of the other Go(vern)ments --- Cosign - John Higgman, Peter Frye - impow(ered) by Decl(aration)."Colonel Samuel Barton (1749 - 1810). Early Pioneer and Patriot Soldier of the American Revolution (1775-1783) and is remembered more for the Exploration and Settlement of what was to become Nashville, Tennessee. Outstanding, sharp and distinct official wax and paper embossed Seal is located at the upper right corner, below which is the deep bold brown signatures "Fra. Bernard" measuring fully 2.75" long. A very rare 1766 French and Indian War Military Commission.Colonel Samuel Barton (May 1749 - January 1810) was a Pioneer and Patriot of the American Revolution (1775-1783) but is remembered more for the Exploration and Settlement of what was to become Nashville, Tennessee. Little is known of his early youth.Family tradition holds that Samuel, born in Virginia, was left bound as an apprentice while his father returned to England for business only to be lost at sea. Recent y-DNA testing of a male descendent of Samuel Barton has shown that this branch of Barton's are part of a lineage whose earliest known member in America was Lewis Barton of Maryland.Barton may have first explored the Cumberland region as a teenager with the Scraggins Party of 1765. This is supported by the fact that biographical sources put him in Nashville "...when there were but four families residing in the place, and when it was necessary to take every precaution to guard against the Indians". Regardless of the chronology it is evident that he vacillated between his native Virginia and the wilds of Tennessee.In 1774 he fought as a ranger against Native Americans in Lord Dunmore's War. With the onset of the American Revolution he mustered in Virginia in June 1775. He served as Sergeant in Morgan's Rifles of the 7th Virginia Regiment, the acclaimed snipers. As an explorer, hunter and frontiersman Barton proved an ideal soldier. Botetourt County, Virginia court records log his marriage to Martha Robertson on March 10, 1778.With the advantages of military training and leadership he returned to Tennessee, then part of North Carolina, and contributed to the settling and development of Fort Nashborough, what was to become Nashville. His original home was called BARTON STATION and was located on Browns Creek where the Lipscomb University now stands. Samuel was a land trader. He bought and sold land grants given for military service in the Revolution.As a testament to the American faith in written law Barton, General James Robertson and other prominent men of the area drafted and signed the Cumberland Compact in May 1780. This document served as an informal "constitution" until Tennessee became the 16th State of the Union in 1796. In 1846, historian Albigence Waldo Putnam found the original document in a truck that had belonged to Barton. The settlement was governed by the "Tribunal of Notables," Barton being one of the twelve. In April 1781, a few days before the "Battle of the Bluffs" he suffered a shot in the wrist defending pioneers from Indians.On January 7, 1783, a second Cumberland Compact was created and Signed by Barton and nine other founders. Upon the creation of Davidson County in April of that year Barton was appointed as Justice of the Peace and Judge of the County Court. In October 1783 he was elected as Court Entry-Taker and was sworn in as 2nd Major of the Militia. In 1784 Samuel Barton was designated as one of the five Directors as well as Treasurer of the fledgling city. He was later selected as a Colonel of the Militia.In 1798, not yet 50 years of age, Samuel Barton resigned from civic life and moved his large family to what would the next year become Wilson County, Tennessee. For the last 12 years of life he farmed his extensive land holdings, having been granted more than 1,000 acres (4.0 km). His large plantation was on Jenning's Fork of Round Lick Creek. He took up the vocation of surveying and appraising land. His burial site is unknown. (From Wikipedia).Sir Francis Bernard, 1st Baronet (1712 - June, 16 1779) was a British Colonial Administrator who served as Governor of the Provinces of New Jersey and Massachusetts Bay. His policies and tactics in the governance of Massachusetts were instrumental in the building of broad-based opposition within the province to the rule of Parliament in the early years of the American Revolution.Appointed governor of New Jersey in 1758, he oversaw the province's participation in the later years of the French and Indian War, and had a generally positive relationship with the colonial legislature. In 1760 he was given the governorship of Massachusetts, where he had a stormy relationship with the assembly. He issued writs of assistance (essentially openended search warrants) early in his term, and handled poorly the popular outrage to first the Stamp Act and later the Townshend Acts, requesting the presence of British Army troops in response to protests in 1768. He was recalled after the publication of letters in which he was critical of the colony.After returning to England, he continued to advise the British government on colonial matters, calling for hardline responses to ongoing difficulties in Massachusetts that culminated in the 1773 Boston Tea Party. He suffered a stroke in 1771 and died in 1779, leaving a large family.Governor of New Jersey: Bernard's wife was cousin to Lord Barrington, who became a Privy Councillor in 1755. Probably through his connections to Barrington and the Pownalls, he secured an appointment as governor of the Province of New Jersey on 27 January 1758, a post that became available upon the death of Jonathan Belcher. Leaving some of his children with relatives, the couple sailed for North America with four of their children, arriving at Perth Amboy on 14 June.The colonies were in the middle of the French and Indian War at the time of Bernard's arrival. He established a good working relationship with New Jersey's assembly, and was able to convince the province to raise troops and funds for the ongoing war effort. He signed the Treaty of Easton, an agreement between New Jersey and Pennsylvania on one side, and a group of Indian tribes (the Lenape being of principal concern to New Jersey) fixing boundaries between colonial and Indian lands. This effort was important, for it reduced raiding on the frontiers and made possible to reallocation of provincial military strength to the war with New France.On behalf of King George II, Bernard established through a patent charter on 24 May 1760, the founding of Bernardston, New Jersey, later renamed Bernards Township and Bernardsville. His service as Royal Governor of New Jersey ended on 4 July 1760.Governor of Massachusetts: Through the influence of his connections in the colonial office, Bernard was appointed Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay in late 1759. Delays in communications and travel were such that he did not arrive in Boston until 2 August 1760. Although initially well received, his tenure in Massachusetts was difficult, because he was responsible for enforcing unpopular laws and taxes, and his tactics in attempting to do so made him many enemies. His difficulties started when he issued Writs of Assistance in 1760 to customs tax collectors. These writs, which were essentially open-ended search warrants, were judicially controversial and so unpopular that their issuance was explicitly disallowed by the United States Constitution. His difficulties continued through other tax measures, including the Stamp Act, which united many factions in the province against him.O B[ernard]! Great thy Villainy has been!Schem'd to destroy our Liberty and Peace:The publick Eye attentively has seenThy base Endeavours, and has watch'd our Ease- Anonymous pamphlet, 1769In 1767 the passage by Parliament of the Townshend Acts again raised a storm of protest in the colonies. In Massachusetts the provincial assembly issued a circular letter, calling on the other colonies to join it in a boycott of the goods subject to the Townshend taxes. Bernard was ordered in April 1768 by Lord Hillsborough, who had recently been appointed to the newly created office of Colonial Secretary, to dissolve the assembly if it failed to retract the letter. The assembly refused, and Bernard prorogued it in July. Bernard and local customs officials also made repeated requests for military support, due to the hostility exhibited, especially to the latter, who were charged with collecting the taxes. British Army troops arrived in Boston in October 1768, further heightening tensions. B ernard was vilified in the local press, and accused of writing letters to the ministry that mischaracterized the situation. Although he was challenged to release those letters he refused. Opposition agents in London were eventually able to acquire some of his letters, which reached members of the Sons of Liberty in April 1769. They were promptly published by the radical Boston Gazette, along with deliberations of the governor's council. One letter in particular, in which Bernard called for changes to the Massachusetts Charter to increase the governor's power by increasing the council's dependence on him, was the subject of particularly harsh treatment, and prompted the assembly to formally request that "he might be forever removed from the Government of the Province." He was recalled to England, and Lieutenant Governor Thomas Hutchinson became acting governor. When he left Boston on 1 August, the town held an impromptu celebration, decorated the Liberty Tree, and rang church bells.Among his accomplishments in Massachusetts was the design of Harvard Hall at Harvard University, and the completion of a governor's mansion in present day Jamaica Plain near Jamaica Pond in Boston. The plan for Bernardstown, Massachusetts was laid out during his administration and is named for him. Bernard also named the Berkshires and Pittsfield, Massachusetts.(From Wikipedia)

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1839 MARTIN VAN BUREN Signed Four-Language Whaling Ship's Passport

Lot 7: 1839 MARTIN VAN BUREN Signed Four-Language Whaling Ship's Passport

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Description: Autographs1839 Martin Van Buren Whaling Ship's Passport MARTIN VAN BUREN (1782-1862). 8th President of the United States, First President born as an American citizen.June 22, 1839-Dated. Partially-Printed Document Signed, "M Van Buren" as President, 21.25" x 16.75", 1 page, Very Fine. Being a Four Language Ship's Passport for the "Harvest", "Charles Fisher" Master or Commander of the burden "312 & 52/95 tons or thereabouts, lying at present in the port of New Bedford bound for Indian Ocean and laden with Provisions, Stores and Utensils for a whaling voyage." Also Signed by "John Forsyth" as Secretary of State. This boldly printed Document is sharp in appearance and very clean, having just a few scattered traces of tone and a trivial edge fold split of no real consequence. The fine blue ink signature of Martin Van Buren measures about 3.25" long, that of Forsyth is bold deep brown and 3.5" long. A nice example for any better quality autograph collection and is excellent for display.

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1838 MARTIN VAN BUREN Signed Ornate Military Commission on Vellum

Lot 8: 1838 MARTIN VAN BUREN Signed Ornate Military Commission on Vellum

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Description: Autographs1838 Martin Van Buren Signed Ornate Military Commission MARTIN VAN BUREN (1782-1862). 8th President of the United States, First President born as an American Citizen!July 10, 1838-Dated. Partially-Printed Document Signed, "M. Van Buren" as President, on Vellum, measuring 13.75" x 17.75", 1 page, City of Washington, Choice Extremely Fine. Also bearing the magnificent bold deep blue signature "J. R. Poinsett" as Secretary of War. Joel Roberts Poinsett (1779-1851) was an American politician and diplomat. He was the first U.S. agent in South America, a member of the South Carolina legislature and the United States House of Representatives, the first United States Minister to Mexico (the United States did not appoint ambassadors until 1896), a U.S. Secretary of War under Martin Van Buren, and a cofounder of the National Institute for the Promotion of Science and the Useful Arts (a predecessor of the Smithsonian Institution), and introduced the Poinsettia, a popular Christmas flower. This being an official Ornate Military Army Commission appointing George M. Griffin as Assistant Adjutant General. This Document reads, in part:"The President of the United States of America, To all who shall see these presents greeting: Know Ye, that reposing special trust and Confidence in the patriotism, valour, fidelity and abilities of George M. Griffin, I have nominated and by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, do appoint him Assistant Adjutant General, with the branch rank of Captain in the service of the United States:..." Docketed on reverse in blue, "Commission as Assistant Adjutant General United States Army July 7th, 1839".Fresh and clean bearing a large bold signature "M. Van Buren" measuring over 3" long, plus a remarkable signature of "J. R. Poinsett." Its white star shaped official paper Seal is fully intact at the upper left. Overall, this Military Commission is in vastly above average quality and is excellent for framing and display.The flower known as Poinsettias received their name in the United States in honor of Joel Roberts Poinsett, who introduced the plant into the country in 1828. Poinsett was a botanist, physician and the first United States Ambassador to Mexico. He sent cuttings of the plant he had discovered in Southern Mexico to his home in Charleston, South Carolina. The word Poinsettia is traditionally capitalized because it is named after a person.

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Rare Signed Signature Card By CHRISTOPHER - KIT - CARSON

Lot 9: Rare Signed Signature Card By CHRISTOPHER - KIT - CARSON

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Description: AutographsChristopher "Kit" Carson Famous American FrontiersmanCHRISTOPHER "KIT" CARSON (1809-1868). American Frontiersman, Trapper, Scout, Indian Agent and Folk Hero.Extremely Rare Signature, "C Carson" nicely written in black ink upon a 3.5" x 2" Autograph Signature Card, Very Choice Crisp Extremely Fine. This Signed Card is fresh and clean having excellent overall eye appeal. It has been tipped on its blank reverse to a slightly larger white leaf for its preservation and display. This lot includes a black and white 5" x 7" reproduction of a photograph of Kit Carson, obtained from the Library of Congress. Ideal for framing along with the signature. Exceedingly rare, a valuable and highly popular autograph. (2 items).Cristopher "Kit" Carson. American Frontiersman, Trapper, Scout, Indian Agent and Folk Hero. After an early childhood in Boone's Lick, on the Missouri frontier, he ran away from home, joining an expedition to Santa Fe, where he learned to trap for furs and fight Indians. In the 1840s, he served as a guide with John C. Fremont's three expeditions to Oregon and California.He became a national hero for his daring in several battles for the conquest of California. Returning to private life, Carson farmed and hearded sheep in Taos, and after 1853, served as a U.S. Indian agent to the Ute tribe. He served in the Mexican War, and fought for the Union in the Southwest during the Civil War. Brevetted Brigadier General of Volunteers for gallantry in the battle of Valverde and for distinguished service in New Mexico.In 1866 he was named Commander of Fort Garland, Colorado, but was forced to resign the following year due to bad health. Mustered out November 22, 1867 and died May 23, 1868.

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MARK W. CLARK, General, U.S. Army Pencil and Charcoal Illustration Signed

Lot 10: MARK W. CLARK, General, U.S. Army Pencil and Charcoal Illustration Signed

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Description: Autographs"Mark W. Clark General, U.S. Army" Signed Charcoal ArtMARK W. CLARK (1896-1984). American General during World War II and the Korean War, the youngest Lieutenant General (3-Star General) in the U.S. Army, best-known for Operation Torch (the invasion of French North Africa) and the campaign in Italy.Original Artwork, handsome Hand-drawn Pencil and Charcoal Portrait Illustration Signed, "Mark W. Clark, General, U.S. Army" measuring 18" x 14", Choice Very Fine. It is also Signed and Dated by the artist, "D.A. Ahrens, 1946" below the image at lower right. A distinguished waist-up portrait of the General in his military uniform. Signed in black ink across his uniform pocket and left arm. Slight faint horizontal crease at top of Clark's shoulders. Clark had a long and distinguished military career, including service in France in World War I, planning the invasion of North Africa in World War II, directing the Italian campaign as Commander of the 15th Army Group, serving in the Korean War as UN Commander and Commander in Chief of the U.S. Far East command, and signing the Korean armistice.Mark Wayne Clark (May 1, 1896 - April 17, 1984) was an American general during World War II and the Korean War and was the youngest lieutenant general (three-star general) in the U.S. Army. He had a distinguished career in World War II; his best-known campaign was Operation Torch (the invasion of French North Africa) and the campaign in Italy.During World War I, he commanded a company of soldiers in 1917 and was seriously wounded by shrapnel. After the war, Clark's abilities were noticed by General George Marshall.During World War II, he was the USA´s Commander in Italy. He is known for his triumphal entry into Rome in 1944, the first major Axis city to fall. Some detractors say he ignored British orders, and they blame him for the escape of the German 10th army which he let slip in his pursuit for the glory of entering Rome first. The German 10th army joined with their countrymen at the Transimene Line. Clark became the youngest American to be promoted to general in 1945.Both Winston Churchill and General Dwight D. Eisenhower considered him a brilliant staff officer and trainer. Clark won many awards, including the Distinguished Service Cross for extreme bravery in war, subordinate only to the Medal of Honor.(From Wikipedia)

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JOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE, 30th President  Signed Presidential Appointment

Lot 11: JOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE, 30th President Signed Presidential Appointment

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Description: AutographsChoice "Calvin Coolidge" Signed Presidential AppointmentJOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE (July 4, 1872 - January 5, 1933). 30th President of the United States (1923-1929) a Republican, born on the 4th of July.February 24, 1925-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Calvin Coolidge" as President, 1 page, measuring 23" x 19" at Washington, DC, Choice Crisp Near Mint. This is an official Presidential Appointment for "Walter F. Boyle, of Georgia" to serve as a "Foreign Service Officer of Class five." Countersigned by "Charles E. Hughes" as Secretary of State. Magnificent Federal Embossed White Paper Seal being distinct and fully intact. There is one small corner handling crease in the bottom left and a vertical crease at left that should hardly be noticed once properly matted and framed for display. A lovely quality, fresh Document boasting a huge crisp 3.75" long "Calvin Coolidge" signature.

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Important Original (GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER) Archive of Ten Items

Lot 12: Important Original (GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER) Archive of Ten Items

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Description: AutographsArchive of Soldier From George Armstrong Custer's Third Cavalry Division Who Was Present At Lee's Surrender(GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER). Highly Important Custer Related Civil War Era Archive Containing TEN Items.This important original Archive contains Ten Items, all belonging to Private Robert McKinley, Co. I, 2nd West Virginia Cavalry. That unit which was a part of George Armstrong Custer's Third Cavalry Division at the time of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's surrender to Union General U. S. Grant at Appomattox Court House, on April 9, 1865.This historic Archive contains items that are both exceptional in rarity and value, as well as more common, including the following 10 items:1. Carte de Visite of George A. Custer (Katz-70), with a notation on the back: "Presented to Robert McKinley June 7th 1865 by Brevet Major General George A Custer Commanding 3rd Cavalry - as a fare well momento." The CDV is worn and toned, with some scattered spotting and some creases at edges which don't touch Custer's image. The mount is stamped "John Brown - Wheeling, West Va." with a period 2¢ U.S. Revenue stamp is on the verso. Very Good. 2. Handwritten, c. 1865 Contemporary Period Transcribed Document, by "L. W. Barnhart, Capt. & A. A. General," documentation of General Custer's Address to the 3rd Cavalry Division, on April 9, 1865, at the Appomattox Court House, 4 pages, measuring 8" x 5", Fine. It is written upon contemporary paper with proper ink and style for the period. We can not prove this to be either a draft or copied statement but further research may help make that determination. It is a highly important, possibly firsthand account of Custer's "Address" by officers who were present at that historic event. This remarkable Document reads, in part,"... Your commanding general avails himself of this, his first opportunity, to express to you his admiration of the heroic manner in which you have passed through the series of battles, which to-day resulted in the surrender of the enemy's entire army. The record established by your indomitable courage, is unparalleled in the annals of war. Your prowess has won for you even the respect and admiration of your enemies. During the past six months, although in most instances confronted by superior numbers, you have captured from the enemy in open battle one hundred eleven pieces of field artillery, sixty-five battle flags, and upwards of ten thousand prisoners of war, including seven General officers... You have never lost a gun - never lost a color - and have never been defeated." --- In closing: "And now, speaking for myself alone, when the war is ended, and the task of the historian begins -- when those deeds of daring which have rendered the name and fame of the Third Cavalry Division imperishable, are inscribed upon the bright pages of our country's history, I only ask that my name may be written as that of the commander of the Third Cavalry Division."Partially Handwritten and written in an upside down manner at the top of page 3 is text reading, "Presented to Robert McKinlay Comy 2nd West Va Cavalry Third Cavalry Division." The pages are toned and there is an archival repair to one fold; otherwise, boldly written. It should be mentioned that more common "Printed" Broadside versions of Custer's Congratulatory Address sell for over $3,000 and none have been offered to our knowledge in recent times. The value of this original, period Handwritten Copy by a Union Officer who was very likely part of Custer's own staff is certainly worth significantly more.3. Robert McKinley's Civil War Discharge Certificate, dated June 30, 1865, at Wheeling, W. Va. and Signed by his Commanding Officer, Capt. A. Smith, measuring 9.75" x 7.75", Fine. The Certificate notes that McKinley was born in Scotland, that he joined in 1862 for three years and that he was a farmer by occupation. Toned and soiled, still legible.4. Small size New Testament Bible, carried by a relative, with notations of war activities along the margins. Front cover is missing and back cover is detached, soiled.5. Time Line of the War written by Robert McKinley on five pages of a notebook, measuring 6.75" x 4.75" with some pages loose. Also, notes on McKinley's marriage, illnesses and injuries he suffered from serving in the Civil War.6. Affidavit filed regarding Robert McKinley's pension, by a doctor who was a member of the same Company as McKinley in 1864. He gives a notarized statement regarding heart trouble McKinley had during the Civil War.7. Program for Union Veteran Legion Encampment No. 31, Newark, Ohio, giving the roster for 1912. McKinley is listed.8. U. V. L. Ribbon pinned with a U. V. L. Button to a white Handkerchief, along with a green Harp-shaped Irish Pin and Ribbon.9. Image of McKinley as an older man, measuring 4.5" x 3.75" unevenly cut with some age spots and mounting remnants on its verso.10. After Supper Address given by Robert McKinley to members of the U. V. L., 5 pages, written in pencil, Fine. Light soiling and some fold splits. A highly patriotic address to his old comrades, naming the battles in which their members participated, in part:"...and last of all Appomatox I had the Honer of being a member of the 3rd Cavalry Division under General George A Custer... was at Appomattox when General R. E. Lee thowed up the Sponge to U. S. Grant..."This remarkable historic Civil War Archive is extraordinary. The Handwritten Transcript of General George Armstrong Custer's "Address to the 3rd Cavalry Division, April 9, 1865, at the Appomattox Court House," combined with the Carte de Visite and the ancillary provenance and related materials make this a very unique opportunity for Civil War and George Custer collectors. (10 items)The 2nd West Virginia was recruited mainly in Ohio. It was organized by Colonel William M. Bolles and operated about Western Virginia until July 1864 when it moved to the Shenandoah Valley. It fought at Kearnstown, Chambersburg, Opequan, Fisher's Hill, Cedar Creek, Five Forks, Sailor's Creek, Appomattox Station, and was at Appomattox during the surrender of the Confederate Army.The Regiment led the Army of the Potomac in the Grand Review at Washington, then travelled to Wheeling and was mustered out on June 30,1865. During its service, the Regiment lost 4 officers and 77 enlisted men killed and mortally wounded; 115 enlisted men died from disease.

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Declaration Of Independence c. 1825 Broadside Printed Upon Silk Not Recorded

Lot 13: Declaration Of Independence c. 1825 Broadside Printed Upon Silk Not Recorded

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Description: AutographsDeclaration of Independence "Discovery" Broadside Printed Upon Silk Not Recorded In "Threads Of History"(Declaration of Independence). c. 1825 Broadside Print on Silk: "IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. - THE - Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of AMERICA. - Published by Thomas Henri Gleason, at T, M, Skinner's Printing Office, Auburn, N. Y." Choice Extremely Fine.This newly discovered Silk Printing of the Declaration of Independence measures a large size 21.5" x 17.25" and includes the complete text. It is printed in an unusual paragraph form, with the printed names of the Signers at bottom. It has strong sharply printed black text upon a clean cream-color Silk. The boldly styled and printed title and header is in different font styles and has decorative designs, being partially in script form. The printed signatures of the Signers of the Declaration appear at the bottom, "John Hancock" being substantially larger than the rest, and it is offset toward the top right, above all of the other Signers. A variety of period typefaces have been used to highlight portions of the text. The printer's information appears in the bottom margin. There is no date of manufacture, yet is likely created to celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, which took place in 1826.This exceedingly rare specimen is Not Listed in the major reference "Threads of History," published by the Smithsonian Institution. Nor have any other examples appeared in "American Book Prices Current" going back over twenty years, though we have located just two other examples. Both the left and right side outer margin edges are lightly frayed with a few trivial outer edge splits to original to this silk. There are previous archival tabs on the blank reverse which stretch it over a piece of white foam board for display. It is in superior quality for its age and silk material with only a few faint folds and light creases. This silk is whole and solid having no major tears, thins or rips. Other than for some minor darker extreme outer edge tone, this Declaration of Independence has nice overall eye appeal.To our best knowledge, this impressive example has only before been twice offered. It is far more rare than it's other contemporaries, such as the (1818) "Tyler" Broadside; (1819) "Woodruff" Broadside; (1819) "Binns" Broadside; (c. 1820-25) "Huntington" Broadside; (1823) "Stone" Broadside; and even the popular (1848) Peter Force Broadside. Plus, this extreme rarity is printed upon delicate silk, not paper or vellum.The use of different fonts and type styles makes it particularly attractive in design. Knowing that this example is one of now only Three Known, and ranks as the very finest in quality as one is heavily pasted down, the other is stained with some splits. This historic Declaration of Independence is missing in virtually every collection.Thomas Henri Gleason is listed with "The Quebec Directory for 1822: Containing an Alphabetical List of the Merchants, Traders and House Keepers &c., Within the City." In 1823 Gleasom published, "Stenographic synopsis, or, - An abstract of the most approved system of short-hand : containing the whole theory of this important art ... qualify a person for taking the substance of any discourse delivered in public." Thought to have been written in Quebec.T. M. Skinner, Printer, Auburn, N. Y., is listed as publishing a periodical from c. 1818 to 1821. He printed, The Farmer's calendar, or, Utica almanack for the year of our Lord 1819 ..." Auburn (N.Y.) : Published and sold by T.M. Skinner at the Auburn Gazette office and bookstore, (1818), listed in: "Early American imprints." Second series; no. 51769. He also printed the book titled, "Proceedings of the Anti-masonic Republican Convention of the County of Cayuga : held at Auburn, January 1, 1830, with their address to the farmers and mechanics of the County." Plus other period items.

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1796 WILLIAM ELLERY Autograph Letter Signed - New London CT Lighthouse Whale Oil

Lot 14: 1796 WILLIAM ELLERY Autograph Letter Signed - New London CT Lighthouse Whale Oil

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Description: Autographs1796 "Wm Ellery" Autograph Letter Signed - Signer from RI New Bedford Whale Oil For The New London LighthouseWILLIAM ELLERY (1727-1820). Signer of the Declatation of Independence from Rhode Island.April 28, 1796-Dated. Autograph Letter Signed, "Wm Ellery" as Collector of Customs for the district of Newport, 6.75" x 8", 2 pages, Custom House, at Port of Newport (Rhode Island), Choice Very Fine. This Letter is written to Jedediah Huntington, the Superintendent of the Custom House at New London, Connecticut. Jedediah Huntington (1743-1818), also known as Jedidiah Huntington, was an American General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. In 1778 he was a member of the court-martial that tried General Charles Lee, and in 1780 of the one that condemned Major André. After the war, he was Collector of Customs at New London, Connecticut. This excellent, period Letter is beautifully penned by Ellery in rich deep brown upon very clean laid paper. His signature is sharp and attractive, measuring 1.5" long at the conclusion. Overall, an impressive quality Letter that is excellent for display.Ellery had been appointed Collector of Customs for the district of Newport by President George Washington in 1790, which post he held for 30 years until his death. Here, William Ellery pens a letter regarding supplying (Whale) Oil from the whaling port of New Bedford (MA.), to the Lighthouse at New London. His excellent content Letter reads, in full:"Sir --- Yesterday I recd a letter from the Commr of the Revenue directing me out of the best of the Oil purchased or to be purchased by me to send to the Connecticut Light house a full supply to April 15th 1797 after deducting from the estimated quantity for a year the number of gallons on hand.You will be pleased therefore immediately to inform me what quantify will be necessary for a full supply to that period, after making the deduction mentioned. This Oil will be shipped from New Bedford, and by agreement the Oil strained from head matter purchased there is to be shipped in the course of the next month.Please to inform me what number of Lamps are used in your Light house, the capacity of each and what quantity of Oil upon an average is consumed every night. I am, With respect, Sir, Yr. obedt. Servant Wm Ellery Supt. L. House --- P. S. In your certificate of goods exported by Augustin Ricardio which were imported in the Diet of Newport in the nuestro senora del carmen is a small mistake. -- The whole amt of duties is 229,,56 -- The deduct. of 1 pr. cent - 2,29 leaves - 227,27 - not 226,27 as in the Certificate." On the verso is written, ostensibly by Jedidiah Huntington:"May 6, 1796 --- Sir, --- I have your letter of April. I shall want 600 Gall oil for supply to the L. House until 15 April.There are 3 Lamps in our L. House holding about one gallon - we calculate that a little more than 2 Gall. oil are consumed every night on average. --- I am (initialed) JH (?)".ELLERY, WILLIAM (1727-1820) was a Signer of the Declaration of Independence; American political leader; Member of the Continental Congress (1776- 81 and 1783-85). Born in Newport, Rhode Island. He was drawn into Colonial politics, and became a leading member of the Rhode Island "Sons of Liberty," which protested the hated Stamp Acts (1765) by burning effigies of local Royal Stamp Vendors at the Newport Courthouse.Ellery clearly regarded his participation in the Congress of 1776, when the Independence resolution was adopted, as the high-point of his public career. After the Revolutionary War, Ellery was elected Chief Justice of the Superior Court of Rhode Island (1785), but he never took his seat so that he could remain in Congress. After retiring from Congress, he was appointed as the Commissioner of the Continental Loan Office for Rhode Island (1786-90). Later he was appointed Collector of the Customs for the District of Newport (1790-1820) by President George Washington, being retained by President Thomas Jefferson and his successors.It was recorded by a descendant that, when the engrossed Declaration of Independence was formally signed, Ellery "... placed himself by the side of Charles Thomson, the Secretary of the Continental Congress and observed the expression and manner of each member, as be came up to sign the Declaration. He used to describe this scene with great spirit ... " Observing the expressions on the faces of the delegates as they affixed their signatures, Ellery reported that all displayed only "undaunted resolution".Jedediah Huntington was born in Norwich, Connecticut, and was the son of Jabez Huntington. He graduated at Harvard in 1763. He was engaged in commercial pursuits with his father, was an active Son of Liberty, and a member of the Committee of Correspondence that was established at a Norwich town meeting on 6 June 1774.He raised a regiment in which he was made captain, joined the Continental Army at Cambridge, Massachusetts, on 26 April 1775. He aided in repulsing the British at Danbury, Connecticut, in April 1776. He "... fought courageously during the Battle of Bunker Hill, from which he emerged a Colonel."Having been appointed Brigadier General on 12 May 1777, he joined the main army near Philadelphia in September of that year, and in May 1778, was ordered to Hudson River.In 1778 he was a member of the court-martial that tried Gen. Charles Lee and in 1780 of the one that condemned Major André. He entertained many distinguished officers in his house, among whom were Lafayette, Steuben, and Pulaski. When Lauzun's Legion was stationed at Lebanon during the winter of 1780/1, he invited that commander and his officers to a banquet.He was one of the first board of foreign missions, and a zealous supporter of charitable institutions. His first wife, Faith, was a daughter of Governor Trumbull, and his second wife was the sister of Bishop Moore of Virginia. He was one of the organizers of the Society of the Cincinnati. He became Collector of the Port of New London in 1789 and held the office 26 years.The General Jedidiah Huntington House in Norwichtown, Connecticut, survives and was listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places in 1970.(From Wikipedia)

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EDMOND CITIZEN GENET, Autograph Note Signed, French Ambassador 1831

Lot 15: EDMOND CITIZEN GENET, Autograph Note Signed, French Ambassador 1831

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Description: AutographsHistoric Citizen Genet French Ambassador Signed PaymentEDMOND CITIZEN GENÊT (1763-1834). Historic French Ambassador to the U.S. during the French Revolution.August 28, 1831-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed, "E. C. Genet" in brown ink, measuring 2.75" x 6.75", Very Fine. This original note reads, in full: "Mr. Hallenbeck Please to let Ephraym Senior have for a dollars worth and charge the same to my account, August 1831. - E. C. Genet." The note is written upon period laid paper which is matted along with a 3.75" x 3.5" circular engraving 3.25" in diameter of Genet, which has all been nicely matted to an overall size of 9.75" x 18.5". The note itself is lightly worn with some normal tone and Genet's use of his English here is quite interesting. Properly framed, this matted display will be ready to hang for presentation.Edmond C. Genet (1763-1834), was the French Ambassador to the U.S. during the French Revolution. He solicited support for the French against the British and Spanish, and also tried to involve the U.S. in the French Revolution itself. President George Washington insisted on remaining neutral. Washington later gave refuge to "Citizen Genêt" when he was recalled to France to face trial, and ultimately later became a U.S. citizen himself!

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Rare 1871 ULYSSES S. GRANT Signed Full Presidential Pardon

Lot 16: Rare 1871 ULYSSES S. GRANT Signed Full Presidential Pardon

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Description: AutographsImpressive & Rare "U.S. Grant" Full Presidential PardonULYSSES S. GRANT. 18th U.S. President, First Lieutenant-General since George Washington, Led the Union Armies to victory in the last years of the Civil War.June 27, 1871, Manuscript Document Signed, "U.S. Grant", 2 pages, measuring 15.5" x 10.5", City of Washington, Choice Very Fine or better. Cosigned by Hamilton Fish, as Secretary of State. This impressive, large size boldly presented original document being an official Presidential Pardon for a man accused of "illicitly distilling." It reads, in part:"Whereas, on the Second Monday in August, 1869, in the District Court of the United States for the District of North Carolina, one Peter Mull was convicted of illicitly distilling, and was sentenced to pay a fine... And whereas, Governor Caldwell, P.W. Perry, Supervisor of the Internal Revenue, Deputy Marshall Foote and U.S. Attorney Starbuck, recommended his pardon, on the ground that he is innocent of any intentional violation of the law.Now, therefore, be it known, that I, Ulysses S. Grant, President of the United States of America, in consideration of the promises, divers other good and sufficient reasons thereunto moving, do hereby grant to the said Peter Mull, a full and unconditional pardon."It is quarter folded with some light wear and has a small unobtrusive central reinforcement on the blank back along a seam, which is far from Grant's signature and the Presidential Seal. The paper is quite crisp, the inked text is very dark and sharp. The Presidential Seal is virtually mint.Signed boldly on the second page, "U.S. Grant," which measures a huge 4" long. This lot also includes a Civil War period Carte-de-visite (CDV) image of Grant from the Paris studio of E. Neurdein, that seems perfect for framing. We sold a similar pardon, for Murder, in our November 14, 2000 auction, Lot 89, in the same quality for a price of $5,175. This is indeed a wonderful example of a rare, official Presidential Pardon by President Grant. (2 items)

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1765 JOHN HANCOCK Signed Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY Ticket

Lot 17: 1765 JOHN HANCOCK Signed Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY Ticket

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Description: Autographs1765 "John Hancock" Signed "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Historic Boston, Mass. Lottery Ticket & Superbly FramedJOHN HANCOCK (1737-1793). First Signer of the Declaration of Independence, President of the Continental Congress, Governor of Massachusetts.June 1765-Dated Pre-Revolutionary War, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "John Hancock," bold "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Boston, Massachusetts, Signed Lottery Ticket, Framed, Choice Extremely Fine. John Hancock was the famous First Signer of the Declaration of Independence and Acted as the President of the Continental Congress and the Governor of Massachusetts. This original, fully authentic Colonial Period Lottery Ticket measuring a full 2" x 3.5" is boldly Signed in rich brown ink "John Hancock." This historic, "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Boston, Massachusetts, Lottery Ticket has a virtually invisible small deft repair at its top center edge with sharply printed deep black text. It is very well centered with full margin border designs. Overall, this extremely rare and historic lottery ticket has a pleasing, even appearance and the large deep brown signature "John Hancock" is very attractive. Custom Framed to about 14" x 15.5" with black and brown inner felt matting in a most expensive, high quality "museum" glass and standards frame.This important "John Hancock" Signed Lottery Ticket is particularly important because it is from early in his public career. He signed this Lottery Ticket in the year following his first election to the Massachusetts General Court. A similar "John Hancock" Signed Faneuil Hall Lottery Ticket has previously sold for about $26,450 in a 2007 Stack's, New York City auction in about the same condition. This example is truly impressive, being of museum quality, certainly an important highlight centerpiece for any autograph, lottery ticket or Colonial Americana collection. Magnificently custom double felt matted and professionally framed in its extremely expensive, absolutely gorgeous gold-gilt wooden museum quality frame. Ready to immediately hang prominently on display.John Hancock's (1737-1793) political career began in 1764, the year he inherited his uncle's fortune and shipping business, when he became a Boston Selectman (member of the city council). In 1766 he was elected to the Massachusetts General Court. During the 1770's his fame as a Patriot spread, and he was elected or appointed to increasingly important offices.

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ANDREW JACKSON Autograph Letter Signed Twice; Andrew Jackson and A. Jackson

Lot 18: ANDREW JACKSON Autograph Letter Signed Twice; Andrew Jackson and A. Jackson

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Description: AutographsAutograph Letter Signed twice "Andrew Jackson" and "A. Jackson" Who Writes About "The blessings of education"ANDREW JACKSON (1767-1845). Seventh President of the United States.May 26, 1826-Dated, Exceptional Content Autograph Letter Signed Twice, "Andrew Jackson" and "A. Jackson," measuring 7.75" x 12.5", 2.25 pages, at Nashville, TN. , Choice Extremely Fine. This beautifully penned Letter is superior in quality and carefulness of execution by Jackson than any other we have offered. This Letter is Signed Twice with one signature measuring 3.75" long the second signature measures 1.75" long, both written in deep bold brown. It is written to "Gentlemen" (General Planche, Col. Preston Atty at Law, Mayor A. Daveson).Here, Andrew Jackson writes on, "the blessings of education" to the benefactors of what would become the University of Nashville. He hopes to help finance two professorships named in honor of the Marquis de Lafayette and himself. This wonderful Letter fully written in Jackson's own hand in rich brown ink upon very clean, period wove paper, reads in full:"Nashville Tennessee -- May 26th 1826 --- Gentlemen --- I take the liberty to address you upon a subject on which I feel great interest, as it is one with which I know the welfare and happiness of our country to be intimately connected. It relates to the blessings of education which, without doubt, constitute the chief support of the liberties which our forefathers have bequeathed to us.There is now in operation in Nashville a college which, with a little more pecuniary encouragement, is likely to become on of the most flourishing institutions in the United States. Situate in a healthful climate, in the great valley of the West, where the feelings, habits, and manners of the people are purely Republican; and where from its continuity to the Cumberland River, the means of support are cheap and abundant, it will extend its advantages to the poor as well as the rich - can propose for the service of their country the sons of the farmers and mechanics, as well as those who by fortune are exempt from the necessities of labour. The President is an accomplished gentleman of the first acquirements: and the subordinate professors are gentlemen highly distinguished for literary and scientific attainments. But to place upon a lasting foundation the prosperity of this college, it is requisite to obtain funds for two more professorships which were created last year, and which the board of Trustees have thought proper (in honor of the good Lafayette, and the humble services I had rendered the country) to call by the names of Lafayette and Jackson.It is well known that the good Lafayette is destitute of the means to make a permanent endowment of this nature, as is the case, also with myself. Otherwise these professorships would have been filled ere this. Situate as we are then, the only alternative is to appeal to the liberality of those who have the means to make donations, and the disposition to yield them for the lasting benefit of an institution so well calculated to prepare the American youth for the councils of our common country.Without doubt the Trustees had two motives in view in honoring Lafayette & myself (if I may be pardoned for speaking of myself in conjunction with that illustrious benefactor) with the names of those professorships-the one to compliment us with the perpetuity which it was that the institution may experience-the other, to operate upon the feelings of such as may devise an additional endowment from this circumstance to contribute to an endowment which, with the smiles of providence, will I trust redound to the credit of its patrons, and the general course of knowledge.The object of this letter then, Gentlemen, is to ask you to present, on cause to be presented to the good citizens of Orleans the enclosed paper, or one of this purport, and to received & remit such aid as each citizen may be disposed to give. It is not expected that any will give but a small sum-small donations will enable the more persons to aid in the establishment of these professorships, and to testify their respect for the cause of literature and science. --- I am very respectfully --- Your mo. Obdt. Servt. --- (Signed) Andrew Jackson(This Letter Continues): PS. --- Will you be good enough to acknowledge the receipt of this letter, & confirm the probability of the success of this appeal to your citizens - any expense that may accrue that may not be covered by donations made, you will please call on me for, which shall be remitted. --- (Signed) A. Jackson"This exceptional content Autograph Letter Signed twice, "Andrew Jackson" and "A. Jackson" about "The blessings of education" includes a typed transcript, plus a small early printed portrait image of Jackson with his signature in facsimile below. A truly great, superb quality ALS that is certain to reign as a significant highlight in any Autograph collection.The predecessor to the University of Nashville, Davidson Academy, was founded as a preparatory school for boys in Nashville,Tennessee in 1789. In 1802 this institution moved to a building in downtown Nashville. The facility, named Cumberland Hall, was located at 300 Peabody St., on the corner of what is now Peabody St. and Third Avenue.The building no longer stands, but a Tennessee State Historical Marker was erected on the site. In 1806, Davidson Academy changed its name to Cumberland College. Andrew Jackson served on the board of trustees for many years during this time. When Reverend Phillip Lindsley was named the chancellor of Cumberland College in 1824, he announced plans to create a grand university. In 1826, the Tennessee State Legislature changed the charter of Cumberland College to the University of Nashville.In 1827, future Confederate General Gideon Pillow was part of a graduating class of twelve. Under Reverend Phillip Lindsley, the University of Nashville provided educational instruction to young men. The quality of the school's instruction caused the city of Nashville to be referred to as the Athens of the South, as it was considered one of the leading universities of the day.

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Autograph, JOHN JAY Signed 1772 New York City Manuscript Land Indenture

Lot 19: Autograph, JOHN JAY Signed 1772 New York City Manuscript Land Indenture

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Description: Autographs"John Jay" Signed 1772 Manuscript NY City Land IndentureJOHN JAY (1745-1829). President of the Continental Congress (Dec. 1778-Sept. 1779), American Jurist and historic Statesman, helped Benjamin Franklin Negotiate the Revolutionary War Peace with Great Britain, Governor of New York, First Chief Justice of the Supreme CourtMay 11, 1772-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed, JOHN JAY, written upon fine watermarked laid period paper, New York, Very Fine. This document is 2 pages, folio, measuring 14.5" x 10", complete with integral blank reverse, which is docketed. Being a NY City Land Indenture transferring land located between Broadway and the Quaker Meeting House to an Abraham Schench, Merchant of the same place. John Jay signs as a witness. Some splitting at the folds, edges are quite worn and light foxing, reinforced on verso with archival tape, not affecting signature. A scarce, good looking "John Jay" signed document.On December 10th 1778, John Jay, the former chief justice of the New York Supreme Court, is elected president of the Continental Congress. Jay, who graduated from King's College (now Columbia University) at the age of 19, was a prominent figure in New York state politics from an early age. While Jay opposed British interference in the colonies, he was against complete independence from Great Britain. Jay was elected to the First Continental Congress in 1774 as a representative from New York, where he published a paper entitled Address to the People of Great Britain, in which he promoted a peaceful resolution with Great Britain instead of independence. Jay was reelected to the Second Continental Congress in 1775 but, upholding his opposition to complete independence from Great Britain, he resigned in 1776 rather than sign the Declaration of Independence.Upon his return to New York, Jay helped draft the state's constitution before his election as the state's first chief justice in 1777. Despite his early misgivings about independence, Jay served as president of the Continental Congress from 1778 to 1779 and in 1782 signed the Treaty of Paris with Great Britain.He contributed to the The Federalist Papers, part of the successful campaign waged by Alexander Hamilton and James Madison to win ratification for the Constitution in 1788 and 1789. Soon after, President George Washington appointed Jay as the first chief justice of the United States.In 1794, Jay negotiated his eponymous treaty with Britain to settle ongoing military and commercial disputes between the two nations. Although extremely unpopular with Jefferson's Republicans, the Jay Treaty was ratified: Jay, however, resigned from the Supreme Court during the uproar over its passing. Still drawn to public service, Jay served as governor of New York from 1797 to 1801, when he retired from public life.

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1807 Rare THOMAS JEFFERSON and JAMES MADISON Signed Four-Language Ship's Papers

Lot 20: 1807 Rare THOMAS JEFFERSON and JAMES MADISON Signed Four-Language Ship's Papers

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Description: AutographsOutstanding Thomas Jefferson & James Madison Signed Four-Language Ship's Papers For The "Virginia"THOMAS JEFFERSON & JAMES MADISON. Third President of the United States (1801-1809), principal Author of the Declaration of Independence. Countersigned by then Secretary of State James Madison, later the fourth President of the United States (1809-1817), regarded as the "Father of the Constitution" and the Author of the United States Bill of Rights.September 17, 1807-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed "Th. Jefferson" as President and by "James Madison" as Secretary of State, measuring 20.25" x 17", 1 page, Choice Very Fine. Being a Four-Language Ship's Papers for an American ship named "Virginia", Countersigned by "Cha Turnbull" as Deputy Collector, at Petersburg. Also signed by "Alexander Brown" as Mayor of Petersburg. This Passport allowed, "Archibald Crockett Master or Commander of the ship called the Virginia of New York of the burthen of 370 3/95 tons or thereabouts, lying at present in the port of Petersburg bound for Amsterdam and laden with Tobacco, Cotton, Staves & Customary Stores to depart and proceed with his said Ship on his said voyage, such Ship having been visited, and the said Archibald Crockett having made oath before the proper officer, that said Ship belongs to one or more of the citizens of the United States of America, and to him or them only."This impressive Thomas Jefferson & James Madison Signed Four-Language Ship's Papers is in vastly superior quality to most encountered. It retains its full original margins and outer paper selvage. The official paper and wax embossed Seal is fully intact at the left central margin. All printed text is clear and easily readable upon period laid paper. There is conservation to the blank reverse side with some expertly sealed fold splits and small wear holes are filled and have reinforcement along the folds. The face side looks Extremely Fine and quite excellent. Both major signatures are very well written and show prominently being penned in deep brown. Any collector would be proud to frame and display this appealing Thomas Jefferson & James Madison Document.

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Superb 1791 THOMAS JEFFERSON Signed Resolution Mourning Benjamin Franklins Death

Lot 21: Superb 1791 THOMAS JEFFERSON Signed Resolution Mourning Benjamin Franklins Death

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Description: AutographsSuperb 1791 Official THOMAS JEFFERSON Signed Congressional Resolution Thanking France In Mourning Benjamin Franklin's DeathTHOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826). Third President of the United States (1801-1809); American Founding Father, the Principal Author of the Declaration of Independence (1776); a spokesman for Democracy and the Rights of Man. In the American Revolution he served in the Continental Congress representing Virginia, then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779-1781). In May 1785, the United States Minister to France.March 2, 1791-Dated. Printed Document Signed, "Th. Jefferson" as Secretary of State, measuring 9.25" x 15", Folio, 1 page, City of Philadelphia, Choice Crisp Near Mint. This outstanding Document being the official signed record of the Congressional Resolution thanking the French government for it's honoring the death of the beloved Benjamin Franklin on April 17th of that same year. It is documented that when the French National Assembly received news of Benjamin Franklin's death, Meribeau and Lafayette called for a three day period of morning by the French. A letter of condolence was to be sent to President George Washington. The French Assembly immediately decreed that both measures should be undertaken. A grateful American Congress in turn issued their response, printed in this Resolution, which reads in full:"Congress of United States: --- At the Third Session, --- Begun and held at the city of Philadelphia, on Monday, the Sixth of December, one thousand seven hundred and ninety.Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of United States of America in Congress assembled, that the President of the United States be requested to caused to be communicated to the national assembly of France the peculiar sensibility of Congress to the tribute paid to the memory of Benjamin Franklin, by the enlightened and free representatives of a great nation, in their decree of the eleventh of June, one thousand seven hundred and ninety."Printed below are the names of the Speaker of the House of Representatives, Frederick Augustus Muhlenberg; Vice-President John Adams; President George Washington, and lastly being very boldly signed at the conclusion, "Th. Jefferson - Secretary of State".This original Congressional Resolution has a wonderful fully 2" long deep dark brown signature of Thomas Jefferson that vividly stands out. Overall, this Document is in superb quality as the printed text is deep black and sharp upon the fresh bright period laid paper. The official paper contains the central watermark "JC & Co" - "BRANDYWINE". A four margins are wide and fully original with just three very light horizontal folds from being stored. The blank reverse side remain perfectly clean and free of any distractions. We are informed that prior auction records have realized upwards of $58,000 for this very same type of officially signed Resolution.Whether a fan or collector of Benjamin Franklin and/or Thomas Jefferson, this Document stands out as a highlight prize for any important historic signature collection. A truly amazing gorgeous Signed Document that is not only exceedingly rare, it has superb content and is of "Museum" quality, ready to placed upon display.President George Washington penned a personal reply to the French Assembly, which reads:"I received with particular satisfaction, and imparted to Congress, the communication made by the President's letter of the 20th of June last, in the name of the National Assembly of France. So peculiar and so signal an expression of the esteem of the respectable body for a citizen of the United States, whose eminent and patriotic services are indelibly engraved on the minds of the countrymen, cannot fail to be appreciated by them as it ought to be. On my part, I assure you, Sir, that I am sensible of all its value."Of course, Benjamin Franklin's negotiations and intrigues in the French court were instrumental in obtaining French financial and military support for the American cause, without which the American Revolution would have been an utter failure. France too, had good reason to court American favor, as her relations with England were engaged in the "Quasi-War."

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THOMAS JEFFERSON 1808 Autograph Letter Signed as President to Caesar A. Rodney

Lot 22: THOMAS JEFFERSON 1808 Autograph Letter Signed as President to Caesar A. Rodney

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Description: AutographsExceptional "Th. Jefferson" Autograph Letter Signed As President to Written to Caesar A. Rodney Regarding Legal Cases Involving General Ira Allen of Vermont and Marc Mouesay a Frenchman Imprisoned For PiracyTHOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826). 3rd President of the United States.August 27, 1808-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Th. Jefferson" as President, measuring 7" x 7", 1 page, at Monticello, Choice Extremely Fine. Written to Caesar A. Rodney (1772-1824), then serving as Attorney General of the United States under President Thomas Jefferson (1807-1811), regarding two important Admiralty cases then facing his administration: that of General Ira Allen with the British government and Marc Mouesay, a French national who had recently been imprisoned for Piracy. Letter reads in full;"Monticello Aug. 27, 1808 --- Dear Sir ----Your favor of the 13th is received. I see no reason against your giving your opinion, in favor of General Allen, to him to be used with the British government. The only doubt I ever entertained in it was that which you mention respecting his bail, and I have not yet seen my way out of that. --- I inclose you the letter of a M. Mouesay, whose case seems to be as hard a one as I have known, I wish you to open a correspondence with the district attorney of Maryland, get him to do for Mouesan whatever he can and to state the truth of the case, as it has appeared to him, & transmit it to us while it is fresh in his memory, as I have little doubt it will become a case between government & government. We have not received one interesting word from Genl. [John] Armstrong [then minister to France] or Mr. [William] Pinckney [then in London conducting negotiations with Great Britain regarding the U.S. embargo and British naval abuses in the Atlantic] since our separation. --- I salute you with affection & respect, --- (Signed) Th. Jefferson".Accompanied by modern, reproduced explanations of both legal cases that are mentioned in this personally Handwritten Letter, Signed by Thomas Jefferson. Also included is a modern reproduction of the Letter which was sent from the Frenchman Marc Mouesay to President Jefferson. The Letter itself is in truly exceptional high quality. Jefferson's writing is sharp, crisp and vivid bold brown. It is beautifully penned upon bright, clean and fresh early wove paper bearing the watermark "JOHN WISE - 1804". Having very light mailing folds and a thin paper tab along the blank left reverse edge. The primary signature, "Th. Jefferson" measures 1.5" long at the Letter's conclusion. This gorgeous quality Letter has historic content of two Government to Government Admiralty legal cases and contains the specific mention of several noted famous American figures by name. Caesar A. Rodney (1772-1824). On January 20, 1807 U.S. President Thomas Jefferson named Rodney his U.S. Attorney General. He served in that office for the remainder of Jefferson's term and for nearly three years in President James Madison's first term.As Attorney General, Rodney participated as a member of the prosecution during the second treason trial of former Vice-President Aaron Burr. Rodney resigned December 5, 1811, unhappy about being passed over for a U.S. Supreme Court appointment.During the War of 1812, Caesar Rodney was captain of a rifle corps which became the Delaware 1st Artillery. They served at Fort Union in Wilmington, on the Canadian frontier, and assisted in the defense of Baltimore in 1814.Rodney was selected by President James Monroe in 1817 for a special diplomatic mission to South America, the South American Commission of 1817-1818. Rodney was appointed to lead the commission to investigate whether the newly formed South American republics should be recognized. He strongly advocated such recognition and, with Graham, published his findings in 1819 as Reports on the Present State of the United Provinces of South America. This report is thought to have contributed much to the thinking behind the policy that eventually became expressed as the Monroe Doctrine. (From Wikipedia)

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July 10, 1786 THOMAS JEFFERSON Autograph Letter Signed as Minister to France

Lot 23: July 10, 1786 THOMAS JEFFERSON Autograph Letter Signed as Minister to France

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Description: Autographs1786 Thomas Jefferson Autograph Letter Signed as Minister to France "Mr. Jefferson" Regarding Free Duty on His WineTHOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826). 3rd President of the United States, an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776) and the third President of the United States (1801-1809). He served in the Continental Congress representing Virginia and then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779-1781). Jefferson served as a diplomat, stationed in Paris. In May 1785, he became the United States Minister to France.July 10, 1786-Dated. Autograph Letter Signed, "Mr. Jefferson" written in the third person, measuring 7.25" x 9.25", 1 page, at Paris, France, Very Fine. This Letter written completely in Jefferson's own hand while serving as United States Minister to France. Here, Jefferson asks for his wine to be received "free of duty." This classic Jefferson Letter regarding his wine has some minor edge toning primarily from some old style adhered paper reinforcements to the blank reverse side. Some minor feathering to two words near the endpoint. The text is precisely and well written by Jefferson in his fine style being easily readable in brown upon laid period paper. This classic Thomas Jefferson Letter reads, in full:"Mr. Jefferson expecting twenty four dozen bottles of wine now on it's way from Bourdeaux, and a cask, supposed to contain about four hundred & eighty bottles of Madeira wine which has been brought for him from New York to l'Orient and is now on it's way from l'Orient to Paris, he has the honor of asking from Monsieur de Reyneual a passport to authorise his receiving it free of duty as he understands to be the practice with other foreign ministers, and as he has been done with the Minister of France in America. --- July 10, 1786".In another hand the letter has a docket in French, at upper left corner, with delivery notes on the wine in question, dated July 18, 1786. A remarkable Thomas Jefferson Autograph Letter Signed while serving as Minister to France.Jefferson was an avid wine lover and noted gourmet. During his years in France (1784-1789), he took extensive trips though France and other European wine regions and sent the best back home.Though he called wine a "necessary of life," his wine interests went far beyond just drinking it. He was interested in its viticulture, making notes on German and Italian grape growing and examinining "the details relative to the most celebrated wines of France." Jefferson planted vineyards at Monticello and experimented with grape growing in his Paris garden on the Champs-Elysees.He also encouraged Philip Mazzei, John Adlum and others in their vineyard efforts and accurately predicted that America would some day, make wines as good as those of France. Jefferson famously made the pronouncement that, "We could in the United States make as great a variety of wines as are made in Europe, not exactly of the same kinds, but doubtless as good." He was of course right on both accounts.While wine grape growing in North America was full of promise, a significant portion of planted grapes in the early years of American viticulture were of the European variety Vitus vinifera, which did not survive the many vine diseases native to the Americas.Some of the highest prices ever paid for vintage wine were for several bottles of Chateau Lafite Bordeaux, supposedly owned by Thomas Jefferson back in the late 1700s, leaving us with the tantalizing possibility that those rare bottles might very well have been part of the cache referred to in this letter.

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Very Rare JOHN PAUL JONES Clip From a Document - I have not yet begun to fight!

Lot 24: Very Rare JOHN PAUL JONES Clip From a Document - I have not yet begun to fight!

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Description: AutographsClassic JOHN PAUL JONES Clip From a Larger Document American Naval Hero Quote "I have not yet begun to fight!"JOHN PAUL JONES (1747-1792). Famous American Naval Officer and Hero.Very Rare, fully authentic and original classic Clipped Signature, "Jno P Jones," measuring 2.5" x 1", no date or place, clip from a larger document, Choice Very Fine+. Jones' signature is one of the scarcest in American naval history. The signature itself is written in bold deep brown and is an excellent example for display. It is penned upon period laid paper that has some text at the top extreme edge and has some faint trivial tone near the bottom. Also included is a copy of a color lithograph of Jones, measuring 6.75" x 8.75", from the engraved colored plate by T.M. Moreau, trimmed at bottom through the facsimile signature.Jones is best remembered for his famous words exclaimed when he refused to surrender his ship in a fierce battle with a British convoy escorted by the Serapis: "I have not yet begun to fight!" Paul was able to capture the Serapis in one of the most desperate sea battles in naval history. Every American historical Autograph collector worth his or her salt certainly holds John Paul Jones as a major "Key" that is lusted after as being greatly desired. A true classic and historic highlight prize for the new owner! (2 items).John Paul Jones (1747-1792). Born John Paul in Scotland, he first served in British ships, then deserted to America after killing one of his crew (1773). During the American Revolution,Jones was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Continental Navy (December 7, 1775), and was given command of the Alfred (1775), the Providence (1776), and the Ranger (1777).Successes against the British Atlantic shipping during this period earned him the command of the French-donated vessel Duras, renamed Bonhomme Richard as a compliment to Benjamin Franklin (1779). Jones is probably best remembered for his famous words exclaimed when he refused to surrender his ship in a fierce battle with a British convoy escorted by the Serapis: "I have not yet begun to fight!"Paul was able to capture the Serapis in one of the most desperate sea battles in naval history. Though he won the fight, Jones lost his ship, which sank two days later. Jones served in the Russian navy on the Black Sea against the Turkish fleet from 1788-1790, which left his physically and mentally a broken man, and then resided in Paris until his death.

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ROBERT E. LEE Rare Signed Photo. Owner At Fords Theater Lincoln's Assassination!

Lot 25: ROBERT E. LEE Rare Signed Photo. Owner At Fords Theater Lincoln's Assassination!

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Description: AutographsRare Robert E. Lee Signed Oval Photo by Matthew Brady Owned by An Audience Member Present at Fords Theater The Night Of Abraham Lincoln's AssassinationROBERT E. LEE (1807-1870). Commanding Confederate States of America Major General throughout the Civil War period. Previously U.S. Army Engineer and Officer. Founder and President of Washington & Lee College in Lexington, Virginia.(Photograph Taken May of 1869). Extremely Rare, Large Format, Albumen Photograph Signed, "R E Lee", Oval, measuring 7.5" x 9.5" (by sight), Framed, measuring fully to 11.75" x 13.75". This famous, historic Photograph was taken by the renowned Civil War era Photographer Matthew Brady. In addition, the original frame back board is attached showing the frame maker's 3.5" x 4.25" business tag intact. That tag is dated 1860 with the name Stansbury as owner, who later used that frame to house this Photo image. The elderly Lee sat for Matthew Brady in this semi-profile pose for this photograph in May of 1869. Lee was on a visit to Washington, DC to meet with then President Grant. Lee is shown in vignette wearing a fine quality suit. He has magnificently Signed "R E Lee" in large bold, easily seen and readable strokes at lower portion upon the image itself, measuring 1.75" long and .75" tall. This photograph comes accompanied with a photocopy of the original wooden oval frame, on which a November 1971 typed notation was attached from a descendant of the original owner, which reads;"W.F. Stansbury, Jr. attended Washington & Lee College in Lexington, Virginia. Was in Ford Theater when President Lincoln was shot, 1865. ---- The picture of Robert E. Lee belonged to him. You will note on the back of frame that it has name of W.F. Stansbury 1860, that was our grandfather, and the frame was purchased long before the picture was framed. This frame was given to me many years later by Aunt Lily Durden, the back was in an old frame."This is a superb photograph with a wonderful history of direct ownership provenance. Directly to W.F. Stansbury, Jr. who attended Washington & Lee College in Lexington, Virginia and was in the audience at Fords Theater when President Lincoln was shot, on April 14, 1865. Without question, one this example is one of the very Finest Signed Photographs of Robert E. Lee Extant. It is of "Museum" quality and worthy of inclusion in the finest Civil War and Autograph collections.

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Classic ABRAHAM LINCOLN Signed Civil War Presidential Military Commission

Lot 26: Classic ABRAHAM LINCOLN Signed Civil War Presidential Military Commission

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Description: AutographsClassic "Abraham Lincoln" Signed Presidential CommissionABRAHAM LINCOLN (1809-1865). 16th President of the United States.May 18, 1863-Dated Civil War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Abraham Lincoln" as President, 14.75" x 19.5", 1 page, on Vellum, at Washington, Very Fine. Being an official ornately designed Military Commission, Appointing Chambers McKibbin, "Second Lieutenant in the Fourteenth Regiment of Infantry". Countersigned by, "Edwin M Stanton" as Secretary of War. This impressive Commission has a large American Eagle above with decorative Militaria and Flags displayed below the text. There is some faint toning at upper margins, small .5" patch of loss from an insect at upper right edge, far away from any text. The blank reverse has a minor prior mounting strip along the top edge, not seen from the face side.Its official Blue Embossed Seal is fully intact and has strong original color at the upper left. Both signatures are full readable though worn. "Abraham Lincoln" measures a huge 3.75" long and "Edwin M Stanton" measures 2.75" long being intersected by vertical and horizontal folds. Overall, this popular historic "Abraham Lincoln" Signed Presidential Military Commission is attractive and has a well printed superior appearance to most. A good candidate for framing and display.

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JAMES MADISON + JAMES MONROE Presidential Signed Four Language Ship's Papers

Lot 27: JAMES MADISON + JAMES MONROE Presidential Signed Four Language Ship's Papers

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Description: AutographsJames Madison & James Monroe Signed Ship's PapersJAMES MADISON & JAMES MONROE. 4th and 5th Presidents of the United States.November 17, 1812-Dated War of 1812 Era, Partly-Printed Document being Fully Accomplished Signed, "James Madison" as President, at Washington, measuring 16.75" x 21.25", Fine. A complete official United States Presidentially Signed Four Language Ship's Papers, printed in dark black upon fine official watermarked period wove paper. Also Signed by "Jas Monroe" as Secretary of State. Both signatures measure about 2.5" long, are nicely written in bold brown, and are totally unimpaired being bold and sharp. There is some obvious wear with some paper loss at upper central edge and have some small edge splits with soiling where worn, affecting some lettering of the top on two of the four JAMES MADISON imprints. However, this Document is well printed, has both its original embossed paper and wax official Seals and is worthy of conservation. Scarce and highly popular with collectors, having dual current and future, James Madison & James Monroe Presidential Signers upon this one large Document. Also Countersigned by "David Gelston," who was appointed by President Thomas Jefferson Collector of the Port of New York in 1801, and held that post until 1821 when he retired.DAVID GELSTON (1744-1828). As the American Revolution approached, Gelston became politically active. He Signed the Articles of Association in 1774, agreeing to avoid British imports, even though this hurt his own business. He represented Suffolk County in the New York Provincial Congress of 1775 to 1777, as well as the 1777 New York State Constitutional Convention that debated and enacted the First Constitution of the State of New York.He was a member from Suffolk County of the New York State Assembly from 1777 to 1785. During his last term, he was Speaker. As Speaker, he took a leading role in reconciling the differences between Tory and Whig factions. He oversaw the repeal of all the laws that had imposed civil and legal penalties on Tories.In 1787, he removed to New York City, and from 1787 to 1801, was Surrogate of New York County. In 1789, the State Assembly appointed him a delegate to the last session of the Continental Congress. He was a member of the New York State Senate from 1791 to 1794, and from 1798 to 1802.Gelston was appointed by President Thomas Jefferson Collector of the Port of New York in 1801, and held that post until 1821 when he retired.(From Wikipedia)

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GOUVERNEUR MORRIS 1813-Dated Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 28: GOUVERNEUR MORRIS 1813-Dated Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsGouverneur Morris Autograph Letter Signed - War of 1812 Era Regarding Napoleon's Invasion of Russia In 1812GOUVERNEUR MORRIS (1752-1816). American Statesman, a Founding Father of the United States, represented Pennsylvania in the Constitutional Convention of 1787, Signatory to the Articles of Confederation, Author of large sections of the Constitution of the United States and one of its Signers. He is widely credited as the author of the preamble, and has been called the "Penman of the Constitution."August 11, 1813-Dated. War of 1812 Period, Autograph Letter Signed, "Gouv Morris", 8" x 9.75", 2 pages, Morrisania, Choice Very Fine. This excellent content Letter was written to Robert G. Harper (1765-1825) in Baltimore. An American patriot who served in the Continental Army at the tender age of 15, Harper went on to become a Member of Congress representing South Carolina in the U.S. House of Representatives. After relocating to Baltimore, he was elected to the U.S. Senate and served one year (1816) before resigning. According to the Biographical Directory of Congress, at the time of this letter - the War of 1812 - Harper was serving a Major General in the Army. Here, Gouverneur Morris pens, in full:"Dear Sir ---Accept my thanks for your kind Letter and the Pamphlet enclosed. I had already twice perused and with increased pleasure your Speech at the Festival. Your Views both Military and political appear to me perfectly correct. As to the latter the most incredulous must soon believe. Unfortunately Kutusow [Russian Prince Mikhail Kutuzov] is no more and Bonaparte remains again unrivalled. The old Marshal's Campaign appears to me not only a Chef d'ouevre but unique - From the time when the Russian Force was collected, from the extensive Posts which the uncertainty of Bonaparte's attack rendered necessary the French Emperor was no long master of a single movement.He could not take the Road to Petersburgh because he would have left his Flank and Rear opposed to the grant Army of Russia - In retreating from Moscow he would I believe have taken the Road to Cracow, in order to pass his winter in Prague, if he could. This at least is the Course I had marked out for him long before we heard of his Movements and indeed immediately on receiving the news of the burning of Moscow fired on the 20th of October for his Departure, I conceive that it was for this Purpose he fought the Battle in which he was defeated.In Possession of Prague and leaving Garrisons where he did leave them he would have secured the co-operation of all his Vassals including Austria for the present Campaign. After we had received information of the Ruin of his Army I looked forward to every thing good if Kutusow should live, but feared much that the slender thread of his existence would break or be broken. The last Affairs prove that he has not left his Mantle to his Successor. ---- Adieu believe me always truly yours --- (Signed) Gouv Morris."When Napoleon invaded Russia in 1812, Michael Andreas Barclay de Tolly (then Minister of War) wisely chose to follow the scorched earth principle and retreat rather than to risk a major battle.His strategy aroused grudges from most of the generals and soldiers, and when Mikhail Kutuzov was appointed Commander-in-Chief and arrived to the army on August 17, he was greeted with delight. Within two weeks Kutuzov decided to give major battle on the approaches to Moscow.The two huge armies clashed near Borodino on August 26, 1812 in what has been described as the greatest battle in human history up to that date, involving nearly a quarter of a million soldiers. The result was inconclusive, with a quarter of the French and half of the Russian army killed or wounded. After the famous conference at the village of Fili, Kutuzov fell back on the strategy of his predecessor: withdraw in order to save the Russian army as long as possible. This came at the price of losing Moscow, whose population was evacuated.Having retreated to the Kaluga road and replenished his ammunitions, Kutuzov forced Napoleon into retreat in the Battle of Maloyaroslavets. The old general's cautious pursuit evoked much criticism, but at any rate he allowed only a remnant of Napoleon's Grand Army to regain Prussian soil. Kutuzov now held the rank of Field Marshal, and had been awarded the title of His Serene Highness Prince Smolensky, awarded to him for his stunning victory over a part of the French army at Smolensk in November, 1812.As Morris alludes in this letter, Kutuzov fell ill and died earlier that Spring on April 23, 1813. Though the hopes of the Sixth Coalition Allies seemed to be dashed with Kutuzov's death, Napoleon's enemies were massing against him. By the following April (1813), their victory was complete, and Napoleon was exiled (temporarily, it would turn out) to the isle of Elba with the Treaty of Fontainebleau.

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MORMONS. 1857 Mountain Meadows Massacre Firsthand Interview Documents

Lot 29: MORMONS. 1857 Mountain Meadows Massacre Firsthand Interview Documents

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Description: Autographs1857 Morman "Mountain Meadows Massacre" Documents Important Interviews and Firsthand Investigation Report (MORMONS). Lot of Two (2) Historic Typed Documents. February 29, 1860-Dated, Post 1857 Mormon "Mountain Meadows Massacre" Period Investigation Document, plus a Later Firsthand Interview conducted in 1940.This important historical content lot features Two Original Typed Manuscripts, one circa 1860 and the other being much later, circa 1940. These two documents are a record and Interview Transcripts and a Statement of an investigator of the September 11, 1857 "Mountain Meadows Massacre" of Arkansas emigrants to Utah Territory by Mormon militia. These original documents recount the Firsthand Recollections of Gladys McConnel (whose great-grandfather and great-uncle lived in Cedar City, Utah), Mabel (the daughter of Chief Kanosh of the Paiute Indians), Mrs. Wetherill (an anthropologist who was adopted by the Navajo and allowed to witness sacred ceremonies), and others who were familiar with that period of Mormon history in Utah.This approximately 50 page, 14" x 9" Legal Size Typed Document is rivet bound at its top margin, having a light-blue paper cover and text detailing the "Massacre" and subsequent concerns. In part, "Miss McConnel was born and raised in Cedar City. Her Great Grandfather, Jehial McConnel was one of the first settlers in Parowan, who built the first house in Iron County... Miss McConnel has made a study of Southern Utah history and has compiled many of the stories told to her by the old people down there..." McConnel further provides great background information, also stating, in part:"It is my belief, from what I have been able to learn, that Isaac Haight was at the head of the entire Massacre. Haight was the head of the militia in Cedar City... It is absolutely correct that the 'white men' from Cedar City and the other towns, who joined in the Massacre, were dressed as Indians and painted as Indians... It is not likely that the true story of the Mountain Meadow Massacre will ever be know, because after the Massacre, all of those who had participated in it were so terrified that they swore themselves to ever-lasting secrecy... There were plenty of Indians who also joined with the whites in the Massacre.... The thing that was so disgraceful about the whole proceedings was that the white flag of truce was accepted until the Mormons and the Indians could take away the firearms of the emigrants, separate the men, women and children and get them out of their camp... the entire group old enough to talk and understand was killed..."The Second Manuscript has 19 pages, being a Typed Statement, submitted in February 29, 1860 by William H. Rogers to a Great Salt Lake City newspaper titled, "The Valley Tan," explaining his investigation of the "Mountain Meadows Massacre." This Document measuring 12" x 8 being a lightly folded, carbon copy on onionskin paper, which also recounts the investigation soon after the Massacre. It reads, in part:"Bishop Lee told the emigrants that the Indians had gone off over the hills, and that if they would lay down their arms and give up their property, he and his party would conduct them back to Cedar City... The emigrants, trusting to Lee's honor and to the sincerity of his statement, consented to the terms... After they had proceeded about a mile on their way, on a signal given by Bishop Higby,... the slaughter began. The men were mostly killed or shot down at the first fire and the women and children who immediately fled in different directions, were quickly pursued and dispatched..."Both Typed Documents are crisp and clean and exhibit trivial wear on the covers and edges, while the black and purple typed pages are sharp, crisp and fully legible. There is a great wealth of knowledge here about the Massacre itself, the Mormon settlements and the Native American Paiute Indians of the region. This appears as highly important, valuable original period documentation about the infamous "Mountain Meadows Massacre." (2 items).The "Mountain Meadows Massacre" was a series of attacks on the Baker-Fancher emigrant wagon train, at Mountain Meadows in southern Utah. The attacks culminated on September 11, 1857 with the mass slaughter of the emigrant party by Mormons (members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints or LDS Church) in the Iron County district of the Utah Territorial Militia and some local Native Americans.The wagon train, composed almost entirely of families from Arkansas, was bound for California on a route that passed through the Utah Territory during a turbulent period later known as the Utah War. After arriving in Salt Lake City, the Baker-Fancher party made their way south, eventually stopping to rest at Mountain Meadows. While the emigrants were camped in the meadow, nearby militia leaders including Isaac C. Haight and John D. Lee made plans to attack the wagon train. Intending to give the appearance of Native American aggression, their plan was to arm some Southern Paiute Native Americans and persuade them to join with a larger party of militiamen, disguised as Native Americans, in an attack.During the initial assault on the wagon train, the emigrants fought back and a five-day siege ensued. Eventually fear spread among the militia's leaders that some emigrants had caught sight of white men, and had probably discovered who their attackers really were. This resulted in an order by militia commander William H. Dame for the emigrants' annihilation. Running low on water and provisions, the emigrants allowed a party of militiamen to enter their camp, who assured them of their safety and escorted them out of their hasty fortification.After walking a distance from the camp, the militiamen, with the help of auxiliary forces hiding nearby, attacked the emigrants. Intending to leave no witnesses of complicity by Mormons in the attacks, and to prevent reprisals that would further complicate the Utah War, the perpetrators killed all the adults and older children (totaling about 120 men, women, and children). Seventeen children, all younger than seven, were spared.Following the massacre the perpetrators hastily buried the victims, leaving their bodies vulnerable to wild animals and the climate. Local families took in the surviving children, and many of the victims' possessions were auctioned off. Investigations, temporarily interrupted by the American Civil War, resulted in nine indictments during 1874.Of the men indicted, only John D. Lee was tried in a court of law. After two trials in the Utah Territory, Lee was convicted by a jury and executed. Today historians attribute the massacre to a combination of factors including both war hysteria and strident Mormon teachings. Scholars still debate whether senior Mormon leadership, including Brigham Young, directly instigated the massacre or if responsibility lies with the local leaders of southern Utah.(From Wikipedia)

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1920s N.Y. Political + Celebrity Autograph Album

Lot 30: 1920s N.Y. Political + Celebrity Autograph Album

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Description: Autographs1920s N.Y. Political & Celebrity Autograph Album(NEW YORK POLITICAL FIGURES & CELEBRITIES).This autograph album from the 1920s measures 6" x 5", and contains signatures of people from New York. Included are Marie Cunningham; Alfred E. Smith Executive Mansion, State of New York card; John F. Hylam, Mayor of NYC; PR Gruppen Mayor of Hoboken, N.J. September 17, 1925; JR Cunningham; CP Linder; Alberta Carpenter; Helen B. Linder; Josephine Ricciardelli; Laurie Bethe; Ida St. John Oye; Perry L. Lindear; and May C. Riol. The album is sold "as is" being in very nice condition, and is truly a treasure trove of 1920s era New York Political & Celebrity autographs.

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Exceedingly Rare Important 1802 THOMAS PAINE Autograph Financial Letter Signed

Lot 31: Exceedingly Rare Important 1802 THOMAS PAINE Autograph Financial Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsImportant 1802 THOMAS PAINE Autograph Letter Signed Author of "Common Sense" and "The American Crisis"THOMAS PAINE (1737-1809). English-American Political Activist, Author, Political Theorist and Revolutionary. Author of "Common Sense" (1776), the all-time best-selling American book that advocated colonial America's independence from Great Britain, and "The American Crisis" (1776-83), a pro-Revolutionary pamphlet series.Dated in the Napoleonic calendar "30 floral" (May 3, 1802), Autograph Letter Signed, "Thomas Paine," measuring 7.5" x 9", 2 written pages, plus Integral Postal Leaf, at Plessis Piquet (France), Choice Very Fine. This exceedingly rare Autograph Letter fully penned in the hand of the famous Revolutionary War author, Thomas Paine. It has excellent overall quality and eye appeal. There is a very thin paper strip reinforcement added along left edge, and a minor paper loss on Integral Postal Leaf in the blank portion from the red wax seal when opened, not affecting any text. Some math notations on a blank panel in Paine's hand.This Letter is written to Fulwar Skipwith, the American Consul in Versailles, France. Here, Thomas Paine seeks some financial advice for a friend in France who is about to invest in an American bank. Overall this Letter is full, solid and complete having rich deep brown writing by Paine. It is written upon very clean laid period paper havingh expected light folds from mailing. The signature, "Thomas Paine" is bold and vivid, extremelt sharp and clear, measuring 2.25" long. This important Letter reads, in full:"Plessis Piques --- 30 florial (10th year - May 3, 1802) --- My Dear friend --- My friend Tenebio at whose place I now am, has directed his Banker in London, Hemmersby, to invest the balance of accounts due to him, in American Bank shares which he has done, and in his letter to him of April 30 says 'We are about to send the necessary deeds to America to have the Stock transfered in your name. The interest thereon may be received there, in Amsterdam, or in London as best suit yourself, but we wish to have your directions that we may give our orders accordingly and at the same time.'Is it necessary to find the original deed to America, or an attested copy of it? Should the original deed rest in the hands of Tenebio? If an attested copy be sent, can more than one be sent, in case of accident, as is done in 1d, 2d, 3d, bills of Exchange. Be so kind to give me your opinion upon this case, and add a word of American news if you have any. When you are mounted on your Rosinwanta and can make a strech thus far we shall be glad to see you. You can tell us what pigs and cows are worth as Tenebio is going to buy some. Give my compts to Mr. Purveyance. --- Your affectionate friend --- (Signed) Thomas Paine --- Chez le Citoyen Tenebio".Rarely does a Thomas Paine Autograph Letter or this high quality and magnitude appear upon the collector market for sale. Even a clip signature of Thomas Paine is considered a prize in any autograph collection. This Letter was penned by Paine at Le Plessis Piquet in the southwestern suburbs of Paris, France, located 10.5 km (6.5 mi) from the center of Paris. Paine's autograph transcends many areas of collecting interests including, American Revolutionary War, Authors, Political and Religion. An important, true major highlight of this outstanding Autograph offering.Thomas Paine (1737 - June 8, 1809) was an English-American political activist, author, political theorist and revolutionary. As the author of two highly influential pamphlets at the start of the American Revolution, he inspired the Patriots in 1776 to declare Independence from Britain.His ideas reflected Enlightenment era rhetoric of transnational human rights. Born in Thetford, England, in the county of Norfolk, Paine emigrated to the British American colonies in 1774. With the help of Benjamin Franklin he arrived in time to participate in the American Revolution.His principal contributions were the powerful, widely read pamphlet Common Sense (1776), the all-time best-selling American book that advocated colonial America's independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain, and The American Crisis (1776-83), a pro-Revolutionary pamphlet series.Common Sense was so influential that John Adams said, "Without the pen of the author of Common Sense, the sword of Washington would have been raised in vain."Paine lived in France for most of the 1790s, becoming deeply involved in the French Revolution. He wrote the Rights of Man (1791), in part a defence of the French Revolution against its critics. His attacks on British writer Edmund Burke led to a trial and conviction in absentia in 1792 for the crime of seditious libel. In 1792, despite not being able to speak French, he was elected to the French National Convention. The Girondists regarded him as an ally. Consequently, the Montagnards, especially Robespierre, regarded him as an enemy.In December 1793, he was arrested and imprisoned in Paris, then released in 1794. He became notorious because of The Age of Reason (1793-94), his book that advocates deism, promotes reason and freethinking, and argues against institutionalized religion in general and Christian doctrine in particular. He also wrote the pamphlet Agrarian Justice (1795), discussing the origins of property, and introduced the concept of a guaranteed minimum income.In 1802, he returned to America where he died on June 8, 1809. Only six people attended his funeral as he had been ostracized for his ridicule of ChristianityAt this time, the United States banking system had just undergone a number of sweeping changes, chiefly of which was the expansion of state-chartered banks. From 1801-1811, the number of state banks rose from 30 to 88, while their total capital increased about three-fold. Investment in these banks was very profitable, especially for foreigners who enjoyed a stronger national currency.Though Paine was eager to solicit financial advice for his benefactor, his own finacial affairs were quite tenuous. He returned to the United States in the fall, but branded an atheist for his most thoughtful work, "Age of Reason" he died alone and in a state of poverty.(From Wikipedia)

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1847 Autograph Letter Signed JAMES K. POLK as President

Lot 32: 1847 Autograph Letter Signed JAMES K. POLK as President

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Description: Autographs1847 Autograph Letter Signed "James K. Polk" as President to the Son of General Thomas L. Hamer Killed at MonterreyJAMES K. POLK (1795-1849). 11th President of the United States (1845-1849). Polk represented Tennessee as a Democrat, and served as the 17th Speaker of the House of Representatives (1835-1839) and Governor of Tennessee (1839-1841). Polk was the surprise (dark horse) candidate for president in 1844, defeating Henry Clay of the rival Whig Party by promising to Annex Texas.May 14, 1847-Dated. Autograph Letter Signed, "James K. Polk", as President, measuring 8" x 10", 2 pages, at Washington City, Choice Extremely Fine. President Polk beautifully hand writes this touching Letter of Condolence to Thomas Hamer, the eldest son of General Thomas Lyon Hamer (July 1800 - December 2, 1846) who died after the historic Battle of Monterrey (September 21-24, 1846) during the Mexican-American War. This extensive and truly gorgeous high quality, rare personal Autograph Letter reads, in full;"Sir: --- Understanding that you are the eldest son of the late Brigadier General Hamer, I transmit to you herewith an authenticated copy of "Resolutions giving thanks of Congress to Major General Taylor and the officers and men under his command in the late military operations at Monterrey,' approved March 2nd 1844: ---By one of these Resolutions the President of the United States is requested to present a 'sword' with suitable devices to the nearest male relative of your distinguished and patriotic ancestor, and to communicate to him 'the deep regret which Congress feels for the loss of a gallant man whose name ought to live in the recollections and affections of a grateful country.'Proper steps have been taken to execute those Resolutions of Congress, and as soon as the 'sword' designed for you, shall be completed, it will give me sincere pleasure to present it to you in a suitable and appropriate manner.I may truly add that none of the numerous friends of your lamented father can regret his death more severely than I do. We were long associated together in public life: An intimate personal friendship existed between us, and knowing his worth I fully appreciate the irreparable loss which his family and his country have sustained in his death. -- I am with Great Respect -- Your Act. Serv. --- (Signed) James K Polk."This heartfelt, sincere and very poignant letter from Polk to a grieving son of a fallen hero. The overall quality of this Handwritten Letter by President Polk is remarkable in that other than for expected mailing folds, the period paper remains very clean with bold deep brown, easily readable finely penned manuscript text. The signature, "James K. Polk" (written as President) measures 3.5" long with his expressive flourish below. Docket upon the blank central reverse panel reads, "Thomas Hamer - May 14 / 47". It contains superb content, mentioning his beloved father, the Resolution by Congress and the transmittal of a Congressional Presentation Sword.General Harmer distinguished himself at the battle of Monterrey and died shortly thereafter. The United States Congress, in recognition of his gallantry, passed a Resolution of Sorrow and Presented a Sword to his nearest male relative, as conveyed to the younger Hamer so eloquently penned by President James K. Polk.General Thomas L Hamer (1800-1846), was the former Speaker of the Ohio House, and served in three Congresses as a Representative from Ohio before volunteering to serve in the Mexican War.While in Congress, he nominated Ulysses S. Grant, the son of a constituent, to be a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point. Hamer served in the Mexican War, initially voluteering as a private, and received the next day (July 1, 1846) a commission as Brigadier General.He was placed in command of the 1st Brigade of William O. Butler's Volunteer Division of the Army of Occupation. He led his brigade with distinction into the fighting at the battle of Monterey. When General Butler fell wounded, Hamer assumed command of the division. When Mexican General Pedro de Ampudia requested to discuss surrender terms, it was Hamer who delivered the message to General Taylor.While still serving in the army he was elected to another term in Congress but died unexpectedly while stationed with the army at Monterrey on December 2, 1846. Upon Hamer's death, General Zachary Taylor exclaimed, "I have lost the balance wheel of my volunteer army" and Lt. Ulysses S. Grant also lamented that the "U.S. has lost a future president".He was buried in his hometown of Georgetown. A few miles away the town of Hamersville, Ohio was named in his honor. Also named in his honor is Hamer Township in neighboring Highland County, Ohio.General Harmer distinguished himself at the battle of Monterrey and died shortly thereafter. The United States Congress, in recognition of his gallentry, passed a Resolution of Sorrow and Presented a Sword to his nearest male relative, as conveyed to the younger Hamer so eloquently by President James K. Polk.

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FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT Signed Photograph + His Eleven Turkey Cabinet Advisors

Lot 33: FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT Signed Photograph + His Eleven Turkey Cabinet Advisors

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Description: Autographs"Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt and his 'Turkey' Cabinet 1932" Photograph Countersigned by His Eleven Other Advisors Known as the "Turkey Cabinet"FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT (1882-1945). 32nd President of the United States.1932-Dated, Original Historic Photograph Signed, "Franklin D Roosevelt" as Governor of New York, measuring a huge size 11.75" x 10.25" (by sight), matted to 15.5" x 13.75", Choice Very Fine. The impressive, boldly Signed Photograph is Hand-titled, "Governor Franklin D. Roosevelt and his 'Turkey' Cabinet 1932." This sepia Photograph is Inscribed just beneath, in deep rich black ink, "For my friend Tom Burchill from Franklin D Roosevelt." It is also then Countersigned by the Eleven other Advisors known as the "Turkey Cabinet."Samuel Rosenman in his memoir, "Working with Roosevelt" states that Governor Roosevelt felt there was not enough contact between the third floor (where the NY State Assembly and the Senate met) and the second floor (where the Executive chamber was located). "They don't understand what I am trying to do," he complained to Rosenman. As a result, the Governor arranged to have the Democratic leaders in each house meet with him at the Executive Mansion each Monday during the legislative session to go over the program for the week. Because the main dish at the first few luncheons was roast turkey, the group came to be known as the "Turkey Cabinet." A truly unique and fantastic Signed and Inscribed historic Photo image from the Presidential election year of 1932. Franklin D. Roosevelt's full signature is extremely bold and distinct, measuring a huge 4.5" long. Exceedingly rare.

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FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT Gifted PresentationBook Inscribed & Signed In 1924

Lot 34: FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT Gifted PresentationBook Inscribed & Signed In 1924

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Description: AutographsFranklin D Roosevelt Presentation Book Inscribed & Signed - ALEXANDER HAMILTON An Essay on American UnionFRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT (1882-1945). 32nd President of the United States.1924-Dated, Presentation Book Inscribed & Signed, "Franklin D Roosevelt..." upon its frontis page leaf, Given as a gift by Roosevelt to his secretary, Very Fine. This book is entitled, "ALEXANDER HAMILTON -- An Essay on American Union," New York, G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1907. It has a red cloth hardcover, contains 502 pages, featuring various reviews the life of Alexander Hamilton and his contributions to the formation of the US Federal government, as seen through the eyes of its British author, Frederick Scott Oliver. Roosevelt gave this book to his secretary, Adele "Dot" Conklin, during the Christmas season of 1924. His personal inscription reads, in full:"Miss Adele Conklin --- With a Democrat's hopes that she will realize that this Republican was principally great because he was human enough to have many, many faults. --- (Signed) Franklin D. Roosevelt --- Xmas 1924".This represents a wonderful historic association between FDR and Alexander Hamilton. Hamilton being the Founding Father who most firmly believed in a strong central Federal government. Accompanying this book is an excellent quality Cabinet Size Photograph of Miss Conklin, the recipient of this beautifully inscribed book. ( Please read more online at: EarlyAmerican.com )Franklin Roosevelt believed the 1920s to be a repetition of the heroic struggle between Progressivism and Conservatism. Though FDR here offers his guarded admiration for Alexander Hamilton, the future President more closely thought of himself as a modern follower of Thomas Jefferson, who was Hamilton's political counterpoint.Like Jefferson, FDR believed rural and small-town life was superior to that of the city. He opposed a privileged position for the wealthy, and supported a government that worked for the best interests of the ordinary citizen. However, to achive this end during his tenure as President, FDR would use the considerable power of the Federal government - a power that Hamilton had worked so hard to achive during his lifetime.In this way, Franklin Roosevelt modified the Jeffersonian belief in "freedom from government" into what he believed was its modern equivalent: the freedom to use government to solve social problems.

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(THEODORE ROOSEVELT). Mr. Roosevelt's WW I Army Division Related Letter

Lot 35: (THEODORE ROOSEVELT). Mr. Roosevelt's WW I Army Division Related Letter

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Description: AutographsRare Theodore Roosevelt's WW I "Division" Related Letter(THEODORE ROOSEVELT).c. May 1917, "Form C - Office Of THEODORE ROOSEVELT 753 Fifth Avenue, New York, Room 402" headed stationary, Typed Letter, no date, not signed by Roosevelt, regarding an application to join Roosevelt's division, rejected for the reason of "age," Very Good. This rare letter is laid down onto a heavier card stock, is somewhat brittle and chipped at the corner tips, primarily at the upper right where is is heavily chipped. The violet type text is faded, being basically readable, and is signed by "W. E. Dame" at it's conclusion. This historic content letter reads, in full:Dear Sir: - I regret to inform you that your application for enrollment in Mr. Roosevelt's division, which he proposes to raise in the event of war, has not been approved by the committee on account of - age - Mr. Roosevelt has asked me to thank you for your patriotic offer, and to express his regrets in being unable to avail himself of your service. - Very respectfully, - W. E. Dame."This 1917 headline from the New York Times helps to tell the story around this letter:"Fight for Roosevelt's Division to be Carried Back to CongressMay 12, 1917, SaturdayWASHINGTON, May 11.-- Notice was given in the House today that an effort would be made tomorrow to reject the conference report on the Army Draft bill because of the elimination of the amendment permitting Theodore Roosevelt to organize a division of volunteers for service in France.

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1907 THEODORE ROOSEVELT Signed Mammoth Size Photograph as President

Lot 36: 1907 THEODORE ROOSEVELT Signed Mammoth Size Photograph as President

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Description: AutographsHuge "Theodore Roosevelt" Signed Photograph as President Inscribed to Roosevelt's Personal Physician & Family FriendTHEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919). 26th President of the United States (1901-1909). Roosevelt was also the first of only three sitting presidents to have won the Nobel Peace Prize. He launched the Bull Moose Party that called for far-reaching progressive reforms.March 7, 1907-Dated. Original Oversized "Mammoth" Sepia Photograph, Boldly Signed and Dated, "Theodore Roosevelt - March 4th 1907" as President, measuring 14" x 11", Choice Very Fine. The image depicts the bespectacled President seated at his desk holding some papers. Roosevelt's personal Inscription, in deep black fountain pen upon the reverse blank portion of the papers in his hand in this image reads, in full:"To Alexander Lambert with the affectionate regard of his friend -- Theodore Roosevelt -- March 4th 1907".Alexander Lambert was Roosevelt's personal physician and family friend. The image is upon a photographer's mat, with just two small minor chips at the top corners which will not be visible if matted and framed for display. A very rare size, impressive image with a magnificent, bold signature "Theodore Roosevelt - March 4th 1907" as President, measuring 3.25" long for the signature alone!

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1909 THEODORE ROOSEVELT Typed Letter Signed From His Kenya Safari in Africa

Lot 37: 1909 THEODORE ROOSEVELT Typed Letter Signed From His Kenya Safari in Africa

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Description: Autographs1909 Theodore Roosevelt Typed Letter Signed From KenyaTHEODORE ROOSEVELT (1858-1919). 26th President of the United States.July 16, 1909-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "Theodore Roosevelt", measuring 8" x 10", 2 separate pages, from Saigo Soi Camp, Lake Naivasha, Kenya, Choice Extremely Fine. Written to Colonel J.J. Asser, Adjutant General of Sudan. In the letter, Roosevelt apologizes for bothering Asser and seeks instructions for meeting with a boat to take him further along. He also explains what he plans to do with the trophies he takes. This terrific content Signed Letter reads, in part;"If we get no elephant in British East Africa, I shall try for them in Uganda or the Enclave, and the white rhino I ought to get in the Enclave before reaching Gondokoro." Roosevelt closes with; "I am delighted with the big double-barreled Holland... I have found it by all odds the best gun for rhino and buffalo, and I intend to use it on elephant and white rhino."There is much more showing the mindset of Roosevelt while on his African safari. This Letter is in wonderful, clean sharply detailed high quality. The period paper has excellent type that is easily readable and even has one correction made by Roosevelt. Other than for the expected fold lines from being mailed, it looks fresh clean and highly attractive. The full signature, "Theodore Roosevelt" is written across the conclusion of the second page measuring a huge 5.25" long! An exciting personal letter having great content on his African safari.Theodore Roosevelt began his celebrated safari in Africa virtually the day he left office. His successor, William Howard Taft, was inaugurated on March 4, 1909 and Roosevelt arrived in Mombasa, British East Africa (now Kenya) by steamer on April 12. For the hunt, he employed over 250 porters and guides - by far one of the largest expeditions of its kind in Africa - and took a number of high-powered weapons.According to one biography, Roosevelt and his son Kermit (who had taken a year off from Harvard to go with his father) bagged 512 animals, including 17 lions, 11 elephants, 20 rhinos, 9 giraffes, 9 hippos, 47 gazelles, 29 zebras, 9 hyenas ans a number of other small animals. To counter criticism that his hunt was nothing more than a wholesale slaughter of African animals, he had taken along a fleet of scienrists and taxidermists from the Smithsonian Institute, who had underwritten the trip.Once killed, each animal was skinned and the bones packaged for shipment back to the United States. The hunting party would then eat the meat. Roosevelt killed only those the scientists needed for their studies, or which the party needed for food. Most of the trophies went to the Smithsonian, with others going to the American Museum of Natural History in New York and the San Francisco Museum.

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Rare 1792 DOCTOR BENJAMIN RUSH Autograph Letter Signed Founding Father + Signer!

Lot 38: Rare 1792 DOCTOR BENJAMIN RUSH Autograph Letter Signed Founding Father + Signer!

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Description: AutographsDoctor Benjamin Rush Autograph Letter Signed - Founding Father of the United States, Who Signed the Declaration of Independence and the Continental Army's Surgeon GeneralBENJAMIN RUSH (1745/46-1813). Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Physician, and Political Leader.April 20, 1792-Dated. Autograph Letter Signed, "Benj.n Rush", 6.25" x 7.75". 2 pages, at Philadelphia, Choice Very Fine. Here, Dr. Rush writes to offer words of encouragement to the family of a sick young girl. This example has a lovely quality, is well penned in deep rich brown upon laid period paper with just a few inking smears. This heartfelt, very personal Letter reads, in full:"My much esteemed friend, --- I sincerely sympathize with you in the alarming indisposition of your daughter, but hope the same kind Providence which restored your daughter who was threatened with a Consumption will spare your present afflicted child to be a Comfort and support to you in the desire of life. I have intensely considered her case, and tho' I think her in great danger, yet I do not despair of her recovery. Dr. Morris will inform you of what has been the result of our consultation in her case, and I have only to request that you would implicitly follow all his directions. Hitherto they have been exactly such as I would have presented in her case had I seen at the time he first saw her. With great respect -- I am your sincere friend --- (Signed) Benj. Rush." Noted at lower left, "Philade. 20th April 1792".A wonderful letter of encouragement to a family worried about their daughter's health. It is quite clean with expected mailing folds and tear where the wax seal was opened, not affecting any text. The signature, "Benj.n Rush" is well written, sharp and clear in deep brown measuring 2" long, located at the conclusion. This highly desirable, great American's autograph is missing in most historic Revolutionary War era collections.Benjamin Rush (January 4, 1746 [O.S. December 24, 1745] - April 19, 1813) was a Founding Father of the United States. Rush lived in the state of Pennsylvania and was a physician, writer, educator, humanitarian, as well as the founder of Dickinson College in Carlisle, Pennsylvania.Rush signed the Declaration of Independence and attended the Continental Congress. He served as Surgeon General in the Continental army, and was blamed for criticising George Washington. Later in life, Rush became a professor of chemistry, medical theory, and clinical practice at the University of Pennsylvania.Rush was a leader of the American Enlightenment, and an enthusiastic supporter of the American Revolution. He signed the Declaration of Independence, and was a leader in Pennsylvania's ratification of the Constitution in 1788. He was prominent in many reforms, especially in the areas of medicine and education. He opposed slavery, advocated free public schools, and sought improved education for women and a more enlightened penal system. As a leading physician, Rush had a major impact on the emerging medical profession. As an Enlightenment intellectual, he was committed to organizing all medical knowledge around explanatory theories, rather than rely on empirical methods. Rush argued that illness was the result of imbalances in the body's physical system and was caused by malfunctions in the brain. His approach prepared the way for later medical research, but Rush himself undertook none of it. He promoted public health by advocating clean environment and stressing the importance of personal and military hygiene. His study of mental disorder made him one of the founders of American psychiatry.

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c 1959 EXPLORER SATELLITES ARCHIVE Explorer VI Original Space Race Program

Lot 39: c 1959 EXPLORER SATELLITES ARCHIVE Explorer VI Original Space Race Program

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Description: AutographsExtensive Original Archive Documentation On America's Historic 1959 Original "Explorer VI" Satellite Program(SPACE PROGRAM). "EXPLORER" SATELLITES ARCHIVE, Dating from 1959, Extensive & Important Space Archive, Including: Original Reports, Press Releases and Photos from the "Explorer VI" Satellite Program, mostly Choice Near New.This is an original, completely authentic Archive of various documentary materials on the first American Space Satellite Program. specifically surrounding the 1959 "Explorer VI" Program. All of this archive material is original and should be reviewed by serious potential bidders. It was officially released by NASA and the U.S. Air Force, plus various subcontractors involved with that early Space project. This extensive and remarkable Archive includes, in part:a. (7) 10" x 8" photos depict the satellite complete or partially disassembled. An eighth photograph shows the launch of the satellite atop a Thor-Able rocket.b. Also present are three 5" x 4" photos of key members of the project and a page of background biography.c. A (9) page press release by Space Technology Laboratories of Los Angeles contains more biographical information on members of the program, and a 24 page paper by Frank A. Burnham outlines the Explorer project to that point.d. Also present are a teletype page directed to Space Technology Laboratories and 4 pages of carbon copies or early photostatic copies of some technical information and a map of the satellite's trajectory.e. Further information includes a 13 page Press Release from NASA on the satellite; 4 press releases (10 pages) from Space Technology Laboratories; weekly bulletins #5 through #10 and 2 earlier bulletins (not numbered, for a total of 21 pages); an extra copy of one of the early bulletins, marked for distribution to Major Neuwrith; and 14 pages of press releases concerning their part in the project, from the University of Illinois, Motorola, Gulton Industries, Space Electronics Corporation, Rantec Corporation, Radio Propagation Laboratory (at Stanford University), Hoffman Electronics, Hallamore Electronics, Radiation Inc. (Melbourne, FL), and Gilfillan Brothers Inc. (Los Angeles).f. To this we have added about 50 pages of information on the program, downloaded from various internet sites. Aside from the teletype page which has a couple tape stains, this archive is like new.An incredible, original treasure trove of over 100 pages of first-hand information and period photos, etc. on the exciting "Explorer VI" Space Program. Sold "as is" as an Archive Lot. (About 100 Pages, Photos & Documents).Following the successful orbiting of the Russian Sputnik satellite in 1957, the United States stepped up its space program. Though Sputnik itself was of little importance, what it meant was that the Russians had succeeded in developing an intercontinental missile capable of striking the United States. The U.S. missile program had been largely unsuccessful up till that time, with some rockets exploding on the launch pad.Explorer 1, launched January 31, 1958, was the first successful orbiting of a U.S. satellite. Nevertheless, Explorer II and Explorer V were unsuccessful, as were a few others through 1961. Explorer VI was successful, though one of its solar panels failed to deploy, reducing its power supply. The satellite transmitted data until October 6, 1959 when its power supply failed. Later in 1959 the satellite was used as a target for an anti-satellite missile test. The missile passed within a few kilometers of the satellite but failed to hit it. Explorer VI burned up in the atmosphere when its orbit decayed on July 1, 1961.

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1847-Dated ZACHARY TAYLOR Mexican-American War Camp Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 40: 1847-Dated ZACHARY TAYLOR Mexican-American War Camp Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsSuperb Content 1847 Autograph Letter Signed "Z. Taylor" From His Mexican-American War Camp Near Monterrey (Mexico)ZACHARY TAYLOR (1784-1850). 12th President of the United States.May 28, 1847-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Z. Taylor", measuring 8" x 10", 3 pages, Camp near Monterrey (Mexico), Extremely Fine. Written to General John E. Wool after securing the northern Territories of Mexico, General Taylor releases his 12-month recruits, while rumors of a new peace accord run high.This superb content Zachary Taylor Autograph Letter reads, in part:"On the subject of a forward or early movement into the heart of the enimies (sic) country I do not expect even if the war continues to be able to do so, for want of a proper force; that portion, or a large part of the ten new Regts, ordered to concentrate at Point Isabel, & which I thought might be placed under my orders, or at my disposal have with Genl. Cadwallader been ordered to Vera Cruz..." Taylor continues; "...if reports are at all to be relied on, no forward movement will be necessary... an individual in Vera Cruz [stated that] 'he had that moment been informed by the British Consul, that he the Consul had that morning recd a letter from the British minister in the city of Mexico, that he had been applied to by the Mexican autorities, to solicit his or his govts, good officer to bring about a peace with the U. States'; if it is true, & there appears to be but little doubt of the fact, the war may be considered at an end, & no doubt an armistice has been already entered into by the parties concerned until the preliminaries for a final peace can be adjusted."An amazing content Letter dates from the height of Zachary Taylor's fame, which would vault him to the Presidency just three years later. The rumor of a peace overture from the Mexican government was unfounded, although it was hoped that Taylor's victory at Buena Vista would compel the Mexicans to surrender. The opposite was true, however, as the Mexican General Santa Anna took his force south to defend Mexico City in the face of Winfield Scott's advance. The Mexican-American War would drag on for yet another nine months.

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WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT, Appointment Document Signed as President 1911

Lot 41: WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT, Appointment Document Signed as President 1911

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Description: Autographs1911 William Howard Taft Signed Presidential AppointmentWILLIAM HOWARD TAFT (1857-1930). 27th President of the United States (1909-1913), later the Tenth Chief Justice of the United States, the only person to have served in both offices.December 26, 1911-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Wm H Taft" as President, 1 page, 19.25" x 15" at Washington, Choice Never Folded Crisp Near Mint. This being an official Presidential Appointment for Harry S. Wolf to serve as a "Notary Public for the District of Columbia." Countersigned by Mr. Dawson, Acting Attorney General. Superb original Embossed Red Paper Seal is fully intact. This is a truly gorgeous Document, with a large 3" long bold brown signature. Simply a perfect, premium quality specimen for display.

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Union General ALFRED HOWE TERRY 1861 Civil War Document Signed

Lot 42: Union General ALFRED HOWE TERRY 1861 Civil War Document Signed

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Description: AutographsUnion Civil War & Indian Wars General Alfred Howe TerryALFRED HOWE TERRY (1827-1890). Union General in the American Civil War and the Military Commander of the Dakota Territory during the Indian Wars Period from 1866 to 1869 and again from 1872 to 1886. In Command of the expedition against the Sioux Indians when Colonel George A. Custer was killed at the Battle of Little Big Horn in June of 1876.September 17, 1861-Dated Civil War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Alfred H. Terry" as Colonel Commanding the 7th Connecticut Infantry, Fine. This original Vellum Military Commission is 1 page, measuring 10" x 15", oblong folio, with some age lines along the folds, Appointing John Day as a Sergeant in Company B, in the 7th Connecticut Volunteers. Day was later taken Prisoner of War at Drewery's Bluff.Alfred Terry's greatest achievement of the Civil War came when he was placed in Command of the Fort Fisher Expeditionary Corps. Benjamin Butler had previously failed in his expedition against Confederate Fort Fisher at the end of 1864, while Terry actually took that Fort for the Union in January of 1865. The Union Army's capture of this Fort ended the Confederate's ability to use Wilmington, North Carolina as a shipping port. Terry later led U.S. troops against the Plains Indians, and was in Command of the expedition against the Sioux Indians when Colonel George A. Custer was killed at the Battle of Little Big Horn in June of 1876. General Alfred Howe Terry (1827-1890) was born in Hartford Connecticut. He was one of 15 officers to receive the "Thanks of Congress" for his part in capturing Fort Fisher, North Carolina during the Civil War (1865). The Union Army's capture of this Fort ended the Confederate's ability to use Wilmington, North Carolina as a shipping port, and was therefore a significant victory. Terry later led U.S. troops against the Plains Indians, and was in command of the expedition against the Sioux when Colonel George A. Custer was killed at the Battle of Little Big Horn (June 1876). He retired from the Army due to illness in 1888, and died two years later.MacNeil's 1934 Statue of General Alfred Howe Terry is located on the South elevation of the Connecticut State Capitol.

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1842 JOHN TYLER Signed Four-Language Whaling Ship's Passport

Lot 43: 1842 JOHN TYLER Signed Four-Language Whaling Ship's Passport

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Description: John Tyler Signed Presidential Four-Language Ship's Paper JOHN TYLER (1790-1862). 10th President of the United States. Also Signed by "Daniel Webster" as Secretary of State. December 31, 1842-Dated. Partially-Printed Document Signed, "J. Tyler" as President, measuring a larger 20.75" x 16", 1 page, Choice Fine. Being a Four-Language Whaling Ship's Passport for the "Canada," with "William H. Lipham" Master or Commander of the burden "545 tons or thereabouts, lying at present in the port of New Bedford bound for Indian Ocean and laden with Provisions, Stores and Utensils for a whaling voyage." Also Signed by "Daniel Webster" as Secretary of State. This document is well printed and easily readable having deep black text and strong brown manuscript portions. Some expected tone located along the fold lines and a few very small fold wear holes which are nominal. The large signature of JOHN TYLER is about 3" long, while Daniel Webster's is 3.25" long. Quite scarce having this dual signature combination and overall in a very collectible quality.

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Outstanding and Superb Large Historic Proclamation Broadside Signed HARRY TRUMAN

Lot 44: Outstanding and Superb Large Historic Proclamation Broadside Signed HARRY TRUMAN

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Description: Historic Proclamation Broadside Signed "Harry Truman" HARRY S. TRUMAN (1884-1972). 33rd President of the United States. (1945-1953). The final running mate of President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1944, Truman succeeded to the presidency on April 12, 1945 when Roosevelt died. Under Truman, the U.S. successfully concluded World War II. Truman assisted in the founding of the United Nations, issued the "Truman Doctrine" to contain communism, and passed the $13 billion Marshall Plan to rebuild Europe. December 25, 1945-Dated (Christmas Gift). Historic multicolor Large Size Proclamation Broadside Signed and Inscribed by, "Harry Truman" as President, measuring 14.75" x 21.75", 1 page, at Washington, DC, Choice Crisp Near Mint. This impressive Proclamation Broadside was issued to designate May 13, 1945 as "A Day of Prayer". It is dated within the printed text May 8, 1945, the day the formal papers of surrender were signed ending World War II with Germany, taking place in Berlin, Germany. This remarkable Broadside was personally inscribed by Truman and given to Commander Clark M. Clifford and his wife for Christmas 1945. Clark McAdams Clifford (1906 - 1998) was an American lawyer who served United States Presidents Harry S. Truman, John F. Kennedy, Lyndon B. Johnson and Jimmy Carter, serving as United States Secretary of Defense for Johnson. Clifford went to Washington, D.C., first to serve as Assistant to the President's Naval Adviser, after the naming of a personal friend from Missouri as the President's Naval Adviser. Following his discharge from the Navy, he remained at Truman's side as White House Counsel from 1946 to 1950, as Truman came rapidly to trust and rely upon Clifford. Truman's personal, Handwritten inscription reads as follows, in full; "This was a happy birthday for me. I hope this will be a happy Christmas for you. --- To Commander Clark M. Clifford and Mrs. Clifford. 12/25/45 --- (Signed) Harry Truman". The text of this historic Broadside reads, in full: "By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation, The Allied Armies, through sacrifice and devotion and with God's help, have wrung from Germany a final and unconditional surrender. The western world has been freed of the evil forces which for five years and longer have imprisoned the bodies and broken the lives of millions upon millions of free-born men. They have violated their churches, destroyed their homes, corrupted their children, and murdered their loved ones. Our Armies of Liberation have restored freedom to these suffering peoples, whose spirit and will the oppressors could never enslave. Much remains to be done. The victory won in the West must now be won in the East. The whole world must be cleansed of the evil from which half the world has been freed. United, the peace-loving nations have demonstrated in the West that their arms are stronger by far than the might of the dictators or the tyranny of military cliques that once called us soft and weak. The power of our peoples to defend themselves against all enemies will be proved in the Pacific war as it has been proved in Europe. For the triumph of spirit and of arms which we have won, and for its promise to the peoples everywhere who join us in the love of freedom, it is fitting that we, as a nation, give thanks to Almighty God, Who has strengthened us and given us the victory. Now, therefore, I, Harry S. Truman, President of the United States of America, do hereby appoint Sunday, May 13, 1945, to be a day of prayer. I call upon the people of the United States, whatever their faith, to united in offering joyful thanks to God for the victory we have won and to pray that He will support us to the end of our present struggle and guide us into the ways of peace. I also call upon my countrymen to dedicate this day of prayer to the memory of those who have given their lives to make possible our victory. In witness thereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed. --- Washington, D.C., May 8, 1945 --- Harry Truman." The beautiful, colorful virtual Mint quality of this fresh, vivid Broadside attests to the proper handling and loving care it has received over the decades. Its historic importance is significant and this inscription makes it unique, though a few other examples are known to exist. The signature "Harry Truman" measures a huge 4.25" long at the conclusion. This Museum quality example is certain to become a major significant highlight in the collection of the proud new owner.

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GEORGE WASHINGTON Signed American Army Discharge Awarding the BADGE OF MERIT

Lot 45: GEORGE WASHINGTON Signed American Army Discharge Awarding the BADGE OF MERIT

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Description: AutographsOutstanding George Washington Signed American Army Discharge Document and Awarding the "Badge of Merit"GEORGE WASHINGTON (1732-1799). 1st President of the United States and Commanding General of the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. Plus, PHILIP VAN CORTLANDT (1749-1831) Revolutionary War Lt. Colonel, mustered out as Brigadier General having served since 1775, 2nd New York Regiment; noted for his gallant service at Yorktown, friend of General Lafayette; Member of Congress; Politician; Charter Member of the Society of the Cincinnati. Plus, JONATHAN TRUMBULL, JR., Aide-de-camp to General Washington.June 8, 1783-Dated, Revolutionary War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "G. Washington", Head-Quarters, Very Fine. An original Revolutionary War Continental Army Discharge Document for "Thomas Jackson private", for "Six Years and Six Months" faithful service during the war. George Washington's bold, vivid signature measures a large 3" long. The introduction of this Document reads:"By His Excellency GEORGE WASHINGTON, Esq; - General and Commander in Chief of the Forces of the United States of America. - These are to Certify that the Bearer hereof Cornelius McDormet Private in the First New York Regiment, having faithfully served the United States Six Years and Six Months and being inlisted for the War only, is hereby Discharged from the American Army. - GIVEN at HEAD-QUARTERS the (Signed) "G. Washington."The Partially-Printed back side of this Document contains an interesting printed "escape clause" for the Army in the event that Peace talks with Great Britain failed and the War resumed. This portion reads, in full:"Head-Quarters, June 8, 1783. - THE within CERTIFICATE shall not avail the Bearer as a Discharge, until the Ratification of the definitive Treaty of Peace; previous to which Time, and until Proclamation thereof shall be made, He is to be considered as being on Furlough." (Signed in print) - "George Washington."At the bottom of the front page, Private Jackson is awarded the "Badge of Merit". General George Washington having authorized only a limited number of certain, select soldiers to receive this special military Award. This official Revolutionary War Military Document also Certifying the awarding of the "Badge of Merit," reading in full:"THE above Thomas Jackson private has been honored with the Badge of Merit for Six Years faithful Service." (Signed) - "P. Cortlandt, Col." Noted in "Public Papers of George Clinton." No. 1376, is a letter from Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt to New York Governor George Clinton, who "Applauds the New Drill Master, Baron Steuben - Camp Valley Forge, May 9th 1778. From another letter: "...It is beyond description to conceive what the men suffer..." Colonel Philip Van Cortlandt, Camp Valley Forge, 2nd N.Y. Regiment, in a letter to George Clinton Governor of New York. February 13th 1778.PHILIP VAN CORTLANDT. Graduated from King's College (later Columbia University) in 1768; engaged as a civil engineer; Member of the Provincial Congress in 1775; during the War of the Revolution served as Lieutenant Colonel and was mustered out of the service with the rank of Brigadier General for gallant conduct at the Siege of Yorktown under General Lafayette; Delegate to the State Convention which adopted the Federal Constitution in 1788; served as Supervisor of the Town of Cortland, and as School Commissioner and Road Master; Member of the State Assembly 1788-1790; served in the State Senate (1791-1793); Elected as a Democrat to the Third and to the Seven succeeding Congresses (March 4, 1793-March 3, 1809); accompanied General Lafayette on his Tour through the United States in 1831; was a Charter Member of the Society of the Cincinnati; died at Van Cortlandt Manor, Croton on Hudson, Westchester County, N.Y., on November 1, 1831.At the end of the Revolutionary War, General George Washington insisted on signing every discharge certificate from the Continental Army personally, rather than having them only signed by individual unit commanders. According to Charles Hamilton's, "Collecting Autographs and Manuscripts," Washington said: "These soldiers have fought long and hard. I wish to sign the discharge for each man, so that he will leave the army knowing that I appreciate his work and that I have personally looked upon his name and testified to his honorable conduct."This important document is in very nice, far above average condition. It is complete and fully intact with 100% of its original margins and printed text present and clearly readable. Some deft sealed fold separations, the original folds from being carried by the recipient. Overall, this historic document is sharply printed with significant amounts of original press text embossing retained within the paper, attesting to its originality. All of the manuscript portions are written in rich deep brown and clearly readable. A marvelous Revolutionary War Military Document magnificently signed by George Washington as Commander in Chief and Lt. Colonel Van Dyck as the Regimental Commander.A major and historic highlight, this rare George Washington Signed, American Army Discharge Document Awarding the "Badge of Merit" has very nice eye appeal and is excellent for framing and display.The "Badge of Military Merit" was first announced in General George Washington's in his general orders to the Continental Army, issued on August 7, 1782 at the Headquarters in Newburgh, New York. Designed by Washington, it was in the form of a purple heart, and was intended as a military order for soldiers who exhibited, "not only instances of unusual gallantry in battle, but also extraordinary fidelity and essential service in any way."Of the Badge of Military Merit, Washington said:"The General ever desirous to cherish virtuous ambition in his soldiers, as well as to foster and encourage every species of Military merit, directs that whenever any singularly meritorious action is performed, the author of it shall be permitted to wear on his facings over the left breast, the figure of a heart in purple cloth, or silk, edged with narrow lace or binding. Not only instances of unusual gallantry, but also of extraordinary fidelity and essential service in any way shall meet with a due reward. Before this favour can be conferred on any man, the particular fact, or facts, on which it is to be grounded must be set forth to the Commander in chief accompanied with certificates from the Commanding officers of the regiment and brigade to which the Candadate [sic] for reward belonged, or other incontestable proofs, and upon granting it, the name and regiment of the person with the action so certified are to be enrolled in the book of merit which will be kept at the orderly office. Men who have merited this last distinction to be suffered to pass all guards and sentinals [sic] which officers are permitted to do. The road to glory in a patriot army and a free country is thus open to all. This order is also to have retrospect to the earliest stages of the war, and to be considered as a permanent one."Most historians indicate that only three people actually received the Badge of Military Merit during the American Revolutionary War itself, all of them noncommissioned officers, and the only ones who received the award directly from General Washington himself. While these three soldiers were most likely the first to receive the Badge of Military Merit, discharge certificates of other Revolutionary War soldiers indicate that they also received the "Badge of Merit" for their years of faithful service. Microfilmed images of these discharges bearing Washington's signature can be found in the individual records of soldiers at the National Archives.The "book of merit" or orderly book mentioned by Washington in his general orders of August 7, 1782 in which the awards were to be recorded has never been found.(From Wikipedia)

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1798 USS CONSTITUTION Receipt for Boards & planks building Frigate Constitution

Lot 46: 1798 USS CONSTITUTION Receipt for Boards & planks building Frigate Constitution

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Description: AutographsHistoric Original 1798 Early "U.S.S. Constitution" Receipt for "... Boards, & planks furnished for building the United States Frigate Constitution..."(U.S.S. CONSTITUTION & American Naval History). September 13, 1798-Dated Federal Period, Partially-Printed Issued Receipt Document Signed, "Jon(athon) Balch, Jun(ior)," Receipt of "Henry Jackson, Naval Agent for the United States at Boston," Massachusetts, for the U.S.S. Constitution, Choice Extremely Fine.A rare original, Partially-Printed Document, 5.25" x 7.25", 1 page, Boston, Massachusetts. Being a receipt for building materials for the refit of the USS Constitution. USS Constitution is a wooden-hulled, three-masted heavy frigate of the United States Navy. Named by President George Washington after the Constitution of the United States of America, she is the world's oldest commissioned naval vessel afloat. (Wikipedia) This exceptional, historic American Naval Document reads, in full:"Received of Henry Jackson, Naval Agent for the United States, At Boston, Eighty three Dolls twenty six cents in full for sundry boards & plank furnished for building of the United States Frigate Constitution per bill - for which I have signed triplicate Receipts of the same tenor and date. --- (Signed) Jon Balch Jun".The remarkable Document is dated just five days after the Constitution's first naval engagement, September 8, 1798 against the British Privateer "Niger". The USS Constitution was first deployed on July 22, 1798, as hostilities rose on the open sea between the fledgling United States and the world's superpowers, Britain and France, which lead to the Quasi-War with France between 1798-1801.An important, historic American Naval Document relating to the construction of the USS Constitution, mentioning some of the cannonball deflecting superior wooden "boards & planks" which would soon give this ship it's celebrated nickname "Old Ironsides." The black printed text is sharp and well printed, having rich vivid brown manuscript portions and signature. All four margins are full and complete, making this important piece of American history perfect for display.The 44-gun Constitution was one of six "Ironsides" authorized by Congress in 1794. It was designed by Joshua Humphreys, built in Edmund Hartt's shipyard at Boston, and launched on October 21, 1797."Old Ironside's" copper sheathing was made by Paul Revere, as well as forged the copper bolts and breasthooks. Its hull of hard oak timbers was bent into place, rather than steamed in the usual manner, making it an innovation in naval technology. The total cost for the frigate was $302,718.

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1854 HENRY WELLS and WILLIAM FARGO Signed American Express Co. Stock Certificate

Lot 47: 1854 HENRY WELLS and WILLIAM FARGO Signed American Express Co. Stock Certificate

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Description: Autographs"Wells" & "Fargo" American Express Co. Stock CertificateHENRY WELLS (1805-1878) & WILLIAM FARGO (1818-1881). Founders of the Wells Fargo and American Express Companies.September 30, 1854-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Wm G Fargo" as Secretary and "Henry Wells" as President, American Express Co. Stock Certificate, measuring 6.5" x 11", 1 page, New York, Choice Extremely Fine. Being an original 1854 Stock Certificate for one share of the American Express Company, Number 1143, made out to "Mrs. E.E.G. Emerson." Also Signed by Alex Holland, as Treasurer. Vignette of an early Train at upper center, printed upon period wove light tan paper in black. All details are sharply printed and clear, all border designs are intact having choice eye appeal. The signatures are written very nicely and carefully with Fargo in light tan ink and Wells being in bold vivid brown. An excellent, historic and highly decorative piece of American western and financial history that is perfect for display.American Express was started as an express mail business in Buffalo, New York, in 1850.[10] It was founded as a joint stock corporation by the merger of the express companies owned by Henry Wells (Wells & Company), William G. Fargo (Livingston, Fargo & Company), and John Warren Butterfield (Wells, Butterfield & Company, the successor earlier in 1850 of Butterfield, Wasson & Company).The same founders also started Wells Fargo & Co. in 1852 when Butterfield and other directors objected to the proposal that American Express extend its operations to California.

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ELI WHITNEY War of 1812 Autograph Letter Signed with Military Ordinance Content!

Lot 48: ELI WHITNEY War of 1812 Autograph Letter Signed with Military Ordinance Content!

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Description: AutographsEli Whitney Autograph Letter Signed Rare War of 1812 EraELI WHITNEY (1765-1825). American Inventor best known for Inventing the Cotton Gin, later manufactured muskets for the newly formed United States Army until his death in 1825.January 5, 1813-Dated. Autograph Letter Signed, "E. Whitney", 7.25" x 8.5", 2 pages, New Haven, Choice Very Fine. Written to Decius Wadsworth, Commissary General of the Ordinance Department, Washington; even in its very clean appearance, extremely well written in deep brown being easy to read, trivial humidity tone at the right margin; small paper loss to the docketed integral address leaf attached and expected offset from the wax seal when opened. Several folds with minor archival reinforcement. Overall, exceedingly pleasing in eye appeal and attractive having its original "17" cent red manuscript postal fee and a red oval stamp "NEW HAVEN, CT - JAN. 7" upon fine quality period laid paper. Here, Eli Whitney writes, in full: "My Dear Sir ---- Capt Roswell Lee of whom I spoke to you when I saw you last is still desirous of obtaining a Commission in the Army of the U(nited) States. I observe there is a proposition before Congress to increase the army, if the measure is adopted it will make an opening for a large number of appointments - Will you be so good as to write to me and inform me whether there is any probability of Capt Lee's obtaining a place either in your Department or in the Army, which would be equal in rank & emoluments to those of a Major or Captain - if it should be tho(ugh)t adviseable he will come on to Washington and make application in person - his recommendations will be full and unexceptionable. Be so good as to write me your opinion relative to the continuance of the war - Who is to be the successor of Doct Eustis? Is there to be a new Sec(retar)y of the Navy? - I am stimulated to these enquiries both by curiosity & interest. Tell me how you are getting on in your Department - I shall be much gratified to hear from you often & am with great regard your friend --- (Signed) E. Whitney"Docket on the reverse central panel reads; "Eli Whitney Esq. -- Recom. Capt. Lee to an office -- New Haven 5 Jany. 1813" with flourish below. Any Autograph Letter Signed by Eli Whitney is extremely rare. This one is of the War of 1812 period and has military ordinance content from a time Whitney was contracted to supply muskets to the United States Army. The signature, "E Whitney" is boldly written in vivid deep brown, measuring over 1.75" long with his lovely flourish below. An important autograph with choice content worthy of the very finest collection.

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JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER, Two Autograph Letters Signed, Poet/Abolitionist Archive

Lot 49: JOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER, Two Autograph Letters Signed, Poet/Abolitionist Archive

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Description: Autographs"John G. Whittier" Poet and Abolitionist ArchiveJOHN GREENLEAF WHITTIER (1807-1892). American Abolitionist of Slavery in the United States, Quaker Poet.Two Autograph Letters Signed "John G Whittier," one Book of Poems Signed, a Rare CDV Signed, two Cabinet Card Photos and one Engraving, Choice Very Fine. A fabulous historical lot from this famous 19th century American abolitionist and poet. Whittier (1807-1892) writes and signs in ink two letters from 1886 and 1887, approximately 6.5" x 4.5" each; inscribes in pencil an original book of poems:"Saint Gregory's Guest and Recent Poems," 3rd ed., 1887, Boston, MA: Houghton, Mifflin and Co., The Riverside Press (Cambridge), which was dedicated in print to "Gen. S.C. Armstrong of Hampton, VA, Whose generous and self-denying labors for the elevation of two races have enlisted my sympathies and commanded my admiration..."The CDV and two cabinet cards are all printed from shops in Boston, and the steel engraving, by P.T. Stuart of Boston, has a facsimile inscription beneath the vignette portrait. A very rare assortment of images and signatures by this noted abolitionist and poet, who originally worked as an editor for William Lloyd Garrison, was a lifelong anti-slavery proponent, helped found the "Atlantic Monthly," suggested the formation of the Republican Party, and was greatly admired as a poet during his lifetime, ranked with Longfellow and Bryant. Documents with typical minor wear, and the signatures are very nice. (7 items)

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Autograph Document Signed GEORGE WYTHE Signer of the Declaration of Independence

Lot 50: Autograph Document Signed GEORGE WYTHE Signer of the Declaration of Independence

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Description: AutographsVery Rare Full "George Wythe" Signature Signer of the Declaration of IndependenceGEORGE WYTHE (1726-1806). Signer of the Declaration of Independence; The first of the 7 Virginia signers of the United States Declaration of Independence, Wythe served as one of Virginia's representatives to the Continental Congress and the Constitutional Convention. Wythe taught and was a mentor to Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and other men who became noted American leaders.Autograph Manuscript Document Signed, "George Wythe" as witness, 1 page, measuring 6" x 7.25", Choice Very Fine. This Legal Document is involving a 1744 case, "Hill v Waugh," being a sworn statement of testimony from a Nicholas Batthe. Boldly Signed "George Wythe" at lower left at bottom. Expected folds, well written in deep brown, easily readable text upon clean period laid paper. A lovely example with a wonderful full George Wythe signature.George Wythe was the First American Law Professor, a noted classics scholar and Virginia Judge, as well as a prominent opponent of Slavery.

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