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Auction Description for WestLicht: 100 Years of Leica
Viewing Notes:
Cameras - Lots 1 - 100. Photographs - Lots 101 - 200.
Sale Notes:
www.westlicht-auction.com

100 Years of Leica

by WestLicht


200 lots with images

May 23, 2014

Live Auction

Westbahnstrasse 40

Vienna, 1070 Austria

Phone: +43 1 5235659

Fax: +43 1 5231308

Email: auction@westlicht.com

200 Lots
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Lots with images first
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Kellner Telescope, c.1852, no.360124

Lot 1: Kellner Telescope, c.1852, no.360124

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Description: Large brass telescope by Carl Kellner, Wetzlar, with original stand, telescope signed "Carl Kellner in Wetzlar". Lens front diameter 56 mm (equivalent to ca. 26 Paris lines). Literature Christine Belz-Hensoldt, Carl Kellners Briefe an Moritz Hensoldt, 2007, p. 576. In 1849 Carl Kellner founded his "Optical Institute" in Wetzlar. At first he mainly designed astronomical oculars and telescopes, later also microscopes. Kellner prematurely died in 1855. At first his successors Rexroth, Belthle and LEITZ operated under the name and also marked their products "Carl Kellner's Successors", while instruments just marked "Carl Kellner" from the very early period are extremely rare and almost impossible to find today. In the sales records of Kellner, the earliest case of a telescope with stand is documented on November 25, 1852. The present telescope is the earliest known example of a product from the workshop which turned into the Leitz Company in 1869 - a historically significant piece from the earliest time of Cars Kellner's Optical Institute, and presumably unique.

Condition Report: B-

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Carl Kellner (Bethle & Rexroth) Large Microscope, c.1861, no.478

Lot 2: Carl Kellner (Bethle & Rexroth) Large Microscope, c.1861, no.478

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Description: The largest microscope by Belthle & Rexroth (Carl Kellner's successors), signed "C.KELLNER IN WETZLAR /BELTHLE & REXROTH.", stamped serial no. 478. Made of lacquered brass and black lacquered cast and turned iron. Four eyepieces (I-IV), five objective lenses (signed "Belthle & Rexroth" and numbered "0-4"), mirror, can be turned around optical axis, condenser disc under table. Original wooden case with table of lens combinations and matching serial number. "Mikroskop Nr. 478 v. Belthle". Dimensions of case: 32 x 7.5 x 11.5 cm, table height of microscope: 10.2 cm. Extremely rare item in fully original condition with typed instructions with handwritten corrections (dated 1853 and corrected to read 1857) signed "Belthle & Rexroth". Carl Kellner (1826-1855) founded the Optical Institute in Wetzlar together with Moritz Hensoldt in 1849. However, in 1854 Kellner contracted intestinal tuberculosis. Starting in December 1856, Friedrich Belthle (1829-1869), a former apprentice of this workshop, takes over the company after marrying Kellner's widow (who had given birth to an illegitimate child of Belthle's in August 1856 already). Belthle heads the young company, with Heinrich Friedrich Rexroth as a partner from August 1957 onwards. Ernst Leitz (1843-1920) joined the "Optical Institute" in Wetzlar in 1864 and became its sole owner in 1869. Leitz' knowledge of serial production, which gave him an advantage over his competition, and the increasing demand for microscopes due to medical research were advantageous for the company's rise.

Condition Report: B

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(Leitz) Moment-Kamera , c.1907, no.201053

Lot 3: (Leitz) Moment-Kamera , c.1907, no.201053

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Description: 13 x 18 cm folding plate camera produced by Kruegener, Frankfurt and sold by Leitz, with E. Leitz Wetzlar 6/18 cm Summar lens in brass/nickel, Bausch & Lomb shutter, red leather bellows, nickel focusing panel engraved 'Summar 180 mm', with Russian dealer's plaque. In very fine condition. LITERATURE Paul-Henry van Hasbroeck (ed.), Leica, a History illustrating every Model and Accessory, p. 1-24, showing a camera with focal-plane shutter. During the early 1900s Ernst Leitz had embarked on manufacturing a range of photographic lenses. He soon decided on a separate undertaking: the marketing of a range of plate cameras. Leitz bought the cameras (produced by Kruegener, Hüttig and later by ICA) and sold them under their own code names (Klapp and Moment Kamera) and fitted with their own lenses (Summar and Periplan). Ony very few of these cameras survived; production was very limited and not very successful.

Condition Report: B+

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Ernst Leitz Factory 1911 Lithography, 1911

Lot 4: Ernst Leitz Factory 1911 Lithography, 1911

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Description: Unique, large format lithography showing the Leitz factory in 1911 (size 53 x 100 cm or 21 x 40 inch - without the original frame), ex James Cornwall collection. This picture hung in Ernst Leitz' office in the former administration building. It shows the Optical Works Ernst Leitz in their extent and design in 1911, the very year that Oskar Barnack began working for Leitz. It is difficult to determine whether it was made after the building extension had taken place or was based on an architect's designs. The extensive park-like grounds indicated in the picture seem foreign to a small town like Wetzlar. Carl Kellner's first workshop was located in an old priory near Jäcksburg with 12 employees. Before 1870 it was moved to the Wöllbach Gate, an extension was built at the Kalsmunt Gate. In 1883 a new residential building and a large workshop were built, complemented in 1890 already by two further buildings. In 1891 the construction of the 20,000th microscope was celebrated. An overview dated ca. 1909 shows the addition of further large buildings. The number of employees was approaching 1000. This lithography from 1911 shows another large building in the left foreground, before the towering chimney, running at a right angle towards the rear. All this indicates that business was booming. Leitz was the purveyor of choice for microscopes and equipment for scientific work. However, the fact that this picture found a home in Ernst Leitz' office also indicates a caesura. Perhaps its meaning was to urge moderation, to stop and fix the achievements so far symbolically in an image. Although the company was manufacturing photographic lenses, the company's photographer Nicolaus Befort lacked the wide-angle lens to capture the wide expanse of buildings in one image. In addition, he would also have had to ascend in a hot-air balloon in order to find the perspective that the draftsman could imagine for himself.

Condition Report: B+

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Broschure 'Barnack Kamera', 1924

Lot 5: Broschure 'Barnack Kamera', 1924

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Description: The very first brochure of the new Leitz camera from 1924, one year before the official delivery of the Leica, then under the name BARNACK"-KAMERA. Provenance: Oskar Barnack estate, his daughter Hanna Ulzenheimer to the present vendor. Extremely rare. Literature Hans-Günter Kisselbach (ed.), Barnacks Erste Leica, 2008, p. 47. When Oskar Barnack completed the first model of his photo-camera for cine film in March 1914, he called it "Lilliputkamera", since it was much smaller than the plate cameras customary at that time. Barnack did not give a special name to the improved sample from 1920. The cameras of the first trial series from 1923 (0-Series) only had numbers (101 - 125). In the next series, made in 1924 and bearing the numbers 126 to 129, the time-setting mechanism was covered by a cap. This cap was engraved "Ernst Leitz Wetzlar", but there was no name for the new camera yet. The department constructing the camera was called "Barnack Department"; perhaps that is why the first printed matter to introduce the camera simply called it the "Barnack" Camera. Upon realisation that Barnack was not a well-known name, those responsible experimented with contracting the first two syllables of the decisive words: LECA = Leitz Camera. But Krauss had already brought out the "Le Eka" in France. The "LECA" labels were covered with "LEICA" ones. And it was under this name that Barnack's camera was announced in the magazine Photofreund in mid-February 1925. This first leaflet is already very cleverly designed. Folded twice, the cover of the closed leaflet says LEITZ "Barnack Kamera" on the left in red ink, and "Ein neuer Typ (A new type)" on the right. The reader's curiosity about this novelty is aroused, and opening the leaflet, one reads "The ideal camera for the amateur, reporter, tourist, scientific explorer". The future referred to there is now the past, but it has shown that this was a very truthful description.

Condition Report: B/A

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0-Series Replika, c. 1980, no.15

Lot 6: 0-Series Replika, c. 1980, no.15

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Description: One of 31 replicas with flip-up viewfinder by Italian Alberico Arces, in mint condition, papers, maker's box. Alberico Arces was a precision mechanic and the boss of the local Italian Telecom State Company's "Telex repair and maintenance shop". In this capacity, he headed a small team of highly specialised precision mechanics and had at his disposal all kinds of fine metal machining tools. In order to keep his team busy, Arces had the idea to let them make UR-Leica replicas based on drawings he had found. The result was so good that he developed the "business" with the enthusiastic help of his team. His "Nullserie" replicas existed nearly 20 years before the costly Leica ones. Next to the normal or "brassy" UR-Replicas, he made tubus and folding viewfinder versions of the Nullserie. Alberico Arces never made "fakes": all his products came numbered and with a "certificate".

Condition Report: A

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Leica I Mod. A Anastigmat, 1925, no.239

Lot 7: Leica I Mod. A Anastigmat, 1925, no.239

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Description: Authentic Leica model A with Anastigmat lens in extremely rare original condition. Export version with distance scale in feet, engraved "Germany". Complete with first version ETRIN case in "EPI" leather style, matching early FODIS rangefinder no. 2381, original slotted type take-up spool, twin cassette container and early FISON sunshade, cap. Cleaned and serviced by Malcolm Taylor. Several versions of the Leica model A were produced, which differ primarily in their respective built-in lenses. The Leica model A with 5-element 50 mm Anastigmat f/3.5 lens represents the first version of a regular production Leica camera, as it was first introduced to the public at the Leipzig Spring Fair in 1925. Only about 155 of these cameras were built and delivered in 1925 (production started with number 126, the 0-Series cameras bearing numbers from 101-125). The "Anastigmat" Leica is historically important and in high demand among collectors. To find an example in original condition is particularly difficult today, as many of such early Leica cameras were later upgraded into more recent models.

Condition Report: B/C

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Leitz - Leica Advertisement, c.1925/26

Lot 8: Leitz - Leica Advertisement, c.1925/26

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Description: 38 x 78 cm (15 x 31 inch) - without frame Leica advertisement as reverse glass painting with original frame. The title of this - presumably unique - picture reads "Revolution in photography means Leitz-LEICA-CAMERA, Small Photographs - Great Pictures". An advertisement with a similar text appeared in Der Photograph on August 13, 1926. In his book Leica in der Werbung Rüttinger reproduces yet another version of his advertisement (cf. also Leica ADS by Paul Comon & Art Evans, p. 3), dating it to the summer of 1927. Leitz' Objektiv no. 64 (Dec. 1968) features a reprint of the original version of this advertisement. The design and text differ from the present object and from Rüttinger's version. The image shows the first version of the I A with Anastigmat, the first printing plate, the text names the lens Leitz Anastigmat "Elmar". Thus, the advertising panel must have been produced after October 1925, when the Elmar was introduced. Extremely decorative and in excellent original condition.

Condition Report: B

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Poster 'Leica Das kleine Photowunder', c.1928

Lot 9: Poster 'Leica Das kleine Photowunder', c.1928

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Description: The original Leica vintage advertising poster (size 40 x 50 inches or 101 x 127 cm, framed) by Hubert Saget, signed *Saget*, printed by Graph. Anstalt W. Wassermann, Basel. The possibly unique poster (in perfect condition) was printed for "Optiker Koch Zürich", a second version for "STRÜBIN DER OPTIKER" also exists (WestLicht collection). Exactly this poster is printed on the back dust cover of Jim Lager, Volume 1, Cameras.

Condition Report: A/B

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I Mod. B Dial-Compur, 1928, no.13156

Lot 10: I Mod. B Dial-Compur, 1928, no.13156

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Description: The Leica model B or Compur occupies a unique position in the history of technical development of the Leica, because it was the only model fitted with a between- the-lens shutter. The focal plane shutter was still not very common at that time, so it was also not accepted by every Leica customer. Also in order to fulfil the wish for longer exposure-speeds, the Leica Compur versions were introduced. Here the first version of the Compur Leica, equipped with the so-called "dial-set" Compur shutter. One of the last examples produced of this rare first type Compur Leica in fine condition, in good and perfect working condition with all original features, base plate engraved "auf / open-zu / close", focusing scale in "feet", inspected by Ottmar Michaely.

Condition Report: B

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Leica I Mod. A 'Cutaway-Model', 1930, no.30663

Lot 11: Leica I Mod. A 'Cutaway-Model', 1930, no.30663

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Description: Extremely rare and decorative piece in very good original condition. LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica, Illustrated History, Vol. I, p. 25. For demonstration purposes, official factory "cutaway" models were individually manufactured of various Leica models over the decades. The cutaway versions of the Leica I are extremely rare - there are only a handful of original specimens known to exist in collections worldwide. The Leica model IA cutaway model with number 30663 offered here is listed as a "Schnittmodell" (cutaway model) in the factory records. Furthermore, the camera is also published in Lager Leica, illustrated History, Vol. I, on page 25.

Condition Report: B

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Leica Ic Non Standard Outfit, 1930, no.53883

Lot 12: Leica Ic Non Standard Outfit, 1930, no.53883

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Description: Very rare and complete Leica model C non standard set in very good original condition, containing body with 13.5 cm swing-in mask and three matching lenses Elmar 3.5 cm f/3.5, 5 cm f/3.5 and 13.5 cm f/4.5 - each engraved "883". Complete with matching first version VISOR "torpedo" finder, filters and close-up lenses in original fitted case. The outfit was delivered on 1. January 1931 to Ernst Leitz, New York with the code "LESAM" (means: camera with three Elmar lenses in feet with leather case). The Leica model C "non standard" was the first Leica camera with interchangeable lens mount. The flange focal distance was not standardised at that time, so lenses needed to be individually configured for each camera body. The lenses were each marked with a three-digit number which repeated the last three digits of the camera serial number, for identification. A further detail to be found on this version is the "swingin" viewfinder mask for the 135 mm field.

Condition Report: B/A

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Leica II Mod.D Luxus, 1932, no.98248

Lot 13: Leica II Mod.D Luxus, 1932, no.98248

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Description: This gold-plated Leica model D with brown waran reptile body-cover is the last Leica 'Luxus' ever produced, in absolutely original condition. With matching gold-plated 5cm Elmar f/3.5 lens no. 144963 and gold-plated cap. The camera was delivered as "Lykup Luxus" in 1932, October 27 to BAKI & FILS in Tirana, Albania. Literature van Hasbroeck, "Leica, a history illustrating every model and accessory", p. 66. The discovery of this, up to date, unknown camera is a sensation. It was found many many years ago at the flee market in France and since then it was in a private collection. The owner just resently discovered to have a genuine "Luxus" in untouched original condition. It is not only the very last "Luxus" camera produced, it is also one of only four of which as Leica model D with built-in rangefinder and interchangeable lenses. In 1929, the price of the original gold-plated Leica "Luxus" with lizard-skin body-cover was twice the price of a regular version. By 1933, Leica production - in total - had already reached more than 100,000 cameras. On the other hand, less than 100 gold-plated Leica cameras were completed between 1929 and 1933. Today the original "Luxus" Leica is one of the most desirable and rare Leica cameras ever.

Condition Report: B-

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Leica Standard w. Snapshot Elmar, 1937, no.253771

Lot 14: Leica Standard w. Snapshot Elmar, 1937, no.253771

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Description: Literatur E James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. I, 1993, p. p. 45, 46 and Vol. II, 1994, p. 123/124. The "snapshot" Elmar was announced under catalogue code ELROO in the June 1935 Leitz leaflet The Interchangeable Leica Lenses (List Photo 7333b) and described as follows: "The snapshot lens Leitz Elmar 3.5 cm f/4.5 was especially designed for the Standard Leica (model E) and is not RF-coupled [...] The lens has click-stopped focus points of 1.75, 3 and 10 meters and infinity." A red insert sheet points out that the lens cannot be delivered "at this time". In fact, the snapshot Elmar never went into commercial production. A complete specimen is preserved at the Leica Camera AG Factory Museum. A handful of other examples are known to exist worldwide. The lens offered here was surely re-plated in nickel finish at a later date and shows practically no signs of use today. With clean optics, on matching Leica model E with built-in wide angle finder in black-paint finish with nickel fittings.

Condition Report: B/A

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Ernst Leitz New York Display Stand

Lot 15: Ernst Leitz New York Display Stand

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Description: Very rare 1930s wooden Leica display stand from E. Leitz New York (mounting screw 1/4") in fine condition, reproduced on the dust cover of Lager, Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III, 1998, cover and p. 330. Decoration material for Leica cameras, lenses and accessories in camera store windows has been produced in quite a variety over the decades. Unfortunately, not very many of those display stands have survived from the early years, as brittle materials such as papier mâché, foil, cloth and also wood were used for them, and obviously dealers replaced them after new models arrived, at a time when there was no collectors' market at all. In today's market, such stands are particularly sought-after, because every private collection display case is beautifully enhanced if original vintage display material is displayed with the individual camera models of the time.

Condition Report: B+

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E. Leitz New York Leica Gun RIFLE, 1937, no.123

Lot 16: E. Leitz New York Leica Gun RIFLE, 1937, no.123

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Description: One of the most rare and unusual accessories in beautiful and 100% original condition. Special viewfinder engraved with serial number 123, E.LEITZ INC. NEW-YORK, modified PLOOT mirror housing no. 2437, Leica IIIa no. 254379 (1937), Telyt 4.5/20 cm no.272806 (hood), complete with extremely rare carrying case RIFUN. The lens was delivered to New York on November, 20th 1937. The company E. Leitz, Inc. New York launched the Leica Gun Rifle in 1938 using the codeword "Rifle"; however, this was only produced for one year (1938 to 1939). The "Rifle" was inspired by Commander Attilio Gatti, the well-known photographer of animals in Africa, and was developed between 1935 and 1937 by E. Leitz, Inc. New York, before being introduced to the public in July 1938. This Leica Gun Rifle produced for Gatti had been the subject of an exclusive photo feature in the magazine Leica-Photographie a few months earlier, in January 1938. The rifle shown there, however, must have been a prototype of the actual Leica Gun Rifle. Using the "Rifle", 1938 saw the first attempts to take photographs with long focal distance just as easily and free-handedly as photographers were accustomed to expect from their Leica cameras. Various authors differ in their estimates about the actual numbers of "Rifles" produced: while P. H. Hasbroeck assumes that only six units were produced, J. L. Lager concludes that a dozen were made overall. We consider a number of 10-12 "Rifles", spread out today over collections worldwide, to be appropriate and realistic. Die Firma E. Leitz, Inc. New York brachte 1938 das Leicagewehr unter dem Codewort „Rifle" auf den Markt, welches jedoch nur noch ein Jahr lang (1938 bis 1939) hergestellt wurde.

Condition Report: B/A

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Leica IIIc Prototype, c. 1934, no.290000

Lot 17: Leica IIIc Prototype, c. 1934, no.290000

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Description: A completely new design was the Leica IIIc with diecast shutter crate - a technical detail which is still to be found in the present analog models of the Leica M-system. First trials for such a camera date back to 1933. The earliest known completely finished Leica IIIc prototype camera carries the serial number 335006. The camera here with number 290000 was discovered only recently, which can be considered a sensational find. Technically, it is identical with no. 335006 to a great extent - concerning the shutter-crate and -mechanism. Also in design of the topplate with the typical round-shaped step under the rewind - a detail which was changed with the first serial camera of a IIIc. Moreover, the camera shows a number of other differences, such as slow-speed aluminun dial without engravings, as well as topplate without engravings for "R/A" and diopter control. A historically important piece and most probably the earliest complete Leica IIIc prototype camera. LITERATURE Wilhelm Albert (ed.), Die Geburtstage der Leitz Fotokonstruktionen seit 1927, (Leica Historica e.V., 1995), p. 41, 47; James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustraded History, Vol. I, Oregon 1993, p. 114/115; Lars Netopil, Prototyp Leica, Germany 2010, p. 225-239.

Condition Report: A/B

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Summitar 2/5cm 'Aluminium Rim', 1941, no.553384

Lot 18: Summitar 2/5cm 'Aluminium Rim', 1941, no.553384

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Description: The focusing mount is made of aluminum and unfinished. Clean optics and perfect working order (cap). Included: a copy of the Leitz delivery book. Ex Theodor Kisselbach collection. Focusing mounts for Leitz and Leica lenses are mostly carried out in a combination of aluminum on brass, which gives the smoothest operation. Besides, there were always experimental designs of helicoils or even complete lens mounts only made of aluminum. Those continue into the late 1950s, with Summicron 35 mm f/2 (8-element) and Summarit 5 cm f/1.4 (Summilux prototype) for example. The purpose of these experiments is largely unknown today. In any case the aluminum lens prototypes are truly rare. Like camera no. 290000, the present Summitar with number 553384 is an item from the Leitz design and development department. It was internally at Leitz Wetzlar delivered to chief designer Wilhelm Albert, Oskar Barnack's direct successor and head of the Leica design department, on January 9, 1941.

Condition Report: B/A

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Leica II Mod.D Dummy set, c.1932

Lot 19: Leica II Mod.D Dummy set, c.1932

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Description: Early black/nickel Leica II dummy with 4 early dummy lenses: (1) nickel 50mm Elmar f/3.5, (2) black/nickel 7.3 cm Hektor f/1.9, (3) black/nickel 9 cm Elmar f/4, (4) black/nickel 10.5 cm Elmar f/6.3 with hood. All items without serial numbers. Much more rare than the original Leica dummy cameras - which mostly appear with a dummy 5 cm lens - are Leitz dummy lenses of different focal lengths. Certainly, for lenses which were already rare as such, dummy versions were not produced in larger quantities. If we look back to the pre-war years (see the following lot), dummy versions are especially rare - one of the reasons being that they were a source of scarce spare parts during and directly after World War II. To find a complete set of a pre-war Leica dummy model with matching lenses today is almost impossible.

Condition Report: B

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250 GG Dummy, c.1938,

Lot 20: 250 GG Dummy, c.1938,

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Description: Original Leica 250 (Model GG) Reporter Dummy in almost mint condition, "Germany" engraved on top plate. With chrome 5 cm Elmar f/3.5 lens no. 499606 and original Leica 250 maker's box. As a precaution against possible burglary in camera stores, the Leitz Company - sporadically over the decades of Leica production - produced small series of dummy Leica cameras. Those cameras were made from original outer camera parts, but there is no mechanism at all inside and they are completely inoperable. Valuable components such as the original rangefinder system and shutter mechanism were omitted, so in case of theft, the loss in value of such a dummy was much less than that of a complete camera. The prewar Leica dummy models are particularly rare, but the existence of a Leica 250 Reporter dummy version was unknown until now - the unit may well be unique.

Condition Report: A-

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Leica 250GG Reporter, 1941, no.352331

Lot 21: Leica 250GG Reporter, 1941, no.352331

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Description: Wartime camera in beautiful original condition, with Xenon 1.5/5 cm no.426788, ESFOO everready case. The Leica 250 or Reporter was introduced in 1934, bearing serial numbers from 130001 (1934) to 359916 (1953); total production is less than one thousand cameras. The unusually shaped Leica produced 250 photographs on 33 feet of film in special cassettes. The characteristic of the 250 are the enlarged film chambers at each end of the camera. Two variations were available: the first version (FF model) had a top speed of 1/500 second, the second version (GG model) a top speed of 1/1000 second. The Leica Reporter is highly valued by collectors, especially in this very fine condition.

Condition Report: A/B

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Leica 2500GG w. Leica-Motor MOOEV

Lot 22: Leica 2500GG w. Leica-Motor MOOEV

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Description: The offered motor no. 10006 is the earliest example known to exist and, like the camera, is in near mint and perfect working condition. It was delivered on October, 27th 1941 to Bln. Berlin. The motor drive inside is engraved with camera no. '352379', complete with chrome Elmar 5 cm f/3.5 lens no. 498098. LITERARTURE: Bahman Bawendi, Die Leica 250 mit Elektromotor, VIDOM no. 84, Leica Historica e.V., November 2003, p. 3ff. The Leica 250 was also known as Leica "Reporter". With its large cassettes it accommodated 33 feet of film, so it could be used for up to 250 exposures without re-loading. The feature of 1/1000 sec. as fastest exposure speed, a novelty which was introduced with the Leica Model G, was adopted for the Leica 250 as early as 1936. A large portion of the resulting so-called "GG" model cameras was delivered during World War II. Only very few cameras were equipped with an electric motor drive MOOEV and used for aerial reconnaissance by German warplanes, where they were permanently installed. A maximum of 92 motor drives were built, most of which were lost in the air battles.

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ANZOO f. Leica  250, c.1936

Lot 23: ANZOO f. Leica 250, c.1936

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Description: Offered here is a rare set of two variations of the nickel-plated film trimming for Leica 250: (1) engraved with „E. LEITZ WETZLAR" condenser logo outside and „Schichtseite - Coated side - Cote emulsionne" inside, (2) engraved with „E. LEITZ NEW YORK" condenser logo outside and „Coated Side - Leader V End" inside (extremely rare). From the beginning, film trimming templates have been a constant part of the Leica System. 35 mm film was not available in prefabricated, single-use rolls as today, but needed to be loaded from film sold by meter. To facilitate the process of loading the camera with film, a particular cut of the film was recommended, and the special auxiliary trimming templates ABLON were available from 1930 onwards. Special skill was required for loading film into a Leica 250 "Reporter", in which the film was not transported from the cassette onto a spool, but from cassette to cassette. For loading, the film needed to be cut on both sides between the cassettes. Today, the special ANZOO film trimming template for the Leica 250 is an absolute rarity. Very few examples were even made by E. Leitz New York. Besides the original Leica 250 carrying case, this special trimming template is highly sought-after today.

Condition Report: B-

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Leica IIIc W.H. Rundbildkamera E2, c. 1944, no.391432

Lot 24: Leica IIIc W.H. Rundbildkamera E2, c. 1944, no.391432

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Description: Unique German military panoramic outfit, containing grey Leica IIIcK W.H. no. 481491 (points present, white "K" on curtain) with Elmar 5cm f/3.5 lens W.H. no.583862, both delivered to Berlin on 03.02.44 as LOOPN/Elmar "W.H." with shipment no. 9773. With grey Hektor 13,5 cm lens f/4.5 no. 576078, delivered to Berlin on 04.09.44 with shipment number 9778 and special gray reversed VIOOH finder W.H. with reticle for 13,5 cm, mounted on matching woodenLeitz tripod with aiming circle "beh". Including a Leitz scissor-telescope S.F.14 Z. Gi. with special ocular adaptor for photography with the 5cm Elmar through the telescope. As a complete outfit with case only one other example is known to exist. Ex Luigi Cane collection. LITERATURE Wilhelm Albert, Die Geburtstage der Leitz Fotokonstruktionen seit 1927, (Leica Historica e.V. 1995), p. 67, 69; James L. Lager, Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III, p. 182. Leica cameras were also delivered for military applications during World War II. Two of the features to be found on wartime Leica cameras are ball-beared shutters and also a gray paint finish. The ballbearings were to enable the cameras to be operated even at very low temperatures. To indicate this, some of the cameras were engraved with the letter "K" for "kaeltefest" (winterized). Among those, the Leica IIIcK "W.H." (Wehrmacht Heer) represents a rarity. Technically, these camera were also particulary interesting: Two fiducial points in the frame bisect the long dimension of the negative format. Those points were usually removed in cameras used after the war. As a so-called "roundshot-camera E2" it was used for panoramic photography by the Artillery.

Condition Report: B/C

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Leica IIId, 1944, no.360124

Lot 25: Leica IIId, 1944, no.360124

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Description: In 100% original and perfect working condition, with matching 5 cm Summitar f/2 lens no. 527746 (bakelite cap). Literature James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. I, 1993, p. 62. During the hectic war years, a mere 427 units of the Leica IIId were produced. It is the first Leica model with built-in self-timer, a technical feature which would later become a standard for many Leica models to follow. The offered camera is from the first series, the 124th Leica produced with a die-cast shutter crate. It was delivered to Switzerland on September 9, 1944. This camera is illustrated in James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. I, 1993, p. 62. IIId heißt das erste Leica Modell mit eingebautem Selbstauslöser.

Condition Report: B-

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Leica IIIc Hanna Ulzenheimer, 1946, no.419851

Lot 26: Leica IIIc Hanna Ulzenheimer, 1946, no.419851

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Description: Postwar IIIc (upgraded into IIIf) with Elmar 3.5 cm no. 170943, inside the base plate inscribed 'Ulzenheimer Köln' in pencil, case. Hanna, Oskar Barnack's daughter, received this camera from Ernst Leitz. According to the Leitz delivery book, the camera with coated lens LOOPN was given to Ulzenheimer in Cologne on December 1, 1947, along with four books: (1) Festgabe für Ernst Leitz zu seinem 70. Geburtstag, 1. März 1941, (2) Ansprachen und Glückwünsche anlässlich des 70. Geburtstages von Dr. h. c. Ernst Leitz, 1. März 1941, (3) Erich Stenger, Die Geschichte der Kleinbildkamera bis zur Leica, 1949, (4) Ernst Leitz Optische Werke Wetzlar 1849 - 1949, 1949 - all ex libris Ulzenheimer, including a personal letter from Ernst Leitz sen. to Johanna Ulzenheimer dated March 13, 1941. Hanna (Johanna) Ulzenheimer was an enthusiastic amateur photographer; her private photo albums were recently discovered.

Condition Report: B

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Leica Standard New York outfit  , 1947, no.355222

Lot 27: Leica Standard New York outfit , 1947, no.355222

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Description: Here a very complete Leica post-war Standard New York outfit, containing a body with Velostigmat 3.5/50 mm no. 510097 in red E.Leitz New York display box, Velostigmat Ser. II 4.5/90mm no. 495860 (cap, keeper), Velostigmat Ser. II 4.5/127 mm no. 452310 (cap, keeper), IMARECT (IMFIN) N.Y. finder no.1244 in maker's box, black FISON hood, chrome FIKUS hood, four black A36 color filters and a chrome A36 polarising filter in fitting brown E. Leitz New York outfit case. All in fine condition. LITERATURE Paul-Henry van Hasbroeck (ed.), Leica in Colour, London 1998, p. 36, 50-51. After production of the then-new Leica IIIc with diecast shutter crate had just re-started in the early postwar years, Leitz Wetzlar parallel assembled small series of pre-war Leica models from remaining parts. The post-war Leica Standard (model E) with only about 600 units produced is a rarity. This model is also often called "Standard New York". A larger series from its small production was shipped to the Leitz Agency in New York, from where it was offered and distributed with the rare Wollensak "Velostigmat" lenses of 50, 90 and 127 mm focal length, which do carry the "E. Leitz New York" engrvavings. A number of matching accessories were made in New York, such as various filters and sunshades, as well as a Universal Finder which does look very similar to the Wetzlar "VIOOH".

Condition Report: B+

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Leitz Stereo Tandem TOWIN, c.1950

Lot 28: Leitz Stereo Tandem TOWIN, c.1950

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Description: Mounted on top, a Leica IIIc no. 516305 with red scale Elmar 3.5/5 cm no. 1090488, on the bottom a Leica IIIc no. 516579 with red scale Elmar 3.5/5 cm no.1198739 with special winding knob, including a very rare matching case for use with the complete unit LITERARTUR E: James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III, 1998, p. 347, 348. Invented in the 1940s by W. Berssenbrugge, an expert in colour and stereo photography, the Leica Tandem TOWIN was originally made for stereo exposures. However, E. Leitz Inc. advertised it in 1949 for simultaneous exposures in black and white and colour photography. Mounted on top, a Leica IIIc no. 516305 with red scale Elmar 3.5/5 cm no. 1090488, on the bottom a Leica IIIc no. 516579 with red scale Elmar 3.5/5 cm no. 1198739 with special winding knob, including a very rare matching case for use with the complete unit, see Lager III, Accessories, page 347 and 348. Extremely rare outfit with the original components, the case is probably unique.

Condition Report: B/A

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Leica IIIf Midland outfit, 1953, no.684738

Lot 29: Leica IIIf Midland outfit, 1953, no.684738

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Description: Very rare Leica IIIf body with self timer in perfect, original condition, top plate engraved "Ernst Leitz Canada Limited Midland Ontario", with Midland Summarit 1.5/5 cm no. 1246561 (N.Y. orange filter, cap). Including matching Midland SOOZI Summicron 2/9 cm no. 1580092 in near mint condition with clean optics (caps, hood, maker's box). Literature Compare Lager Vol. I p. 69 for camera Nr. 684768. In 1952 Guenther Leitz founded the Leitz works in Midland, Ontario (Canada). What was first planned as a plant for the assembly of cameras and lenses from Wetzlar production parts for the U.S. american market, soon turned into a high-tech centre with its own research and development department. Particularly worth mentioning is the Canadian Leitz lens design department under Dr. Walter Mandler. In total, at the Canadian plant more than 5.000 units of the Leica IIIf were produced, but only about 200 specimens carry the "Canada" engraving.

Condition Report: B/A

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Summitar * 2/5cm, 1950, no.812296

Lot 30: Summitar * 2/5cm, 1950, no.812296

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Description: Very rare Summitar * in fine original condition with light cleaning marks (case, cap). LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, p. 45-47, 54; Ulf Richter, 10 Jahre Leica Historica, 2009, p. 89-91. The introduction of the Summicron lens in 1953 can beconsidered one of the most important steps in the development of Leica lenses. By using high-refractive optical glass "LaK9" - an invention from the Leitz glass laboratory - a high-performance lens with high aperture - could be realized without the need for radioactive elements. During early experiments for such a lens with a new optical formula from 1950, thoriumoxyde-free Lanthanium crown glass was not yet available. In total, 88 examples of the then so-called "Summitar *" with serial numbers 812242-812329 were made, which are considered immediate precursors of the Summicron. The use of an asterisk "*" in the name (not after the serial number) of these lenses was probably chosen in order to identify them as containing a radioactive element. The diaphragm stops down to f/22. The lens from the following lot 031 has the consecutive serial number.

Condition Report: B+

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Summitar * 2/5cm in Compur-Shutter, 1950, no.812297

Lot 31: Summitar * 2/5cm in Compur-Shutter, 1950, no.812297

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Description: one of a maximum of 6 Summitar * lenses produced (prototype of the later Summicron) in Compur shutter, in very good original condition, the lens no.812327 was sold in one of our past auctions and is illustrated in Lager Vol. II page 123 (from a reproduction of a Leitz Wetzlar photograph), complete with original release arm and matching black dial IIIf body no.537878 LITERATURE Paul-Henry van Hasbroeck (ed.), Leica, a history illustrating every model and accessory, p. 195, 202. Both Summitar * as well as Compur Summicron lenses are among the great rarities of Leica lenses from the 1950s. Most unusual is the combination of both, which actually existed: only six specimens of the Summitar * were completed as central-shutter lenses and so are not only forerunners of the Summicron, but prototypes of the later Compur-Summicron (see lot 032) as well. The Summitar * with central shutter mount is almost impossible to find. Consecutive serial number to previous lot.

Condition Report: B/A

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IIIf + Compur Summicron 2/5cm, c.1955, no.724650

Lot 32: IIIf + Compur Summicron 2/5cm, c.1955, no.724650

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Description: The IIIf body no. 724650 in like new condition with the rare Compur Summicron 2/5 cm no. 1168613, meter scale, engraved "Germany", with release lever. In mint condition with clean optics (cap). LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, p. 57-58. American photojournalists demanded a synchro speed for flash faster than the 1/50 second which the Leica focal plane shutter could offer at the time. Leitz designer Erwin Neurath incorporated a between-the-lens central shutter into the fitting of a Summicron 50 mm lens. This shutter permitted electronic flash synchronisation at 1/100 and 1/200 sec. A special release arm mounted to the camera first closed the central shutter, then opened the focal plane shutter of the Leica IIIf (set to "B") and then released the exposure with the central shutter. Of this unusual assembly, only three small series of 50 lenses each were produced. Only 58 of the 150 lenses were ever officially sold, while the remaining 92 units remained in the factory and were sold to Leitz employees almost 20 years later.

Condition Report: A-

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IIIf + Stemar 3.3/3.5cm outfit, 1955, no.773826

Lot 33: IIIf + Stemar 3.3/3.5cm outfit, 1955, no.773826

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Description: IIIf red dial with self-timer and near mint and rare stereo equipment OIRZO, Stemar lens no. 1124458, both caps, beam splitter OIMPO no. 11534, cap, finder, hood, in original leather case OIBUO, instructions. In 1953 the pre-war Stereo Elmar reappeared with a very small number of 3.5/3.3 cm Stemar lenses under the codeword OISBO, made in Wetzlar. The outfit included a stereo prism OIMPO, hood OIGEO and stereo finder OIDYO. One year later Leitz Canada, Midland started the production of the Stemar outfit to meet the renewed interest in stereo photography in the United States. It was available in both screw-mount and bayonet-mount versions. The Stemar, Leitz's finest contribution to stereo photography, is a wonderful technical achievement, but it failed to attract a great mass of customers. Between 1954 and 1957 only about 500 units left the factory in Canada.

Condition Report: A-

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Leica 72 Midland, 1955, no.357326

Lot 34: Leica 72 Midland, 1955, no.357326

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Description: Rare and authentic Leica 72 Midland in perfect working original condition. Elmar 3.5/5cm no. 832191. With expertise by Ottmar Michaely. LITERATURE Gianni Rogliatti, Leica, the first 70 years, 1995, p. 68-70; Shinichi Nakamura, Leica Collection, 1992, p. 26-27. The only half-frame Leica model to go into serial production is the Leica 72. It takes 72 instead of 36 exposures on one regular roll of film. Earliest experimental Leica half-frame cameras date back to the 1940s, when film was scarce and valuable. In the early 1950s, a small run of Leica 72 cameras was produced in Wetzlar. The "serial production" of 150 units was then built at the Leitz factory in Midland, Ontario (Canada). Today, the Leica 72 is a sought-after collector's item.

Condition Report: B

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SABRE Rifle Stock, 1956,

Lot 35: SABRE Rifle Stock, 1956,

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Description: The complete set includes a matching Leica IIIf no. 548691 and the Telyt 5/40 cm no. 1097053 (hood), Visoflex I no. 27786 with 45° PEGOO, SABRE gunstock with cable release - all in perfect condition. LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, Lenses, 1994, p. 188. The "Sabre Photographic Supply Company", located in the state of Illinois in the USA, only produced the wellknown "Sabre Stock" Leica rifle, custom-made for the screw-mount and M-series Leicas, for one year (1956 to 1957), but this was never officially sold by Leitz. Therefore, we can only estimate how many of these were sold in the USA - conservative estimates ranging between two and three dozen. However, the "Sabre Stock", painstakingly crafted in keeping with Leitz quality standards, was not only a piece of wellthought-out photographic equipment for Leica cameras, but is also a joy to behold for any lover of highprecision products. The use of high-quality materials as well as great accuracy and precision in its making led to a handy Leica rifle, sure to fascinate any Leica fan to this day.

Condition Report: B/A

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Leica IIIg Midland, 1959, no.934093

Lot 36: Leica IIIg Midland, 1959, no.934093

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Description: Very rare set in perfect condition, containing a IIIg body no. 934093, engraved "Ernst Leitz Canada Limited, Midland Ontario" with Leitz Canada Summicron 2/35 mm no. 1745641 and Leicavit engraved "Ernst Leitz Canada Limited Midland Ontario", original base plate. LITERATURE this set is illustrated in Lager Leica, Vol. I,Cameras p. 74. Shinichi Nakamura, Leica Collection, Tokyo 1992, p. 31. Even two years after introduction of the Leica M3, the screw mount Leica system found its culmination in the Leica model IIIg. The most striking feature of the Leica IIIg is the built-in optical brightline finder. When this model was introduced, 50,000 units of the the new Leica M3 had already been sold - a quantity never reached with the total production of the Leica IIIg. The Leica M-system had prevailed. Only 1,780 units of the Leica were produced by Leitz Canada. Most unusual is the Leica IIIg Canada with "Midland" engravings, as usually it carries the "Wetzlar" top plate.

Condition Report: A-

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Leica IIIg black 'Swedish Military', 1960, no.988009

Lot 37: Leica IIIg black 'Swedish Military', 1960, no.988009

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Description: The camera offered here is in 100% original and perfect working condition. It comes with the matching Elmar 5 cm f/2.8 lens no. 1636625 and a black paint lens cap. Camera and lens were both delivered together to the Swedish Leitz agent Brandt in Stockholm on May 25, 1960, listed as shipment number 80866. Black paint variants of Leica cameras from the 1950s are usually versions for press photographers. In one case, however, a military client also decided on the less conspicuous black finish: for the Swedish military Leitz produced 100 Leica IIIf cameras as well as 125 units of the IIIg in satin-finish black paint. The IIIg cameras bore the serial numbers 987901 - 988025 and were additionally engraved with the three "Crowns of Sweden" on the rear side of the top plate. The Elmar 5 cm f/2.8 lenses were finished in silver chrome and engraved with the same emblem.

Condition Report: B/C

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Elmar 4.5/7.5cm, 1932, no.97273

Lot 38: Elmar 4.5/7.5cm, 1932, no.97273

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Description: Extremely rare 7.5 cm Leitz Elmar f/4.5 in good working condition. Compur-shutter (code OBDUL) with clean optics. LITERATURE Leitz Photo Objektive, Liste Photo 7188c, April 1933, p. 6. The Leitz company produced photographic lenses even before Oskar Barnack designed the UR-Leica in 1914. The first photographic lens made by Leitz was the 220 mm Duplex in 1894, followed by early Periplan and Summar lenses, which were used in plate cameras of other manufacturers or early Leitz micro- and macrophotographic units. Even after the introduction of the Leica, Leitz continued to supply photographic lenses for other companies. One well known example is the 5 cm Leitz Elmar lense for the Nagel Pupille. An existing Leitz brochure from April 1933 lists individual photographic lenses. Interestingly, these include a few focal length and/or largest apertures which did not exist in this combination as Leica lenses at the time. Those lenses were offered for other cameras only and are extremely rare. Some of those listed in that brochure have never even been seen. The lenses were offered each in different mounts, of which one always was mounted in a Compur-shutter. The 7.5 cm Leitz Elmar f/4.5 lens seems to have been produced in a very small number only. Interestingly, the price sheet of the 1933 leaflet quotes a price of RM 72.00 and defines the value of one German Reichsmark (RM) as equivalent to 1/2790 kg (0.36 g) fine gold.

Condition Report: B/A

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Stereo-Elmar 3.5/3.5cm *, 1940, no.567082

Lot 39: Stereo-Elmar 3.5/3.5cm *, 1940, no.567082

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Description: Here a most unusual prototype Stereo Elmar lens is being offered which lacks such a receptacle for the finder. This does not represent a later modification, but its original status. Presumably the lens was intended for experimental use in combination with a different finder solution. LITERATURE Wilhelm Albert, Die Geburtstage der Leitz Fotokonstruktionen seit 1927, Wetzlar 1990, p. 49-56; James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III, 1998, p. 277-278; Paul-Henry van Hasbroeck (ed.), Leica, a history illustrating every model and accessory 2nd. ed., colour plate XXIV. From 1937 - 1942, Wilhelm Albert designed paired lenses, held in a common focusing mount for stereo-photography. These lenses produced a pair of 18 x 24 mm images within the full 24 x 36 mm frame. A single ring controlled the diaphragm of both lenses. Two versions of such lenses were made during WWII, both of 3.5 cm focal length and with the typical black finished front plate: the f/2.5 Stemar and the f/3.5 Stereo Elmar. In the 1950s, this design was further developed and turned into the familiar 3.3 cm Stemar lens system. The wartime stereo lenses are exceedingly rare, as less than 50 units were produced. Usually, the lens mount was equipped with a receptacle for holding the arm pin of a specially modified VIDOM viewfinder.

Condition Report: B-

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Summar 2/5cm Lenses (Lot), 1933

Lot 40: Summar 2/5cm Lenses (Lot), 1933

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Description: Three Summar lenses in beautiful condition: (1) rigid 5 cm Summar f/2 nickel no. 167473 (1933 - early lens from the first batch), (2) 5 cm rigid Summar f/2 chrome no. 186912 (1933 - early and rare chrome version), (3) collapsible 5 cm Summar f/2 nickel with black rim no. 190567 (1933) All lenses with both caps and matching red maker's boxes. LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, p. 37-38 The first Leica lens with a maximum aperture of f/2 was the 5 cm Leitz Summar lens. It was introduced in 1933 and contained six elements in four groups. The first version was a rigid mount lens. As chrome finish Leica cameras were offered as an alternative from 1933 onwards, both nickel and silver chrome-versions of the early rigid Summar version exist. Fittings of black-paint finished Leica cameras continued to be equipped with nickel fittings, so that there was demand for both finish variants also in lenses. Of the rigid Summar, in total only 1,261 pieces were made, only 246 units of which in silver chrome. We find the opposite proportion in the collapsible second version of the Summar: the fittings of the black-paint Leica cameras were changed to chrome versions in later years, so that only a smaller number of nickel lenses exist of the collapsible Summar introduced in 1934, compared to the mass production chrome lens. The first version of the collapsible Summar in nickel finish shows a typical black rim as lens front-mount and is particularly rare.

Condition Report: B/A

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Hektor 1.9/7.3cm w. Agfacolor Filters, 1934, no.235962

Lot 41: Hektor 1.9/7.3cm w. Agfacolor Filters, 1934, no.235962

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Description: Beautiful set of near mint black/chrome 7.3 cm Hektor f/1.9 no. 235962 (hood, both caps) and both Agfacolor filters (FARBA for shooting, FARPU for projection - both with red maker's boxes). LITERATURE Die Farbenfotografie mit der Leica, Liste Photo 7375, January 1934; James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, p. 65-66, Vol. III, 1998, p. 306-310. When the Leitz Company introduced the six element 7.3 cm Hektor f/1.9 lens in 1932, it had long been eagerly awaited by magazine and portrait photographers. The combination of longer than normal focal length with a very wide f/1.9 aperture made this Hektor lens ideally suited to their needs. From 1934 onwards, the lens was alternatively available in a parallel mount. It permitted use of the special lenticular filters of the Agfa Color Film process, which was introduced in the same year. Agfacolor filters were offered by Leitz in special fitting mounts for the 5 cm Summar and 7.3 cm Hektor lenses in parallel mount. The same shooting lens was then also used for projection of the slides, while two different filters needed to be used for shooting and projection. Today the Leitz Agfacolor filters are sought-after rarities, of which only a few pieces still exist. Historically important example for the history of colour photography with the Leica before introduction of the Kodachrome film.

Condition Report: A/B

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Hektor 1.9/7.3cm, 1932/38

Lot 42: Hektor 1.9/7.3cm, 1932/38

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Description: The offered lot contains four variations of this spectacular lens, all in beautiful, near mint condition: (1) HEKON no. 129733 (1932), black/nickel, in feet, hood, caps, maker's box, (2) HEGRA no. 129335 (1932), black/nickel, in meter, hood, caps, (3) HEGRA no. 166056 (1933), all black (very rare), in meter, hood, caps, maker's box, (4) HEGRA no. 437300 (1938), black/chrome, in meter, hood, caps. hood, caps. There were two versions of the high speed lens Hektor 73 mm available since 1932: the HEKON with rotating focusing mount and the HEGRA with parallel focusing mount. The very first lenses were uncoupled. The Hektor was built until about 1942 with over 7,000 lenses produced, all with a special lens hood and front cap. Ab der Markteinführung des lichtstarken Hektor 73 mm in 1932 gab es zwei verschiedene Versionen: das HEKON mit Geradeführung und das HEGRA mit Parallelführung. Die ersten Exemplare waren ohne Entfernungsmesser-Kupplung. Das Hektor wurde bis etwa 1942 mit einer Gesamtproduktion von über 7.000 Objektiven hergestellt, alle mit einer speziellen Sonnenblende und Deckel.

Condition Report: A-

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Summarex  1.5/8.5cm black paint, 1943, no.593259

Lot 43: Summarex 1.5/8.5cm black paint, 1943, no.593259

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Description: Original black paint Summarex in fantastic condition with clean optics. Complete with both caps (aluminum front cap), original black aluminum hood engraved "Summarex 8,5 cm Ernst Leitz Wetzlar", red maker's box marked: "Leitz Objektiv 8,5 cm 1:1,5 Soocx". LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, p. 68-71; Dennis Laney (ed.), Leica Collectors Guide, 2nd. Ed., 2005, p. 249-250. The Summarex was the first high speed medium focal length lens for the Leica. It was a complicated, 7-element design in 5 groups with a maximum aperture of f/1.5. Earliest samples of that new lens were prepared in 1941 and still are named "9 cm Summar". First lenses of the 8.5 cm Summarex were delivered in 1943 for military applications. Early experiments with lens coatings also included those wartime Summarex. Finally, the Summarex was commercially introduced to the civilian market in 1949 under catalogue code SOOCX. From the beginning, lenses so far produced were finished in black paint. Within the same year and first serial number batch, however, the finish was then changed to silver chrome. The total number of black Summarex lenses produced was less than 300. Therefore, today it is difficult to find a black paint Summarex in original and clean condition. Interestingly, the change from black to chrome finish also included a re-design of the large sunshade supplied with the lens, as well as of the cap. Accessories from the later chrome finish version cannot be used with the early black lenses, and so a black Summarex lens with its original accessories is extremely scarce. The Summarex remained in the Leitz catalogue until as late as 1962, after a total production of only 4,342 pieces.

Condition Report: B/A

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Thambar  2,2/9cm, 1937, no.375224

Lot 44: Thambar 2,2/9cm, 1937, no.375224

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Description: Almost new-condition Thambar softfocus lens with clean optics, both caps, hood, centre-spot filter and red maker's box. Literature James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. II, 1994, p. 86-88. The four-element 9 cm Thambar f/2.2 lens was introduced in 1935. It is the only Leica lens ever officially announced as a "soft-focus lens". Leitz always took particular pride in the high optical resolution of its lenses, image sharpness being one of the decisive factors. Thus, the Thambar was also an exception in terms of marketing policy. In fact, the Thambar did not produce unfocused images. It was delivered in combination with a special centre spot filter which needed to be used with the lens in order to achieve the desired soft-focus effect: The special clear-glass-filter had a silvered central spot which blocked the axial rays; thus, only the marginal rays form the image. The degree of diffusion was controlled by the lens diaphragm opening and the maximum effect was obtained at f/2.2. From f/9 up, there was practically no effect. For this reason the Thambar is equipped with a special diaphragm scale from f/2.2 to f/6.3, calculated to show the effective aperture with filter in use. The Thambar is one of the great classics among the collectible Leica lenses, of which only less than 3,000 units were produced from 1935 to 1949.

Condition Report: A/B

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Telyt' 8/600mm 'Prototype', c.1947

Lot 45: Telyt' 8/600mm 'Prototype', c.1947

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Description: With original leather lens cap on gray Leica IIIc no. 387747, PLOOT mirror reflex housing no. 3847 and double cable release. LITERATURE Wilhelm Albert (ed.), Die Geburtstage der Leitz Fotokonstruktionen seit 1927, Leica Historica e.V., 1995, p. 143, 145-148; James L. Lager (ed.), Leica, Illustrated History, Vol. II, p. 133, 137 Until the year 1966, the longest focal length for a Leica lens was always 400 mm. Experiments with longer focal lengths date back as early as 1946. Individual specimens of lens prototypes with focal lengths of 600, 800 and even 1000 mm focal length from the period of 1946-1949 are known to exist. The lens here is an unknown prototype of a 600 mm lens with the largest aperture of f/8 and focusing-wheel from this period, which was discovered in South Africa in the 1990s. The lens does not carry a serial number. Truly a museum piece and probably unique.

Condition Report: B-

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Leitz Finders, 1930/40

Lot 46: Leitz Finders, 1930/40

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Description: Small collection of some rare finders: (1) VIHEU torpedo finder for 3.5 + 5 cm, extremely rare, (2) VIZWC torpedo finder, black, with parallax, (3) VIFUR torpedo finder, chrome, with parallax, (4) WEISU telescope finder 3.5 cm, chrome, early type, red box, (5) WEISU telescope finder 3.5 cm, chrome, late type, red box, (6) SUWOO telescope finder 5 cm, for single exposure housing, (7) SUOOQ folding finder 2.8 cm, black, red box, (8) SOODL cradle type finder 5 cm, in feet, (9) AUFSU waist level finder with shoe, red box, (10) AYOOC waist-level finder 3.5 cm, red box, (11) AHOOT waist level finder 2.8 cm - all in very fine to mint condition. For many decades the development of specialized viewfinders for the Leica progressed at an astounding pace. In addition to the universal models (torpedo finder, VIDOM, VIOOH), period catalogues list waist level, right angle, simple optical, rigid optical sports, folding optical sports, folding frame sports and others. They were developed on a very high optical and mechanically standard. Rare models are highly sought-after by collectors.

Condition Report: A/B

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VIOOH  Round Body, c.1936

Lot 47: VIOOH Round Body, c.1936

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Description: Extremely rare round VIOOH, black/nickel, in perfect condition. Without engravings, in red maker's box. LITERATURE James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III, 1998, p. 24. Auxiliary viewfinders have always been a part of the Leica system since the first Leica camera with interchangeable lens mount appeared in 1930. There have been various models of Leica viewfinders since and their variations seem infinite. Leica viewfinders have become a collectors' field of their own, and collections with more than 100 different finders are not unusual. Multifocal finders were first introduced as the so-called "torpedo" finders in 1931, equipped with a line-drawn glass plate showing fields of view for specific combinations of lenses. After that, the VIDOM universal finder with adjustable masking device was introduced in 1932. Like the torpedo finders, the VIDOM also still produced a reversed image. A substantial improvement was achieved with the introduction of the VIOOH universal finder with its laterally correct image in 1939. Quite a number of variations of the VIOOH itself have been reported, from which the round-bodied version seems to be the most mysterious: it was never announced in any Leitz publication and appears to be a prototype. Only a very few specimens are known to exist.

Condition Report: B/A

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Leitz 13.5cm Sports Finder SYEOO black, c.1935

Lot 48: Leitz 13.5cm Sports Finder SYEOO black, c.1935

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Description: In very fine condition, nickel with black finish, parallax correction lever in meter, engraved "Ernst Leitz Wetzlar 13.5 cm", red maker's box marked "Leitz Sportsucher für Objektiv 13,5 cm Syeoo". LITERARTUR E James L. Lager (ed.), Leica Illustrated History, Vol. III, 1998, p. 35 (the finder illustrated there is now in the famous WestLicht finder collection); Paul-Henry van Hasbroeck (ed.), Leica, a history illustrating every model and accessory, colour pl. 25. The folding optical sports viewfinders were first marketed in 1935. Four versions were catalogued in 1936: SAIOO, SEROO, SIZOO and SYEOO for focal lengths of 7.3 cm, 9 cm, 10.5 cm and 13.5 cm. The SIZOO for 10.5 cm may not have been manufactured; to this day, not a single specimen has been found. Almost all folding optical sports viewfinders are finished in chrome, only very few exist in black finish. This specific finder is engraved "13.5 cm", although the front window and the rear glass are for a black 9 cm SEROO finder. We suppose, as the finish is 100% original black paint with nickel foot and nickel parallax correction lever, the finder is a sample, prototype or mistakenly engraved black 9 cm finder SEROO. Until now only two black SEYOO finders and one black SEROO have been discovered.

Condition Report: B

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Leica Early Hoods Collection, 1925/40

Lot 49: Leica Early Hoods Collection, 1925/40

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Description: A very fine collection of 15 different early Leica hoods, all in very good condition: (1-3) three different versions of the first type FISON with rectangular aperture in front (1925-1927), (4-6) three different versions of the middleperiod FISON without set screw - including extremely rare chrome hood, (7-9) three different versions of the last version FISON, (10-12) three different versions of FLQOO - one engraved "E. Leitz N.Y. Elmar 50 mm", (13-14) two SOOHN hoods for 28 mm, one in chrome engraved "E. Leitz New York", one in black engraved "E. Leitz N.Y. 28 mm", (15) first version of FIKUS in black/nickel.

Condition Report: B

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MOOLY-C chrome 'Pre-Series', 1940, no.3498

Lot 50: MOOLY-C chrome 'Pre-Series', 1940, no.3498

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Description: Very rare MOOLY-C from the pre-series, delivered to the Italian Leitz agent Cattaneo on January 17, 1941, with delivery number 20706 (probably used for Italian military), with red maker's box, marked serial no. 5000 (which was also delivered to Cattaneo at the same date). LITERATURE Heimfert, „Mooly-C Nullserie" in: 10 Jahre Leica Historica, Leica Historica e.V., 1985, p. 79; Paul-Henry van Hasbroeck (ed.), Leica, a history illustrating every model and accessory, p. 126-132. The springwound Leica Motor was introduced in 1935 under the catalogue code MOOLY. It fitted the "short base" Leica cameras up to model IIIb and had an external linkage to the camera release. After the Leica IIIc with die-cast shutter crate came out in 1940, accessories such as bottomplates, rapidwinders and motors did not fit the new Leica model, which had a width that was elongated by 3 mm, compared to its predecessor. Therefore, a new version of the MOOLY was designed for the Leica IIIc, which then also had an internal coupling. This long base "MOOLY-C" officially started at serial number 5000 (interestingly not at 5001), after a small pre-series was prepared with serial numbers 3495 to 3546. The MOOLY-C is quite rare, as only about 750 units were completed (compared to 3,400 units of the short base version), the majority of which are finished in black paint. A chrome MOOLY-C - besides the grey version - is one of the rarest Leica accessories from the World War II era, a specimen from the pre-series is almost impossible to find.

Condition Report: B

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