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Auction Description for Alexander Autographs: Winter 2013 Auction Part II

423 lots with images

January 31, 2013

Live Auction
423 Lots
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CONFEDERATE SURGEON'S KEPI

Lot 419: CONFEDERATE SURGEON'S KEPI

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Description: CONFEDERATE SURGEON'S KEPI An excessively rare piece of Confederate headgear, the surgeon's kepi once belonging to Lt. James W. Claiborne of the 12th Virginia and one of only perhaps six surgeon's kepis known to exist in public or private hands. The dark blue/black kepi bears a round top with 4 1/2" diameter, and is 2 1/2" tall at front, 6" tall at rear. It bears a double band of gold braid 1/16" wide encircling the lower part of the cap, with a 1/8" single gold braid strand and front and back seams and a single quatrefoil in 1/8" gold braid on the crown. A 1/2" gold braid chinstrap is present, terminating at the end of the visor, and is affixed with tin-backed buttons with single star motif. The kepi is lined with brown silesia (twill cotton), and the sides are lines with a cotton print of stylized flowers on a zigzag repeating backgroung. The lining is merely set into the cap. The 1" oilcloth sweatband is painted black. The 2 1/8" deep visor is made of black leather lined with green leather or paper in a pressed pattern of striated leather, with black leather edging. The visor, stitched to the cap, is very slightly loose on the right side, and there are six or seven tiny moth nips in the body of the cap. The visor bears surface cracking and one nominal crease but overall this kepi is in much better condition than is usually found. Claiborne enlisted with the 12th Virginia Infy. at Petersburg, Va. as a private sometime prior to April 30, 1861 and remained with that regiment until he was paroled at Appomattox at war's end. He was quickly appointed Assistant Surgeon, effective Sep. 14, 1861, thus immediately elevating in rank him from private to lieutenant. The provenance and authenticity of this item is impeccable. Present is a copy of a letter from recognized uniform expert Les Jensen to dealer Will Gorges carefully describing the kepi and mentioning its connection to Claiborne. Jensen notes: "This is a very good example of an original Confedertae surgeon's kepi. There appears to be no restoration...the lining is identical to the material used in the sleeve lining of a coat that belonged to Colonel William McComb of the 14th Tennessee Infantry. Given that Surgeon Claiborne was from Petersburg, and that Colonel McComb was in the vicinity of Petersburg from the summer of 1864 until nearly the end of the war, it seems likely that this kepi is the product of either a Petersburg tailor, or one operating in central Virginia...less than half a dozen are known to exist. This is a highly important cap...". Also present are two original 1997 letters of provenance signed by Jerry Wright which also describe the kepi. They note: "...[it] came from a home in Petersburg, Virginia, around 1959-61 and was the former property of James W. Claiborne, Company E, 12th Virginia Infantry...The hat has resided in the same major collection in the Petersburg, Virginia vicinity until I obtained the item in May, 1997, and has never been offered for public or private sale to anyone since its initial release from a Claiborne family member...". The 12th Virginia fought at at Oak Grove, Second Manassas, in the Maryland Campaign, at Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg, and surrendered at Appomattox. Sold with Claiborne's partial service record, letters of provenance, Jensen analysis, Will Gorges catalog offering, and other supporting material.

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JAMES E. B. STUART

Lot 420: JAMES E. B. STUART

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Description: JAMES E. B. STUART (1833 - 1864) Confederate major general of cavalry who circled McClellan's army twice, was late to the battle of Gettysburg, and in 1864 was mortally wounded at Yellow Tavern. Rare, good content war-date A.L.S. "Stuart" with postcript initialed "J.E.B." on "Head Quarters Cavalry Corps, Army of Northern Virginia" letterhead, Dec. 31, 1863, 2+pp. 4to., [n.p.], to an unnamed colonel. In part: "...Our friends [Frank] Vizatelly [British war correspondent and illustrator who came to the US in 1861 and covered the Civil War from the Confederate viewpoint] and Capt. Ross left us this morning and will be with you before this reaches you. I was very sorry Lawley [British newspaperman Francis Lawley?] did not come up. I hope however to go down on 3 or 4 days leave...to Ricmond to attend the nuptuals of my brother in law Gen'l [John R.] Cooke. I hope to see you then. I am very much gratified at your exertions in behalf of the Cavalry, the army, and the country. I would dislike very much to lose you for foreign missions or anything else during this war....Your being superceded so soon in Congress must be regarded as a public calamity...I was glad the House had the manliness and patriotism to put the bill putting in all men who claim exemption by reason of having furnished a substitute. It should be quickly followed up by the enrolling officers - so as to get our army full by spring. ..Why don't the mil. committee hurry up a report about the cav'y measures proposed - I have another scheme - to establish under command of a disabled Col. or other Field Officer - a camp of artisans...with shops, tools and materials...for all of the prisoners of war who renounce their allegiance to the enemy & take the oath to the Confed. States. Also all the deserters from the enemy to us. This class is rapidly growing...The camp should be subject to mil. discipline, the operatives to be paid for their works. Under such a man as Col. R. E. Withers it would flourish and be very profitable to the gov't. The Sec. of War has the authority to do it...These Yankees in two days in the woods would be as comfortable as I am at this moment. I am uneasy about their presence in Richmond...". In his initialed postscript (detached from the letter), Stuart adds: "Poor Sweeny the banjoist is no more. He died of the small pox during my absence. His loss is very generally felt throughout our military circle...Hurry up legislation for the cavalry & the army...". Fine condition. Contrary to Stuart's hopes, the C.S.A. never adopted his plans, though at Belle Isle and to a lesser extent in some other camps, prisoners were employed in iron works, and in constructing battlements and additions to camps.

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EDWARD JOHNSON

Lot 421: EDWARD JOHNSON

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Description: EDWARD JOHNSON (1816 - 1873) Confederate major general who served with distinction in the Valley Campaign of 1862. Johnson led Stonewall Jackson's old division at Gettysburg, the Wilderness, and Spotsylvania where he was captured while defending the "Bloody Angle". After his release, he was captured yet again at Nashville and imprisoned at Fort Warren in Boston for the duration of the war. Fine content A.L.S. "Edw. Johnson Maj. Gl. CSA" written from captivity at Fort Warren, 3pp. 4to., Apr. 17, 1865. Two days after the death of Abraham Lincoln, Johnson writes from Casemate #5 in the bleak prison to his cousin, Emily Barton Brune in Baltimore, lamenting the death of the president. In part: "...recent events that have transpired in Va. and in Wash'n must have affected you as they have done us...heartfelt gratitude for your sympathy and your kindness in my misfortune...yr father, mother & sister who have been surrounded by such awful & trying events...I room in what is called a casemate in military parlance, a sort of subterranean abode, built of very solid masonry, but not shut out from the light of sun...I no doubt occupy the apartments formerly occupied by your friends [Baltimore Mayor George W. Brown, among others]...exercise at all hours of the day...we have been shocked by the terrible tragedy recently perpetrated in Wash'n, and all of us deeply and sincerely deplore it. Nothing at this time could have been more unfortunate for our unhappy country. All honorable men must feel as we do about this assassination. It must have [?] in the brain of the perpetrator. I feel confident that he had no aid or sympathy from honorable men of the South. They are not assassins and not the allies of assassins...". Johnson closes with warm sentiments and expressions of thankfulness to his much beloved cousin. Censor's signature at upper-left, folds, else near fine. With transmittal envelope, near fine.

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JAMES LONGSTREET

Lot 422: JAMES LONGSTREET

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Description: JAMES LONGSTREET (1821 - 1904) Confederate major general who commanded Lee's right wing at Antietam, and the left flank at Chickamauga. Longstreet has been accused of delaying his attack at Gettysburg, leading to the Confederate defeat there. Excessively rare fine content and association war date A.L.S. "J. Longstreet", 4pp. 8vo., "Camp near Winchester", Oct. 5, 1862 to fellow Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. Just four days before his promotion to Lieutenant General, Longstreet corresponds with his old friend who had been wounded at the Battle of Seven Pines in early June. In part: "…I was much gratified at having a letter from you, and particularly so at receiving the photograph. It has revived a good deal of the old enthusiasm that your old Army has always had at the sight or thought of you. Although they have fought many battles and successfully under another leader [Robert E. Lee], I feel that you have their hearts more decidedly than any other leader can ever have. The men would now go wild at the sight of their old favorite. I can't become reconciled at the idea of your going west. I command the 1st Corps in this Army. If you will take it you are more than welcome to it, and I have no doubt but the command of the entire Army will fall to you before Spring. I am now thirty thousand strong and increasing very fast daily. It would do my heart a great deal of good to have one good talk with you, can't always write what we would like to say…we are trying to shoe & clothe our men and scratch out the wrinkles from their stomachs caused by their short rations…we are now beginning to feel like game cocks again, and some begin to wish for the chance to convince the Yankees that Sharpsburg is but a trifle to what they can do…If it is possible for me to relieve you by going west don't hesitate to send me…" Slight toning, with paper thinning partially affecting one letter in signature, else very good. A most telling letter, obviously showing Longstreet's great admiration for Johnston, but more tellingly it hints at Longstreet's dissatisfaction with his new commanding officer, Robert E. Lee. The rest is history: Johnston was indeed sent to command the Department of the West, and Longstreet's tenuous relationship with Lee would cause him to be blamed by many for the debacle at Gettysburg.

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UNION CAPTAIN OF RIFLES FROCK COAT

Lot 423: UNION CAPTAIN OF RIFLES FROCK COAT

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Description: UNION CAPTAIN OF RIFLES FROCK COAT An excessively rare U.S. Captain of Rifles frock coat, one of only a tiny handful known to be in public or private hands. This dark blue single breasted broadcloth coat is very tightly woven and is composed of two front, two side, and two back panels with a center seam. The standing two-piece collar is of the same material as the coat, and stands 1 1/2" at front and rear, 1 3/4" at its tallest point. An iron hook and eye are present at the base of the collar. The two-piece sleeves measure 8 3/4" across at the elbow and 4 1/2" at the cuff, which is turned underneath and stitched. The functional cuff buttons with two 15mm. U.S. Rifle Officer's buttons backmarked "SUPERIOR QUALITY", with a third (surprisingly) non-functional button affixed furthest from the cuff. Each shoulder bears a Smith's patent captain's shoulder strap, the edge and devices made of stamped brass. The background is a light green cloth, more so obvious under the metal edge. Each strap is 4" x 1 1/2", with edging piece 3/8" wide. The straps are attached to a dark blue or black wool backing and sewn to the coat. The coat bears a center vent and a pair of side folds with pocket flaps on either side. There are four 22mm. Rifle Officer's buttons on the back, two at the hips, and one each at the end of each pocket flap, all backmarked "STEEL & JOHNSON". The coat is lined in a brown/green material, perhaps fine cotton, with a ribbed padded breast and shoulders. The coat measures 16 1/2" from the bottom of the collar to the waist seam at font; 19 1/2" in back; the skirt is 17 1/2" long in front and 18 1/4" in the rear. The sleeve front seam is 20" long, back seam 24 1/2". According to analysis provided, signed by expert Les Jensen: "...This coat conforms to U.S. Army regulations of 1851 and 1861 for a Captain of Rifles...[it is] clearly from the period of the Civil War. There were a limited number of units designated ar Rifles during the war...Based on thirty years of observation and study...it is my considered opinion that this is an original U.S. officer's frock coat for a Captain of Riflemen, dating from the period of the Civil War. It is a fine survival of a rare type of officer's coat. Congratulations on a very fine acquisition...". A few very tiny and widely scattered miniscule moth nips mentioned only for accuracy, else fine condition. A fine opportunity to acquire an excessively rare frock coat.

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JOHN S. MOSBY

Lot 424: JOHN S. MOSBY

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Description: JOHN S. MOSBY (1833 - 1916) Confederate officer, "The Grey Ghost" led his Partisan Rangers on numerous troublesome raids against Union forces and supply trains. Superb Gettysburg and political content A.L.S. on Dept. of Justice letterhead, 1p. 4to., Washington, Oct. 16, 1907 to "Sam" , likely Samuel F. Chapman, Mosby's "Fighting Parson" and a fellow ranger. In part: "...Please tell Stockton [Terry, ex-color bearer for Mosby's Rangers] and my cousins that I leave here today for the University [of Virginia]...Stockton says it will be hard to convince the Virginia people that [cavalry General J. E. B.] Stuart was not in default at Gettysburg. As he had not been ordered to Gettysburg, but to join Ewell on the Susquehanna, it was not his duty to be there. If Stuart ought to have been at Gettysburg on the first day then so ought General Lee and Longstreet. All three were absent on that day for the same reason - because the army had not been ordered there. They could not foresee that [Gen. Ambrose P.] Hill and [Gen. Henry] Heth were going there on a picnic on July 1. The Democratic Party in Virginia has appropriated General Lee just as the Catholic Church has appropriated the Virgin and the Episcopal old Henry VIII. Reason has no influence on them. I wrote you that John Daniel [a Mosby Ranger] complained of my getting Grant to turn out carpetbaggers and appoint Confederates. He said it injured the Democratic Party by rendering a grievance. Of course then he must blame the Confederates for accepting these offices. Ask Stockton if he endorses John. If so, he must condemn his nephew Lewis Mosby...". In a postscript he adds: "...I suppose old [Campbell] Slemp [Colonel of the 64th Virginia Infy.] died happy (drunk)...Bascom is a hardened nutand I have no doubt had been putting up office at auction to the highest bidder...". Fine condition. A remarkable letter! "Jeb" Stuart has long been (wrongfully) partially blamed for the Confederate loss at Gettysburg. Lee has anticipated his arrival there prior to the first day of battle, July 1, but he did not arrive until late on July 2, after plans for "Pickett's Charge" had already been made. In actuality, Stuart had followed two conflicting orders from Lee to harass Hooker's army from behind, while destroying canal locks and communications. And Mosby's involvement? His Partisan Rangers were directly under Stuart's command, and it was Mosby who was Stuart's advisor as to which routes should be used for his incursion into Maryland, so of course it benefitted Mosby to protect himself historically...and politically. After the war, Mosby befriended Grant, became a Republican, and paid a heavy price for going against the political tide in Virginia: he received death threats, his boyhood home was burned down, and at least one attempt was made to assassinate him. Said Mosby: "There was more vindictiveness shown to me by the Virginia people for my voting for Grant than the North showed to me for fighting four years against him."

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1861 SAM HOUSTON SECESSION BROADSIDE

Lot 425: 1861 SAM HOUSTON SECESSION BROADSIDE

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Description: 1861 SAM HOUSTON SECESSION BROADSIDE Excessively rare broadside, 1p., 5 1/2" x 10 1/2"., Austin: [printer unknown], headed: "REPORT. COMMITTEE ROOM, January 31st, 1861", a response to the Texas Committee on Secession from Houston in his capacity as Executive. The top of the broadside bears a report by Texas Secession Convention committeemen to the President of the Secession Convention O. M. Roberts sending Gov. Houston's response to their meeting with him discussing a secession referendum. Houston's reply, also signed in type, is printed beneath, in part: "...Getlemen [sic]: The Executive has had the honor to learn at your hands, of the passage of a resolution by the Convention assembled, expressing a desire on the part of that body to 'act in harmony with the different departments of our State Government,' upon matters touching with our Federal relations...". Houston, not a willing secessionist, nevertheless understood the will of the majority and political expediency, and continued: "...I can assure you, gentlemen, that whatever will conduce to the welfare of our people will have my warmest and most fervent wishes. And when the voice of the people of Texas has been declared...no citizen will be more ready to yield obedience to its will, or to risk his all in its defence, than myself. Their fate is my fate, their fortune is my fortune, their destiny is my destiny, be it prosperity or gloom, as of old, I am with my country...". On Feb. 1, 1861 elected delegates met in convention and authorized secession from the United States, and Texas became a charter member of the Confederacy a month later. Houston was ultimately evicted from office shortly thereafter for refusing to take an oath of allegiance to the Confederacy. Some folds at the corners, else very good.

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LLOYD J. BEALL

Lot 426: LLOYD J. BEALL

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Description: LLOYD J. BEALL (d. 1887) Confederate military officer, the commandant of the Confederate Marine Corps which was considered one of the best fighting units in the Civil War. Rare A.L.S., 1p. 4to., "Army Pay Office", Albany, July 12, 1854, to Sgt. James Davidson at Ft. Constitution, NH. In part: "...Enclosed herewith you will find a draft on the Asst. Treasurer U.S. at Boston for $52.24, the amount of your pay...". Very light toning at part of one fold, else very.

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AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE

Lot 427: AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE

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Description: AMBROSE E. BURNSIDE (1824-1881) Union major general who is known for the disastrous charges made at Fredericksburg in 1862, and the nicknaming of distinctive facial hair. Fine content war-date A.L.S. on State of Rhode Island Adjutant General's Office letterhead, 3pp. 8vo., Providence, Aug. 9, 1861 to "Hon. Henry Wilson", future Vice President, at the time a Senator from Massachusetts and Chairman of the Committee on Military Affairs. Three days after his promotion to brigadier general, Burnside, who had led poorly at First Manassas, engaging his troops piecemeal, seeks to cover his tracks. In part: "...You will remember a conversation that I had with Genl. [Irvin] McDowell...in reference to the move upon Manassas...you looked at me as if you thought I was inclined to be over cautious...in the course of some remarks at Newport the other day, I unwisely alluded to your looks of distrust as to my courage...today...I learned that you were the first to urge my confirmation as Brig. Genl., which convince me that you never could have entertained the thoughts...I am always anxious to repair a wrong...thank you for your kind support...As I may have been understood to imply that you were urging a forward move at the time I beg to say that I never heard or saw anything from you that tended that way...". Very good. Wilson received far more criticism for his involvement with First Manassas: he may have revealed plans for the invasion of Virginia (culminating in First Manassas) to southern spy Rose O'Neal Greenhow. Wilson (although married) had seen a great deal of Mrs. Greenhow, and while with her may have told her about the plans followed by McDowell, which may have been part of the intelligence Mrs. Greenhow got to Confederate forces under Beauregard. Sold with a carte de visite photo of the general in uniform by Appleton, corners clipped.

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A. B. CAMPBELL

Lot 428: A. B. CAMPBELL

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Description: A. B. CAMPBELL Surgeon and Medical Director of U.S.V. War-date manuscript D.S. 1p. 4to., Cumberland, Md., Feb. 1, 1865, on official letterhead. Titled "Special Orders No. 7", in part: "...The Military Hospital at Hagerstown, Md. is discontinued. Surg. Gen. M. Kellogg, U.S.V., Med. Dir. Mil. Dist. of Harper's Ferry will see that all the patients there being treated, together with all U.S. Hospt property are, at once, transported and turned over to the Surgeon in Charge of Post Hospital at Martinsburg, Va...". Boldly signed. Matted and ready to frame, very good.

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JOHN A. DIX

Lot 429: JOHN A. DIX

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Description: JOHN A. DIX (1798 - 1879) Union major general most remembered for his threat to shoot anyone hauling down the American flag, and his suppression of the bloody New York draft riots. War-date A.L.S. 1p. oblong 8vo., [n.p.] Apr. 25, 1864 to Massachusetts Gov John A. Andrew in Boston ordering the state militia to occupy positions vacated by the transfer of heavy artillery units stationed around Washington into active field service. He writes, in full: "I am authorized to call for militia to take the place of U.S. troops ordered from our forts to the field. I will direct them [to] muster into the service of the U.S." Usual folds, light toning, else very good.

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JOHN A. DIX

Lot 430: JOHN A. DIX

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Description: JOHN A. DIX (1798 - 1879) Union major general most remembered for his threat to shoot anyone hauling down the American flag, and his suppression of the bloody New York draft riots. War-date A.D.S., 1p. oblong 8vo., Yorktown, Dec. 22 [1862], to Maj. Gen. Erasmus D. Keyes showing Dix's "compassionate" side": "...The inmates of the Lunatic Asylum should be supplied with prisoners'[?] but not with full rations...". Stamp docket, very good.

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THOMAS EWING

Lot 431: THOMAS EWING

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Description: THOMAS EWING (1829 - 1896) Union brigadier general who fought with distinction at Pilot Knob and in the subsequent Union retreat. War-date A.L.S. "Thomas Ewing Brig Gen", 1p. 8vo., Austin, Oct 9, 1863 in pencil to Col. Edward Lynde of the 9th Kansas Calvary and written during one of Confederate General Joseph Shelby's raids in to Missouri. Ewing writes, in most part: "…If you have no reason to believe that Shelby is Striking for Kansas South of you, come over with your command & join me tonight with your Effective Strength. I go from here towards Butler 4 miles, thence towards Osceola, passing 4 miles South West of Johnstown. Col [William] Weer will probably join me about Johnstown this afternoon…" Light soiling, else very good.

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DAVID G. FARRAGUT

Lot 432: DAVID G. FARRAGUT

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Description: DAVID G. FARRAGUT (1801 - 1870) Union rear admiral instrumental in the taking of New Orleans and the Union control of the Mississippi. It was at Mobile Bay where he exclaimed "Damn the torpedoes! Full speed ahead!". War-date manuscript L.S. 1p. 4to., on "United States Flag Ship Hartford" letterhead, New Orleans, Mar. 2, 1863. Farragut writes to Paymaster R. Julius Richardson of the U.S. Navy, in part: "...Being under parole, you are hereby accorded permission to proceed North as soon as you shall have transferred the a/co of the 'Harriet Lane' and 'Queen of the West' to A. A. Paymaster Tarbell of the 'Kensington'...". The USS Harriet Lane was captured by the Confederates on Jan. 1, 1863, and was employed in the Texas Waters. US Ram Queen of the West was likewise captured at the start of 1863. Signed less than two weeks before Farragut's disastrous decision to begin the siege of Port Hudson earlier than planned. Handsomely matted and framed with an image of Farragut and biographical plaque. Fine condition, not examined out of frame.

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AUTHOR OF THE LIEBER CODE FOR THE CONDUCT OF TROOPS

Lot 433: AUTHOR OF THE LIEBER CODE FOR THE CONDUCT OF TROOPS

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Description: AUTHOR OF THE LIEBER CODE FOR THE CONDUCT OF TROOPS FRANCIS LIEBER (1800-1872) German-American jurist and political philosopher. Most widely known as the author of the Lieber Code during the American Civil War, also known as Code for the Government of Armies in the Field (1863), which laid the foundation for conventions governing the conduct of troops during wartime. A.Q.S. 1p. 8vo.: "The conscious water saw its god …'blushed' and glowed – was wine; And does my soul remain unchanged Drinking His word divine?...". Very good. The Lieber Code was probably commissioned by the Lincoln Administration to deal with the crisis touched off by Emancipation, which the Confederate States of America insisted was in violation of the customary rules of warfare.

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CHRISTOPHER MEMMINGER

Lot 434: CHRISTOPHER MEMMINGER

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Description: CHRISTOPHER MEMMINGER (1803-1888) Confederate Secretary of the Treasury. A.L.S. 3pp. 8vo., Flat Rock, Aug. 4, 1876, to "McGrady", defending a clergyman and discussing politics. In part: "...we feel the impulse of the wars which are agitating elsewhere. Rev. Wm Johnson...has been here with his sick wife for some weeks and the visitors at the hotel have given him no respite from their assaults...He continues times of his old opinion, upon the ground of principle...the Dem. Exec. Committee has done the same thing...It seems to me that Chamberlain would be a better Governor for us than any of our men...". Very good.

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DAVID D. PORTER

Lot 435: DAVID D. PORTER

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Description: DAVID D. PORTER (1813 - 1891) Union admiral who received the surrenders of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and was indispensable in the siege and subsequent Union victory at Vicksburg. A.L.S. 1p. legal folio, Portsmouth, N.H., Aug. 3, 1857, to Commander C. W. Pickering, in part: "...Agreeable to regulations. The four engines this day have been examined and exercised. No. 2 is in perfect order. No. 1 is out of repair & requires packing [?] which will be done immediately...".

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WILLIAM H. RICHARDSON

Lot 436: WILLIAM H. RICHARDSON

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Description: WILLIAM H. RICHARDSON Virginia Adjutant General, early on signing orders in place of Robert E. Lee. Fine content pre-war A.L.S. as Adjutant General, 1p. 4to., [Richmond], Oct. 27, 1860 to Col. Samuel Downing. Richardson discusses issues related to forming and arming a militia company and explains that "now we have only flintlock muskets and a limited number of accoutrements", but hopes to procure more muskets soon, and assures the colonel that efforts to procure more arms are already under way. In part: "...The Governor is extremely aware of the hazards of the times & of the exposed situation of your & other sections of the Tidewater region, and desires me to assure you that it is his most anxious wish to place them, as speedily as he can, in the best possible position of defense...The pistols that had been procured will be apportioned by the Governor among the Cavalry occupying the most exposed positions, but there are not enough to supply field officers...I hope the Cavalry in your Regiment will soon be prepared to receive arms...". Quick expansion of the state militia was clearly a high priority in Richmond, as Lincoln's election and inevitable secession was clearly in the cards. Very good.

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RAFAEL SEMMES

Lot 437: RAFAEL SEMMES

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Description: RAFAEL SEMMES (1809 - 1877) Confederate admiral of the raider Alabama which battled and was eventually destroyed by the Union frigate Kearsarge off Cherbourg in 1864. Scarce A.L.S. 1p. 4to., Mobile, June 22, 1876 to Wm. L Maury, Jr. responding to an inquiry "...as to business prospects in Mobile. When I say to you, that our people have been and still are envying the prosperity of Savannah, you will be able to form some idea of the dearth of business, in our stagnant - old City of the Gulf. A man who can bring some capital with him, can find something to do with is here, as everywhere, else, lest where we have one place to fill by a young man without capital, we have at least half a dozen young men anxious to fill it. But if you care looking for a new place of business, the best plan is to visit the locality, yourself, and examine for yourself". Mounting remnants on verso, usual folds, light soiling, else very good condition.

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WINFIELD SCOTT

Lot 438: WINFIELD SCOTT

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Description: WINFIELD SCOTT Fine association war-date I.S.P., a carte-de-visite by Chas. D. Fredericks, New York, showing the stout Lt. General in a seated pose with sword at the ready, inscribed on verso to Mary Coles, the daughter of Illinois Governor Edward Coles. In full: "I inscribe this photograph to my young friend, Mary Coles - the daughter of my oldest & dearest living friend, Gov. Edward Coles Winfield Scott". Corners clipped and rounded, light staining to right edge and light soiling, overall very good condition.

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JOHN M. SCHOFIELD

Lot 439: JOHN M. SCHOFIELD

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Description: JOHN M. SCHOFIELD (1831 - 1906) Union major general who led a corps at Kennesaw Mountain, Atlanta, and defeated Hood at Franklin. A.L.S. on Dept. of the Potomac letterhead, 1p. 12mo., Richmond, Mar. 5, 1867 to "Comdg Officer Libby Prison" allowing a doctor and his party to visit a prisoner "under the usual restrictions...". Mounted, a tear into the text, soiled, still good.

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WILLIAM T. SHERMAN

Lot 440: WILLIAM T. SHERMAN

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Description: WILLIAM T. SHERMAN (1820-1891) Union major general declared by the press to be "insane", he led his army in their March to the Sea, taking Atlanta, Savannah and Columbia along the way. Fine bold signature adding rank as general, penned on heavy stock. Professionally matted with a copy of a Prang litho showing Sherman before Atlanta. Sold with a signature and rank of JAMES H. WILSON (1837-1925) Union brigadier general of cavalry who fought with Sheridan at Yellow Tavern and Petersburg, captured Jefferson Davis after his flight from Richmond. Two pieces, fine.

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BENJAMIN F. SMITH

Lot 441: BENJAMIN F. SMITH

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Description: BENJAMIN F. SMITH (1831 - 1868) Union brevet brigadier general, served on the field and staff of the 1st Ohio and the 126th Ohio Vols. After serving in Kentucky with the 1st, Smith formed the 126th Ohio and served as its colonel until war's end. He would die at Fort Reno in 1868. Oval albumen portrait, 8" x 10" (trimmed), hand-colored, showing him seated in uniform with sword in hand, signed with rank at bottom right. Backstamp by W. L. Germon, Philadelphia. Slight dampstains do little to detract, else very good.

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EDWIN M. STANTON

Lot 442: EDWIN M. STANTON

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Description: EDWIN M. STANTON (1814 - 1869) Secretary of War in Abraham Lincoln's cabinet whose dismissal by Andrew Johnson led to impeachment hearings for the president. Fine content A.L.S. 1p. 8vo., Washington, Jan. 5, 1861. Just three months before the start of the Civil War, Stanton, then still Attorney General, writes to an ominous note to Lt. Gen. T. [?] Campbell, in full: "...Your note was received this morning. I am fully sensible of the dangers that beset us on all sides and threaten the the existence of this government. I trust you need no assurance that everything in my part within my power will be done to avert the impending ruin & save the country. I have firm faith that we shall pass through these troubles; and that with patience, forbearance; and resolution peace & harmony will be returned...". By January 1861 the Confederate States of America had been created and declared secessation. On January 4, Alabama troops seized an arsenal in Mobile, Alabama and, the day of this letter, Winfield S. Scott substituted a heavily-armed warship for a merchant vessel to sail to Ft. Sumter with supplies. The following day brought Florida's militia siege of a federal arsenal near Appalachiacola -- with five more states seceding before the month's end. Boldly penned and in very good condition.

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LEW WALLACE

Lot 443: LEW WALLACE

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Description: LEW WALLACE (1827-1905) Union major general who saw action at Forts Henry and Donelson and was later criticized by Grant for his costly hesitancy at Shiloh. Wallace is also remembered as the author of Ben Hur. A.N.S. on a small sheet likely cut from a book: "Indianapolis Dec. 18th, 1898 By request, I re-write my name in this volume. Lew Wallace". Fine.

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CONFEDERATE CABINET AND POLITICIANS

Lot 444: CONFEDERATE CABINET AND POLITICIANS

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Description: CONFEDERATE CABINET AND POLITICIANS A lot of seven signatures executed on vintage album pages or cut individually, includes: JUDAH BENJAMIN, ROBERT TOOMBS, THOMAS BRAGG, ROBERT M. T. HUNTER, JOHN SLIDELL, LOUIS T. WIGFALL and one other. Fine condition.

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UNION GENERALS

Lot 445: UNION GENERALS

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Description: UNION GENERALS Manuscript L.S. 1p. legal folio, Cantamount, Mar. 15, 1877, a request for a furlough, endorsed on verso by; NELSON A. MILES, GEORGE RUGGLES (son of General George Ruggles), and with a separate third endorsement on a small sheet signed by ALFRED H. TERRY affixed beneath Ruggles' signature. A fourth endorsement from the Asst. Adjutant General of the Div. of the Missouri is also affixed. Very good condition.

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CIVIL WAR CORRESPONDENCE OF J. B. COPPENHAVER OF THE 93RD PENNSYLVANIA

Lot 446: CIVIL WAR CORRESPONDENCE OF J. B. COPPENHAVER OF THE 93RD PENNSYLVANIA

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Description: CIVIL WAR CORRESPONDENCE OF J. B. COPPENHAVER OF THE 93RD PENNSYLVANIA A excellent archive of material including 37 A.Ls.S and a diary written and kept by J. B. Coppenhaver of the 93rd Pennsylvania dating between Feb. 23,1862 and Feb. 3, 1865. The 93rd Pennsylvania took part in the Peninsular Campaign seeing action at Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, and Malvern Hill. They were mercifully held in reserve at Antietam, but saw action at Gettysburg. The regiment also served in the Shendoah Valley fighting at the Wilderness, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. During his service with the 93rd our correspondent was wounded at Fair Oaks and again at the Wilderness. Written primarily to his mother and other family members, Coppenhaver accomplishes the majority of the letters in ink with several in pencil. In part: "[Washington, March 3, 1862] …The brave ninety third is now in the field ready and willing there [sic] rifles weld ]sic] against all traitors and treacherous foes whilst onward we march to deal the death blows. With colonel Johnston at our head giving the command we will march defiantly down into dixie land and there show them what our relgium [sic] rifles will do when handtled [sic] by pennsylvanians who always prove true… ["Near Richmond" June 3] …I think you have he[a]rd of the great battle, we had on Satturday [sic] the 31 May [Seven Pines] I was in the whole time and got safe out I stra[i[ned myself in the leg a little do doubt you will see my name on the wound list… I am not in the hospital… [July 4] …our Army moved City Point they fought the last 6 days hard our regt. was in a small fight but I was not along out we are now about 15 miles from richmond on the James river the river so full of our gun boats to protict [sic] us, yesterday the rebels throwed [sic] a shell in our camp a bout 50 yds from us, but we are acquainted to it that we don't mind it any more, on the field were we laid yesterday there were about 50 thousand men and we got more than 50 thousand fresh troop[s] again. I don't no [sic[ what the object was of coming over hear [sic] but I think McClellan nows [sic] what he is doing… at 5 P.M. the guns were fired in honor of the forth [of] July… [Yorktown, Aug. 27] Our camp is near the place where Cornwallis surrendered to George Washington … on the South bank of york River… [near Frederickbsurg, Dec. 28] …I heard that we have Marching Orders again where to we move I dont no… we can hear Canonading [sic] again to day in front… [Williamsport, Oct. 28] ….I am promoted to Serge[a]nt in our company… [Maryland, July 8 1863] …our regt was in the fight [Gettysburg], but did not get a man killed 10 or 11 wounded only. The rebels got enough this time, and they will get it better before they get out of Md. we had awful rain these few days, our regt is … g[u]arding Artillery the road is awful bad, the teams can hardly get through … we are now near the old Antietam battle ground… July 9… God gave us one of the greatest victories of the war, I think you saw it in the paper, the rebels laws [sic, loss] as between 45 and 50 thousand men, the battle was fought at Gettysburg, the regt was in the fight on the 2… Vicksburg… our news are [sic, is] good … [Halltown, Va., Feb. 23, 1864] …Last night we got marching Orders we got 2 days ration all the Cavalry went out in the front I heard that the rebs want to gross [sic, cross] the Shanando [sic] river and come in this valley… ["In Hospital at Fredericksburg Va", May 24 1864] …to day I feel very well my wounds are get[t]ing along well… I heard Wm. Boeshar had One of his Arms taken off they are moveing [sic]… the wounded as fast as they can to Washington… [Alexandria, Va., May 15, 1864] …I was wounded in both legs, at the knees but it was only [a] flesh wound do not trouble yourself about it… [Philadelphia, July 12, 1864] …I think there must have been a great excite[ment] up there again, but you need not be alarmed that the rebs are coming down there they are advancing on Baltimore in force they send all the troops and the men out of the Hosp[i]t[al]s that were fit to go on to Baltimore the trains are running every hour but we will soon of the old 6th corps or some other that will arrived [sic] at Baltimore you need not be alarmed that they will get up there… More fine content. The letters bear the expected folds with some marginal wear and light soiling, very good condition overall. The correspondence is accompanied by a journal/diary kept by Coppenhaver late in the war which includes three muster rolls for Company C of the 93rd (March, April & May 1864) as well as diary entries (kept in pencil) chronicling his recovery from his knee wounds received at the Wilderness (July 3 to Oct 14, 1864). Diary bears the expected wear to the leather covers, some pages loose, else very good.

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EMILY A. GATES GETS NEWS FROM THE FRONT

Lot 447: EMILY A. GATES GETS NEWS FROM THE FRONT

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Description: EMILY A. GATES GETS NEWS FROM THE FRONT A great group of three war-date A.L.S.s written to Emily A. Gates, Peoria, Illinois by her friends and family members. The first is a battle letter, by a certain "John" 86th Illinois, 4pp. 4to., on "Office, Assistant Quartermaster, U. S. A." stationery, "Camp near Atlanta, Georgia., July 27, 1864", in part: "…there is plenty of fighting going on every day. We have bin in herring of artillery and musketry so long that it is nothing now to us…there was several twenty pound shells passed over our train this evening. The rebels sends one now and then to let us know they are a bout yet …the results…from…Gen. Thomas of three days fighting is as follows. The rebus loss on the 20, 21, 22 was twelve thousand killed and captured besides what they got off themselves…on the 23rd in front of Hooker's Corps there were nine hundred buried [and] their papers admit of fifteen thousand loss while ours is less than five thousand. We lost one excellent General McPherson and the rebels lost two Hood and Hardee. I suppose you have heard of the loss in our regiment and brigade since we left…it is one thousand men and three cols and some 15 or twenty commissioned officers. Col. McCook, Col. Harmon and Clancy. In the last charge the 86th [Illinois] did not loose so heavy, 4 killed and 6 wounded. We are not having as gay times as we did last July…". Also included is the original stamped transmittal cover. The second letter, written by Pvt. George Hull, Co. E, 20th Illinois Vols., 2pp. 8vo., on patriotic "Union and Constitution" stationery, n. p., [but Osage City, Mo.], Nov. 11, 1861, in part: "…we are in Missouri. We have fine times here. We are on the Osage river to guard the bridge that runs above the river. Our company was sent and the company that your brother belongs to was [sent] for that purpose…we are ready for a fight any time…The rebels shot at us one night but didn't hit any of us…". The third letter is written by her brother, Pvt. James A. Gates, 146th Illinois Vols., 3pp. 8vo., Camp Butler, [Springfield, Ill.], Sept. 22, 1864, in part: "…I am a member of Co. I, 146th regiment state militia…we have got our uniforms, knapsacks, haversacks…and [?] rifles…Carr charged too mutch for the Colt and I would not give it. Tell mother to pay for that five dollars for that tomb stone…". Together, three pieces in very good condition.

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REBEL SPY BELLE BOYD IS CAPTURED BY THE USS CONNECTICUT

Lot 448: REBEL SPY BELLE BOYD IS CAPTURED BY THE USS CONNECTICUT

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Description: REBEL SPY BELLE BOYD IS CAPTURED BY THE USS CONNECTICUT A good group of eight (8) Union naval letters, totaling 15 pp. 8vo., written by Sailor Henry S. Gray, USS Cambridge of Bradley, Maine concerning his naval career on board a North Atlantic Squadron blockader. In part: "… [Camp Coburn, N. H., Aug. 21, 63]…we are getting ready to start…we was down to Augusta…on a dress parade and met the Bangor Company. The Bangor Brass Band is going out in the 14th Me. and they are hear now…we marched through the State House and had a pretty good time…[Cambridge, Newport, R. I., Aug. 23]…I am…[on] the ship Constitution. It is a pleasant place here…[U. S. Steamer, Cambridge, March 15, 64]…we are in the North Atlantic Blockading Squadron, S. P. Lee Act Rear Admiral…[Beaufort, N. C., Mar. 17, 64]…we on the 5th of Feb. discovered a light up to Mason Burrough Inlet. We run up to there and it was a steamer on fire. She run against and then the crew set her on fire. She was loaded with coffee and bacon and lickers. She was a Blockaderunner. Our boat's crew went a shore and took 7 prisoners. This steamer's name was the Dee from Bermuda. On the 11th Feb. there was two steamers run ashore. One on one side and one on the other side of the steamer…I forgot the manner [the blockade runners capture]…we sent one boat crew ashore and some Rebels come out of the woods and fired a volley of musketry and wounded one of our men in the right side. You must not worry about me…[Norfolk, Va., May 17]…we are at Norfolk again for repairs. The boilers are out of order…the Steamer Connecticut caught a Blockade runner by the name of Gray Hound with the Rebel spy Belle Boyd…[Gosport Navy Yard, Va., June 1]…you said that Daniel Webster was wounded. I do not hear anything about it. We don't hear anything about the war without I Bg [Bangor] paper…[U. S. S. Cambridge, July 17]…I am almost 30 days over my time and cant get my discharge. It is enough to make a minister swear…the longer I stay in the Navy. The more money I shall bring off…[Feb. 28, 65]…I am in camp as recruit. They did not find any fault with us…we are in good spirits and I don't want you to worry about us because I have [g]nawed hard tack before…". Two stamped transmittal covers are also included. Very good condition overall.

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CIVIL WAR CORRESPONDENCE OF PVT. JUNIUS N. SPRATEY, 13TH VIRGINIA CAVALRY

Lot 449: CIVIL WAR CORRESPONDENCE OF PVT. JUNIUS N. SPRATEY, 13TH VIRGINIA CAVALRY

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Description: CIVIL WAR CORRESPONDENCE OF PVT. JUNIUS N. SPRATEY, 13TH VIRGINIA CAVALRY A good correspondence of four letters dating between March 11, 1862 and Jan 31, 1863 written by Junius Sprately of the 13th Virginia Cavalry to his sister Rebecca in Surrey County, Virginia. His letters read, in small part: "[Petersburg, Mar. 11, 1862] …The Governor has issued a proclamation ordering out all the militia in Virginia and I expect we will start now for our place of rendezvous. We are ordered to report to General Huger at Norfolk. You may look out now for the war to come to a close for when the bloody 39th gets after the Yanks, they will be sure to squander. You need not be surprised to hear of our Capturing Burnside and the whole of his fleet… I suppose our arms will be corn stalks and brick bats and you know no army can resist such formidable weapons as those… [Brandy Station, Nov. 1, 1862] … We have been put in a brigade of calvary commanded by Gen. Fitzhugh Lee and it is thought we will be sent to Stewart's Division soon… we captured 18 of the enemy; that was at Manassis rite [sic] on the old battle grounds we then started back for camp some 15 miles distant and when within four miles of camp were surprised by a scouting party who had ambushed us and found a perfect storm of Bullets into us before we knew anything … routed the Yankees in less than no time capturing three and killing a Captain. The Captain was killed by Major Belches. The Captain took three deliberate shots at the major before he fired on him but the second shot from the major brought him down… [Ocuapica, Va., Jan. 27, 1863] …we are now on the Rappahanock about 40 miles from Fredericksburg … we expect to move again some time this week to a small village in King and Queen County called Stevensville… we have had some few cases of [of smallpox] in our regiment … all of us have been vaccinated and every precaution taken to keep it from spreading … [Burnside] is now passing off his time in sending out partys [sic] to liberate the salves and taking the farmers horses … we have had one auction but things sold higher at auction than what they could have been bought privately so we have concluded not to get another Blockader to auction off his goods and pay him what he asks if he has anything we want… [Ocupacia, Va., Jan. 31, 1863] …thought we would move to King and Queen County, but order countermanded… expecting a fight at Fredericksburg soon… the Government does not furnish with but a quarter of a pound of pork a day now…" Offered together with a letter of Major James Walter Spartely who served as Quartermaster for Gen. Franklin Gardner written as a prisoner of war at Johnson's Island, Ohio also to Rebecca Sprately in Virginia, Feb. 28, 1864. Spartely was captured at Port Hudson and the letter complains of the monotony of prison life: "…Letters are the only alleviators of the monotony of our prison life - If it were not for my cousins in New Orleans I know not what I would do - They write me regularly every week…" Letters bear the expected folds, some light toning and later ink emendations identifying the addressee, else very good. Together, five pieces.

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EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS OF ACTION BY WILLIAM QUANTRILL AND

Lot 450: EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS OF ACTION BY WILLIAM QUANTRILL AND "BLOODY BILL" ANDERSON - BY ONE OF QUANTRILL'S GUERILLAS!

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Description: EYEWITNESS ACCOUNTS OF ACTION BY WILLIAM QUANTRILL AND "BLOODY BILL" ANDERSON - BY ONE OF QUANTRILL'S GUERILLAS! Startling historic eyewitness accounts of likely the first meeting of Confederate guerillas William Quantrill and "Bloody" Bill Anderson, and events at Lawrence, Kansas as recorded in in-person interviews with one of Quantrill's raiders, William H. Gregg. The first interview is 7pp. legal folio, the second, 4pp. legal folio, Kansas City, July 14, 1910 (and other times close to the same). The interviewer, who signs the first account, was William Elsey Connelley, a prolific writer of western history and a crusader against the Standard Oil Company whose work resulted in the dissolution of the corporation. The first interview is conducted entirely with Gregg, then a "turnkey" at the Kansas City Jail, who opens describing himself as a sickly child, then offering the personal traits of some of his more famous relatives, including CSA Gen. John Gregg and a noted uncle who was a physician or reverend, probably Alexander Gregg, the first Bishop of Texas. Gregg then describes his (and probably Quantrill's) first encounter with William T. "Bloody" Bill Anderson. Gregg was riding with William Quantrill and probably no more than a dozen others, Quantrill having been commissioned a captain in the Confederate army. He relates: "...It was early in 1862 that Quantrill first disarmed Bill Anderson and his men. There were but three or four of them. They had been stealing horses from Missourians. Anderson and his gun men were operating along the Kansas line...Quantrill warned them not to steal anything more where he could get hold of them if they valued their lives. It seems that Anderson did not heed this warning, for late the following fall he was still stealing. He had some fifteen men...Quantrill...sent Captain Gregg to bring him in...Meeting him in the road, Gregg rode by until his men were opposite and parallel...then he halted them...He demanded that Anderson and his men hand over their revolvers. Anderson's men complied...Gregg told them that if any enemy were encountered they would be given their revolvers...When Anderson and his men were brought back before Quantrill they were sternly dealt with...their horses were taken from them...Quantrill told Anderson...if he ever stole again...he would hang him and his men to the first tree that would bear their weight...Quantrill was not a Mason...the statement that people in the Eldridge House were saved during the raid, or on the day Lawrence was sacked, by giving Quantrill Masonic signs is [untrue]...Some signal may have been agreed upon between Quantrill, Robinson and Stevens [at the Red Dog Bank]...". Connelley also interviewed others who crossed paths with Quantrill and Anderson. Meeting with Col. E. F. Rogers (1903), he relates: "...I asked him about the house on Grand Avenue [in Lawrence]which fell down and killed some women and for which Quantrill and his men made an excuse...the house was not undermined. It was poorly built brick house. There was no floor in the lower story...Hogs slept in there...urine had run along the ground and soaked in. This caused the foundation to give way. The women were held as hostage for protection of Union residents...the Union officers [guarding the house] were criminally intimate with some of the women. Some of them had been given permission to go home and refused...Col. Weir...had a skirmish with the rebel forces. Col. Jennison had some 20 men, called Jennison's Scouts [Jayhawkers]...Jennison carried out of Missouri about 1,000 mules...He made a sale of them...The horses...were sold to U.S. Army officers for the use of the U.S. Government...He said Jennison was always doing something like that...". He also interviews Capt. J. M. Turley of the 7th Mo. Cavalry: "...he fought at least a dozen battles and skirmished with Quantrill and his men, and that he invariably defeated the guerillas and scattered them, and often with fewer men...He described the battle of Diamond Grove Prairie where he charged into the brush and scattered the forces of Quantrill...captured a number of prisoners. Turley recognized among them one of the men who had shot his (Turley's) father. He had this man shot at once, also two others...". Historic content!

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COMPENSATION FOR A GETTYSBURG SCHOOL BUILDING USED AS A HOSPITAL

Lot 451: COMPENSATION FOR A GETTYSBURG SCHOOL BUILDING USED AS A HOSPITAL

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Description: COMPENSATION FOR A GETTYSBURG SCHOOL BUILDING USED AS A HOSPITAL Fine content war-date A.L.S. by attorney David A. Buehler 3pp. 8vo., Gettysburg, Pa., Oct. 21, 1863 to Surgeon Henry Janes of Camp Letterman concerning compensation for damages incurred at the Union (Public) School during its occupation as a hospital after the battle of Gettysburg, in part: "Capt. Blood is adjusting some damages to the furniture of the school buildings of 'Gettysburg School District' during its recent occupation for Hospital purposes by U. States, and today requested me to procure from you a certificate that the building was so used. Although…the repairs have been made under his direction, it seems that a surgeon's certificate is necessary to accompany the vouchers. Will you do us the favor to send us…the necessary certificate…the building was taken possession of on the 1st of July and continued in use until…about the last of August…first by Dr. [Theodore T.] Tate [3rd Penn. Cavalry] and then by Dr. [W. H.] Rulison [9th New York Cavalry] of the cavalry…I do not recollect the precise date of its vacation. You may recollect that you ordered it to be vacated upon the representation of Mr. Carson, President of the Board, and myself…your attention will most oblige the Board of Directors of Gettysburg School District…". Buehler served as secretary of Board of Director's of the Gettysburg School District from 1852 to 1867. The Union Public School was the primary public school used to educate the children of Gettysburg. At the time of the battle it enrolled nearly 400 students. These students were displaced from July 1 until September 1, 1863 while over sixty wounded Union cavalrymen were cared for there. Fine.

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GETTYSBURG HOSPITALS PAY THEIR GAS BILL

Lot 452: GETTYSBURG HOSPITALS PAY THEIR GAS BILL

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Description: GETTYSBURG HOSPITALS PAY THEIR GAS BILL War-date partly-printed D.S., 1p. 4to., [Gettysburg, Pa.], August 30, 1863, enumerating payment due to "The Gettysburg Gas Company", listing, in part: "For gas furnished from 3rd July to 3rd Aug. at Col. comdg. post…3.60. At Capt. Smith's office…4.80. At hospitals in Shead's & Buehler Hall…21.60…use of Borough lamps at Med. Dir…office…24.40. at R. R. office, use of Mil. Telegraph…40.40. [total] $122.20…". Signed and made official by Col. H. Clay Alleman, 36th Penn. Vols. From the personal papers of Surgeon Henry Janes who commanded Camp Letterman, Gettysburg. Fine.

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GETTYSBURG COLLEGE SEEKS BATTLE COMPENSATION

Lot 453: GETTYSBURG COLLEGE SEEKS BATTLE COMPENSATION

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Description: GETTYSBURG COLLEGE SEEKS BATTLE COMPENSATION A rare Gettysburg related D.S. by Surgeon Henry Janes, as director of Camp Letterman, ., 1p. 4to., "Camp Letterman, Gettysburgh Pa., Oct. 7th, 1863", being the draft of a cover letter concerning damages sustained at Pennsylvania College (today's Gettysburg College), in part: "Copy of the endorsement on the commensuration of H. L. Baugher, President of the Pennsylvania College concerning damages done to the building & carpets belonging to the college…the Pennsylvania College building was taken during the battle of Gettysbugh by the Confederates as a hospital for their wounded who of course ruined the building and injured the carpets. If any property belonging to the college or students was brought to this camp it was done without my knowledge or consent. I have no knowledge of the amount of damage, as it was mostly done before I had charge of the hospitals in this place. My impression is that the President has made a very liberal estimate (for the college)…". Fine.

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DR. GORDON WINSLOW SEEKS COMPENSATION FOR THE U.S. SANITARY COMMISSION AFTER GETTYSBURG

Lot 454: DR. GORDON WINSLOW SEEKS COMPENSATION FOR THE U.S. SANITARY COMMISSION AFTER GETTYSBURG

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Description: DR. GORDON WINSLOW SEEKS COMPENSATION FOR THE U.S. SANITARY COMMISSION AFTER GETTYSBURG A great war-date Gettysburg hospital-related letter, written by former 5th New York Chaplain Gordon Winslow (1821-1864) as military agent of the Sanitary Commission, 1p. 4to., on "United States Sanitary Commission" stationery, New York, Nov. 10, 1863, to Surgeon Henry Janes, as director of Camp Letterman, in part: "Will you have the kindness to inform me what deferring (if any) there will be in the Hos'l fund to meet the indebtedness to the San. Comm. for moneys expended at the Gen'l. Hospital. The bill…was $1900 and some cents. Will it be necessary for me to go on to send the bill on to Washington...You can keep open the amount and settle matters there…please let me know by return mail & send one your pictures and get one of mine at Tyson's on my account…". Fine.

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A GETTYSBURG SURGEON LOOSES HIS PAY AFTER STEALING FROM WOUNDED CONFEDERATES

Lot 455: A GETTYSBURG SURGEON LOOSES HIS PAY AFTER STEALING FROM WOUNDED CONFEDERATES

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Description: A GETTYSBURG SURGEON LOOSES HIS PAY AFTER STEALING FROM WOUNDED CONFEDERATES Group of three war-date Gettysburg hospital-related letters, totaling 6pp., concerning a lost pay voucher due Gettysburg contract surgeon James B. Carpenter. Interestingly, Carpenter's August 1863 pay voucher was "lost" after the crime was committed and it is not know how the case was settled, but it is documented here. The first is a draft A.LS.,1p. 4to., by Surgeon Henry Janes, as director of Camp Letterman, "Camp Letterman, Gettysburgh Pa., Oct. 15, 1863," and reads, in part: "…Dr. J. B. Carpenter…contracted with the Surgeon General July 28th 1863. He stated…that he had resigned his commission-to another he stated that the mustering officer refused to muster him…when he reported during the battle because there were already too many medical officers…he stated that he had formerly held a commission in the 34th [35th] N. Y…on the 9th of Sept. he was relieved from duty at Camp Letterman…and ordered to report to Surg. N. L. King…while on duty at the Confederate hospital of the 3rd Corps…he received and appropriated…money from the following named patients, viz., $40.00 in gold from Ernest Lockman, Co. D, 5th Texas and $10.00 in gold and $35.00 Confederate Script from Sergt. W. J. Parker, Co. A, 17th Miss. The 2nd Auditors order for the payment of his bill for services for the month of August was stolen from the tent of one of his friends and still remains unpaid…if desirable its payment could be stopped. Assistant Surgeon J. D. Watson, 3rd Maine Vols. who occupied the same tent with Dr. Carpenter perhaps could give additional information…". The second is a copy letter, 1p. 4to., issued by Capt. & asst. adjutant general Robert Leroy, "Head Quarters, Department of the Susquehanna, Oct. 19, 1863" being an order to stop Dr. Carpenter's August army pay. The third piece is a A.L.S. by Dr. James B. Carpenter, 4pp. 8vo., "Theresa, Jefferson Co., N. Y., Nov. 6, 1863", to Surgeon Henry Janes, as director of Camp Letterman, in part: "…I am somewhat astonished to think that Dr. Harper should report to you that my certificate was lost or stolen from his tent…Dr. Kerper took that certificate from the P. O. in camp on the 21st day of Sept…and was to have forward it to me…I do not like the way…Dr. Kerper acted. He could most certainly have written me that the certificate had been stolen and I could have stopped…the payment…would you…stave off the payment of it…I most certainly shall hold Dr. Kerper responsible…I would not willingly charge any thing to any man, but his not answering matters…is suspicious…will you…inform me…to what place he has been ordered…I would like to keep track of him…". A great archive worthy of further research. Overall very good.

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GENERAL FERRY ASSUMES COMMAND AT GETTYSBURG

Lot 456: GENERAL FERRY ASSUMES COMMAND AT GETTYSBURG

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Description: GENERAL FERRY ASSUMES COMMAND AT GETTYSBURG ORRIS S. FERRY (1823-1875), A good Gettysburg related military order, 1p. 4to. issued and signed as Brigadier General "Head Quarters U. S. Forces, Gettysburg, [Pa.], August 22, 1863", being General Orders No. 1 in which he announcing his assuming command of the US forces at Gettysburg, in part: "Pursuant to orders from Major Genl. Couch, Comdg. Dept. of the Susquehanna, the undersigned here by assumes command of the troops in and around Gettysburg. Lieutenants Henry L. Johnson and George C. Ripley are announced as aides-de-camp, and will be obeyed and respected accordingly…". Fine.

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9TH ALABAMA CAVALRY JOHNSON'S ISLAND POW LETTER

Lot 457: 9TH ALABAMA CAVALRY JOHNSON'S ISLAND POW LETTER

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Description: 9TH ALABAMA CAVALRY JOHNSON'S ISLAND POW LETTER A good war-date A.L.S. by Capt. James Harrison, 9th Alabama Cavalry, 1p. oblong 4to., "Military Prison, Johnson's Island, Ohio, Nov. 21, 1864" to Mr. James Brooks, Richmond, in part: "I am a prisoner of war at this place [and] was wounded at Lafayette Ga., on 14th last June very severely in the left side…I am again well, but in great need of some funds & provisions. I have written repeatedly to persons that I knew before the war but unfortunately…I cannot hear from them doubtlessly they never received my letters. I would be under many obligations…if you could send me one box of good chewing tobacco which would answer in the place of money also…could you send me a Bl. of flour…you should be paid at the earliest opportunity. I now belong to the 9th Ala. Cav. [and] have left the old 4th Ala Regt. of Infy. How does Capt. J. Taylor Jones come on & Lieut. Wm. Taylor. Has Dick gone back to the Regt. He was married a few days before I was captured to Miss. Lora Watkins formerly of Va…I am not in a sclose a place as I was at Gaines Mills, but am in one as little to be desired as the one referred to above…Capt. James Harrison, Prisoner of War Block 2 Johnson's Island Ohio". A note on the verso by Mr. Brooks reads, in part: "I left 30 3/4 boxes of manufactured tobacco which I had…to be sent to Lynchburg as all communications are cut and I don't know what to do with it…". Fine.

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11TH ILLINOIS GOES ON AN EXPEDITION INTO MISSOURI

Lot 458: 11TH ILLINOIS GOES ON AN EXPEDITION INTO MISSOURI

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Description: 11TH ILLINOIS GOES ON AN EXPEDITION INTO MISSOURI A good war-date A.L.S, by Pvt. George Bright, Co. I, 11th Illinois Vols., 4pp. 8vo., on "Onward to Victory" patriotic stationery Bird's Point, [Mo.], Nov. 13, 1861, to his sister. In part: "…we were starting on a tramp though the swamps of Missouri to Bloomsfield…we started on Wednesday and returned on…tuesday. We had a very hard march it was what they call a forced march. We did not accomplish eny thing of importance. Carson our spy killed two cesesh and took one prisoner. We took four prisoners I seen five houses on fire. I suppose some of the other regiments done it. There was six thousand troops out. Your friend Keener was out on the same expedition. He is in the eighth regiment under Col. Oglesby…[CSA Gen.] Jeff Thompson heard of our move and run with his ragamuffins into the swamp. It was a fine thing for him…the part of this state we went through was very poor Cape Garadan [Girardeau] is a pretty town on the upper Mississippi river. Where we went on board the steamer boat…our boys that went to Belmont [on Grant's first Civil War expedition where he learned the rebels were as afraid of him as he was of them] had a hard time of it. It is opposite Columbus…if our officers…would let us fight…we could settle it in two months…". Very good.

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A CONNECTICUT SOLDIER GIVES A DESCRIPTION OF WASHINGTON WHILE A COLONEL IS THROWN FROM HIS HORSE.

Lot 459: A CONNECTICUT SOLDIER GIVES A DESCRIPTION OF WASHINGTON WHILE A COLONEL IS THROWN FROM HIS HORSE.

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Description: A CONNECTICUT SOLDIER GIVES A DESCRIPTION OF WASHINGTON WHILE A COLONEL IS THROWN FROM HIS HORSE. A good war-date A.L.S. by Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman [wounded in the chest at Gettysburg July 1, 1863], Co. D, 17th Conn. Vols.,, 4pp. 4to., Tennalytown, Md., Oct. 18, 1862, in part: "… we are now in a place of hills and hallows which had been covered with wood but it is now nearly all cut off. Forts and batteries are posted on every h[ill now]…they are not all completed yet but will soon will be…after stopping in Washington we got some raw ham, bread…and lay down on the floor of the room built for the reception of soldiers…we stopped in plane sight of the capital…it is a splendid building or will be when it is finished…they are repairing the steps and chunks of marble are scattered all around and the chips…are not cleaned off….there are some nice statues in front…also a pond with an iron fence around it…we passed the treasury building…the statue of Washington on his horse…full life sizes also a fine sight. We also passed directly in front of the President's house and had a good view…I don't know as there is much chance of my getting there to live…we are under Gen. Bank's jurisdiction…Lieut. Hubbell says we may stay here a week…the Connecticut cavalry…are encamped about a mile from us…they are a fine set of fellows…they are now six weeks waiting for horses and as soon as they get them they will…take the field…quite an accident happened to…Col. [Noble] yesterday while on the march he was thrown from his horse onto the cobble stones…it only dislocated his shoulder…the accident happened directly in front of a large hospital where several of the best surgeons in Washington were…they set it without much trouble…he come out on a carriage…". Small tear affecting two lines of text on front page, else very good.

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AN ORDERLY SERGEANT COMMANDS BLAKEMAN'S COMPANY

Lot 460: AN ORDERLY SERGEANT COMMANDS BLAKEMAN'S COMPANY

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Description: AN ORDERLY SERGEANT COMMANDS BLAKEMAN'S COMPANY War-date A.L.S. by Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman (wounded in the chest at Gettysburg July 1, 1863), Co. D, 17th Conn. Vols., 5pp. 8vo., "Camp 17th Regt. Conn. Vols. near Brook's Station, Va., Mar. 15, 63, in part: "…our corduroy road building is nearly done…there are several forts being built not far from us…the Col. [Noble] drills us every afternoon…I don't believe he will be Brig. Gen. before next week…Capt. Lacey and six other Capts are still under arrest…Lieut. [Samuel E.] Blinn [WIA & POW Chancellorsville] still commands the Co. and I have heard the remark made 'I hope Capt. [Lacey] will be under arrest till our time is out'…he seems to take great pride in drilling the Co. and all like to please him and do well…we have the reputation…of being the best drilled Co. in the Regt…Col. [Noble] told Lieut. Blinn so and we intend to sustain our reputation…". Very good.

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CHANCELLORVILLE POWS RETURN TO THE 17TH CONN. WHILE THE TRUE LOSSES ARE REVEALED

Lot 461: CHANCELLORVILLE POWS RETURN TO THE 17TH CONN. WHILE THE TRUE LOSSES ARE REVEALED

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Description: CHANCELLORVILLE POWS RETURN TO THE 17TH CONN. WHILE THE TRUE LOSSES ARE REVEALED A nice war-date A.L.S., by Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman (wounded in the chest at Gettysburg July 1, 1863), Co. D, 17th Conn. Vols., 4pp. 8vo., "In the house of Joseph Gallahan, Near Camp, Brook's Station, Va., May 22, 63", in part: "…Gen. [Nathaniel] McLean [blamed for the Union disaster at Chancellosville] bade us 'farewell' last Tuesday. He has been assigned a command in the west under Burnside-all are very sorry to see him leave…he tried his best to get liberty to take the brigade…it was thought they were needed here…the brigade wished to be commanded by him…Gen. Wright takes McLean's place….you wanted me to explain about Capt. [William H.] Lacy [WIA Chancellorsville]. The night before he left he spoke to the Co…and said…that he came only to get some men that would not come unless he did and that he did not expect to stay long…if that is the way he intended to treat men why let him go. He can't do it again…there are just as good men left as he is…we heard from a few missing boys from our Co. The true account of the loss is two killed, three besides the Lieut. wounded and eight prisoners. The prisoners were taken to Richmond from there to City Point and paroled and are now at the parole camp….where they will probably stay until exchanged…". Very good.

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COL. NOBLE ARRESTS NEARLY ALL HIS LINE OFFICERS

Lot 462: COL. NOBLE ARRESTS NEARLY ALL HIS LINE OFFICERS

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Description: COL. NOBLE ARRESTS NEARLY ALL HIS LINE OFFICERS A nice war-date A.L.S. by Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman [wounded in the chest at Gettysburg July 1, 1863], Co. D, 17th Conn. Vols., 4pp. 4to., "Lacey's sheep without a shepherd camp near Brook's Station, Va., Mar. 1, 63", in part: "…twenty five out of thirty line officers in this Regt are under arrest by order of Col. Wm. H. Noble. The fracas occurred…as…Col. Noble has never been out ot drill the Regt. since we left Conn…two or three of the senior Capts. requested Gen. McLean to have the Col. drill the Regt. Gen. [McLean] told them to get up a paper to take effect which they did…they said the[y] wished to know whether he was capable of doing it or not. This paper was signed by all except five of the line officers…as soon as the Col. learned what they had done he put all those that signed it under arrest and ordered Capt. Lacey and one or two other officers that had furloughs back but…they will come when their time expires as they have Gen. Siegel's name on their furloughs. Our Orderly Serg. Henry North now has command of the Co…the crazy turn that Charles Clark had in Bridgeport must have been when I was away as nothing of that kind occurred when I was there…that story won't go nor Charley's playing crazy won't get him a discharge as they do not discharge crazy men…[they] send them to the insane retreat in Washington..." Clark was discharged for disability, April 10, 1863.". Very good.

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CONFEDERATE POWS ARE POORLY DRESSED

Lot 463: CONFEDERATE POWS ARE POORLY DRESSED

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Description: CONFEDERATE POWS ARE POORLY DRESSED A war-date A.L.S. by Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman (wounded in the chest at Gettysburg July 1, 1863), Co. D, 17th Conn. Vols., 4pp. 8vo., by, [n. p., n. d., but Dec. 7, 1862], in part: "…the first death in our company occurred last Sunday at Washington. The person was Samuel Burditt…I had a chain to see some rebel last Monday…a scout of cavalry brought in 31 prisoners, 40 horses and 50 head of cattle. The men looked like other men but were dressed in all manners…no two were dressed alike and the[y] looked…anything but soldiers…". Very good.

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A RECENTLY RELEASED CONFEDERATE P.O.W. DESCRIBES RICHMOND JUST PRIOR TO ITS EVACUATION IN 1865.

Lot 464: A RECENTLY RELEASED CONFEDERATE P.O.W. DESCRIBES RICHMOND JUST PRIOR TO ITS EVACUATION IN 1865.

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Description: A RECENTLY RELEASED CONFEDERATE P.O.W. DESCRIBES RICHMOND JUST PRIOR TO ITS EVACUATION IN 1865. Fine content war date A.L.S. "W.S.W." 3pp. 4to., Richmond, Va., March 29, 1865. Identified in pencil as William S. Wall, the correspondent was a recently released Confederate P.O.W. who provides a good account of his return from captivity as well as a superb and unusual account of life in the Confederate capital just before the evacuation of the city. Wall writes two days after his release, in part: "…Richmond is a gay place, and except in the high price of every thing, I can see but little difference between it and other cities. Every thing is plenty. The stores can furnish any article called for, and the streets are full of gaily dressed ladies. For gold, or silver, a man can live cheaper here than in New York, but for Confed. money it requires a small fortune a day. It used to be, that persons carried baskets to market to bring home their purchases, but now they find baskets necessary to carry the money required. I have, but a few minutes since, had a plate of very fine ice-cream in as fine and well furnished saloon, as can be found in Cincinnati, or Louisville. The bill was only $5.00 (cheap). There is no fighting, particularly going on, along our lines, now, nothing more serious than an occasional skirmish. In the little affair near Petersburg the other day, we trounced the Yankees finely… I have seen none of the dejection, and scare, among the citizens of Richmond, which Northern accounts led me to expect- on the contrary, business is just as brisk, and the people just as lively, as if Grant's Army was a hundred miles away. If there is any intention to evacuate Richmond, it requires some one better posted than I am, to see any of the indications. I can't see anything that looks like it. I thought I had seen fortifications and buns before, but I must acknowledge that until I came here, I had seen but little. There are guns enough to fence in half of Harrison County … Of my trip from Prison … but as my last letter had to pass through the hands of an Inspector couldn't say much more than that we were well treated … The guards it is true did treat us, or rather those of us who had a little money, better than we expected. The officer (a little, excitable Dutch lieutenant…) put us to all the discomfort he dared - closed car doors and windows when wherever we stopped at a station, would not allow us to speak to citizens, and drove off all the pedlers &c. that came near us - frequently refused to allow us to have water, when the men were almost suffocating with thirst … It was almost as bad as remaining in Prison. The Yankees would not generally allow us to buy bread & pies &c. from the pedlers, but would buy it themselves, an let us have it, at double, or treble cost. At night, when we would lie down in the heat to sleep, they would steal the boys hats & blankest &c. and many poor boys came around bare headed… " Some toning along folds, else very good.

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FORREST'S TROOPERS ATTACK MOSCOW, TENN. WOUNDING FUTURE GENERAL HATCH

Lot 465: FORREST'S TROOPERS ATTACK MOSCOW, TENN. WOUNDING FUTURE GENERAL HATCH

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Description: FORREST'S TROOPERS ATTACK MOSCOW, TENN. WOUNDING FUTURE GENERAL HATCH A rare war-date A.L.S. by Pvt. William Seely, Co. B, 47th Illinois Vols., 4pp. 8vo., "Lagrange, Tenn., Dec. 10, 1863", in part: "…you speak of your Cousin's being wounded but didn't state whether it was in battle or whether it was an accident but from the weight of the ball I judge it was from an army gun…Harvey Divelbliss was taken to St, Louis and kept in a military prison several days. Then sent to Vicksburg and lodged in prison again…the Prov. Marshall at Peoria served him a mean trick…we have changed our base of operations from Miss. to Tenn. We were very much crowded on the boat…did not leave Memphis for two days…we were detailed to escort the wagon train out but when the teams were all loaded and ready to start we were ordered to take the cars and guard an ammunition train…for the guerrillas had become somewhat troublesome occasionally firing into the train…we received orders to march at six in the morning with three days rations. The first day we marched 25 miles but the Rebels learning of our movement came in our rear, tore up the Railroad track in several places and burnt several cars that were left at Salisbury…next day we turned and marched back but did not come in contact with the Rebs…our cavalry was skirmishing with them for a considerable distance. They would not wait for the infantry to come up. The march was a hard one on the men…we were ordered to prepare for action immediately…we only marched a little out of town…the rebus did not come. They went to the west and attacked Moscow and destroyed a small bridge, but were driven off…[future brig. gen.] Colonel [Edward] Hatch of the 2nd Iowa Cavalry was mortally wounded and has since died. The bridge was soon repaired and the cars now run as usual from Memphis to Corinth…". Also included is the original stamped transmittal cover. Very good.

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PVT. BLAKEMAN DRAWS TENT QUARTERS AFTER GEN. MCLEAN COMPLIMENTS THE CONNECTICUT YANKEES

Lot 466: PVT. BLAKEMAN DRAWS TENT QUARTERS AFTER GEN. MCLEAN COMPLIMENTS THE CONNECTICUT YANKEES

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Description: PVT. BLAKEMAN DRAWS TENT QUARTERS AFTER GEN. MCLEAN COMPLIMENTS THE CONNECTICUT YANKEES A nice war-date A.L.S., by Pvt. J. Henry Blakeman (wounded in the chest at Gettysburg July 1, 1863), Co. D, 17th Conn. Vols., 4pp. 8vo., "Camp 17th Regt. Conn. Vols. near Brook's Station, Va., Feb. 15, 63", in part: "…we are now very comfortably situated in our new houses which you will gain some idea of by looking at the…plan…which I have drawn at the commencement of this sheet…it is 10 feet long by 6 1/2 feet wide and high enough to stand erect…there are tow bunks, one above the other…have potatoes three times a week and onions and tea…by order of Gen. Stahl commanding 11th Army Corps…great quants of troops have been shipped from this vicinity to N. Carolina…Gen. [Nathaniel] McLean told us we should…stay where we are for some time. He…rode through our camp while we were building and said he was glad to see us getting on so well as he was afraid we were suffering from the cold…said he, 'Yankees are sure to get along somehow.' Quite a compliment to the Yankees from an Ohio man…the Col. [Noble]…has not drilled the Regt…since we left Conn….if he tries to give any order on review…he generally gets it wrong…the quartermaster [Lt. Hanford N. Hayes, resigned July 18, 63]…was arrested for selling provisions belonging to the Regt…he was restored to his office…". Very good.

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RECALLING THE BATTLE OF BATON ROUGE

Lot 467: RECALLING THE BATTLE OF BATON ROUGE

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Description: RECALLING THE BATTLE OF BATON ROUGE A fine war-date A.L.S. written by Pvt. Franklin S. Twichell, Co. B, 13th Conn. Vols., [POW Winchester, Va., Sept. 19, 1864. Died as POW Salisbury Prison, Dec. 9, 1864], 4pp. 8vo., on finely illustrated 13th Conn. stationery, New Orleans, Aug. 14, 1862. In part: "…we have got pretty exciting times here…the rebels attacked our troops at Baton Rouge on the 3rd…they got nicely whipped out. They had from 5 to 6 thousand men while we only had two thousand five hundred. Our loss was 60 killed and 150 wounded. The rebels lost about five hundred killed…we have not found out how many they had wounded as they carried most of them with them…it will be our turn next. They are making preparations to attack us immediately with 40 thousand men…we are ready for them…I am on guard at the St. James Hospital. Our regiment is scattered all over the city doing guard duty…". Very good.

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RICKETT'S BATTERY KILLS TWO HORSES AND WEARS OUT EQUIPMENT DURING BURNSIDE'S MUD MARCH

Lot 468: RICKETT'S BATTERY KILLS TWO HORSES AND WEARS OUT EQUIPMENT DURING BURNSIDE'S MUD MARCH

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Description: RICKETT'S BATTERY KILLS TWO HORSES AND WEARS OUT EQUIPMENT DURING BURNSIDE'S MUD MARCH A good war-date Union artillery document packet with seven documents signed by ROBERT B. RICKETTS, Captain of the 1st Pennsylvania Artillery, total of nine folio documents in the packet, being the "Quarterly Return of Ordnance and Ordnance Stores, Received, issued and remaining on hand, in In the field…January 1863 by 1st Lt. R. B. Ricketts, Comdg. Bty. F 1st Reg't Pa.V. Lt. Arty." The time covered in this packet includes the battle of Fredericksburg and Burnside's Mud March. These documents show the blacksmith's expenditures, worn out horses and of the loss of "two, horses, died on the march from Belle Plain to Falmouth" and more. The 1st party arrived in Gettysburg on the Taneytown Road on the morning of July 2, 1863 and replaced Capt James H. Cooper's Battery B, First Pa. Light Artillery, on East Cemetery Hill. Around nightfall, two Confederate brigades broke the thin Union front line at the foot of the hill in two places and one group attacked the left of Ricketts' battery, trying to spike the guns. The fight for the guns became hand to hand, but the Confederates were unable to capture the whole battery. Eventually Union reinforcements from the II Corps brigade of Col Samuel S. Carroll drove the Confederates down hill. A monument to the battery stands in the general location of their fight. Overall very good.

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