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Auction Description for Kedem: Rare and Important Judaica
Viewing Notes:
26th January 11am - 8pm., 27th January 11am - 10pm., 28th January 11am - 8pm., 29th January 11am - 2pm.

Rare and Important Judaica

(78 Lots)

by Kedem Public Auction House Ltd


78 lots with images

January 29, 2014

Live Auction

58 King George St

Jerusalem, Israel

Email: kedem.ltd@gmail.com

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Torah scroll in Ancient Ashkenazi Writing, Written According to Early Ashkenazi Tradition and with Rare Crownlets of Unusual and Odd Letters, 16th/17th Century

Lot 1: Torah scroll in Ancient Ashkenazi Writing, Written According to Early Ashkenazi Tradition and with Rare Crownlets of Unusual and Odd Letters, 16th/17th Century

Description: Ancient Torah scroll, early Ashkenazi writing, with many crownlet adornments and unusual odd letters, including rare appearances of these letters. [16/17 century]. With replaced sheets from later times [c. 17/18 century]. This scroll has letters with many crownlets and unusual letters according to the custom of early scribes, including unusual crownlets, upside-down letters, spiral Peh (inner winding of the middle of the letter), odd Chet (the legs of the letter Chet are wide apart and according to Ashkenaz tradition are adorned at the ends of the legs). Special adornments of the letters Lamed, Nun and other letters. This Torah scroll was written according to early Ashkenazi tradition including the tradition regarding chaseirot and yeteirot (with a Vav and Yud or without), open and closed parshiot, large and small letters, dotted letters (special dots above selected list of letters) and the manner in the writing of the last lines of Shirat HaYam in Parshat Beshalach. The Shirat HaYam has unique changes in this scroll in the manner the words are divided among the three columns of the shira (song). This scroll was written according to the tradition and custom of early scribes as detailed in the early book called Sefer Tagi. This tradition is brought by the Rambam in Hilchot Sefer Torah Chapter 7, Halacha 8. There he writes: "...and he should be careful with large and small letters and with dotted letters and odd letters, such as the spiral Pehs and the crooked letters, in the manner copied from scribe to scribe, and he should be careful with the crownlets and their number, some letters have one crownlet and others have seven...". This manner of writing has slowly disappeared throughout the generations, due to lack of uniformity in the various versions of this tradition and relying on the Rambam's opinion that a Sefer Torah is not invalid (pasul) without the crownlets and odd lettering. The tradition of crownlets and odd letters is still preserved in some of the Ashkenazi Torah scrolls even from later times. In recent years, Torah scrolls are not written with crownlets and odd letters. All the above is written according to a detailed opinion (19 leaves) of a researcher of the area of the many crownlets and odd letters, with details of the many differences. According to the finding of the study and the examination, some of the appearances of the many crownlets and odd letters are entirely unknown from other sources. Some speculate that the scroll was written in Poland, but it is not clear. The replacement sheets were written in different times (most were written especially to restore this scroll). The height of the parchment is approximately 65 cm. The maximal size including the atzei chaim is 100 cm. 72 sheets, 215 columns. 53 are original and 19 were written as restoration and were changed during various times. The ink of the original sheets has faded and was restored with early reinforcement according to the first writing. Estimate: 20,000-30,000$

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An Illustrated Esther Scroll with Drawings and Important Adornments - Central Europe, 18th Century

Lot 2: An Illustrated Esther Scroll with Drawings and Important Adornments - Central Europe, 18th Century

Description: A magnificent Esther Scroll (Megillat Esther) illustrated and decorated by an artist. Central Europe [Austria?], Beginning or mid-18th century. Ink on parchment. High-standard artistic illustrations and decorations. The writing of the scroll was combined with its illustration and decoration. The scroll is written in the style of HaMelech, i.e. each column begins with the word HaMelech, but unlike other scrolls written according to this custom, HaMelech is written in large letters, integrated into the decoration at the top of each column. Throughout the scroll, there are frames adorned with dense vegetation, with various nesting fowl: a peacock, owl, birds and eagles [one illustration is of a double-headed eagle, perhaps an emblem of the country in which the scroll was illustrated]. At the top of every column is a medal with the word HaMelech, flanked by a pair of animals: lions, hares, deer and eagles. Between the columns are varying illustrations of the figure of a king in attire that is typical for those times. Along the bottom part of the scroll are rectangular frames with illustrations portraying episodes of the Megillah story: Ahasuerus' banquet, the king stretching out his scepter to Esther, Haman leading Mordechai on the horse, Mordechai and Esther writing letters to benefit the Jews. At the beginning of the Megillah, is a single medallion with a European landscape of a castle on the top of a hill and a river with a boat. The ten sons of Haman were written inside the text [in enlarged letters] and not in a separate column as usual. Height of parchment: 22 cm. Fair condition. Creases, faded text and illustrations in several places. Stains, ink stains. Dark stains on text and frame at the beginning of the scroll. A later childish illustration on one of the illustrations. One loose sheet. Estimate: 50,000-60,000$

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Miniature Manuscript Illustrated Megillat Kohelet [Book of Ecclesiastes Scroll] on Parchment

Lot 3: Miniature Manuscript Illustrated Megillat Kohelet [Book of Ecclesiastes Scroll] on Parchment

Description: * Megillat Kohelet [Book of Ecclesiastes Scroll]. [Europe, early 20th century]. Miniature manuscript scroll on vellum, in a handsome Hebrew scribal hand in tiny lettering. Profusely illustrated throughout with impressive colorful frames, drawings and artistic adornments. Between the text columns appear illustrations of structures with pointed roofs and turrets. Floral decorations top and bottom consisting of leaved branches bearing various types of fruits and flowers. The top margin adorned with images of doves and the bottom with decorative medallions featuring lions passant regardant. Height of parchment: 6 cm. Height of text: 3.5 cm, in 19 lines. Good condition, few stains, sporadic peeling of color. Unlike Esther scrolls, on which it is customary to have illustrated decorations (and at times on Song of Songs scrolls), it is rare to find a decorated Kohelet scroll illustrated with adornments and images. * Megillah case. [Europe? Late 19th or early 20th century?]. Silver case (unmarked), private silversmith work. Secondary use of a grated cylinder with a stylized stamped and pierced decoration of putti, grape vines and wine goblets. Megillat Esther blessings engraved along the top and bottom margins. Handle for winding scroll. Embedded with turquoise gems (on the clasp and top of case). At a later date, the scroll was incorporated into this case, despite the fact that the case was originally intended for use with an Esther scroll. Height: approximately 12 cm. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Decorated Ketubah on Parchment - Mogador (Essaouira), 1794 - One of the Earliest Moroccan Ketubot

Lot 4: Decorated Ketubah on Parchment - Mogador (Essaouira), 1794 - One of the Earliest Moroccan Ketubot

Description: A colorful decorated Ketubah on parchment, recording the marriage of the groom Menashe ben Yitzchak ben Moshe "called Amzaleg", with the bride Simcha bat Yosef ben David ben Aharon "called ben Shabbat". Essaouira (Mogador, Morocco), Tuesday, the 12th of Sivan, 1794. Witnesses' signatures: Moshe ebn Yosef Elmeliach, Yosef ebn Ya'akov Banebashti. Elaborate Ketubah in good condition. Handsome Western-Sephardic handwriting. Outer frame adorned with leaves and flowers in colored ink. A frame of verses - blessing for the groom and the bride. Inner frame in brown ink decorated with rocailles and flowers. One of the earliest Ketubot known to originate in Morocco. The first known Ketubah from Morocco written on parchment [only one other Ketubah is known to originate from the city of Mogador; it preceded this one by several years; written on paper, lacking and damaged]. Unlike the usual custom in Morocco, to hold weddings on Wednesdays (according to Chazal regulations, Tractate Ketubot, Chapter 1, Mishnah 1), this Ketubah was written for a wedding held on Tuesday. 33X40 cm. Framed in a 54X45 cm. frame. Good condition, stains, folding marks. Several tears to margins. Estimate: 8000-10,000$

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A Large Illustrated Amulet for Home Protection - Italy, 19th Century

Lot 5: A Large Illustrated Amulet for Home Protection - Italy, 19th Century

Description: A large illustrated amulet, meant to be hung on the wall. [Italy, 19th century]. Brown, red, green and light blue ink on paper. Impressive artistic work. In the center of the leaf, incorporated into an illustration of the Temple Menorah are the verses of the Psalm LaMenatzeach and other verses. Above the Menorah are the inscriptions Shiviti Hashem LeNegdi and other Shiviti verses. At the base of the Menorah are two vases from which branches, leaves and flowers are growing, with nesting birds. Surrounding the Menorah is a decorated colorful frame in the shape of a Hamsa. On the background of the leaf, around the Hamsa and inside it, are the words of the amulet with Hashba'ot and Holy Names for protection for those who live in the home where the amulet hangs. The amulet is bordered by three frames decorated with flowers and geometric patterns. At the top of the middle frame is the phrase "Blessed shall you be when you come in" and at the bottom: "blessed shall you be when you go out". On the sides of the frame is the Holy Name of 22 letters. At both bottom sides of the Hamsa are illustrations of Temple vessels: the golden altar, the table, Lechem HaPanim, Menorah vessels, and two illustrations of the steps leading to the Menorah. At the edges of the Hamsa is the signature of the artist: "Made by Michael Alon". Michael Alon, a scribe born in Morocco. Alon lived in Italy. In1828 he was appointed by the Jerusalem emissary Rabbi Yosef Yisrael HaLevi as an emissary on his behalf to the small Italian communities. Later this caused a dispute between them. [See enclosed material]. Leaf, 39 cm. glued on heavy paper and framed. Overall good condition. Holes from ink burn and several [restored] tears to margins. Estimate: 3000-4000$

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Large

Lot 6: Large "Mizrah" - Kol Koreh for Hachnasat Kallah - Jerusalem

Description: "Remember G-d from afar and Jerusalem shall rise in your hearts" - Mizrah - "From this side is the spirit of life". Jerusalem, [187-]. Large "Mizrach". On the top appears an illustration of the Temple Mount and holy sites of Jerusalem and its surroundings, with complementary explanations. Printed on the bottom is a long Yiddish letter by Rabbi Shimon Deutsch, head of Kollel Shomrei HaChomot in Jerusalem and disciple of the Chatam Sofer (died in 1878), calling for contributions for the marriage of a young Torah scholar with a needy bride and he promises to pray for all donors at the Western Wall. At the bottom of the letter are illustrations of the grave of Zecharya the Prophet, Cave of Machpelah and Rachel's Tomb. Impressive copy of a stamp [of Rabbi Shimon Deutsch?] with the illustration of a tree and a ladder standing on the ground with its top in the Heavens, with verses hinting to the city of Jerusalem and with the initials of the name Shimon. [1] leaf. 52X37.5 cm, framed: 62X49 cm. Fair-good condition. Creases, tears (some glued), missing pieces at the margins. Stains. Glue stains at the margins. Rare. Not found in the JNUL. Not listed in the book Sifrei Yerushalayim HaRishonim by Shoshana Ha-Levi. Estimate: 3000-4000$

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Lot 7: "Severe Ban" approved by the Vilna Gaon - A Printed Proclamation Against Chassidim - Only Known Copy

Description: "Cherem Chamur (Severe ban) - organized by Jewish leaders in the city of Vilna at the time and with the approval of the Vilna Gaon". Printed proclamation with the wording of the famous ban against Chassidism from Rosh Chodesh Iyar 1772, by rabbis and dayanim of Vilna headed by the Vilna Gaon and Rabbi Shmuel, Av Beit Din of Vilna. [Lacking place and name of printer, 19th century?]. "Our brothers, the House of Israel... new arrivals have come... suspicious cult of Chassidim... form groups among themselves... therefore the leaders must don the cloak of zealousness... to destroy and annihilate and raise our cries of bans and curses... and as we have uprooted them from this place so they shall be uprooted from all place and not leave any memory forever...". In 1772, the first ban against the Chassidic movement was announced by the rabbis of Vilna. It was printed that year in the book Z'mir Aritzim V'Charvot Tzurim (Oleksinets, 1772), signed by the Vilna Gaon and two Batei Din in Vilna (altogether 18 signatures). The text in this proclamation has been printed in an abridged form, with an interesting change in the order of the signatures: in the book Z'mir Aritzim, the Vilna Gaon's signature appears in the first line next to the signature of Av Beit Din of Vilna. Here it appears only in the fifth line in the right column. See Vinograd, Otzar Sifrei HaGra, page 219. Vinograd listed this proclamation according to the catalog of the exhibition "Aderet Eliyahu, The Gaon of Vilna: The Man and his Legacy", published by Beit HaTfutsot (Tel Aviv, 1998). This copy is the same copy that appeared in that exhibition. Printed sheet, 40 cm. Good condition, few stains, file holes. This proclamation does not appear in the JNUL collection and in the large libraries in the US and Europe and is not known to exist in any private library. To the best of our knowledge, it is the only copy in the world. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Illustrated Notebook - The Po'alei Tzedek Tailors' Association - Bac?u, 1832 - Approbations by Foremost Chassidic Leaders and Rabbis

Lot 8: Illustrated Notebook - The Po'alei Tzedek Tailors' Association - Bac?u, 1832 - Approbations by Foremost Chassidic Leaders and Rabbis

Description: Notebook of the Po'alei Tzedek tailors' association. Bac?u, Romania, 1832. Handsome illustrations in ink. Illustrated title page: "The pure notebook of the Po'alei Tzedek association". The next leaf has another title page, with an illustration of a two-headed eagle and a shield with the inscription "The year 1832", a pair of lions holding a medallion with the name of the author and the illustrator: "I, the writer and illustrator Asher David ben Rabbi Mordechai of D?rm?ne?ti ". The opening leaf has an article on the virtue of having an occupation quoted from Talmudic sources. Six leaves follow with the association's regulations. After the regulations is a letter of authorization of the notebook with signatures of the Bac?u community leaders. On the next leaves are the names of the members [some in their own handwriting], "Column of the association's workers". These leaves are decorated and illustrated with attractive gates, animals and fowl. Further are more leaves with entries of the association's decisions, appointing gaba'im,etc. The notebook includes five letters of approbation and blessing to the Poalei Tzedek association by the following rabbis: * A letter by "Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi of Brody" - Rabbi Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi (1775-1845), one of the most prominent Chasiddic leaders, disciple of the Chozeh of Lublin and Rabbi Uri of Novyye Strelishcha (Strelisk), one of the first Chassidim to ascend to Jerusalem. This signature is from 1838, when he was passing through Bac?u on his way to Eretz Israel (reached Eretz Israel in 1839). Rabbi Aharon Moshe encourages the society and blesses them that "their work should by doubly blessed with life for us and all the Jewish people...". [Nine lines in his handwriting]. * Letter by "Yechiel Michel ben Rabbi M. Yitzchak of Medzhybizh" - Rebbe Yechiel Michel (Drahbtisher) of Yampoli, son of Rabbi Yitzchak Drahbtisher of Medzhybizh. From his paternal side, was grandson of Rabbi Yechiel Michel, the Maggid of Zlotchov. On his maternal side, he was grandson of Rabbi Yechiel Ashkenazi son-in-law of the Besht [grandfather of Rabbi Nachman of Breslov]. Son-in-law of Rabbi Mordechai of Chernobyl son of Rabbi Nachum of Chernobyl. Rabbi Yechiel Michel writes that he happened upon Bac?u, read the regulations in the notebook and they found favor in his eyes. Therefore, he blesses the society with "the G-d's blessing of success in their endeavors, children life and sustenance and they should merit ascending to Zion with joy...". [6 lines in his handwriting]. * Letter by Rabbi Yosef Landau, a leading Chassidic figure. Disciple of Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berdychiv, Rabbi Baruch of Medzhybizh, Rabbi Avraham Yehoshua Heshel of Apta and Rebbe Yisrael of Ruzin. Rabbi in the city of Lityn and Kamyanyets (Kaminetz) and by recommendation of his teacher Rabbi Yisrael of Ruzhyn was appointed as Rabbi of Ia?i in Romania in 1834. Author of Birkat Yosef responsa. [13 lines of his handwriting]. Further in the notebook, an interesting, enigmatic letter is concealed between empty leaves which ends with the following words: I have signed, I who worry about the Jewish people's travails and am waiting for the salvation of G-d's presence and the consolation of Zion and Jerusalem, spoken by the lowly person and an undesired vessel, Gilgul Baruch ben Eliezer. We do not know who wrote this and if he was an important figure. Apparently, he encrypted his name. The Bac?u Tailor Association was known for its large impact on the city. The Jewish tailors instituted the modern European attire which replaced the Turkish mode of dress. The society had a synagogue [a contract of sale of a Torah scroll to the society's synagogue appears on a leaf of this notebook]. Besides being an economic guild, the spiritual elements were also stressed, such as banning work on Chol HaMoed, reciting Tehillim and studying Chumash with Rashi every Shabbat. [See enclosed article about the Tailors' Society in Bac?u, based on a Romanian translation of the notebook from 1887: Yitzchak Shwartz-Kara, Notebook of the Po'alei Tzedek Tailors' Society, Bac?u 1832, in the book, Kehillat Bac?u, Tel-Aviv 1990, pages 225-228]. The empty leaves of the notebook were used for recording births and deaths and family inscriptions of the owner of the notebook who brought the notebook from Bac?u to Eretz Israel. These leaves [21-34] will be removed from the notebook after the auction and returned to the owner. 120 leaves [most of the inscriptions and illustrations mentioned above appear in the first 20 leaves, most of the notebook leaves are empty]. 33 cm. Good condition, stains, minor wear. Moth marks to several leaves. Leather binding [damaged]. The notebook has been partially and imprecisely described in an article by Eliyahu Feldman, The Affinity of the Workers' Societies in Moldavia to the Community and Rabbinate, Sinai, Vol. 86, Tishrei-Adar 1980, pp. 73-85, according to a defective copy to which he had access. Estimate: 25,000-30,000$

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Illustrated Manuscript, Etz Chaim by Rabbi Chaim Vital - Eastern Europe, 17th Century

Lot 9: Illustrated Manuscript, Etz Chaim by Rabbi Chaim Vital - Eastern Europe, 17th Century

Description: Illustrated manuscript, Etz Chaim, Torah learned from the Ari HaKadosh by his disciple Rabbi Chaim Vital. [Eastern Europe, second half of 17th century]. Eloquent Ashkenazi writing. This composition was edited by Rabbi Meir Poppers, with introductions by him and by Rabbi Chaim Vital. Variations in the text, compared to the printed editions. Glosses on sheet margins by the scribe who wrote the manuscript and by another writer, most glosses by Rabbi Ya'akov Tzemach, Rabbi Meir Poppers and other known glosses. Some are additions or corrections from a different manuscript [the glosses were not closely examined]. At the end of the second volume are replacement leaves in the handwriting of the scribe, and indexes by another writer. The manuscript is illustrated throughout, with impressive artistic illustrations, in ink colored in hues of gold, gray and brown. The illustrations adorn the opening of each Heichal [the composition is divided into Heichalot, each Heichal is divided into chapters]. All the illustrations differ one from another. Some illustrations are designed as architectural structures in the Eastern European style [onion-shaped roof domes, castles and tower turrets crowned by flags]. Illustrations of fowl, deer and lions. Decoration in floral and leaf patterns. In the third Heichal, Heichal Keter (Crown), is an illustration of a crown, with a lion on each side. The sixth Heichal has an illustration of a pair of winged lions with heads of birds. At the end of the manuscript is a medallion adorned with leaf patterns, with a pair of eagles on its top, and clusters of grapes on the edges [the inside of the medallion is empty. Apparently, it was intended to be used by the scribe to write a colophon]. Illustrated decoration at the ends of Heichalot 1 and 2. Complete manuscript. 3, 257, 2, [2] leaves. Good-fair condition. High-quality paper, most leaves in good condition. Several leaves restored with glued paper [on the text in several places and on an illustration on the first title page]. Stains, few moth holes. Tears and damages to several leaves. Ancient vellum binding. Estimate: 30,000-40,000$

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Imrei Binah Manuscript - Illustrated Title Page - Italy, 18th Century

Lot 10: Imrei Binah Manuscript - Illustrated Title Page - Italy, 18th Century

Description: Imrei Binah manuscript, index to Chazal's sayings according to the alphabet. Handsome Italian-Sephardic Rashi writing. Italy, 1734. The title page is an illustrated etching in Rococo style (adornments of acanthus leaves and flower bouquets, a shell crown and an animal figure in the center). Early writing. Not printed. On the title page appears an opening in rhyme. [112] written pages, 20 cm. Very high-quality paper, good condition, minor stains. Ancient worn binding with adorned leather back. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Large Pamphlet - Seven Leaves - In the Handwriting of the Chatam Sofer - Mattersburg (Mattersdorf), 1805

Lot 11: Large Pamphlet - Seven Leaves - In the Handwriting of the Chatam Sofer - Mattersburg (Mattersdorf), 1805

Description: A complete large pamphlet written in the Chatam Sofer's own handwriting, novellae on the treatise "Ein Me'Abrin Nisan B'Nisan", written at the time the Chatam Sofer served in the Mattersburg rabbinate. Autographic writing with many erasures and corrections in his own handwriting, on large-format leaves [folio]. On page [9], the Chatam Sofer mentions his teacher Rabbi Pinchas HaLevi Horowitz, author of the Hafla'ah with Birkat Hachaim (which means that Rabbi Horowitz was still alive at the time he wrote the pamphlet). Rabbi Pinchas Horowitz died in the month of Tamuz that same year. On page [5], the Chatam Sofer mentions "that which my elder uncle Moshe Frankfurter found difficult in his commentary on the Mechilta...". [Rabbi Moshe Frankfurter was a Dayan in Amsterdam and wrote many books]. He also copies "that which I have written in my Torah novellae Parashat Bo...". In the city of Mattersburg, the name of the Chatam Sofer began to spread as the leading Torah authority of his times and as a pillar of Torah and halacha rulings. In Mattersburg, he stood at the helm of a yeshiva for many disciples. There he began to write some of his novellae which spread throughout the world. Two year after these novellae were written, at the beginning of 1807, the Chatam Sofer moved to serve as Rabbi of Pressburg. There he moved his famous yeshiva and from there he influentially led his generation until his death in 1840. These novellae were printed in Chiddushei Chatam Sofer on the Talmud, Jerusalem 1969, Siman 3 (Page 18 and on). 7 leaves - 14 pages written in his own handwriting [aprox. 50 lines per page]. 36 cm. Good condition, stains, ink stains. Minor wear at the edges. Few tears to lower margins, some with minor damage to text. Estimate: 140,000-160,000$

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Rav Alfas - Amsterdam, 1643 - Complete Volume on the Whole Talmud - Hundreds of Glosses in the Handwriting of the

Lot 12: Rav Alfas - Amsterdam, 1643 - Complete Volume on the Whole Talmud - Hundreds of Glosses in the Handwriting of the "Chavat Ya'ir" and his Father Rabbi Shimshon Bacharach

Description: Hilchot Rav Alfas, with Rashi commentary. Part 1 - Seder Mo'ed (including Tractate Brachot and Halachot Ketanot), Part 2 - Seder Nashim (with Tractate Hullin) and Part 3 - Seder Nezikin. Amsterdam, [1643]. Printed by Emanuel Benbenishti. The three parts include all the Hilchot HaRif [Rav Alfas] on the Talmud tractates, bound in one volume. Separate title page for each part. On the first title page appears the signature of Rabbi "Yair Chayim Bacharach" author of the Chavat Ya'ir responsa, and another inscription [partially erased] in his handwriting and with his signature: "This book of the Rif, I have given - to my mechutan -- , Yair Chayim Bacharach". This copy belonged to the renowned Torah scholar Rabbi Yair Chayim Bacharach Av Beit Din of Worms and author of the Chavat Ya'ir responsa. He studied from this copy and added hundreds of glosses, corrections and notes in his own handwriting on the sheet margins. This volume was the source for the glosses of the Chavat Ya'ir on the Rif in the editions of the Talmud first printed in Zhitomir in 1858-1864, and reprinted a second time by the printers of the Vilna Talmud. Since that printing, all editions of the Rif include these glosses. This volume was bequeathed by the Zhitomir printers, the holy Shapira brothers, to their great-grandson Rabbi Yitzchak Meir Shapira of Uman who made it available to the Vilna printers who wished to reprint the glosses in a more precise fashion with the addition of glosses which were omitted from the first printing. While examining the manuscript, we discovered that between the hundreds of glosses in the handwriting of the Chavat Ya'ir, there are dozens of glosses written in another handwriting, apparently the handwriting of Rabbi Shimshon Bacharach, father of the Chavat Ya'ir and Rabbi of Worms, who apparently bequeathed the book to his son. Astoundingly, both the Zhitomir printers and the Vilna printers did not discern this fact in spite of the clear differences between both handwritings and they printed all the glosses under the name of the Chavat Ya'ir. The importance of this volume among other qualities, is the identification of the author of the glosses, as well as a new understanding of part of the glosses [for example, sometimes Rabbi Shimshon asks a question and his son the Chavat Ya'ir answers. At other times, he comments or complements the words of his father]. Tractates Bava Kama and Bava Metzia include dozens of additional scholarly glosses in a later handwriting, most refer to glosses by the Chavat Yair. We were not able to identify the handwriting, but from the content of the glosses, they were apparently written by an exceptional Torah scholar, who prepared the glosses for print [in Zhitomir or Vilna]. The glosses were marked in parentheses, and to the best of our knowledge were not printed. Rabbi Yair Chayim Bacharach (1638-1701) Rabbi and Av Beit Din of Worms, one of the foremost Torah leaders of his times and leading Torah authority for all following generations. Disciple of his father Rabbi Shimshon Bacharach and of Rabbi Mendel Bass Av Beit Din of Frankfurt, in 1666, was appointed Av Beit Din of Koblenz and in 1669, returned to Worms and was appointed as successor of Rabbi Aharon Te'omim and as dayan in the city. After the city of Worms was destroyed in 1689, he was exiled with all the city's Jews. After they returned to their community, he served as Av Beit din of the community succeeding his father and grandfather until his death. Known as a tremendous Torah genius and very proficient in all realms of Torah knowledge, with an incredible memory and breadth of knowledge evident in his writings. Was knowledgeable and proficient in worldly wisdom as well. Wrote dozens of works, most remain in manuscript form and some were recently printed, but he was famous for his book of responsa "Chavat Ya'ir" which he named after his mother, Chava. Although he printed only a small part of more than 600 responsa which were prepared for printing in this book, his book was accepted as one of the basic books of responsa an as an important source of Torah decisions and is often mentioned in halachic literature until this day. Among his other works is a commentary named Mekor Chaim on Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim, which he prepared for printing but before it reached print, the Maginei Eretz books - Turei Zahav and Magen Avraham, all which were similar to his book, were published. He therefore had to re-edit his book (printed from his handwriting in 1982-1984); the book Mar Keshisha - rules of the Talmud, printed in 1993; a huge encyclopedic work of 46 volumes was lost, only the index named Ya'ir Netiv remained. See enclosed material. His father, Rabbi Moshe Shimshon Bacharach (1607-1670), was born to his father Rabbi Shmuel Darshan Av Beit Din of Worms, from which he was expelled with his family and the rest of the city's Jews in 1615. After his father died on the way, he reached Prague together with his mother and sisters, where he was raised by his grandfather Rabbi Yitzchak HaCohen disciple of the Maharal of Prague. Served as rabbi of several important communities. In 1729, when 22 years old, he was appointed Av Beit Din of Hodonín and a year later was chosen to serve as Rabbi of Lipník nad Be?vou where his only child, Rabbi Ya'ir Chayim, author of Chavat Ya'ir was born. In 1744, he was appointed darshan in his native city of Prague until 1750 when he was chosen to succeed his father as Rabbi and Av Beit Din of Worms. He remained in that capacity for 20 years until his death. One of the most outstanding rabbis of his knowledgeable generation, proficient in all parts of Torah knowledge, revealed and hidden, a posek and commentator, preacher and liturgical poet. A prolific writer, one of his most well-known works is the book Shemen HaMa'or (remained in manuscript). Some of his halachic responsa was printed in the book Chut HaShani edited by his son Rabbi Chaim Ya'ir, who quoted some of his father's words and piyutim in his book Chavat Ya'ir. 211 leaves; 160 leaves; 104 leaves, 21 cm. Most of the leaves are in good condition. Tears and holes to few leaves [damage to text in several places], some pages restored with reinforcement paper and adhesive tape. Stains. Moisture stains to some leaves. Ancient parchment binding, slightly damaged. Estimate: 90,000-100,000$

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Long Gloss in the Maharshal's Own Handwriting

Lot 13: Long Gloss in the Maharshal's Own Handwriting

Description: A leaf from the Mizrachi commentary [by Rabbi Eliyahu Mizrachi - the Re'em] on Rashi's commentary on the Torah. Venice, 1527. With a long gloss [5 lines] in the handwriting of Rabbi Shlomo Luria - the Maharshal. The Maharshal - Rabbi Shlomo Luria (c. 1510-1573, Otzar HaRabbanim 18496), Rabbi of Lublin. One of the spiritual giants of Polish Jewry at the beginning of the period called Achronim. Belongs to the generation of Torah scholars such as Maran Beit Yosef, the Rama and the Arizal. A leading Torah authority and Talmud commentator. Lived in Brisk, Lithuania and in Ostroh where he taught Torah. After Rabbi Shalom Shachna Rabbi of Lublin died, was appointed Rabbi of the city and head of the yeshiva. With his Torah authority and hundreds of disciples, he established the largest Torah center in Poland and its surroundings. Many of his generation's leaders and the rabbis of Polish communities were his disciples. Among them are Rabbi Yehoshua Falk HaCohen author of the Sma, Rabbi Shlomo Efraim of ??czyca author of the Kli Yakar commentary, Rabbi Chaim of Freidberg brother of the Maharal of Prague, Rabbi Eliyahu Ba'al Shem of Chelm, Rabbi Binyamin Selnik author of Masat Binyamin responsa, Rabbi Moshe Meth of Przemy?l author of Mateh Moshe, and the Holy Shla. The leading Torah leaders of his generation and following generations testified to his greatness and his enormous impact. The Rama, his friend and relative was also a leader of Polish Jewry at that time and a head of a large yeshiva in his native city of Cracow. The two had halachic responsa connections which at times developed into sharp polemics, but at the same time, the Rama revered the Maharshal and self-deprecated himself before him. The Rama wrote, "it is fitting to rely on him as if his words were from Moses who learned from the mouth of G-d". In the following generation, Rabbi Ya'ir, author of Chavat Ya'ir, wrote of his greatness: "It has already been said of the Maharshal that if Torah had been forgotten from Israel, he would bring it back with his ability to study Torah", and "From Shlomo to Shlomo, no one like Shlomo arose". His renowned work, Yam Shel Shlomo is used as a kind of halachic summary of the Talmud tractates [only writings on some of the tractates survived]. Moreover, he wrote glosses and explanations on the Talmud. Glosses of his version appear in the Talmud editions, some were incorporated into the text of the Talmud itself. His commentary on the tractates is printed in Talmud editions [beside the Maharsha novellae] and is called Chochmat Shlomo. He also wrote halachic responses and more compositions on revealed and hidden parts of Torah. His glosses on the book of Mizrachi were printed in Yeri'ot Shlomo, Prague 1609, and became a basis for the other commentators on Rashi. This leaf is from Parshat Metzorah, with five lines written in the Maharshal's own handwriting: "There are those who ask, why does the leper bring birds to purify the houses in the week before it was cured...". This gloss was printed in the book Yeri'ot Shlomo [Prague 1609, page 29]. Leaf, 29 cm. Good condition, stains. Several restored moth holes. Bound with new elaborate leather binding. Enclosed is an expert's authorization, identifying the Maharshal's handwriting. Estimate: 20,000-25,000$

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Nishmat HaChaim Manuscript - Volume of Novellae by Rabbi Chaim Amram author of MiTa'am HaMelech - Lost Compositions, not Printed

Lot 14: Nishmat HaChaim Manuscript - Volume of Novellae by Rabbi Chaim Amram author of MiTa'am HaMelech - Lost Compositions, not Printed

Description: Nishman HaChaim manuscript - volume of novellae by Rabbi Chaim Amram. Damascus and Safed, 1788 and after. Large manuscript composed of hundreds of leaves. Illustrated title pages and introductions handwritten and signed by the author. Many handwritten inscriptions in the handwriting of his son Rabbi Natan Amram. In one section he writes "This book of novellae and simple meaning and ways and jests and riddles and homiletics which I have written on the Talmud, on Torah verses and on the Nevi'im and Ketuvim". From studying the manuscript it appears that this is a general notebook of novellae which the author wrote on various topics, from which his son Rabbi Natan Amram edited several works. Many inscriptions and titles of the names of works related to the novellae, some in the author's handwriting and some written by his son. Most of the author's Torah was printed in his books MiTa'am HaMelech: Part 5 and Part 6 (Thessaloniki, 1829). Part 4 (Livorno, 1836). Part 2 (Thebes, 1908). Part 1 and Part 3 arranged for print were lost throughout the years. In the introduction by the author's son to his book Noam HaMidot, he relates of the loss of Part 3 of the book MiTa'am HaMelech and from his words we learn his method in editing his father's books. This is what he writes: "... It was lost by Rabbi the Emissary Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Ashkenazi when he went on the mission of the Rabbi of Jerusalem in 1832, I sent it with him to the city of Trieste, and after a while he informed me that it never reached him and woe to us is the loss. And the truth is that its source is included inside my father's holy writings nonetheless it entails much effort to compile it from its primary writing, and I toiled greatly until I arranged it in such a pleasing manner, G-d should remember me for the good". And indeed, this volumes is its "primary writing", many sections are inscribed "MiTa'am HaMelech Part 1" and "MiTa'am HaMelech Part 3". This volume contains novellae on halacha and the Talmud, homiletics and explanations of the Bible and Chazal Agadot, explanations to Megillat Esther and the Passover Haggadah, jests [=opening to homiletics in rhyme and riddle] and many Cabalistic matters. Apparently, most of the text of this manuscript has not yet been printed. The names of works mentioned in the manuscript in titles as named by the author or his son: * The six parts of his book MiTa'am HaMelech - only four were printed and two were lost. * Leshon Limudim. * Ma'aseh HaTzedaka. * Pri Shabbat on Tractate Shabbat and Kuntress Korban Shabbat. * Succat David on Tractate Succah. * Chanukat HaBait - on matters of Chanukah. * Pirsumei Nisa on matter of Purim and Kuntress Divrei HaPurim. * Chukat HaPesach and Korban Pesach. * Brit Olam on matters of circumcision. * Likutei Shas. * Likutei Tehillim and Likutei Tanach. * Other works. During the editing, some of the names of the works were changed. But as already mentioned, most of the works were not yet printed. Rabbi Chaim Amram (c. 1759-1825), was born in Safed and at the age of seven traveled to Damascus to study in the Beit Midrash of the rich descendants of the Farchi family, where the best students in the city gathered. In this yeshiva, he studied for 40 years and was renowned for his greatness. Eventually, Rabbi Chaim became the head of the Beit Midrash, a teacher and Dayan in the city's Beit Din. During these years, he wrote most of his works and became proficient in Kabala as well. In 1805, he returned to Safed and was one of its leading Torah scholars. In his later years, he moved to Alexandria in Egypt. His father and uncles were leading Torah scholars in Safed and Damascus. In this manuscript, he mentions many things in the name of his father and his uncles and in the name of his grandfather [apparently, Rabbi Chaim Amram of Safed, one of the most prominent rabbis of his times. Died in 1760, and was buried in Tzippori]. His son is the renowned Rabbi Natan Amram (1790-1870) author of Kinyan Perot, Kinyan HaGuf and No'am HaMidot, emissary of Tiberias and Hebron. He expended great efforts in editing and printing his father's works and his own. From 1863, he was Rabbi in Alexandria (Thebes). While there, he tried very hard to print the rest of his father's books and even brought printing machinery to Thebes. [4], 285 leaves. Approximately 24 cm. More than 550 closely written pages. Fair condition, wear and heavy moth damage. Some pages have fungus stains. New binding. Estimate: 12,000-15,000$

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Sefer HaGoralot by Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra - Early Ashkenazi Manuscript, 16th Century, Unique Version, Different from the Printed Version

Lot 15: Sefer HaGoralot by Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra - Early Ashkenazi Manuscript, 16th Century, Unique Version, Different from the Printed Version

Description: Manuscript, Sefer HaGoralot, by Rabbi Abraham Ibn Ezra. Handsome Ashkenazi handwriting from the 16th century [c. 1530]. Title at top of the manuscript: "The author said, I command the person who uses these lots for a query, only to ask if he wishes to hear a correct true answer". The chart of queries [luach ha'she'elot] is divided according to constellations and a chart of faces [luach ha'partzufim] is incorporated into it. This version is unique and different from the printed version and from that of other manuscripts of Sefer HaGoralot. The Ashkenazi manuscripts of this book from such an early time are rare; only three other manuscripts are known to originate at that time. 25 leaves. 19.5 cm. High-quality paper, good-fair condition, stains, wear (restored), fancy leather binding. All the above was written according to the expert opinion of Yael Okun, the Manager of the Department of Hebrew Manuscripts of the JNUL. Dated by water marks on paper to 1531. Estimate: 5000-6000$

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Manuscript, Novellae of Rabbi Bunim Eiger and his Son Rabbi Moshe - Handwriting of Rabbi Moshe Ginz

Lot 16: Manuscript, Novellae of Rabbi Bunim Eiger and his Son Rabbi Moshe - Handwriting of Rabbi Moshe Ginz

Description: A large handwritten volume, novellae on Talmudic tractates by Rabbi Simcha Bunim Ginz-Eiger Av Beit Din of Mattersburg, and his brother Rabbi Akiva Eiger, autograph with many additions in the handwriting of his son Rabbi Moshe Ginz. [c. 1830]. Novellae on the Talmud, Tractates: Pesachim, Beitzah, Succah, Megillah, Chullin, Yevamot, Ketubot, Kiddushin, Gittin, Bava Kama, Bava Metzia and Bava Batra. Copy of responsa by Rabbi Akiva Eiger and Rabbi Bunim's responses to him, etc. Additional novellae and comments on the sheet margins signed by his son Rabbi Moshe (who copied and prepared the manuscript for printing) - "His son and disciple Rabbi Moshe said". Rabbi Simcha Bunim Ginz-Eiger Rabbi of Mattersburg (1770-1829), younger brother and Torah companion of Rabbi Akiva Eiger. An outstanding leading Torah genius of his times; had much responsa correspondence with the Chatam Sofer. Dozens of responses written to Rabbi Simcha Bunim in the responsa of his brother Rabbi Akiva Eiger and the Chatam Sofer's responsa. Rabbi Akiva Eiger quotes him many times in his books and writes about him with great esteem "...If my brother the Torah genius agrees with this..."; "I was very happy to see that you approved of my words" (at the end of the book Drush V'Chiddush); "...And if this does not seem acceptable to my brother, my words shall be void" (ibid); "...All these are hidden from my blind eyes, perhaps you have ways to understand me and explain our Rabbis' words properly" (ibid); "My lowly opinion is annulled before your great opinion" (Ginzei Rabbi Akiva Eiger, 13) "Inform me your lofty thoughts about this...Your friend, who is attached to you with love". (A compilation with a collection of about 40 letters of correspondence between the great brothers named Alei Esev was published in London in 1995). Among his famous sons and sons-in-law are his son Rabbi Moshe Ginz-Schlesinger who wrote this manuscript; his son Rabbi Yosef Ginz-Schlesinger (son-in-law of his uncle's wife); his son Rabbi Shmuel and his renowned son-in-law Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Ulman Av Beit Din of Makova author of Yeri'ot Shlomo. His son Rabbi Moshe Ginz-Schlesinger (died 1857), disciple of his uncle Rabbi Akiva Eiger. Served as rabbi in Wielu? (near Posen). In 1830, was accepted into the Kloiz in Hamburg in the Beit Midrash of Rabbi Leib ben Shaul. (in Igrot Sofrim, Letters of Rabbi Akiva Eiger, 22, Rabbi Akiva Eiger writes to his brother Rabbi Bunim: "...to give good tidings that his son my friend the sharp minded Rabbi Moshe became a resident of the Beit Midrash in Hamburg..."). He assisted and prepared for print much of the Torah of his uncle Rabbi Akiva Eiger as brought in the introduction of Drush V'Chidush. Mentioned dozens of times in the writings of Rabbi Akiva Eiger and the Chatam Sofer. See: Chachmei Altona, Hamburg and Wandsbek (Hamburg, 1908, p. 119). Approximately 121 leaves. 32 cm. Written in two columns, with comments on sheets. Good-fair condition, wear and restored tears on first and last leaf margins. Manuscript lacking approximately two leaves at beginning. Elaborate leather binding. Estimate: 6000-7000$

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Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim - Original Glosses in the Handwriting of Zvi Hirsch Kalischer - Zvi LaTzaddik

Lot 17: Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim - Original Glosses in the Handwriting of Zvi Hirsch Kalischer - Zvi LaTzaddik

Description: Magenei Eretz, Shulchan Aruch Orach Chaim, Dyhernfurth, 1811]. Printed by Yosef Maya. Ownership inscription on title page: "I can testify that this Magenei Eretz belongs to my father ...Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Kalischer ". The leaf before the title page has a dedication signed by his son "Yehuda Leib Kalischer", who gave this book "which belonged to my father the Gaon with his glosses" to his son-in-law Rabbi Meir Reisner in 1886. Dozens of long scholarly glosses in the handwriting of Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Kalischer. These glosses were copied (partially) and sent to the Vilna printers to print them in the edition of the Shulchan Aruch. The Vilna printers printed only the glosses on Yoreh De'ah under the name of Zvi LaTzaddik, while the glosses on Orach Chaim were not printed in Vilna. The manuscript of that copy reached the JNUL in Jerusalem together with the collection of manuscripts of the Romm publishing house. These glosses on Orach Chaim were printed only in the edition of the Shulchan Aruch HaShalem published by Machon Yerushalayim - the Freidman edition, in the column of a compilation of commentaries from manuscripts, with the name Zvi LaTzaddik. A few of the glosses were printed earlier in the compilation Zechor L'Avraham (Holon, 1991, pp. 151-156). Some of the glosses which were printed in Zechor L'Avraham were omitted for some reason from the edition of the Shulchan Aruch HaShalem (for example, see one of the two glosses on Siman 331, and the interesting gloss in Siman 404 concerning traveling on Shabbat out of the Techum Shabbat in an Eisenbahn = train). The results of examining the original glosses in comparison to the printed version of the glosses portray that 40 of the glosses were printed in the aforementioned books (with minor changes from the original), and more than 15 glosses were not yet printed. (For example, see the glosses in this manuscript in Simanim 11, 120, 124, 127, 248, 311, 325, 330, 333, 338, 340, 350, 362). The famous Rabbi Zvi Hirsch Kalischer (1795-1874), a leading Torah scholar of his times, disciple of Rabbi Akiva Eger and Rabbi Ya'akov Av Beit Din of Leszno, author of Netivot Mishpat, and of his uncle Rabbi Yehuda Leib Kalischer Rabbi of Leszno. Served as Rabbi of Torun without remuneration. Authored the books Moznayim LaMishpat on Choshen Mishpat (Krotoszyn, 1855); Zvi LaTzaddik glosses on Mishnayot and Shulchan Aruch, Even Bochan, Emuna Yeshara, and more. He was one of the first leaders active in inspiring the Jewish people to establish the Jewish settlement and purchase land in Eretz Iisrael, and he published his books Drishat Zion (Tehran, 1866) and Shlom Yerushalayim (Tehran, 1868). His book Drishat Zion was reprinted in several editions after the founding of the Hovevei Zion movement and Rabbi Kalischer is considered one of the spiritual fathers of Hibbat Zion. Many Israeli cities have streets named after him. Rabbi Kalischer was also famous for his great vision of renewing the sacrifices in the temple, a subject which he wrote of in his books and periodicals of that time. He had contact concerning responsa with leading Torah scholars of his times, especially with his friend Rabbi Eliyahu Guttmacher Av Beit Din of Grodzisk Mazowiecki. [2], 300, [3] leaves. 38.5 cm. Good-fair condition, wear and stains, wear damages to several leaves. Detached leaves. Colored edges. Original leather binding, worn and torn. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Manuscript, Chesed L'Avraham on Mishnayot - Rabbi Avraham, Av Beit Din of Tomashpil

Lot 18: Manuscript, Chesed L'Avraham on Mishnayot - Rabbi Avraham, Av Beit Din of Tomashpil

Description: Manuscript, Chesed L'Avraham on Seder Zera'im (Birkot Bikurim), handsome neat writing [with additions in the same handwriting], autographic writing of the author, Rabbi Avraham, Av Beit Din of Tomashpil. 1840. Rabbi Avraham, son of Rabbi Yechiel served for approximately 40 years in the Tomashpil Rabbinate (Podolia region, Central Ukraine) and died ca. 1850. His work on Seder Zera'im is a comprehensive commentary explaining and expounding upon the words of the leading commentaries, Rabbi Ovadia of Bartenura and the Tosfot Yom Tov. This work was finally printed only 30 years after the author died (Chernivtsi, 1884) with the approbations of Rebbes: Rabbi David of Tolna, Rabbi David Moshe of Chortkiv, Rabbi Yitzchak and Rabbi Israel of Sadigura, and others. In the introduction to the printed book, the author's son-in-law Rabbi Ya'akov Shapira Av Beit Din of Vinnytsia, relates that Rebbe Yitzchak Meir of Zinkov, the Apta Rebbe's son, participated in Rabbi Avraham's funeral and afterward at the mourners' home he studied Mishnayot. When the manuscript of this book was brought before him, the Rebbe studied it and claimed, "From this book, it is clear that the author studied Torah Lishma and feared Heaven. The city of Tomashpil does not know what it has lost". 3-129 leaves (few leaves lacking at beginning and end). Approximately 22 cm. Good-fair condition, wear and stains. Non-original semi-leather binding. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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A Sermon for Shabbat Tshuva - a Booklet with Dozens of Leaves Handwritten by Rabbi Yoseph Chaim of Baghdad, Author of Ben Ish Chai

Lot 19: A Sermon for Shabbat Tshuva - a Booklet with Dozens of Leaves Handwritten by Rabbi Yoseph Chaim of Baghdad, Author of Ben Ish Chai

Description: Complete booklet, sermon for Shabbat Tshuva. Autographic handwriting of Rabbi Yoseph Chaim of Baghdad author of Ben Ish Chai. [Baghdad], 1901. At the top of the first leaf: "In the name of G-d we will do and be successful...the sermon I have delivered in the year 1901 on Shabbat Tshuva. G-d in His mercy and kindness has given me the merit and assistance to speak every year Torah Lishma for good life and peace, Amen". At the end of the sermon: "Our eyes shall see and our hearts rejoice at the coming of our Redeemer, the Messiah our Righteous One quickly in our days, Amen. G-d should help us and protect us... Amen". Rabbi Yoseph Chaim of Baghdad (1833-1909), author of Ben Ish Chai and dozens of other important books. Son of Rabbi Eliyahu Chaim, son of Rabbi Moshe Chaim Rabbi of Baghdad. Disciple of Rabbi Abdullah Somech, was famous for his genius and righteousness. After the death of his father in 1859, when only 26 years old, Rabbi Yoseph Chaim succeeded his father is speaking at the Great Synagogue, and spoke there every Shabbat for 50 years. When he spoke on special Shabbatot such as Shabbat Tshuva and Shabbat HaGadol, more than 4000 people would congregate to hear him and he would enthrall the audience for four to five hours while spicing his words with pleasing parables. His sermons were a mixture of halacha and agadda and explanations of verses and agadot Chazal, according to their simple meaning, remez and their hidden meanings. The author of Ben Ish Chai was the leading Torah scholar of his city and the entire country. All the rabbis and dayanim of Baghdad submitted to his authority and he was the unchallenged leader of Babylonian Jews. He studied Torah Lishma, his greatness in revealed and hidden Torah became renowned throughout the world and he was famous for his great holiness. In 1869, he travelled to Eretz Israel to pray at the graves of tzaddikim, and at that time, it was revealed to him from Heaven that his neshama (soul) originated from the neshama of Benayahu ben Yehoyada and therefore he named many of his works after him: Ben Ish Chai, Ben Ish Chayil, Ben Yehoyada, Rav Pe'alim, Od Yoseph Chai, etc. His other books are Leshon Chachamim, Aderet Eliyahu, Torah Lishma responsa (which he printed anonymously), Chasdei Avot, Birkat Avot etc. Approximately 58 leaves, more than 110 written pages, approximately 18 lines written on each page. 13.5 cm. Brittle paper, good-fair condition. Wear and detached leaves. Erasures and additions between the lines, all in the handwriting of the Ben Ish Chai. Enclosed is an authorization by an expert. The content has been printed in his book Teshuva MeChaim, Jerusalem 2009, pp. 230-276. There the sermon was apparently printed according to another manuscript with difference from this manuscript. Estimate: 40,000-50,000$

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Autographic Manuscript - Metek Sefatayim by Rabbi Avraham Avli Yaffe Av Beit Din of Panev?žys - Handwriting and Signature of Rabbi Zundel of Salant

Lot 20: Autographic Manuscript - Metek Sefatayim by Rabbi Avraham Avli Yaffe Av Beit Din of Panev?žys - Handwriting and Signature of Rabbi Zundel of Salant

Description: Manuscript, Metek Sefatayim, novellae and commentary on Tractate Shabbat, by Rabbi Avraham Avli Yaffe. Viekšniai, 1782-1787. Complete volume. Illustrated title page. Autographic handwriting by the author, arranged in two columns [with additions on margins of some pages]. The book was written during 1782-1787: on the title page appears the year 1882 and at the end of the volume is the author's stamp (Leaf 122/2), "By the author...Avraham ben Rabbi Israel Yaffe in the city of Viekšniai and its region". At the omissions at the end of the volume, the author mentions the "Homiletics of Parshat VaYakhel of 1787 and the "Homiletics of Parshat VaYakhel of 1788". At the beginning of the manuscript are two added leaves with novellae on various topics, signed by the author, with dates: Chol HaMo'ed Pesach 1786; the 9th of Av 1890; "This I have delivered on Shabbat Teshuva 1791". Leaves 90-91 have sketches of the boards of the Mishkan (Shabbat Leaf 98). The title page and other leaves have stamps: "Beit Midrash Menachem Zion in the Churva of Rabbi Y. HaChassid", whose library was managed by Rabbi Yosef Zundel of Salant. A long inscription on the title page in the handwriting of Rabbi Zundel. "These books given to Rabbi...Shabtai Rabbi of Viekšniai, as a contribution to the Midrash Menachem Zion... Jerusalem, Zundel of Salant". [Some leaves have other inscriptions in his handwriting: "To Midrash Menachem Zion"]. Other ownership inscriptions by the author's family. Rabbi Avraham Avli Yaffe (died 1820), a Lithuanian Torah genius. Born to his father Rabbi Israel Yaffe Av Beit Din of Joniškis descendant of the author of HaLevushim. After his father's death, his mother moved to New Žagar? [in this book, he writes of his father's writings burnt in the big fire that broke out in this community], and there he began to write this work [on Leaf 92/2, he writes: "Until here I wrote when living with my mother and from here on I wrote here in the community of Viekšniai in 1785]. Served as Rabbi of Viekšniai and its region. Afterward, appointed as Rabbi of Panev?žys and the first rabbi in the history of this important city where famous leading Lithuanian rabbis served. [For more information see enclosed material]. After his death, the manuscript passed on to his son Shabtai Yaffe Rabbi of Viekšniai, who ascended to Eretz Israel and placed it for safekeeping in the Menachem Zion Beit Midrash in the Churva of Rabbi Yehuda HaChassid in Jerusalem. The work was printed according to this manuscript in 1997. [3], 144, [3] leaves. 31 cm. Good condition. The title page is pasted on paper for reinforcement. Stains, minor wear, moth marks. Worn binding. Estimate: 5000-6000$

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Notebook of Torah Novellae by Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach from his Youth

Lot 21: Notebook of Torah Novellae by Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach from his Youth

Description: "Special notebook for the Torah novellae I have written when I was studying or reviewing with my friends"; the 26th of the month of Tevet, 1924 I have begun to write my novellae. Jerusalem, Eretz Israel". Novellae on treatises in Tractate Bava Kama and Bava Batra and "Omissions". The renowned Torah genius Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Auerbach, head of the Kol Torah Yeshiva and a leading Torah authority (died 1994), was born in Tamuz 1910. When writing these novellae in the winter of 1924, he was still a young boy, 14 years old, and yet the novellae in this notebook are on the high level of an adult Torah scholar. His Torah proficiency at a young age does not contradict the youthful joy that apparent in this notebook, such as scribbles and many curly signatures which he signed in many places in the notebook. He mentions things learned in group and quotes others: "...We can explain this according to the words of my father, my teacher...", "My teacher gave a very strained answer...", "Question of Rabbi Akiva Eiger, answered by R' Yeshaya Vinograd...", "and it was answered by Rabbi Gedalya Neiman...", etc. Throughout the notebook, his love for Torah is apparent as well as his love of the novellae he wrote: [such as, "And I have proven from Rashi...if you look well you will find that the answer shows good understanding and knowledge"]. 21 cm. Original black soft cover. Approximately 40 written pages. Most of the leaves are in good condition. Several leaves are torn or scribbled. Estimate: 8000-12,000$

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Torah Or - Kopys, 1836 - First Edition

Lot 22: Torah Or - Kopys, 1836 - First Edition

Description: Torah Or, Part 1, compilation of discourses on Bereshit, Shemot and Megillat Esther. Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi [Admor HaZaken (elder Rebbe) of Chabad]. Kopys, 1836. First edition edited and prepared for print by the Rebbe, author of Tzemach Tzedek [based on a manuscript by Rabbi Yehuda Leib (the Maharil) of Yanovichi, brother of the Admor HaZaken]. Two title pages. First is short and the second is detailed. Part of the text in both title pages was printed in red ink. The Russian government closed the Hebrew publishing house in Tevet 1937, therefore only the first part of the work was printed [on Bereshit, Shemot and Megillat Esther] and not as written in the second title page [i.e. on the rest of the Chumash, Shir HaShirim and on the festivals]. [1], 187 leaves. Last leaf with "list of mistakes and corrections" is lacking in this copy. 20 cm. Good condition. Stains, moth damages. Ownership inscriptions and stamp. Ancient leather binding, damaged. Stephansky Chassidut, no. 610. Estimate: 2000-3000$

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Orach LaChaim - Berdychiv, 1817

Lot 23: Orach LaChaim - Berdychiv, 1817

Description: Orach LaChaim, on the Torah, five parts. By Rebbe Avraham Chaim of ?elechów. Berdychiv, 1817. Printed by Rabbi Irael Beck. First edition. Interesting approbations by Chassidic leaders: Rabbi Levi Yitzchak of Berdychiv [who writes "This book was written by a giant among giants who wrote this work with holy purity"]; Rabbi Israel of Kozhnitz [who concludes "My prayer is always on my lips before G-d our Redeemer, that we shall serve him day and night and gather strength until the day on which he will give us joy just as the days we were afflicted, and he will bring us to his Holy Mountain"]; Rabbi Ya'akov Yitzchak "the Chozeh of Lublin" [who writes: "Although I usually do not conduct myself in greatness, because each person knows his own way and I am neither a Rabbi or a Maggid, however, love changes a person's conduct. Out of my love of G-d... and I also love every Jew and much more so the tzaddikim, therefore I am writing an approbation..."]; Rabbi Avraham Yehoshua Heshel of Apta; Rabbi Chaim of Botosani (author of Siduro Shel Shabbat) and a long introduction by Rabbi Efraim Zalman Margaliot of Brody. 52; 59; 29; 37; 31 leaves. 20 cm. Greenish paper, varying condition, most leaves are in good condition. First and last leaves are damaged and restored. Some leaves have damages to margins with lacking text. Many inscriptions in later handwriting. Handsome leather binding. Rare. Stefansky Chassidut, no. 34. Estimate: 5000-6000$

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Shnei Luchot HaBrit [Shla] - Amsterdam, 1698 - Copy of Rabbi Shmuel Bernstein, Av Beit Din of Amsterdam

Lot 24: Shnei Luchot HaBrit [Shla] - Amsterdam, 1698 - Copy of Rabbi Shmuel Bernstein, Av Beit Din of Amsterdam

Description: Sefer Shnei Luchot HaBrit (Shla) by Rabbi Isaiah HaLevi Horowitz. Amsterdam, 1698. Printing press of Emmanuel son of Yosef Atiash. Illustrated title page (by Avraham son of Ya'akov Hager). Signed inscription indicating that book was given as Mishlo'ach Manot to "great esteemed genius" Rabbi Shmuel Av Beit Din of Greigen, Purim 1804. [The Ga'on Rabbi Shmuel Bernstein, 1773-1839, among leading rabbis of Holland. Son-in-law of Rabbi Ya'akov Moshe Levenstam Av Beit Din of Amsterdam. From 1802 served as Av Beit Din of Greigen (Holland) and from 1815 Av Beit Din of Amsterdam]. [4], 422, 44, [12] leaves. 30.5 cm. Fair condition; stains, wear and moth damage. Ancient leather binding. In letters of Rabbi Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn of Lubavitch (letter II 853) he refers to Sefer HaShla HaKadosh "which was printed in 1698 - numerical value of Nachat [satisfaction], and this is a sign that the revelation of the holy book caused heavenly satisfaction, and in that same year the Ba'al Shem Tov was born... and the Ba'al Shem Tov stated that he was born in the year that the Shla HaKadosh was printed to enlighten the world with inspiration of the Almighty...". Estimate: 3000-4000$

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Mishne Torah Le'HaRambam - Venice, 1665 - Sabbatian Edition, Illustration of Shabtai Zvi Riding a Lion

Lot 25: Mishne Torah Le'HaRambam - Venice, 1665 - Sabbatian Edition, Illustration of Shabtai Zvi Riding a Lion

Description: Mada, Ahava, Zemanim of Yad HaChazaka Le'HaRambam - Students' edition with references and a short commentary. With an appendix of the laws of forbidden foods and the laws of shechita. Venice, [1665]. Sabbatian edition, printed at the climax of the era of the false Messiah Shabtai Zvi, when the rumors of his appearance had spread throughout European communities and were at the peak of their popularity. At the top of the title page is a drawing of an imagined figure of Shabtai Zvi riding a lion [the vision of Shabtai Zvi's appearance riding a lion is mentioned in Sabbatian writings as well as in the "prophecy" of Natan Ha'Azati]. The book's colophon also has a typical Sabbatian sign: "Completed on Rosh Chodesh Tamuz, the year of Mashiach Nagid". The title page and the last leaf with the colophon are extremely rare, since they were usually torn from the book due to their Sabbatian connotations, and are missing from most existing copies. For further information on this edition see: Y. Avida, Sefer Mishne Torah Le'HaRambam as a Textbook, Areshet, Vol. 3, 1961, p. 44; Y. Zana, Inyanei Shabtai Zvi, Sefunot, Vol. 3-4, 1959-1960, pp. 67-69. [6], 32, 37-104, 109-186 leaves. The title page and last leaf exist in this copy. Leaves 33-36, 105-108, are lacking and replaced with handsome scribal writing from the time of printing or shortly thereafter. 23 cm. High-quality paper. Good condition. Stains. Minor wear, tears [some restored] to several leaves, loose leaves, one detached leaf. Inscriptions. Ancient binding, damaged. Estimate: 12,000-18,000$

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Unknown Historical Archive - Sixty Letters by Russian and Polish Rabbis and Rebbes Protesting the Beilis Trial Blood Libel

Lot 26: Unknown Historical Archive - Sixty Letters by Russian and Polish Rabbis and Rebbes Protesting the Beilis Trial Blood Libel

Description: A singular archive of great historical significance containing 60 letters written by Russian and Polish rabbis and rebbes protesting the Beilis Trial in the years 1911-1913. The protest letters were sent to Rabbi Yehuda LeibTsirelson, Rabbi of Kishinev, during the months of Iyar-Sivan 1911, in the framework of Rabbi Tsirelson's initiative to publish a rabbinical protest in the Russian general media. Among the rabbis who wrote the letters: Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer, Av Beit-Din of Slutsk; Rabbi Shlomo Zalman Sender Kahana Shapira, Av Beit-Din of Krynki; Rabbi Eliyahu Meir Feivelson, Av Beit-Din of Kupiškis; Rebbe Avraham Weinberg of Slonim; Rabbi Zvi Yehezkel Michelson, Av Beit-Din of P?o?sk; Rabbi Dov Menachem Regensberg, Av Beit-Din of Zambrów; Rebbe Shmaryahu Noah Schneersohn of Babruysk; Rabbi Eliezer Rabinowitz Av Beit-Din of Minsk; Rabbi Yisrael Ortinberg of Berdychiv; Rabbi Aharon, son of Rabbi Shmuel Kaminker, Av Beit-Din of Zborov; Rabbi Chaim Uri, son of Bezalel HaCohen of Vilna; Rabbi Yehuda Leib Fein Rabbi of Ashmyany ,and others. . The Beilis Trial - The Twentieth Century Blood Libel In April 1911, near Kiev, a corpse of a Christian boy named Andrei Yushchinsky was found mutilated with numerous knife stabs. The investigation of the real identity of the murderer was intentionally distorted by the Russian government which pounced on the opportunity to circulate a blood libel against the Jews. Based on false evidence, a Jew named Menachem Mendel Beilis was accused of murdering the boy and using his blood for ritual purposes, in baking his Passover matzoth. Quickly, the Beilis Trial developed into a "showcase trial" against the Jews. On the setting of Beilis' imprisonment and trial, reactionary extremist organizations called "The Black Hundreds" organized a campaign of incitement against the Jews. The Russian judicial system exerted itself to "prove" the ancient libel that Jews use Christian blood for baking matzoth, and during the trial most of the discussions dealt with investigating the matter of ritual slaughter. Among the discussions, a claim surfaced that even if Jews do not use blood, a Jewish sect called Chassidim does fulfill the custom of using Christian blood for their service. The free world and especially the Jewish world were astounded to realize that the blood libel is still alive in the twentieth century. Protest rallies were organized in many places all over the world and pressure was exerted on the Russian government. On November 10, 1913, after nearly three years of imprisonment, Beilis was acquitted by the jury. In 1917, after the Revolution, an investigation committee was established for the Beilis Affair. The committee found that the government knew the real circumstances of the murder and notwithstanding, staged the trial out of anti-Semitic motives. The Protest of the Rabbis and Rebbes The Rabbinical Protest initiated and implemented by Rabbi Yehuda Leib Tsirelson, Av Beit Din of Kishinev, is almost unknown. This archive of letters pours a singular light on this affair and exposes new obscure details. When reports of the Beilis arrest were published, and the wave of anti-Semitism spread throughout Russia, Rabbi Tsirelson who was already renowned as a foremost Jewish community leader in Russia, published a notice in the Jewish newspapers (such as HaTzfira, HaModia and Hed HaZman). He wrote to the rabbis of all Russian regions that he is planning to publish a letter in Russian newspapers protesting the blood libel, denying that Jews use blood for their rituals and staing that this is a malicious defamation. To expedite the matter, Rabbi Tsirelson requested the rabbis to telegraph the letter to him and write that they agree to sign the rabbinical protest against the blood libel. More than 300 rabbis responded to his call and confirmed that they will sign the letter of protest. Apparently, most sent a telegraph as Rabbi Tsirelson requested, but many others sent him their letter by regular post. That is how this rare collection of letters was created. Many of the rabbis who wrote the letters apologize that they did not telegraph their response as he had requested for a variety of interesting reasons. For example, the telegraph system is under the supervision of hostile elements, or they do not wish to arouse attention to this plan. Rabbi Shimon Ya'akov Gliksberg of Odessa writes along these lines: "I did not send my letter by telegram, not out of miserliness, but because I think that for such an important matter publicity is harmful...and 'the surrounding conditions' are not appropriate for telegrams to come flying from all directions to one central location". A similar thought was written by Rabbi Menachem Karkovsky the Av Beit-Din of Khislavichi (later Rabbi of Navahrudak and Vilna, author of Avodat HaMelech) that a telegraph "will just rouse an unnecessary fuss and it is known that some of "them" are in each city and are also in the post office and it is not a good idea...". Rabbi Yosef Ben-Zion Diamond Av Beit-Din of Yalta (author of Emek HaBacha and Otzar Nechmad) writes "And I send my confirmation to sign my name by writing and not by telegram since here the telegraph tellers are careful about every word and first inform and ask the city minister because our city is in a state of very high vigilance...". The cry and protest of the greatest rabbis in Russia at that time is evident in all the letters in regard to the devious blood libel. Many write with bleeding hearts and express great shock from the persecution of Jews in the manner of the dark Middle Ages. The letters reveal important details from the process of organizing and publishing the protest, as well as the range of opinions regarding the protest, its benefits and the harm that it may cause. Even the rabbis who were doubtful of the results that the protest would yield, supported Rabbi Tsirelson in their letters and relied on his judgment. Some of the ideas presented in the letters were indeed published in the final version of the protest. Some of the letters relate of a similar organization initiated by the Jewish-Russian intelligentsia in Saint Petersburg, intending to publish a letter of protest signed by intellectuals, and that Rabbi Chaim Ozer Grodzinski tried to influence Rabbi Tsirelson to unite his protest with the protest of the intelligentsia circles (Rebbe Shmaryahu Noah of Babruysk and Rabbi Eliezer Rabinowitz, Rabbi of Minsk, were also involved in this matter. The alliance never came to fruition). Since the Chassidic community stood at the hub of the libel, Rabbi Tsirelson called upon Chassidic Rebbes to sign the protest which utterly denied the existence of a Jewish sect which uses Christian blood for baking matzoth. The Slonim Rebbe and the Lubavitcher Rebbes, Rabbi Shmaryahu Noah Schneerson Rabbi of Babruysk, Lubavitcher Rebbe of Kopys and his nephew Rabbi Chaim Yeshaya Schneerson Rabbi of Romny, son of Rebbe Shalom Duber Schneerson of Rositsa and other Chassidic rabbis sent letters to Rabbi Tsirelson. So, for example, Rabbi Eliyahu Lehrman son of Rebbe Chaim of Kro?niewice writes in his letter on an official postcard of his brother Rabbi Simcha Bunim Lehrman who succeeded his father as Rebbe; "I have come as instructed by my brother Rebbe Simcha Bunim, to sign his name for the community's benefit, because his signature will make a great impression in our land as he is one of the most famous rebbes in our region. He succeeded my father...who died in 1911 and our tears have not yet been wiped off our cheeks...". In another letter, Rabbi Avraham Nachman Palievsky of Mezritch writes that he sent a telegram from the city's Rabbi Dov Nachman Shapira as well as a protest letter by the local Rabbi Shlomo Rabinowitz. "But my primary wish is inform you that Rabbi Shlomo is Rebbe of a large community of Chassidim who adhere to his every word...". In some letters, Rabbi Tsirelson underlined in red ink certain sentences that he deemed important, and he also crossed out sections not directly connected to the Beilis Trial. Rabbi Tsirelson - Head of the Rabbinical Commission Rabbi Yehuda Leib Tsirelson (1860-1940), Chief Rabbi of Serbia and Rabbi of the capital city of Kishinev. A prominent leader of Charedi Jewry in Eastern Europe. At the 1900 Rabbinical Conference in Saint Petersburg [with the participation of Rabbi Chaim of Brisk, Rebbe Shalom Ber of Lubavitch, and other leading rabbis] he served as Chairman of the conference and its representative before the government [therefore, in this collection of letters, he is called Head of the Rabbinical Commission]. Later, he was one of the founders of the Agudat Yisrael movement, established in 1912. In 1923, he was elected as president of Agudat Yisrael's first Knessia Gedolah (Great Congress) which took place in Vienna. He held this position for the next two Knessiot as well (in 1929 and 1937). He also served as a member of the Moetzet Gedolei HaTorah and head of Agudat Yisrael in Serbia. After Serbia and Romania merged, Rabbi Tsirelson was appointed as parliament delegate and afterwards as member of the Romanian Senate. He was awarded degrees and honorary medals by the Romanian and Russian governments and due to his connections and influence upon various circles. He succeeded in accomplishing a lot for his Jewish brethren. Besides his many articles about current affairs in the Russian Jewish newspapers, he also wrote many halachic responses for many various places. His works: Atzei Levanon responsa, Gevul Yehuda responsa, Hegyon Lev, Lev Yehuda, Ma'archei Lev. He was killed during World War II when the Germans bombed the city of Kishinev. 60 letters, some written on official stationary, some on postcards. Varied size, overall good condition. Rabbi Tsirelson gave this archive of letters to one of his relatives who immigrated to Eretz Israel a short while before World War II. The archive has never been exposed and never copied and it is offered for sale in its entirety. At the request of the owner, scans will not be provided. More details about the affair can be seen in the enclosed material. Estimate: 50,000-60,000$

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Letter by Rabbi Israel Salant and Letter by Rabbi Eliyahu Chaim Meisel - About Publishing the

Lot 27: Letter by Rabbi Israel Salant and Letter by Rabbi Eliyahu Chaim Meisel - About Publishing the "Tevuna" Compilation - Memel, 1861

Description: A letter handwritten and signed by the renowned Torah genius Rabbi Eliyahu Chaim Meisel and a letter handwritten and signed by the founder of the Mussar Movement, the renowned Torah leader Rabbi Israel Lipkin of Salant. Memel, [1861]. The letters were sent to Rabbi Zvi Binyamin Auerbach Av Beit Din of Darmstadt, regarding Rabbi Israel of Salant's plan to publish the Tevuna compilation. So Rabbi Eliyahu Chaim Meisel writes: "... I have now come for a new matter which in my opinion will find favor in your eyes...that Rabbi Israel Salanter who is now settled in Memel, wishes to publish a weekly booklet full of G-d's blessing and to distribute it among the Jewish people. These booklets will have questions and responses by the Torah leaders of our times, halachic Torah discourses, study of the rules of Torah laws, novellae and explanations of halacha and agadda and the Scriptures. Also, anecdotes and ethical poems to enthuse hearts that wish to cling to God. Rabbi (Israel Salanter) requested me, since he doesn't know Your Honor personally that I come... and ask Your Honor to assist us and send us some crumbs of his dear novellae or Torah discourses and responsa...I have responded to the Rabbi's request and I am beseeching Your Honor and hope that he will favor us and fulfill his request...". On the leaf margins are several lines of another letter handwritten and signed by Rabbi Israel of Salant who himself writes: "Also I ask the Rabbi... Zvi Binyamin...and trust his goodness to fulfill my request and send me as soon as he can his pleasant words...Yisrael of Salant called Lipkin". Rabbi Israel Lipkin of Salant - founder of the Mussar Movement (1811-1883), son of Rabbi Ze'ev Wolf Ben-Aryeh (Lipkin). A prominent Torah genius of his times and the disciple of the disciples of Rabbi Chaim of Volozhin. He passed on his Torah to a chosen group of disciples who spread his Torah in all yeshiva circles until our times: Rabbi Simcha Zissel of Kelm (who established his yeshiva by the guidance of his teacher and rabbi), Rabbi Yitzchak Blazer and Rabbi Naftali Amsterdam. The Saba of Slabodka and the Saba of Novardok were his close disciples as well. He founded the Kollel Perushim in Kaunas, and placed his disciples Rabbi Avraham Shanker and Rabbi Zvi Hirsh Levitan at its head. He stood behind many institutes for strengthening Torah and Mussar study in various countries. During the 1860s, he decided to take action in the countries where the Haskalah movement was rampant, to reinforce Judaism and study of Torah and Mussar. To achieve this, he received German citizenship and changed his attire and language to that of the local population. He lived a few years in Konigsberg and in Memel in Eastern Prussia, and traveled to various places where he spoke in German and brought people closer to Torah and mitzvoth. During those years, Rabbi Israel of Salant made his first public appearances and to honor the Torah, he founded a podium for Torah works and Mussar novellae in the issues of Tevuna which he published during 1861-1862, one of the first Torah compilations of the Torah world. This important letter is a significant document of the activities initiated by Rabbi Israel of Salant to raise the banner of Torah and his efforts to connect between Torah leaders in Germany. Rabbi Eliyahu Chaim Meisel (1821-1912), was celebrated from his youth as a Torah genius and already at the age of eight [!] entered the Volozhin Yeshiva to study Torah from Rabbi Yitzchak of Volozhin. At the age of 19, he was appointed Rabbi of Gródek, his native city, and in 1851, he was appointed Rabbi of Derechin. Later, he served in the rabbinate of Pruzhany and Lomza and from 1873, served for 40 years in the Lodz rabbinate. Was well known as one of the most prominent Torah leaders of his times in Lithuania and Poland and was famous for his exceptional chesed in redeeming captives and saving needy families from starvation. His gravesite in Lodz is popular as a place for prayer and entreaties and for bringing salvation to the Jewish people and to individuals and is constantly covered with notes. The recipient: Rabbi Zvi Binyamin Auerbach (1808-1872), served from 1835-1857 as Rabbi of Darmstadt, Germany. After being pursued for many years by reform circles in the city, he resigned from the rabbinate and moved to Frankfurt am Main where he was devoted to his Torah mission of preparing Sefer HaEshkol for print. He copied this book from ancient manuscripts and printed it with his commentary Nachal Eshkol. In 1863, he was appointed Rabbi of Halberstadt. He became one of the greatest Torah leaders of the Orthodox rabbinate in Germany. 28 cm. Bluish thin stationary. Fair condition, minor tears, tape stains. On reverse side of leaf is the address and damaged post stamps. Estimate: 30,000-35,000$

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Letter on Kabalistic Matters by Rabbi Shlomo Elyashuv, Author of Leshem

Lot 28: Letter on Kabalistic Matters by Rabbi Shlomo Elyashuv, Author of Leshem

Description: Letter regarding kabalistic matters, handwritten and signed by the Mekubal Rabbi Shlomo Elyashuv author of "Leshem", to the Mekubal Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Maharil, author of To'ameha Chaim Zachu. Šiauliai,1906. The second page of the letter has kabalistic inscriptions in the handwriting of Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Maharil. Rabbi Shlomo Elyashuv (1851-1926), "G-dly Mekubal, Master of Secrets, Unique in his Generation, Genius in Knowledge of the Truth... Rabbi Shlomo Elyashuv" (called so by his disciple Rabbi Aryeh Levine in the section of a booklet where he wrote about Rabbi Shlomo), lived in the city of Šiauliai in Lithuania and was considered the greatest Mekubal in Lithuania. Rabbi Shlomo was renowned from his youth for his proficiency in kabalistic knowledge and he prepared most of the Vilna Gaon's kabalistic writings for print. His glosses on the book Etz Chaim were printed in the Warsaw 1891 edition named Glosses of Rabbi Shevach [acronym of Rabbi Shlomo ben Chaikel]. His series of books on kabbalah called Leshem Shvo V'Achlama were printed during 1909-1948, and are basic books for studying kabalistic wisdom. In 1924, he ascended to Jerusalem [together with his daughter and son-in-law, Avraham, Av Beit Din of Homyel, who later changed his family name to his father-in-law's last name. Their only son, Yosef Shalom became famous as the greatest posek of our generation, Rabbi Yosef Shalom Elyashiv] and was greeted with great admiration by the leading Sephardic cabalists in Jerusalem, Rabbi HaSadeh and the disciples of the Ben Ish Chai who heard from their rabbi of the greatness of Rabbi Shevach. Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Maharil, (Otzar HaRabanim 1884), was born in Žagar? in Lithuania. A genius and mekubal, disciple companion of the author of "Leshem". Ascended to Jerusalem in 1909, and later became renowned as one of the greatest kabalistic elders in Jerusalem and was one of the heads of the Sha'ar Shamayim Yeshiva. Author of the 3 volumes of the book To'ameha Chaim Zachu (commentary on Etz Chaim by Rabbi Chaim Vital) and many other books. Died in Jerusalem in Cheshvan 1938. 20.5 cm. 19 rows of his own handwriting. Fair condition, tears to margins and paper folds (without damage to text). Estimate: 10,000-12,000$

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Long Interesting Pamphlet by Rabbi Eliezer Meltzen - Author of

Lot 29: Long Interesting Pamphlet by Rabbi Eliezer Meltzen - Author of "Siddur HaGra Ishei Israel" and "Shvitat HaShabbat"

Description: Long booklet, 10 pages handwritten and signed by Rabbi Yitzchak Meltzen of Kelm and Jerusalem. Sent to his friend Rabbi Shraga Meir Leizerovitch, Jerusalem, [1910s]. Fascinating letter dealing with many varied subjects, Torah thoughts on halacha, mussar and kabbalah. The writer tells of a hidden matter [perhaps about kabalistic actions to bring the redemption] that Rabbi Zvi [Levitan, disciple of Rabbi Israel of Salant] and Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Maharil cautioned not to deal with because "It is a dangerous path, a powerful battle with the opposing party and moreover without anything... by adding holiness and merits, by nothing else". Further on, he brings a story which he heard from the Chafetz Chaim about the Vilna Gaon (an interesting scarcely known story). He also brings an interesting story about something he heard in 1880 from his teacher and mentor Rabbi Israel of Salant, about Rabbi Israel's plan to divide the Talmud to be studied by a number of Torah scholars, and many other interesting matters. In his letter, Rabbi Israel tells of the Rabbis of Eretz Israel. He writes about Rabbi Zvi Pesach Frank [who was a young man at the time], "He is one of the greatest of the Badatz Rabbis here in Jerusalem". He also writes of the Ga'avad of Jaffa [Rabbi Avraham Yitzchak Kook], "He is close to the Chassidim and does not oppose them". He relates of what takes place in the Etz Chaim and Chayei Olam Yeshivot in Jerusalem and more. Rabbi Yitzchak Meltzen (1854-Tishrei 1917, Otzar HaRabanim 10821) was born in Slutsk to his father Rabbi Shmuel, author of Even Shlomo from the Vilna Gaon. He studied Torah with outstanding diligence and became exceptionally proficient in Torah knowledge. Was a disciple of Rabbi Israel of Salant and his Rabbi once said about him that where Rabbi Yitzchak is, books of the Talmud are not necessary. In 1891, he was appointed Rabbi in Kelm. He was a Rabbi in the Radin Yeshiva. One of the Torah scholars who transmitted the Vilna Gaon's revealed and hidden Torah thoughts and was involved in publishing kabalistic books and the Vilna Gaon's books (Imrei Noam) together with Rabbi Aryeh Leib Lipkin Rabbi of Kretinga and with Rabbi Shraga Meir Leizerovitch. In 1906, he ascended to Jerusalem. He wrote halacha and mussar books: Siddur HaGra Ishei Israel, Azharat Shabbat, Shvitat Shabbat, Siach Yitzchak etc. See more about him in Tenu'at HaMussar Vol. 2 pp. 311-318. Recipient of letter: Rabbi Shraga Meir Leizerovitch, born in Kelm ca. 1840. A tzaddik and mekubal, childhood companion and close to the great Lithuanian Cabbalists: Rabbi Shlomo Elyashuv, Rabbi Aharon Shlomo Maharil and Rabbi Aryeh Leib Lipkin of Kretinga (together they published Imrei Noam from the Vilna Gaon. Rabbi Shraga Meir also published Chidushei Aggadot Maharel by Rabbi Aryeh Leib Lipkin to which he attached his book Shraga D'Nehora). In ca. 1890, he arrived in England and served many years in the Chevrat Shas rabbinate. He was close to Rabbi Leibly Chassid of Kelm. In his later years, he ascended to Jerusalem where he died in 1929. 10 pages. 21 cm. Fair condition, stains, wear and tear. The first leaf has damage to text. Estimate: 6000-8000$

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Letter by Rabbi Alexander Moshe Lapidot, Av Beit Din of Raseiniai and Rabbi Yechiel Michel Wolfson, Author of Sfat HaYam

Lot 30: Letter by Rabbi Alexander Moshe Lapidot, Av Beit Din of Raseiniai and Rabbi Yechiel Michel Wolfson, Author of Sfat HaYam

Description: Letter by Rabbi Yechiel Michel Wolfson Av Beit Din of Joniškis and Rabbi Alexander Moshe Lapidot, Av Beit Din of Raseiniai, to Rabbi Yosef Zechariah Stern, Av Beit Din of Šiauliai. Joniškis, Shvat 1885. Letter regarding Rabbi Shraga Meir, son of Reuven Zvi [Leizrovitz] that "never had Torah and livelihood at the same time and now he is in a bad financial state and must accept upon himself the burden of the rabbinate...". Rabbi Yechiel Michel writes a lengthy praise of Rabbi Shraga Meir and requests Rabbi Yosef Zechariah Stern to write to the city of Krak?s (in the Kaunas region) that is seeking a rabbi and recommend Rabbi Shraga Meir as worthy of filling the position. Further on in the leaf, is a letter handwritten and signed by Rabbi Alexander Moshe Lapidot, who at that time stayed in Joniškis, who joins the request to assist Rabbi Shraga Meir. Rabbi Alexander Moshe Lapidot (1819-1906), an outstanding Torah scholar in his time and one of the leaders of the Charedi Jewry in Lithuania, Rabbi Israel Salanter's right hand and one of the founders of the Mussar Movement. Disciple of Rabbi Hirsh Broide of Salant and Rabbi Avraham Abele Pasveler Av Beit Din of Vilna. Son-in-law of Rabbi Ya'akov Benditman Av Beit Din of Boisk. At the age of 17, he was appointed Rabbi of Jonava, and in 1866, became Rabbi of Raseiniai, where he served as rabbi for 40 years until his death. An exceptional Torah genius and one of the greatest rabbis who wrote responsa in his time, he joined current leaders in dealing with the problems confronting Russian Jewry and in reinforcing Jewish bastions in the everlasting struggle of maintaining the Jewish way of life. He was appointed to head the leaders of his generation who were called upon to arbitrate in the dispute of the Volozhin Yeshiva. In his youth, he became close to Rabbi Israel Salanter who greatly influenced Rabbi Lapidot, and became one of Rabbi Salanter's supreme admirers. He defended the Mussar Movement from opposition and contributed significantly to its spreading amongst the Lithuanian yeshivas. He was considered to be Rabbi Israel Salanter's right hand in his great endeavors; and became one of the founders of the Kollel Perushim in Kovne. Jointly with Rabbi Israel Salanter, the Chafetz Chaim and Rabbi Yitzchak Elchanan Spector, he published the Etz Zvi compilation (Vilnius, 1881), about the great virtue of learning and supporting Torah. This compilation was published in the framework of his activities to raise the banner of Torah and change the attitude towards those who study Torah. His attitude towards Torah scholars can be seen in this letter where he writes: "It is fitting to help those who hold the oars of Torah and its great scholars, to help them in their difficult hours...". His work Divrei Emet, first printed anonymously, became one of the most comprehensive Mussar books printed in his times. Rabbi Yechiel Michel Wolfson (Otzar HaRabbanim 9278), a leading Lithuanian rabbi, disciple of the author of Beit HaLevi in Volozhin. Son-in-law of Rabbi Chaim Zalman Av Beit Din of Mir. Served as Rabbi of Selets and Parichi, and for many years as Rabbi of Joniškis. Was renowned for the three volumes Sfat HaYam responsa which was highly esteemed by the leading Torah scholars of his times. See previous item regarding Rabbi Shraga Meir Leizerovitz (1840-1929), a tzaddik and Cabalist, born in Kelm, who traveled to London in 1890 and served there as Rabbi of "Chevrat Shas". 23 cm. Fair condition, stains, tears and folding marks. Glued on a paper leaf for restoration. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Letter by Rebbe Tzvi Hersh of ?omazy to his Wife the Rebbetzin - With Special Regards to his Granddaughter, Wife of the Gur Rebbe Author of Lev Simcha

Lot 31: Letter by Rebbe Tzvi Hersh of ?omazy to his Wife the Rebbetzin - With Special Regards to his Granddaughter, Wife of the Gur Rebbe Author of Lev Simcha

Description: Letter by Rebbe Tzvi Hersh Morgenstern of ?omazy, to his wife the Rebbetzin, on family matters. Biala, [ca. 1910]. Yiddish. In the letter which is addressed to "My modest wife", he mentions his daughter Gittel and a journey to Siedlce to his son "Avremeli". At the end of the letter, Rebbe Tzvi Hersh sends regards to his children and "especially to my granddaughter Ms. Yuta Hena" - Rebbetzin Yuta Hena, wife of the Gur Rebbe author of Lev Simcha. Rebbe Tzvi Hersh Morgenstern of ?omazy (1852-1926, Encyclopedia L'Chassidut Vol. 3, pp. 602-603), third generation of the Kotzk dynasty. Son of Rabbi David Morgenstern, the Kotzk Rebbe, and grandson of Rebbe Menachem Mendel the Seraph of Kotzk. Son-in-law of Rebbe Shlomo Yehoshua Gutterman of Radzymin. Began to serve as the Rebbe of Radzymin at the age of 22. Later moved his court to ?omazy and afterward to Warsaw where he died. His sons-in-law were Rebbe Avraham Weinberg of Slonim - author of Beit Avraham, and Rabbi Nechemia Alter son of the Gur Rebbe author of Sfat Emet. Rabbi Nechemia 's daughter Rebbetzin Yuta Hena (1898-1982), married her cousin, the Gur Rebbe Simcha Bunim Alter, author of Lev Simcha. The son of Rabbi Tzvi Hersh, mentioned in the letter as Avremeli, is Rabbi Avraham Pinchas Morgenstern (born in 1876, Encyclopedia L'Chassidut Vol 1, pp. 133-134), who served as Rebbe in Siedlce and in Warsaw and perished in the Holocaust. On the second part of the leaf appears an ownership stamp. Folded leaf, 21 cm. Good condition, folding marks and a few stains. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Letter by Leading Rabbis - Jerusalem, 1945 - With Signature of the Rabbi of Bi?goraj Before his Death

Lot 32: Letter by Leading Rabbis - Jerusalem, 1945 - With Signature of the Rabbi of Bi?goraj Before his Death

Description: An impressive letter of thanks signed by leading rabbis and rebbes in Jerusalem to the generous woman Ms. Leah Cohen, wife of Dr. Chaim Cohen, on her contribution to the union of Tomchei Achim that was active in helping the ill and lending medical devices. Jerusalem, c.1945. "Thanks to this, we have been successful in saving a large number of needy ill people from death". One of the first signatures and stamps belong to "Rabbi Mordechai Rokeach of Belz" - the Rebbe of Bi?goraj who ascended to Eretz Israel in mid-1944 and died in 1946, father of the current Belzer Rebbe. Handwritten signatures and stamps of Jerusalem Torah leaders and tzaddikim in those days: Rabbi Akiva Sofer Av Beit Din of Pressburg; Rabbi Yitzchak Ya'akov Wachtfogel; Rabbi Zalman Sorotzkin Av Beit Din of Slotzk; Rabbi Shmuel Weingart "Former Rabbi of Fellheim, Germany"; Rabbi Baruch Abba Rakovsky "Rabbi of the Even Israel neighborhood, Ezrat Israel and the surrounding area"; Rabbi Meir Chaim Ungar "Former Rabbi of Lackenbach"; Rabbi Ya'akov Moshe Charlap; Rabbi Yosef Gershon Horwitz "Rabbi in Jerusalem... teacher at the Me'ah She'arim Yeshiva and Talmud Torah"; Rabbi Moshe Chaskin "Rabbi of Priluki formerly of Krekenava"; Rabbi Yosef Meir Kahane "Former Rabbi of Sredneye"; Rabbi Yitzchak Arieli "Rabbi of Knesset Israel neighborhood and its surroundings...founder and teacher at the central Mercaz HaRav Yeshiva"; Rabbi Eliyahu Re'em "Dayan and Torah Authority in Jerusalem"; Rabbi Isser Zalman Meltzer "Rabbi and teacher at Slotzk, Head of the general institute and Etz Chaim Yeshiva"; Rabbi Chaim Yudah Leib Auerbach "Rabbi at the Sha'ar HaShamayim Yeshiva"; Rabbi Aharon Ya'akov Klapfish "Rabbi of ?niadowo and now in Jerusalem". Interesting signature of Rabbi Shmuel Wosner from his youth, who at the time served as "Rabbi of Geula - Even Israel" [signature and stamp. The signature is faded]. Stamps without signature of Rabbi Shimshon Aharom Polonsky, Rabbi Meir Stelnitz, Rabbi Dov Cohen and the Beit Din Tzedek of the Sephardic Community in Jerusalem. 23X34 cm. Good condition. Dark paper. Placed in original wooden frame and glass. Slight damages. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Seder Tefillot L'Rav Amram Gaon - the Copy of the Chafetz Chaim

Lot 33: Seder Tefillot L'Rav Amram Gaon - the Copy of the Chafetz Chaim

Description: Seder Tefillot, Rav Amram Gaon, Parts 1-2, prayers for the whole year with laws and customs, by Rabbi Amram Gaon. Warsaw, 1865. First edition. Seder Rav Amram Gaon is an early prayer book arranged by Rabbi Amram Gaon [head of the Sura Yeshiva in the 9th century], is composed of all prayers for weekday, Shabbat, and festival prayers incorporated with the laws and customs of prayer. This is one of the earliest siddurim, on which were based Spanish, French and Ashkenazi prayer and custom. This work was first printed in this edition by Rabbi Nachman Nathan Koronil, according to an early manuscript on parchment from the holy city of Hebron. On the reverse side of the first title page is an ownership inscription: "To Rabbi Israel Meir ben Rabbi Aryeh Ze'ev HaCohen of Radin" [in the handwriting of his son Rabbi Aryeh Leib]. On the last leaf appears a signature (in pencil) of the Chafetz Chaim: "Israel Meir". This book has arrived from the estate of Rabbi Zvi Yehuda Edelstein ben Rabbi Yerachmiel Gershon Edelstein Rabbi of Shumyachi (1862-1919), author of Ben Aryeh. This book was given to Rabbi Y. G. Edelstein during World War I, when the Chafetz Chaim was exiled together with the Radin Yeshiva to Shumyachi in the Minsk region, where they stayed for two and a half years. At that time, the rabbi of the city was very close to the Chafetz Chaim and in Part 2 of his book, there are several responsa on the topic of Mikva'ot and Aguna, asked of the Chafetz Chaim who requested Rabbi Yerachmiel Gershon to respond. (The Chafetz Chaim said of him that he is a disciple of Rabbi Chaim of Brisk not only in Torah but also in righteousness). Enclosed is a letter by his grandson Rabbi Ya'akov Edelstein, Rabbi of Ramat HaSharon who authorized the sale of the book and writes, "These books which belonged to the Chafetz Chaim when staying in the city of Shumyachi in Russia during World War I passed to the ownership of our grandfather Rabbi Y. G. Edelstein and after that to his son, our father Rabbi Zvi Ya'akov Edelstein who were the rabbis of the city. When we came to Eretz Israel in 1934 our father brought them with him, together with whatever luggage he was able to take and the rest of the books and it was in our home in Ramat HaSharon until now". [4], 55 leaves; [1], 59, [1] leaves. 21.5 cm. Good-fair condition, stains and wear, few moth holes. Elaborate leather binding. Estimate: 30,000-40,000$

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Chok L'Israel with Tehillim - Copy of Rebbe Yeshaya'le of Kerestir

Lot 34: Chok L'Israel with Tehillim - Copy of Rebbe Yeshaya'le of Kerestir

Description: Chok L'Israel, Part 1 Bereshit-Toldot. The book of Tehillim is bound at the end with the prayer Yehi Ratzon said before reciting Tehillim. Piotrków, 1911. This is the copy used by the famous Rebbe Yeshaya'le of Kerestir. Stamps of "Yeshaya ben Moshe, who served the Rebbe of Liska in Kerestir". Signature of his close follower who served him: "Shlomo HaCohen Engel, Tokaj". Signs of much use of the Sefer Tehillim. This book is of special importance, the Chok and Tehillim of the famous Tzaddik, who said many prayers and beseeched G-d on behalf of the People of Israel. Rebbe Yeshaya Steiner (1852-1925), called Reb Yeshaya'le Kerestirer (called after the city of Kerestir in Hungary where he served as rebbe), a very holy person and a wonder-worker, one of the greatest tzaddikim of his generation. Orphaned at a tender age, raised from the age of 12 in the home of his teacher and rabbi the Tzaddik Rabbi Zvi Hirsh of Liska (author of Ach Pri Tevu'a), known already in his youth as a wonder-worker and many came to request that he recite Tehillim for their salvation. When his rabbi died in 1874, Rebbe Mordechai of Nadvirna said "From Heaven it was announced that Yeshaya should succeed the Rebbe of Liska" [Rebbe Yeshaya'le was then in his twenties]. A highly esteemed figure by Hungarian Jewry which swarmed by the thousands to receive his blessing and merit salvation. He would conduct himself with outstanding simplicity and would trouble himself with Hachnasat Orchim to receive the hundreds of people who arrived daily to bask in his court. In his personal stamp as well, he would refer to his yichus as a "meshamesh b'kodesh" of his rabbi, Rabbi Zvi Hirsh of Liska. Renowned for the wonders he brought about for those who applied to him, such as the story of the harmful mice which left Jews' granaries because of his blessing. [Until today, many have the custom to hang his picture as a segula against mice]. His history has been printed in the book Mei Be'er Yeshayahu (Tarnów, 1928). Sayings in his name are also mentioned in this book by his faithful disciple Rabbi Shlomo Engel of Tokaj, whose signature is in this book. [2], 2-468 pp; 62 pp (lacking last leaf of Sefer Tehillim). 15 cm. Good-fair condition, many stains and wear damage to leaf margins, especially to the Sefer Tehillim. Redone and rubbed semi-leather binding. Estimate: 12,000-15,000$

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Midrash Shmuel on Tractate Avot - Signature, Stamps and Glosses of Rabbi Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi, Disciple of the Chozeh of Lublin and the First Rebbe in Jerusalem

Lot 35: Midrash Shmuel on Tractate Avot - Signature, Stamps and Glosses of Rabbi Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi, Disciple of the Chozeh of Lublin and the First Rebbe in Jerusalem

Description: Midrash Shmuel, on Tractate Avot, Rabbi Shmuel di Ozida. Dyhernfurth, [1798]. Printed by the modest woman of valor Mrs. Rechil and her sons Michael, Shimon, Aharon and Yosef Maya. Signature in the handwriting of "Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi". Many stamps: "Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi of Brod" and handwritten glosses [cutoff] - Rabbi Aharon Moshe MiGeza Zvi (1775-1845), one of the greatest Chassidic leaders, disciple of the Chozeh of Lublin and Rabbi Uri of Strzeliska, first of the Chassidim who immigrated to Jerusalem (in 1839), considered the founder of the Chassidic settlement in the Holy City and head of the Kollel of Chassidim. Written on his tombstone on the Mount of Olives are descriptions which are not extant in that generation in Jerusalem: "Here rests the perfect man, our Master Teacher and Rabbi, the renowned Tzaddik Botzina Kadisha MiGeza Zvi". [1] 94 leaves. 21.5 cm. Fair-poor condition, moth damages, wear and tear, detached leaves. Worn ancient binding. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Levush Ir Shushan - Signatures of Rabbi Avraham Borenstein Author of Avnei Nezer and his Brother-in-law Rabbi Binyamin Morgenstern of Kotzk

Lot 36: Levush Ir Shushan - Signatures of Rabbi Avraham Borenstein Author of Avnei Nezer and his Brother-in-law Rabbi Binyamin Morgenstern of Kotzk

Description: Levush Ir Shushan, Choshen Mishpat (Part 5 of the Levushim books). Berdychiv, [1821]. Printed by Rabbi Israel Beck. The stamp of Rebbe "Avraham Borenstein", author of Avnei Nezer appears on the title page. On Leaf 2 appears the signature "Avraham" [using the letter Bet of the page number),,in his own handwriting. Signatures on title page of his brother-in-law Rabbi "Binyamin ben Rabbi S. Morgenstern of Kotzk". Rabbi Avraham Borenstein - the first Sochatchov Rebbe (1839-1890), a leading Torah genius and tzaddik in his times. Son-in-law of Rebbe Menachem Mendel "The Seraph of Kotzk". At the same time he served as Rebbe to thousands of Chassidim, he held the position of head of a yeshiva where he taught his special method of studying Torah [as he writes in the introduction to his books, he received his study method from his father-in-law, Rebbe Mendeli of Kotzk]. Many of Poland's Torah scholars were his close disciples (the Chelkat Yo'av, Rabbi Aryeh Zvi Frumer, the Gaon of Kozieg?owy, Rabbi Avraham Weinberg, author of Reshit Bikurim, and others). His Avnei Nezer and Eglei Tal responsa on the melachot of Shabbat are basic study books in the area of Torah scholarship and halacha. His brother-in-law Rabbi Binyamin Morgenstern of Kotzk (1840-1866, Encyclopedia L'Chassidut, Vol 1, p. 354), son of Rebbe Menachem Mendel of Kotzk and son-in-law of Rebbe Avraham Mordechai Alter of Gur son of the Chiddushei HaRim and father of the Sfat Emet. Was outstanding in his sharp cleverness and highly admired by the Chassidim who saw in him the one who could restore Kotzk to its original greatness. He died at a young age, and people said that had he lived for many years, he would have subjugated the Jewish people to their Father in Heaven". Some of his remarkable letters were printed in the book Si'ach Sarfei Kodesh. 180 leaves (mispaginated), 34 cm. Blue paper. Good condition. Stains. Restored damages to last leaves. New, elaborate semi-leather binding. Enclosed: an expert's authorization identifying the signatures. Estimate: 10,000-12,000$

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Hasidic Psalms of Rebbe Shalom of Shotz (Suceava)

Lot 37: Hasidic Psalms of Rebbe Shalom of Shotz (Suceava)

Description: Psalms, with Rashi and Metzudot commentaries, and the Amarot Tehorot commentary by Rabbi Eliezer Horowitz of Tarnogród.Maramure? -Siget, 1900. Two title pages. Stamps of Rebbe "Shalom Moshkovitz, Suceava region". Rebbe Shalom of Suceava (1878-1958, Encyclopedia L'Chassidut Vol. 3, pp. 661-662), descendent of Rebbe Michal of Zolochiv and Rabbi Meir of Peremyshlyany. A leading rebbe of the last generation, amazingly proficient in all areas of Torah, and a great posek. In his youth, he was ordained by the Maharsham of Berezhany and even lived in his home for nine months to learn the practical application of the Torah. He served G-d in holiness and was a Cabbalist, known as a wonder-worker through his prayers, like a son beseeching his father. Disciple of the Rebbe of Sieniawa and the Belz Rebbes. Served in the Suceava rabbinate from 1903 and was the teacher and Rabbi of Rabbi Meir Shapira of Lublin who initiated the Daf HaYomi. From 1927, served as Rebbe in London. Wrote many books on the Talmud, the Torah and on Chassidut. His greatness and holiness were world-renowned and he was highly esteemed by all the great Rebbes of his generation. His diligence was rare; he would study Torah for hours and hours, stopping only to eat and perform mitzvoth. At the same time, his London home was wide open and people from all circles came to seek his blessing, ask his council and ask him for Torah decisions. In his testament, he promised to awaken Heavenly mercy upon any person who visits his grave, lights two candles for the elevation of his soul and accepts upon himself reinforcement of mitzvah observance or Torah study (he requested that this promise be printed on his gravesite in three languages: Hebrew, Yiddish and English). [10], 8-434,[11] leaves. 21 cm. Brittle paper, fair condition, tears, stains and wear. Several leaves have damages with lacking text. Original binding. New leather spine. Estimate: 6000-8000$

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Shev Ya'akov Responsa - Frankfurt am Main, 1742 - Signed by the Malbim

Lot 38: Shev Ya'akov Responsa - Frankfurt am Main, 1742 - Signed by the Malbim

Description: Shev Ya'akov Responsa, Vol. 1 [Orach Chaim and Yoreh Deah] and Vol. 2 [Even HaEzer and Choshen Mishpat], by Rabbi Ya'akov, son of Rabbi Binyamin Katz [Poprosh]. Frankfurt am Main, [1742]. Separate title page for each volume. Handsome copy in good condition. On the leaf after the first title page is a signature in the handwriting of Rabbi "Meir Leibush Malbim". [Another signature on the title page: "Refael ben Rabbi M---"]. Rabbi Meir Leibush Malbim - [Rabbi Meir Leibush ben Yechiel Michel], (1809-1880, Otzar HaRabanim 13090) - a Bible commentator and one of the outstanding leaders of his generation, proficient in revealed and hidden Torah (studied kabbalah from Rabbi Zvi Hirsh of Zhidachov). In his youth, he wrote the book "Artzot HaChaim" on the Shulchan Aruch which received the enthusiastic approbation of the Chatam Sofer who proclaimed the Malbim an exceptional Torah genius. In all places where he served as Rabbi and where he traversed (he served in Wreschen, Kempen, Bucharest, Kherson, Lencziza, Mogilev and Königsberg), the Malbim was renowned for his uncompromising opposition to the "modernists", maskilim and reform Judaism, and suffered much travail on this accord. During the time he served in the Bucharest rabbinate, he led the resistance against the city's maskilim which ended in a blood libel schemed by his opposers for which the Malbim was imprisoned and sentenced to death. Only after Sir Moses Montefiore intervened on his behalf was his sentence altered to expulsion from Romania. The spreading of the Enlightenment Movement caused the Malbim to devote his skills and much time to writing a systematic commentary on the Bible, in order to explain the depth of Chazal's wisdom and the truth of the Oral Torah. So his famous commentary on the Bible was created. It was accepted in all Jewish circles and merited hundreds of editions. [1], 109; [1], 139 leaves. 32 cm. High-quality paper. Good condition, stains, few moth holes. Minor damage to binding. Estimate: 3000-4000$

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Babylonian Talmud - Munich 1949 - The Shas of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef from the Time he served as Rabbi in Egypt

Lot 39: Babylonian Talmud - Munich 1949 - The Shas of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef from the Time he served as Rabbi in Egypt

Description: Babylonian Talmud - full set. Munich-Heidelberg, 1949. "Published by the Va'ad Agudat Rabbanim of the American region of Ashkenaz". First full edition of the Talmud printed after the Holocaust, by the rabbis of the she'erit hapleita camps in Germany. Colorful title pages designed especially in commemoration of the printing of the Talmud on the burnt earth of Germany, with illustrations of a Jewish shtetl and of a labor camp surrounded by barb wire fences and inscriptions: "Labor camp in Ashkenaz during the time of the Nazis" and the verse "They have almost consumed us in the land and I have not forsaken your commandments". Tractate Beitzah has two signatures of Rabbi "Ovadia Yosef". Some tractates have few glosses in his handwriting and additional glosses written by other writers. Inscriptions of the Chazon Ovadya Yeshiva. According to the testimony of Rabbi Ovadia Yosef's son the Rishon L'Zion Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef, Rabbi Ovadia studied from this Talmud when he served as Chief Rabbi of Egypt (1947-1950) and when he returned to Eretz Israel in 1951, he brought the Talmud with him and studied from this Talmud day and night. Rabbi Ovadia Yosef (1920-2013) was born in Baghdad and at a young age immigrated with his parents to Jerusalem. From his youth, he was extraordinary in his amazing diligence and his astounding genius. He was exceedingly beloved by his teachers, Rabbi Ezra Attiya the head of the Porat Yosef Yeshiva and his other teachers. When still a young man, he began to write books and teach Torah to the public. According to his rabbis' instructions, he traveled to Egypt to serve in the rabbinate which he did with authority in spite of his being under the age of 30. This took place right before the establishment of the State of Israel and in the atmosphere prevalent at that time he suffered greatly from the suspicions of the Egyptian undercover police who followed him about and restricted his movements. (Once, when his eldest son, Rabbi Ya'akove was a two-year-old baby, he took books from his father's library and played with them on the veranda, tearing out pages and throwing them into the street. The police agents saw leaves with Hebrew writing being thrown from the house and suspected that they are espionage communications to the "Zionist enemy" and held the rabbi for investigation. When they entered the house, the police asked Rabbi Ovadia where he hid his arsenal, and he answered them pleasantly that his many books are his weapons and the inkwell with which he writes his religious writings are his arms). When he returned to Eretz Israel in 1951, he served in the Petach Tikva rabbinate. He delivered sermons and discourses in Jerusalem and throughout Israel. At that time he also began publishing the first volumes of his series Chazon Ovadia and Yebia Omer. In 1958, he was appointed member of the Jerusalem Beit Din, and in Tishrei 1965, he was appointed member of the Rabbinical Great Beit Din alongside Rabbi Elyashiv and the elder rabbis of his generation. In 1969, he was appointed Chief Rabbi of Tel Aviv-Jaffa and in 1977 Rishon L'Zion and Chief Rabbi of the State of Israel. Eventually, he reached the status of one of the greatest Torah authorities of his generation and as an unparalleled influential spiritual leader. He was especially famous for his outstanding proficiency in Torah study and for his clear halachic decisions, but his authority and influence were not limited just to halachic issues but spread out over many varied areas pertinent to Jews in Israel and all over the world. Already, in the first years that he served as a young dayan, he was heavily involved in the life of his people and acted to improve their material and religious state and toiled to teach Torah to the masses and to raise the honor and esteem of Oriental Jews in Israel. Returning the "crown of Sephardic Jewry to its former glory" was one of his life's activities and was characterized both in the area of halachic decisions as well as in the area of society and politics. In the framework of this vision, he stood at the helm of Mo'etzet Chachmei HaTorah and navigated the Worldwide Sephardic Association of Torah movement. Rabbi Ovadia left a tremendous literary yield, including his primary series of books: Yebia Omer responsa (10 volumes), Yechave Da'at responsa (six volumes), Chazon Ovadia (18 volumes) and many other books. He died at the age of 93. Tens of thousands came to pay him their last respects and his funeral was claimed to have been the largest funeral in the history of the State of Israel. 19 volumes. 39 cm. Good-fair condition. Some volumes have torn or detached leaves. The illustrated title pages of two volumes are torn (some missing parts). One volume has many tears to the title pages and first leaves. Original bindings, damaged. Enclosed is the authorization by Rabbi Yitzchak Yosef, Rabbi Ovadia Yosef's son, Rishon L'Zion and Chief Rabbi of Israel, testifying that his father brought this Talmud from Egypt and studied from it and also an authorization to sell the Talmud. Estimate: 40,000-50,000$

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Tractate Gittin - Talmud Owned by Rabbi Aharon Yehuda Leib Shteinman, with his Signature and Glosses

Lot 40: Tractate Gittin - Talmud Owned by Rabbi Aharon Yehuda Leib Shteinman, with his Signature and Glosses

Description: Babylonian Talmud, Tractate Gittin, New York, 1951. Published by Va'ad HaHatzala. On the first title page appears the signature of Rabbi "A.Y.L. Shteinman". On the sheet margins are many glosses in his handwriting. Most of the glosses are short, reminders and books mentioned by the rabbi during the discourses he delivered in the yeshivot. The glosses are apparently from 1950-1960, the time he began teaching Torah as Rosh Yeshiva . Rabbi Aharon Yehuda Leib Shteinman was born in Brisk in Lithuania where he studied in a yeshiva. Because of the fear of conscription into the Polish army, he traveled to Switzerland in the summer of 1938 together with his friend Moshe Soloveichik, to study in the Montreux Yeshiva. This move right before the Holocaust proved to be the miracle of survival for these two great Torah figures that impacted the whole generation which built the Torah world in our times - Rabbi Moshe Soloveichik in Zurich, from where he led the Torah world in Europe and Rabbi Aharon Leib Shteinman in the city of Bnei Brak. In 1945, he ascended to Eretz Israel, and after a short while was asked to serve as head of the Chafetz Chaim Yeshiva in Kfar Saba. Later, he moved to Bnei Brak and was appointed head of the Ponovezh Yeshiva Litze'irim. Many Torah leaders and famous rabbis and heads of yeshiva were his students during the 60 years he taught Torah. At a young age, he was already esteemed as an outstanding Torah scholar and the Chazon Ish bestowed upon him much honor. With the passing years, he became famous as one of the leading yeshiva heads. He heads Kollel Ponovezh, the Orchot Torah Yeshivot and Ge'on Ya'akov. His home is a focal point for many yeshiva heads in Israel, who consult with Rabbi Shteinman in matters of education and in leading the Torah world. From the mid-1990s, his leadership is evident in all matters of the Charedi public and Torah world: establishing and supporting networks of kollelim for young men, support and assistance to fundraising campaigns of charity and chesed organizations, leading the Chinuch Atzma'I and Va'ad HaYeshivot and Degel HaTorah. In 1912, Rabbi Chaim Kanievsky published a historic letter in which he writes: "The leadership of the generation is now in the hands of Rabbi Aharon Yehuda Leib Shteinman" and he notes that Rabbi Aharon Yehuda Leib Shteinman is the successor of the path and leadership of Rabbi E.M. Shach and Rabbi Y.S. Elyashiv. This is the Talmud that Rabbi Aharon Yehuda Leib Shteinman used for many years of Torah study and teaching. From the content of the glosses, it is apparent that the Rosh Yeshiva used this volume for delivering his discourses. [1], 116, 23, 34 leaves. (mispaginated). 37.5 cm. Slightly dry paper, fair-poor condition, wear from much use. Detached and torn leaves. Original fabric binding, reconstructed and restored with new spine. Estimate: 6000-8000$

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The Shofar of the Holy Baba Sali

Lot 41: The Shofar of the Holy Baba Sali

Description: Shofar. Bent ram's horn. Sawn adornments on the upper opening. According to testimony, this shofar belonged to Rabbi Israel Abuhatzeira, the Baba Sali. Enclosed are letters of testimony and authorization by Rabbi Shlomo Bussu [the Baba Sali's grandson] and by Rabbi Aharon Zarifi [head of the Teivat Noach Yeshiva in Jerusalem]. Rabbi Israel Abuhatzeira, the Baba Sali, (1889-1984), son of Rabbi Mas'ud, Rabbi of Tafilalt (Morocco), son of Rabbi Yaakov Abuhatzeira. An outstanding Torah genius in revealed and hidden Torah, holy and pure from his youth. Published writings of his grandfather Rabbi Yaakov. Served as Chief Rabbi of Erfoud and its surroundings. In 1950, ascended to Jerusalem, and in 1957 returned to Morocco. In 1964, settled in Eretz Israel in the city Netivot. Great and important people swarmed to his home for counsel and blessings and he was renowned as a wonder-worker. His grandsons are the famous rabbis of the house of Abuhatzeira. Length: 32 cm. The shofar has broken into two pieces and glued (the central part after the break is larger than the measure required for a kosher shofar). Estimate: 20,000-30,000$

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The Walking Stick of Rebbe Menachem Mendel of Stryków

Lot 42: The Walking Stick of Rebbe Menachem Mendel of Stryków

Description: Wooden walking stick. [Europe, 20th century]. This cane was used for many years by Rebbe Menachem Mendel Landau of Stryków. In his second visit to Eretz Israel, in 1935 [a year before his death], he gave the cane as a gift to the Chassid Rabbi Noach Gad Weintraub, a follower of the House of Stryków and author of many books. Enclosed is a letter of authorization from his son Rabbi Ya'akov David Weintraub. Rabbi Elimelech Menachem Mendel Landau - the elder Rebbe of Stryków (1860-1936, Encyclopedia L'Chassidut Vol 1, page 247), member of Mo'etzet Gedolei HaTorah and one of the leading rebbes in Poland. Son of Rebbe Doverish Landau of Biala. After his father's death, he and his brother Rabbi Aharon Zvi stayed at the court of Rebbe Yechiel of Alexander and his son Rabbi Yerachmiel Israel Yitzchak, the Yismach Israel. After the Yismach Israel died without children, the Alexander Chassidim crowned Rabbi Elimelech Menachem's brother, Rabbi Aharon Zvi as Rebbe, however he died after half a year. The Chassidim then clung to his younger brother Rabbi Menachem Mendel and he established his court in the city of Stryków where he became renowned as one of the Charedi Jewish leaders in Poland. Very close to the Jews of Eretz Israel, he encouraged his Chassidim to settle there and visited Eretz Israel twice. Height: 84 cm. Good condition, cracks. Estimate: 10,000-12,000$

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Collection of Items from the Home of the

Lot 43: Collection of Items from the Home of the "Holy Shoemaker" Rabbi Moshe Ya'akov Ravikov

Description: Collection of various items from the home of the "Holy Shoemaker" from Tel Aviv, Rabbi Moshe Ya'akov Ravikov: Tallit and kippah, shoemaking tools from his workshop, scythe for cutting wheat, printed leaves of segulot and protection, pictures, books and parts of books from his library with the stamp [made after his death] "Rabbi Moshe Ya'akov Ravikov". Some books have short glosses. One title page has a signature in his handwriting. Among the books are prayer books and machzorim, kabalistic, mussar and Chassidic books. Stenciled edition of his writings, "Likutei Moshe Ya'akov", printed by his son in one hundred copies, Tel Aviv, 1969. The Tzaddik Mekubal Rabbi Moshe Ya'akov son of R' Yosef HaCohen Ravikov (1873-1967) - the Holy Shoemaker from Shabazi Street in Tel Aviv-Jaffa. A hidden tzaddik, mekubal and wonder-worker. Born in Lithuania, a disciple of Rabbi Shlomo Elyashiv author of Leshem Shvo V'Achlama [the Leshem]. Ascended to Eretz Israel in 1913, and after an unsuccessful attempt to settle in Kfar Uriah in the Judah Plains, moved to the city of Yaffo (Jaffa) and opened a shoemaking workshop. Very soon, disadvantaged people or people who needed good counsel, arbitration or a loan, sought his assistance and salvation. Although he hid himself and his powers, the generation's leaders and mekubalim recognized his amazing righteousness, kept close contact with him and studied from him. It is a well-known fact that the Chazon Ish encouraged him to reveal himself and sent people to receive his counsel and blessings. Another well-known fact is that Rabbi Kook told Rabbi Aryeh Levine that The Shoemaker is one of the "lamed vav" hidden tzaddikim of his generation. Many stories circulated of wonders he performed and his Holy Spirit and during his life he was known to have merited the revelation of Eliyahu the Prophet [this was published in newspapers of those times]. Many people visited his home daily to receive his blessing and accordingly saw deliverance. A few months after his death, the Six Day War broke out, and at that time rumors circulated that in his testament, the Shoemaker saw the War's victories and the enemy's fall. He is buried in Bnei Brak, his grave is renowned as a place of prayer and salvation to this very day and many of those who visit the grave of the Chazon Ish pray by the grave of the Shoemaker as well. Approximately 30 items, amongst them nine work tools (a scythe, a shoemaker's last and punch tools), kippah (worn), a worn and stained tallit. The rest are books, book remnants and single leaves. All the items are in fair-poor condition. Some of the book sections are placed in glass and wooden frames. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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Rebbe of Kaminka-Myropil - Collection of Items: Manuscripts, Objects and Documents

Lot 44: Rebbe of Kaminka-Myropil - Collection of Items: Manuscripts, Objects and Documents

Description: Collection of items from the estate of Rebbe Shmuel Kaufman-MeRabbeinu, "the tzaddik of Myropil". The collection includes: * four volumes handwritten by Rebbe Shmuel, novellae and thoughts on the Torah and the Talmud [printed in 1996 by his grandson in the book Tiferet Shmuel Vol. 2]. * Photograph of the Rebbe in his later years and photographs of his and his wife's gravesites. * Polish passports [of his daughter and son-in-law], applications for visas to the USA for the Rebbe's family from 1922, recommendations, letters and other documents related to his immigration to the US. * Letter regarding the decision to appoint the Rebbe as Rabbi of the "Nechamat Yerushalaim" community in New York for two years. * A stamp seal for paper with the Rebbe's name [in English]. The MeRabbeinu family descends from Rabbi Yehuda Hanasi and hence their family name. "The Brothers from Kaminka" were among the Ba'al Shem Tov's beloved disciples. Rabbi Shmuel Kaufman, son of Rebbe Avraham David of Myropil, Wo?y?, Ukraine), succeeded his father as Rebbe and in 1923 immigrated to the US and established his court in New York where he became renowned by the name "The Tzaddik of Myropil". Most of his writings remained in Russia and were lost. Some of his novellae were printed in the "Pardess" periodical as well as in his book "Tiferet Shmuel" which he printed in New York in 1926. The last Rebbe of the Kaminka- Myropil dynasty, his son R' Moshe did not continue serving as Rebbe. Died in 1938. 4 handwritten volumes. Approximately 15 paper items. 4 photographs. Seal. Varied size and condition. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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A Pair of Silver Tefillin Boxes for Miniature Tefillin - Polotsk, 1870

Lot 45: A Pair of Silver Tefillin Boxes for Miniature Tefillin - Polotsk, 1870

Description: A pair of boxes for miniature tefillin. Polotsk (Russia),1870. Silver (marked and dated, city mark and assayer's mark); cast, cut and engraved. Square boxes, with hinged bases that open and close. The sides and bases are adorned with flowers and frames in geometric patterns. Inscriptions on top of the boxes: Shin Yud = Shel Yad; Shin Resh = Shel Rosh. Size of box: 2X2 cm. size of base: 3.5X5 cm. Estimate: 6000-8000$

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Spice Tower - Ukraine / Poland, 19th Century

Lot 46: Spice Tower - Ukraine / Poland, 19th Century

Description: Spice tower. Ukraine or Poland, [c. 1840]. Silver (marked). Designed like a tower with four sides, at the top of the turret is a flower shaped decoration. Engraved on its body are floral and animal decorations (leopard, eagle, deer and lion), according to the saying in Pirkei Avot "Be bold as a leopard, light as an eagle, swift as a deer and mighty as a lion to do the will of your Father in Heaven". Height: 23 cm. Estimate: 10,000-12,000$

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Silver Torah Shield - Vienna, First Half of 19th Century

Lot 47: Silver Torah Shield - Vienna, First Half of 19th Century

Description: Torah Shield. Vienna, Early 19th century [c. 1810-1819]. Silver (marked), cast and engraved. Set with gems. In the center of the plate are the Two Tablets of Law, inscribed with the Ten Commandments. Above the Tablets is a Torah Crown. The figures of Moses and Aaron and a pair of lions adorn the sides. A vase of flowers and adornments of branches with leaves. Small compartment with a window for changing plates with names of festivals [four plates are enclosed with two-sided inscriptions: Shabbat, Rosh HaShana, Yom HaKippurim, Chag HaSuccot, Chag HaMatzot, BeChag HaPesach, Chag HaShavuot]. Colored glass stones are set in the crown. Five coral gems are set in other places [two gems are missing]. Original chains for hanging are connected to top of the shield. Height: 32 cm. Width: 26 cm. Estimate: 40,000-50,000$

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Magnificent Hanukkah Lamp - Eastern Europe, 19th Century - Unique Architectural Model

Lot 48: Magnificent Hanukkah Lamp - Eastern Europe, 19th Century - Unique Architectural Model

Description: Silver Hanukkah lamp. [Eastern Europe. Poland?], 19th century. Unique model evidently made by private order of a wealthy Jew. Silver (unmarked), various techniques. Impressive artistic silversmith work. Especially wide back panel, designed as an architectural model of the front of a fancy structure with a gate and arched windows. Possibly, made inspired by a known building (such as a synagogue or Beit Midrash). At the center of the wall is a wide opening, flanked on both sides by four windows with doors and blinds which can be opened and closed. Pillars screwed unto the wall constitute a division between the doors and the windows, the two middle pillars are rounded and designed with leaf and floral patterns; the right pillar has place for the Shamash (missing). The openings (the gate and the windows) are cut from the back panel, and upon them are screwed decorated frames. At the top of each adorned frame stands an eagle. The top of the panel is bordered by a floral strip and a grated fence. At the front appears an oval tray. In its center stand cup-like oil fonts. Clearly, much thought was invested in every detail of this Hanukkah lamp. Even its back is carefully designed and handsomely adorned [possibly, the artist's thought was that this way, since a Hanukkah lamp is usually placed by a window facing the street, the members of the household who see its back can enjoy its beauty as well]. The second side of the back-panel is covered entirely with attractive engravings, like a carpet of flowers and leaves. Even the ends of the screws are covered with nuts designed like flowers and incorporated in the floral carpet. The panel is supported in the back all along its width by two gilded reinforcement strips. Height: 22 cm. Width: 48 cm. Good condition. Several missing nuts. Lacking Shamash (serving light). Estimate: 25,000-30,000$

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Eleven Honorary Keys Given to Contributors to Synagogues, Yeshivot and Jewish Institutes - England and the USA, 1927-1975

Lot 49: Eleven Honorary Keys Given to Contributors to Synagogues, Yeshivot and Jewish Institutes - England and the USA, 1927-1975

Description: Eleven Honorary Keys made of silver and brass, with engraved decorations and dedications. Given to contributors to synagogues, yeshivot and Jewish institutes in the USA and England during 1927-1975. ~ Five Honorary Keys given on behalf of communities and institutes in the USA: 1927-1944: 1. A large key, given on behalf of the Ohav Emeth community (New Jersey, USA). On one side is the inscription "Donated by Mr & Mrs Freund" and in the other side: "To The Cong. Ohav Emeth Anshe Ungarn, September 11, 1927". Cast brass. Length: 33.5 cm. 2. Key, given to Lazerus and Ethel Greenhill, on behalf of the Hebrew Ladies Home For Aged in Brooklyn, New York. October 16, 1927. At the end of the key is a Star of David with an engraved decoration and the inscription "Moshav Zekenim" (Hebrew). Cast brass. Length: 15.5 cm. 3. Key to the side entrance of the synagogue of the Beth Tfiloh community in Baltimore, March 6, 1927. Given to Oscar Caplan (?). Silver (unmarked). Length: 15.5 cm. 4. Key, given as a token of appreciation to Philip Rosenthal and his wife, on behalf of the Bialystoker Home for the Aged in New York. September 24, 1944. At the end of the key is a Star of David. Cast brass. Length: 21 cm. 5. An especially large key, at its end is a Star of David (without a dedication). Cast brass. Length: 36 cm. ~ Six Honorary Keys made of silver, given to the brothers Arthur and Walter Hubert on behalf of yeshivot and Jewish communities in England, 1969-1975: 6. A key given to Arthur Hubert on behalf of the Jewish community of Whitefield (Manchester), in honor of the opening of the community's synagogue, April 27, 1969. Silver (marked). Length: 10.5 cm. 7-8. Two different keys given on behalf of the Gateshead Yeshiva - Beit Yosef in England, in honor of opening a new lecture hall, November 19, 1972. One was given to W. [Walter] Hubert, and the other was given to A. [Arthur] Hubert. Silver (marked). Remnants of gilding. Length: 11 cm. The Gateshead Yeshiva (near Newcastle, England), one of the largest most prominent yeshivot in Western Europe, was founded in 1929. During the Holocaust, the yeshiva was a haven for hundreds of young men from Germany who received visas to enter England following the yeshiva's request. 9-10. Two keys to the Hubert Wing of the Manchester Yeshiva, given to Arthur Hubert on January 14, 1973. Silver (marked). Remnants of gilding on both. Length: 13 cm. 11. Key given on behalf of the Jewish Hillock community (Manchester) to Arthur and Walter Hubert, in honor of the opening of the community's synagogue, October 19, 1975. Length: 9 cm. Arthur Hubert was born in Schlüchtern (Germany), son of a family who traded in metals. After the Kristallnacht, he was sent to the Buchenwald concentration camp. After liberation, his family moved to Frankfurt, where his younger brother Walter studied at the Philantropin School. Later, they moved to England. In 1948, Arthur founded his own business and following the economic success of his business, began a widespread philanthropic career. He and his brother contributed funds to yeshivot, synagogues and many Jewish organizations. Total of 11 keys. Good condition. Estimate: 8000-10,000$

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Lot 50: "The Great Dress" - Bridal Attire - Morocco

Description: Bridal attire, called the "Great Dress" [El-Keswa El-Kbira / Barbariska]. Morocco (Rabat or Tangier), [late 19th century / early 20th century]. These elaborate clothes called El-Keswa El-Kbira - The Great Dress - arrived in Morocco with the Spanish Jews who settled in the north of the country. They served the woman at her wedding and after her marriage were worn on festive occasions and on Jewish festivals. The apparel is made of four parts: a large wrap-around skirt, a vest, a breastplate and another chest adornment, all made of crimson velvet fabric and decorated with gold embroidery and golden ribbons. * The skirt, called a Zaltita (derived from the Spanish word giraldeta, meaning encompassing, is cut from several parts sewn together like a fan. The skirt is adorned with golden ribbons and golden embroidery on its lower corners. The width of the skirt along its bottom is 310 cm. * The vest, called a Gombayz, has short sleeves. Along the opening at the front is a row of metal buttons. The neck opening, the shoulders and the shoulder blades are ornamented with golden ribbons. 50X75 cm. * The breastplate, cut like a small tallit, called Katef in Arabic and Ponta in Spanish, is adorned with golden embroidery in vegetal patterns (on a cardboard lining). This part is the most elaborate and costly part of the whole attire therefore decorated by the most exclusive embroidery. 45X50 cm. * Another adornment, also with rich golden embroidery, apparently also used to decorate the chest area. 42X60 cm. Overall good condition. Some of the golden ribbons are detached. Damage to velvet. Minor tears and damage. Literature: 1. The Lives of the Jews in Morocco, Aviva Muller-Lantzet (editor). The Israel Museum, 1983 (second edition), pp. 200-203. 2. Morocco, Jews and Art in a Muslim Land, Vivian B. Mann (editor), published by Merrell and the Jewish Museum of New York, 2000, pp. 134-136, 174-176. Estimate: 4000-5000$

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