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Auction Description for Auctionata: Fine Asian Art
Viewing Notes:
A preview at Auctionata on March 24/25 is only possible by prior appointment.

Fine Asian Art

by Auctionata


73 lots with images

March 28, 2014

Live Auction

Franklinstrasse 13

Berlin, 10587 Germany

Phone: +49 30 9832 0222

Fax: +49 30 20239 2169

Email: sales@auctionata.com

73 Lots
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Singed Ivory Netsuke of a Group of Monks with Dragon, Meiji

Lot 1: Singed Ivory Netsuke of a Group of Monks with Dragon, Meiji

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Description: Auction announcements 20 March 2014 Shipping of this lot is only possible within the European Union. Ivory, carved from a single piece Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Artist signature on red lacquer inlay Himotoshi on the underside An amusing carving of numerous monks With a dragon in their midst Lively detail and partly open work Underside carved with clouds Dimensions: 5 x 7 cm (H x B) Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Large ivory netsuke with a beautiful patina and extremely fine carving This detailed netsuke was carved in Japan during the Meiji period (1868-1912) and is made from one piece with partly open work. It shows an amusing carving of numerous monks. Each is holding a Buddhist text or an attribute. A dragon can be seen in their midst. The vivid details and the fine representations of clouds underneath exemplify the high quality of craftsmanship with an extraordinary attention to detail. The artist's signature 'Koumyou' on a red lacquer inlay as well as the himotoshi (cord holes) can be seen on the underside. The beautiful patina completes the detailed work. The netsuke is in very good condition with minimal signs of wear consistent with age, such as barely visible loss of material to the dragon's head. The height measures 5 cm and the width 7 cm. Japanese Netsuke Japanese netsuke are small carvings hung on cords as a counterweight to the sagemono ("hanging container") that were attached to the belt of pocket-less Asian clothing. This enabled the wearer to carry small objects like pipes, tobacco, money or other personal belongings. Netsuke were initially made out of root wood, other materials also used were ivory, whale and walrus teeth, boxwood, bamboo and staghorn, among others. A variety of mythological symbols, especially the Seven Lucky Gods, were depicted, as well as animals, flowers, fruits and everyday objects and scenes. Netsuke originated in the late 17th century with the strengthening of the middle class and remained in use until the 1880s, when the kimono went out of style as an item of everyday clothing.

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Bronze Figure of Hotei with His Bag and Lotus, Japan, Meiji

Lot 2: Bronze Figure of Hotei with His Bag and Lotus, Japan, Meiji

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Description: Bronze Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Expressive face Fine patina Flowing robe Removable lotus Height: 27cm Good condition Provenance: from a Austrian private collection Cheerful representation of the lucky god Hotei, bronze with dark and red-brown patina This bronze figure represents Hotei, the Japanese god of contentment and bliss, and was crafted in the Meiji Period (1868-1912). Hotei is one of the seven Lucky Gods (Shichi Fukujin), mostly represented, as is the case here, as a monk with a large belly and broad smile. Hence, he is also often called 'laughing Buddha'. In his left hand he holds a stick and his bag, which contains presents for children and the poor. A removable lotus can be found in his raised right hand. The figure has a cheerful facial expression with squinting eyes and bushy eyebrows. The flowing robe leaves the belly and the chest uncovered. The dark and reddish brown patina gives the figure an appealing charm. The bronze figure is in good condition with signs of wear consistent with age. A rear dent and some patina wear here and there are visible. The height without lotus measures 27 cm. The total height is 41 cm.

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Izuka Toyo, Gold Iro-e Taka Maki-e Inro Suite, 18th C

Lot 3: Izuka Toyo, Gold Iro-e Taka Maki-e Inro Suite, 18th C

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Description: Iro-e taka maki-e and nashiji Japan, 18th century Izuka Toyo (1725?-1790) - Japanese lacquer artist Underside (chi) with signature Finely worked in multicolored high relief Figural netsuke With an oni fighting a dragon Dimensions: 7 x 5 x 1.5 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A delicately crafted inrō decorated with a dragon as a symbol of power and strength This two case inrō by Izuka Toyo (1725?-1790) is finely worked in iro-e taka maki-e. The background is decorated in gold sprinkled black lacquer. The front is adorned with a delicate relief depicting an oni fighting a dragon - a symbol of power and strength. The beast's scaly body and expressive face are rendered with great skill. The back shows a full moon with a wave decoration in relief. The underside (chi) bears the artist's signature. A black and gold netsuke in the form of a cat is attached to the cords. The omije is made of amber. The inrō is in very good condition with hardly any signs of wear. There is only minor losses of color in a few areas. It measures 7 cm in height, 5 cm in width and 1.5 cm in depth. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke.

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Signed Black Lacquer Inrō Suite with Samurai, Edo

Lot 4: Signed Black Lacquer Inrō Suite with Samurai, Edo

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Description: Iro-e taka maki-e Japan, Edo Period (1615-1867) Underside (chi) with signature 'Koman' Finely worked in gold lacquer on a dark ground Wife welcoming home her Samurai husband and his attendant Wooden manju netsuke Dimensions: 9.5 x 5 x 2.7 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A beautiful inrō with a fine figural scene This four case inrō is finely worked in iro-e taka maki-e. The interior is decorated in nashiji. The front and back are adorned with one continuous scene depicting a wife welcoming her Samurai husband and his attendant. A pine tree - as a symbol of longevity - rises against the dark background behind the young woman. The fine relief is rendered with great skill and the lavish robes of the figures are meticulously incised with delicate patterns. The underside (chi) bears the artist's signature. A wooden manju netsuke decorated with fans in black and gold is attached to the cords. The omije is made of amber. The inrō is in very good condition with hardly any signs of wear. It measures 9.5 cm in height, 5 cm in width and 2.7 cm in depth. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke.

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Signed Nikkosai Taka-Zogan Inrō, Ex Tomkinson Collection, Edo

Lot 5: Signed Nikkosai Taka-Zogan Inrō, Ex Tomkinson Collection, Edo

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Description: Iro-e taka-zogan Japan, Edo Period (1615-1867) Underside (chi) with signature 'Nikkosai' and Tomkinson collection label Finely worked metal inlaid lacquer Samurai kneeling under a pine tree Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.5 cm Very good condition Provenance: formerly Michael Tomkinson collection, thereafter German private collection An exquisite inrō, which exhibits the virtuoso craftsmanship of Japanese art This four case inrō by the master lacquer artist Nikkosai is finely worked in taka-zogan with nashiji on the inside. The front and back are adorned with one continuous scene depicting a samurai kneeling under a pine tree - as a symbol of longevity - greeting an equestrian figure crossing a bridge over a river. Only at second glance one discerns a dragon swimming in the heaving water. The inlaid figures are rendered in high relief with great love to detail. The background is decorated in gold maki-e. The underside (chi) bears the artist's signature and the Tomkinson collection label. The plain omije (later) is colored in gold. The inrō is in very good condition with hardly any signs of wear. It measures 8.5 cm in height, 5.5 cm in width and 1.5 cm in depth. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke.

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Signed Nikkosai Taka Maki-e Four Case Inrō with Fuji, Edo

Lot 6: Signed Nikkosai Taka Maki-e Four Case Inrō with Fuji, Edo

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Description: Taka maki-e Japan, Edo Period (1615-1867) Underside (chi) with signature 'Nikkosai' Finely worked in relief Cockerels and Mount Fuji Dimensions: 8.5 x 5.5 x 1.7 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A beautifully worked inrō with highly a symbolic subject matter This four case inrō by the master lacquer artist Nikkosai is finely worked in taka maki-e with nashiji interior. On side shows a cockerel and a hen with their chicks under a bamboo by a mountainous seashore. The rooster is the tenth animal in the Chinese zodiac and symbolizes pride and renown. The plumage is depicted in incredibly delicate relief - every single feather seems to be accurately rendered. The other side shows a hut by a lake with Mount Fuji - a favorite motif in Japanese art - rising in the background. The underside (chi) bears the artist's signature. A small malachite colored omije is attached to the cords. The inrō is in good condition with minor signs of wear. The color is a little rubbed here and there with minor nicks. It measures 8.5 cm in height, 5.5 cm in width and 1.7 cm in depth. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke.

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Signed Taka-Zogan Inrō Suite with Ivory Inlays, Edo

Lot 7: Signed Taka-Zogan Inrō Suite with Ivory Inlays, Edo

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Description: Iro-e taka-zogan Japan, Edo period (1615-1867) Underside (chi) with signature 'Nobuya' or 'Hiroya Saku' Elaborately worked with metal and ivory inlays Shogun sharpening a sword Dimensions: 10 x 7 x 2.5 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A fine inrō with magnificent inlays This five case inrō and is elaborately worked in iro-e taka-zogan on a maki-e ground with nashiji interior. The front shows a shogun sharpening his sword with the help of an attendant. The faces and hand are meticulously inlaid with ivory. The lavish garments are finely decorated with various patterns. The reverse shows an abstracted landscape with two foxes - as harbingers of good fortune - also inlaid with ivory. The underside (chi) bears the artist's signature. The wooden manju netsuke is decorated with gold lacquer depicting chrysanthemums and can be opened. The omije is made of agate. The inrō is in good condition with signs of wear. The color is a little rubbed here and there and there are a few scratches. It measures 10 cm in height, 7 cm in width and 2.5 cm in depth. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke.

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Kakosai Shozan, Shibayama Gold Lacquer Four Case Inro, Meiji

Lot 8: Kakosai Shozan, Shibayama Gold Lacquer Four Case Inro, Meiji

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Description: Auction announcements 20 March 2014 Shipping of this lot is only possible within the European Union. Shibayama lacquer Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) Kakosai Shozan - Japanese lacquer master of the early 19th century Underside (chi) with signature 'Kakosai', red jar seal and mother of pearl inlaid signature Elaborately worked in relief Seven mon of the Seven Lucky Gods of Japan, one with an extremely fine inscription Dimensions: 9 x 5 x 1.7 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An extraordinary inrō inlaid with the finest materials depicting the Seven Lucky Gods of Japan This four case inrō by the Japanese lacquer master Kakosai Shozan is elaborately decorated with shibayama inlays of mother of pearl, horn, ivory and coral, with nashiji interior. Both sides show mon with the Seven Lucky Gods - Hotei, Jurōjin, Fukurokuju, Bishamonten, Benzaiten, Daikokuten and Ebisu. They are each depicted with their respective attributes. One shows an extremely fine inscription. The underside (chi) bears a signature in gold, a red jar seal and a mother of pearl inlaid signature. The ivory omije is also meticulously carved with the faces of the deities and bears a signature in red. The inrō is in very good condition with minor signs of wear. The color is a little rubbed here and there. It measures 9 cm in height, 5 cm in width and 1.7 cm in depth. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke. Shibayama Shibayama is an inlaying technique from the 18th and 19th centuries, named after a Japanese artist family. The technique uses natural materials like mother-of-pearl, turquoise, coral, horn inlayed in wood or ivory. This type of artistry was at the peak of its popularity in the 19th century. Objects of all sorts - from cases to jewelry boxes and swords - were decorated using this technique. Meiji-period artworks are particularly in demand with collectors.

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Kinkozan Satsuma Earthenware Miniature Vases, Japan, Meiji

Lot 9: Kinkozan Satsuma Earthenware Miniature Vases, Japan, Meiji

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Description: Satsuma ceramic, hand-painted and glazed Kinkozan, Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) One base with four character signature of Kinkozan Finely enameled with panels of Samurai Rich blue ground applied with gilt foliate scrolls Height: each 12.5 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Highly detailed figural scenes with gold and enamel colors on a deep blue ground catering to a European taste This pair of Japanese earthenware vases dates to the Meiji period (1868-1912) and was made in the historical province of Satsuma. They were made in the Kinkozan manufactory and have a characteristic royal blue and ivory glaze. Two panels with depictions of samurai gathered at a social event are rendered in fine painting. Each figure is seated on a mat on the floor of a room. In the background of one panel a folding screen with a crane is visible. On the other reserve, the figures are represented while eating and drinking. The same representations are found both vases. The gold decoration of the precious vases shimmers magnificently on the distinctive Kinkozan or royal blue. The scenes as well as the surrounding glaze show a multitude of golden ornaments such as foliate scrolls. The fine craquelure, characteristic of Satsuma ware, is clearly visible. One base is marked with the four character signature of Kinkozan. The two vases are in very good condition with slight signs of wear consistent with age. The four-character mark of one vase is rubbed off. The height of each measures 12.5 cm.

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Komai Gold Inlaid Miniature Box and Cover, Meiji

Lot 10: Komai Gold Inlaid Miniature Box and Cover, Meiji

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Description: Gold inlaid brass Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Manufacturer: Komai Base etched with a scene of Mount Fuji and a seal mark Hinged cover exquisitely worked with a phoenix Leaf-shaped vignettes of exotic landscapes on a vine-strewn ground Fitted with a drawer on four cabriole feet Dimensions: 6 x 7 x 5 cm (height x width x depth) Excellent condition Provenance: from a German private collection Desirable miniature box with motifs accented in gold, made for export This Japanese brass miniature box and cover was made by the Komai company during the Meiji period (1868-1912). The box is decorated with gold inlays and stands on four curved feet. The rectangular body can be closed with a hinged lid, which is decorated with an exquisitely worked phoenix. Inside further, finely incised decoration are visible. Leaf-shaped vignettes of exotic landscapes on a vine-strewn ground and flowers in cartouches adorn the entire wall. The front drawer has a flower-shaped knob and a scene of the Fuji volcano adorns the front and the base. The latter shows an etched seal mark between cranes. The miniature box is in excellent condition with only minimal age-related signs of wear. The height measures 6 cm, the width 7 cm and the depth 5 cm. Komai The Komai company was presumably founded in 1841, but it was under the direction of Komai Otojiro that the company began to produce its famous works with textured inlays in gold and silver, a technique called nunome-zogan 布目象嵌. Komai Otojiro became acquainted with various inlay techniques when training under a sword-fitting artisan. From 1873 onwards he began to produce decorative damascened ironware, aimed at the export market. His delicate and highly detailed work was well received abroad and shown at foreign exhibitions, such as the Nuremberg Metalwork Exhibition of 1885. Soon other artisans in Kyoto began to produce similar objects. In 1906 Otojiro's son took over the company and continued to produce intricate inlaid objects of gold and silver set into iron until 1912. The Komai workshop is considered a pioneer of damascene work and the distinctive style of the Komai family essentially defined the art of metalwork in the Meiji Period.

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Komai Metal Miniature Box and Cover with Gold, Meiji

Lot 11: Komai Metal Miniature Box and Cover with Gold, Meiji

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Description: Gold inlaid metal Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Manufacturer: Komai Base incised with floral sprigs and seal mark Depicting an exquisite exotic landscape scene Vine-strewn ground typical of Komai style Width: 6 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Very finely handcrafted miniature box with lush elements, accented in gold This Japanese miniature box with cover by the Komai company was made during the Meiji period (1868-1912). It is made of metal with inlays of gold. The oval body stands on four curved feet and can be closed with the matching cover. The latter is decorated with an exquisitely detailed landscape scene with the Fuji volcano in the background. The wall of the box is adorned with dense foliage, which represents the typical Komai style. Borders of vines, meanders and flowers also adorn the wall and cover. Inside further bird and flower representations are engraved. On the base, next to the flowers branches, the incised Komai seal mark is visible. The box is in very good condition with hardly any signs of age and wear. The width measures 6 cm. Komai The Komai company was presumably founded in 1841, but it was under the direction of Komai Otojiro that the company began to produce its famous works with textured inlays in gold and silver, a technique called nunome-zogan 布目象嵌. Komai Otojiro became acquainted with various inlay techniques when training under a sword-fitting artisan. From 1873 onwards he began to produce decorative damascened ironware, aimed at the export market. His delicate and highly detailed work was well received abroad and shown at foreign exhibitions, such as the Nuremberg Metalwork Exhibition of 1885. Soon other artisans in Kyoto began to produce similar objects. In 1906 Otojiro's son took over the company and continued to produce intricate inlaid objects of gold and silver set into iron until 1912. The Komai workshop is considered a pioneer of damascene work and the distinctive style of the Komai family essentially defined the art of metalwork in the Meiji Period.

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Single Case Inrō with Shibuichi Inlaid Bronze, Meiji

Lot 12: Single Case Inrō with Shibuichi Inlaid Bronze, Meiji

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Description: Gold, silver and copper inlaid bronze Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) With a scholar and his student Detailed landscape Attached to the obi through himotoshi (cord holes) on the sides Dimensions: 5 x 6 x 2 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Dark patinated single case inrō with a landscape scene and figures worked in relief This Japanese inrō dates to the Meiji period (1868-1912) and is made of dark patinated bronze. Inlays of gold, silver and copper emphasize the oval wall and create colorful accentuations. Shown is a detailed representation of a landscape. On one side a scholar with his students is visible. The individual motifs are worked in chasing and repoussé work. This creates an adorable piece of art, which arises in the smallest space. The container can be attached to a belt through the himotoshi (cord holes). The inrō is in very good condition with hardly any signs of wear consistent with age. The height measures 5 cm, the width 6 cm and the depth 2 cm. Inrō An inrō is a Japanese seal or medicine case, which belongs to the so-called sagemono (containers hanging from the obi). An inrō is usually composed of a stack of tiny, nested compartments that can be sealed and held together by a cord. It can be made of wood, horn, ivory or ceramic. Originally the containers were used to store messages. Later they carried coins, personal seals or medicine. Inrōs were mainly used by men since their gowns often had no sleeve pockets. The little containers were therefore suspended from the belt (obi) and secured to a netsuke.

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Shibuichi Box with Figures and three Compartments, Meiji

Lot 13: Shibuichi Box with Figures and three Compartments, Meiji

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Description: Gold, silver and copper inlaid bronze Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) Detailed figure scenes Removable elements Dimensions: 6.5 x 4 x 2.5 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Dark patinated box with representations of oni, guards, warriors, mystical creatures and fishermen This shibuichi bronze box was made during the Meiji period (1868-1912). The container is decorated with inlays of gold, silver and copper and has an oval shape similar to an inrō. The body is composed of several removable elements. The decoration shows oni, guards, warriors, mystical creatures and fishermen in a scenic landscape. The cover is decorated with two fishermen and the base shows a groove décor. The individual elements are worked in relief and show a precise craftsmanship. The various nuances of the inlays create a lively appearance. The box is in very good condition with hardly any signs of wear consistent with age such as little gold wear. The height measures 6.5 cm, the width 4 cm and the depth 2.5 cm.

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Pair of Inlaid Bronze Miniature Vases with Birds, Meiji

Lot 14: Pair of Inlaid Bronze Miniature Vases with Birds, Meiji

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Description: Inlaid bronze Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) Each base with seal mark 'Shouyou Sei' Finely inlaid with copper, silver and gold between elaborate bands With differing scenes of birds amidst foliage Each on three short feet Height: each 8.5 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Two cylinder-shaped vases, each decorated with birds and flowers in relief, made for the export market These two cylindrical vases from the Japanese Meiji period (1868-1912) are made of bronze. The slender body is raised on three small feet. The sides are richly decorated with fine inlays of copper, silver and gold showing exquisite representations of birds between floral elements. The motifs on the sides are framed by elaborate borders at the top and along the rim. The elements in relief and the interplay of the different colors created an appealing look as well as a graceful feel. Each base shows a seal mark. The bronze vases are in very good condition with a natural patina and little signs of age and wear. Only minimal loss of color is visible. Each height measures 8.5 cm.

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Moriguchi Gold Inlaid Iron Baluster Vase and Cover, Meiji

Lot 15: Moriguchi Gold Inlaid Iron Baluster Vase and Cover, Meiji

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Description: Gold inlaid iron Japan, Meiji period (1868-1912) Base with signature 'Moriguchi sei' Finely worked in nunome zogan With barbed panels, pendant lappets and mon Finely cast diaper ground Height with cover: 16.5 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Attractive vase with cover, decorated with landscape scenes and flower décor in gold and silver, made for the export market These richly ornamented iron vase dates to the Japanese Meiji period (1868-1912) and shows gold inlays as well as nunome zogan elements. The body stands on an ornate foot rim and forms a pronounced shoulder. The original, matching lid can be placed on a round neck. The wall as well as the lid, crowned by a bud-shaped knob, are adorned with various motifs. Flowers, vine tendrils, landscape sceneries with buildings and find birds in dense foliage are rendered inside cartouches and mon emblems. The cast elements in relief as well as the interplay of colors create an appealing look and feel. An incised signature can be found on the underside. The iron vase is in good condition with little signs of age and wear. Minimal traces of corrosion are visible here and there. The height with lid measures 16.5 cm.

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Komai Gold and Silver Inlaid Iron Vase with floral Décor, Meiji

Lot 16: Komai Gold and Silver Inlaid Iron Vase with floral Décor, Meiji

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Description: Gold and silver inlaid iron Kyoto, Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Manufacturer: Komai Eight character inscription 'Komai Shingakudo (Shinrakudo) of Kyoto' in the lower area Extremely fine inlay Pendant lappets of various finely worked scenes A continuous vine band and further lappets encircling the shoulder Height: 13 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Elegant vase with richly chased and repoussé worked decoration in gold and silver, made for export This detailed Japanese iron vase was manufactured by Komai in Kyoto, during the Meiji period (1868-1912) and is decorated with fine inlays of gold and silver. The vase stands on a circular foot rim on which the body with accentuated shoulder rises. The short neck forms a small, elevated lip. The wall of the vase is adorned with extremely fine decorations. Pendant lappets of various finely worked landscape scenes, flowers, birds and a flowering cherry blossom branch are visible. A continuous vine band and further lappets can be seen on the shoulder. Encircling borders are also found on the wall as well as on the neck and the foot. An appealing look and feel is created through the elements in relief and the interplay of colors. The eight character inscription 'Komai Shingakudo (Shinrakudo) of Kyoto' is seen in the lower area of the vase. The iron vase is in very good condition with little signs of age and wear. Only minimal traces of corrosion in the interior are visible and the height measures 13 cm. Komai The Komai company was presumably founded in 1841, but it was under the direction of Komai Otojiro that the company began to produce its famous works with textured inlays in gold and silver, a technique called nunome-zogan 布目象嵌. Komai Otojiro became acquainted with various inlay techniques when training under a sword-fitting artisan. From 1873 onwards he began to produce decorative damascened ironware, aimed at the export market. His delicate and highly detailed work was well received abroad and shown at foreign exhibitions, such as the Nuremberg Metalwork Exhibition of 1885. Soon other artisans in Kyoto began to produce similar objects. In 1906 Otojiro's son took over the company and continued to produce intricate inlaid objects of gold and silver set into iron until 1912. The Komai workshop is considered a pioneer of damascene work and the distinctive style of the Komai family essentially defined the art of metalwork in the Meiji Period.

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Komai Gold Inlaid Iron Vase with Rich Maple Leaf Décor, Meiji

Lot 17: Komai Gold Inlaid Iron Vase with Rich Maple Leaf Décor, Meiji

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Description: Gold inlaid iron, some silver inlays Kyoto, Japan, Meiji Period (1868-1912) Manufacturer: Komai Character mark underneath Extremely fine inlays With different scenes Ornamental maple leaf bands cover the body Height: 12 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Exquisite vase with rich maple leaf décor in gold and silver, made for the export market This ornate iron vase was manufactured in Japan during the Meiji period (1868-1912) by Komai in Kyoto and shows fine inlays of gold and partially silver. The vase stands on a circular foot rim on which the body with accentuated shoulder rises. The neck forms an elevated, outward opening moth edge. The wall of the vase is adorned with an extremely fine décor and two different scenes. A landscape with buildings in the front and the Fuji volcano in the background are rendered in one panel. The other scene shows irises and birds. Ornamental maple leaves cover the body and frame the motifs in the center. Encircling borders adorn the neck as well as the foot. An appealing look and feel is created through the elements in relief and the interplay of colors. A character mark in gold can be found on the underside. The iron vase is in very good condition with little signs of age and wear. Only minimal traces of corrosion on the underside are visible and the height measures 12 cm.Komai The Komai company was presumably founded in 1841, but it was under the direction of Komai Otojiro that the company began to produce its famous works with textured inlays in gold and silver, a technique called nunome-zogan 布目象嵌. Komai Otojiro became acquainted with various inlay techniques when training under a sword-fitting artisan. From 1873 onwards he began to produce decorative damascened ironware, aimed at the export market. His delicate and highly detailed work was well received abroad and shown at foreign exhibitions, such as the Nuremberg Metalwork Exhibition of 1885. Soon other artisans in Kyoto began to produce similar objects. In 1906 Otojiro's son took over the company and continued to produce intricate inlaid objects of gold and silver set into iron until 1912. The Komai workshop is considered a pioneer of damascene work and the distinctive style of the Komai family essentially defined the art of metalwork in the Meiji Period.

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Sino-Tibetan Fire-Gilt Bronze of a Serene Tara, 18th/19th C

Lot 21: Sino-Tibetan Fire-Gilt Bronze of a Serene Tara, 18th/19th C

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze China / Tibet, 18th / 19th century Bejeweled with coral, lapis and turquoise Finely cast Seated in lalitasana With vitarka and varada mudra Dimensions: 10.5 x 7.5 x 7.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a French private collection Decorative, finely engraved bronze figure of the goddess Tara in a meditative posture This Sino-Tibetan depiction of a Green Tara was crafted in the 18th / 19th century from fire-gilt bronze. The Green Tara is a symbol of compassion and deemed the protector from all danger. The goddess is also often referred to as Syamatara or Dolma. The deity is seated in lalitâsana, the position of royal ease, on an encircled double lotus throne. Her right foot is supported by another small lotus throne. Tara carries a peaceful, serene expression with a smile. Her right hand rests on her knee, showing the varada mudra, the gesture of granting wishes and she holds a lotus stem between her thumb and forefinger. Her left hand shows the vitarka mudra, the gesture of argumentation, and is lifted in front of the chest. Lotus blossoms rise up to her shoulders on both sides. Her body is covered with precious jewelry with inlays of coral, lapis and turquoise and a crown decorates her head. Red hand painting accentuates the back of the crown and the curly ribbons around her forearms. The presentation of the green Tara shows masterful chasing and rich gilding. The sealed bronze base plate is decorated with the incised double vajra symbol. The bronze statue is in good condition with a beautiful, authentic patina and usual signs of wear consistent with age. A lotus leaf and some of the inlays are missing. The base plate has a dent. The figure is 10.5 cm high and 7.5 cm wide as well as deep.

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Fire-Gilt Sino-Tibetan Bronze Bodhisattva Vajradhara, 16/17th C

Lot 22: Fire-Gilt Sino-Tibetan Bronze Bodhisattva Vajradhara, 16/17th C

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze China / Tibet, 16th / 17th century Crossed hands, holding a vajra and a ghanta Precious jewelry and five-leaf crown Remains of red and blue cold paint on the crown, the hair and the base Measurements: 12.5 x 9 x 6 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Meditative bronze figure with serene expression This fire-gilt, Sino Tibetan bronze figure represents Bodhisattva Vajradhara and was made during the 16th / 17th century. Vajradhara, also called the 'diamond holder', is seated inpadmasana on a double lotus throne with a sealed bronze base plate and the soles of his feet are turned upwards. His crossed hands are raised in front of the chest and form theshunya mudra with the thumb and middle finger. The attributes of the Vajradhara, the thunderbolt vajra and the bell ghanta, can be found on the lotus flowers that ascend to his shoulders. These two attributes are the most important elements of Vajrayana Buddhism, representing the male and female principles, method and wisdom, leading to the path to enlightenment. The bodhisattva is adorned with precious jewelry and a five-leaf crown adorns his head, which symbolizes the reign of the five elements. Behind the headdress a high topknot is visible, which is crowned with a vajra. Remains of red and blue cold paint are found mainly at the back of the crown, the hair and the base. The face of the Bodhisattva shows a meditative expression with a smile on his face. The bronze figure is in good condition with merely light traces of wear consistent with age. The inlays are missing and some gilding wear here and there can be seen. The figure measures 12.5 cm in height, 9 cm in width and 6 cm in depth.

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Rare Fire-Gilt Bronze Figure of Buddha Amithaba, China, Yongle

Lot 23: Rare Fire-Gilt Bronze Figure of Buddha Amithaba, China, Yongle

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze China, Yongle Period (1402-1424) Reign mark removed from the front Serene expression with a smile With royal jewelry and a chased garment Fine detailed casting Dhoti around the hips On double encircling lotus throne Dimensions: 18 x 12 x 9 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: from a French private collection Rare, very finely engraved bronze figure with a pronounced smile This Chinese, fire-gilt bronze figure was made during the Yongle period (1402-1424) and represents Buddha. He is seated in padmasana, the lotus position, with both soles of his feet turned upwards. His right hand, lying on his knee, forms the bhumisparsa mudrā, the gesture of touching the earth. His palm is turned inward and his fingers point towards the earth. With this gesture, he calls upon the earth to bear witness to the truth of his words. His left hand is hereby placed upon his foot with the open palm facing upwards. The noble, very finely engraved robe covers his shoulders in flowing shapes and a dhoti is placed around the hips. The body of the figure is decorated with precious, lush jewelry and his face has a serene expression with a distinct smile. His head is graced with a five-leaved crown that symbolizes his superiority over the five elements. The extremely fine hair behind the crown forms a distinct, high topknot and the third eye, the urna, is found in the middle of the forehead. The base of the figure is sealed and bears a double vajra symbol. The bronze figure is in very good condition with a beautiful, authentic patina and only minor signs of wear consistent with age. Slight abrasion of gold here and there is visible. On the front a reign mark has been removed. The figure is 18 cm high and 12 cm wide and 9 cm deep.

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Sino-Tibetan Fire-Gilt Bronze of Avalokiteshvara, 18th C

Lot 24: Sino-Tibetan Fire-Gilt Bronze of Avalokiteshvara, 18th C

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze China / Tibet, late 18th century Finely cast Four armed Diaphanous robes In padmasana lotus position Hands form anjali mudra gesture Dimensions: 16 x 11 x 7.5 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: from a Swiss private collection Serene figure of Bodhisattva on a decorated double lotus throne This Sino-Tibetan Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara was crafted from fire-gilt bronze in the late 18th century. Literally translated, Avalokiteshvara means 'the lord, who looks down to the suffering world'. The word derives from the Sanskrit term ishvara (ruler) and loka (place or world). The deity is seated on a lotus pedestal, in the lotus position padmâsana with the soles of his feet facing upwards. The hands clasped in front of the chest form the gesture of worship, theanjali mudra. The hands held above the shoulders hold attributes, like a necklace and a lotus flower, to the sky. Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara wears luxurious, chased jewelry, as well as a fine robe and his forearms are emphasized by curly ribbons. The face has a serene expression with a smile and half-closed eyes. A five-leaved crown, behind which a high topknot with the face of Buddha Amitabha rises, adorns the head. Wisps of the fine hair are falling over the shoulders of the deity. The base of the figure is closed with a base plate marked with a double vajra symbol. The Bodhisattva is in very good condition with slight signs of wear consistent with age such as gold abrasion here and there. It is 16.5 cm tall, 11 cm long and 7.5 cm wide. Avalokiteśvara In Mahayana Buddhism, Avalokiteśvara is known as the Bodhisattva of compassion. Literally translated his name roughly means 'The Lord looking at the world with compassion'. Already at a young age Avalokiteśvara resolved to support all living creatures and help them to salvation. He swore an oath never to ease his efforts, otherwise he should shatter into a thousand pieces. According to legend he then ranged the world. As he paused to look at his work, he noticed that the suffering of the people had not diminished. This moment let him doubt, so he broke into a thousand pieces. Countless Buddhas immediately came to him to put him together again. But this time they gave him a thousand arms and eleven heads, so that he could better fulfil his vow.

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Sino-Tibetan Miniature Bronzes of Various Deities, 19th C

Lot 25: Sino-Tibetan Miniature Bronzes of Various Deities, 19th C

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Description: Bronze, one fire-gilt China / Tibet, 19th century Four bronze figures Two Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvaras One Bodhisattva Manjushri figure One Usnisavijaya presentation Chased decoration Each figure with rich jewelry and five-leaf crown Measurements: 4-5 x 2.5-4 x 2 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Enchanting collection of various Buddhist deities in miniature form These four Sino-Tibetan miniature bronzes date to the 19th century and represent the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara, the Bodhisattva Manjushri and the deity Usnisavijaya. Each figure is seated on an ornate lotus plinth in the padmasana lotus position, with the soles of their feet facing upward. Avalokiteshvara is known in Mahayana Buddhism as the Bodhisattva of compassion. Literally translated his name means 'The Lord looking at the world with compassion' and in this case both figures are shown with four arms. The Bodhisattva Manjushri is one of the oldest bodhisattvas; his name translates to 'Gentle Glory'. In his raised right hand a sword is visible, which cuts through the veil of ignorance. The book of wisdom lies on the lotus stalk by his left shoulder. The three-headed and four-armed deity Usnisavijaya is one of the oldest goddesses in Lamaism. She holds a vajra in her front right hand, which is raised to her chest, and the bell ghanta in her left hand, which is laid down in her lap. Each figure wears precious jewelry as well as a five-leaved crown on the head, which symbolizes the reign of the five elements. Fine, individual facial features with a meditative, serene expression are visible and chased decoration adorns the garments. The bronze figures are in good condition with only minor signs of age and wear, such as a missing ketumala. They have a height of 4 to 5 cm, a width from 2.5 to 4 cm and each a depth of 2 cm.

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Fire-Gilt Miniature Bronze of Bodhisattva Amitāyus, 18 / 19th C

Lot 26: Fire-Gilt Miniature Bronze of Bodhisattva Amitāyus, 18 / 19th C

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Description: Fire-gilt bronze China / Tibet, 18th / 19th century Chased decorations Jewelry and five-leaf crown Ambrosia vase in the hands Dhyāna mudra, the gesture of meditation Measurements: 7 x 5 x 3.5 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Ornately worked bronze figure of Amitāyus, also known as The Buddha of Infinite Light This fire-gilt, Sino Tibetan miniature bronze of Bodhisattva Amitāyus was made during the 18th / 19th century. The bodhisattva Amitāyus is a form of the Buddha Amitābha. They are reflective images of each other and symbolize longevity and wisdom. This figure shows Amitāyus seated on a lotus pedestal in padmasana with the soles of his feet turned upwards. His hands are placed in his lap and form the dhyāna mudra, the gesture of meditation, while they are holding an ambrosia vase. The bodhisattva is adorned with jewelry and wears a five-leaf crown on his head, which symbolizes the reign of the five elements. Amitāyus has a faint smile on his face. The lower portion of his body is surrounded by the curved ribbons of his garment. The figure is sealed with a bronze plate on the underside. The bronze figure is in good condition with merely light traces of age and wear, such as gold abrasion in some areas. The figure measures 7 cm in height, 5 cm in width and 3.5 cm in depth.

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Gilt and Black Lacquered Bronze Figure of a Dignitary, Qing

Lot 27: Gilt and Black Lacquered Bronze Figure of a Dignitary, Qing

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Description: Lacquered bronze China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Four character mark of Qianlong in relief on the back Wearing official's robes and hat Badge of rank Animal at his feet Dimensions: 23 x 11.5 x 12 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Noble figure of a dignitary with a natural patina This Chinese gold and black lacquered bronze figure originated in the Qing dynasty (1644-1912). It shows a dignitary with badges of rank, dressed in a fine long official's robe and wearing a hat. He is seated on a pedestal and between his feet an animal is visible. The right hand is raised in front of the stomach and the left hand lies relaxed on the armrest. The figure has a peaceful expression with half-closed eyes and a slight smile. On the back the four-character mark of the Qianlong period is found in relief. The bronze figure is in good condition with slight signs of wear consistent with age. There are minor losses and pitting as well as rubbing with traces of gilding remaining. The height measures 23 cm, the width 11.5 cm and the depth 12 cm.

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Bronze Figure of the Boy Buddha on a Double Lotus Throne, Ming

Lot 28: Bronze Figure of the Boy Buddha on a Double Lotus Throne, Ming

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Description: Bronze China, Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) Standing on a double lotus throne Scantily clad Remains of leaf gilding Rich patina Total height: 20 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Representation of the childlike Buddha on an open lotus flower This bronze figure was crafted in the Chinese Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) and represents Buddha as a child. He stands scantily clad on a double encircling lotus throne in an upright position. His right hand is directed downward, while his left hand is shown to heaven. Both hands form the pran mudra, the gesture of life, with an outstretched index and middle finger. His face has a peaceful yet determined expression with fine features. A rich patina and traces of leaf gilding complete the presentation. The bronze is in good condition with signs of wear consistent with age. Loss of material at the base is visible and the total height is 20 cm.

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Bronze Vase in Hu Form with Archaic Décor, China, Song Dynasty

Lot 29: Bronze Vase in Hu Form with Archaic Décor, China, Song Dynasty

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Description: Bronze China, Song Dynasty (960-1279) Archaic in form and décor Fine chasing Motifs in relief Open work handles on the sides Height: 18 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A beautiful archaic vase, which features an ornamental decoration This lavishly decorated archaic bronze vase dates back to the Song Dynasty (960-1279). The vase is a so-called hu vessel. The bulbous body rests on an oval foot rim and forms a long neck ending in an accentuated lip. A richly ornamented pattern of bands, meander borders and tendrils in relief adorns the sides. Two open work handles, which are decorated with floral elements, can be found at the top of the neck. The bronze vase is in good condition with signs of wear consistent with age. There are minor scratches along the lower area, a small crack on the wall and on the base, which are barely visible. The height measures 18 cm.

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Unusual Huanghuali Scroll Holder Resembling Bamboo, China, Qing

Lot 30: Unusual Huanghuali Scroll Holder Resembling Bamboo, China, Qing

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Description: Huanghuali China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Realistically carved to resemble bamboo Beautiful grain Excellent patina Height: 24.5 cm Diameter: 20.5 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a Hamburg private collection An unusual object made from one of the world's most expensive woods This elegant scroll holder or large brush pot dates to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). The pot, made from Huanghuali - one of the most valuable woods in the world - is realistically carved to resemble bamboo. The organically shaped body seems like a modern sculpture, whose finely polished surface exhibits the beautiful patina and the exquisite grain of the Huanghuali. The scroll holder is in very good condition with only minor signs of age and wear. It measures 24.5 cm in height and has a diameter of 20.5 cm. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare type of rosewood that was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The color varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Bamboo Brush Pot with Finely Carved Figures, China, Qing

Lot 31: Bamboo Brush Pot with Finely Carved Figures, China, Qing

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Description: Bamboo China, late Qing dynasty (1644-1912) Fine carving with figures In distinct relief On three feet Large size Height: 18 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A brush pot of considerable size, which features beautiful carving This large bamboo brush pot was made in the late Qing dynasty (1644-1912). It has a cylindrical body supported by three feet. The foot and lip rims are slightly flared, according to the natural curvature of the material. A fine, circular carving with figural scenes decorates the sides. Flying cranes, immortals in clouds, children with kites and peaches as well as mountains and trees can be seen. The elements are worked in distinct relief, making it easy to discern the individual facial features of the figures. The ornaments have an amazing sculptural quality and the natural grain of the bamboo completes the brush pot. The bamboo brush pot is in very good condition with hardly any signs of age and wear. The height measures 18 cm.

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Rare Zitan Wood Brush Washer and Rest, China, Qing

Lot 32: Rare Zitan Wood Brush Washer and Rest, China, Qing

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Description: Polished zitan wood China, Qing dynasty (1644-1912) Beautiful, natural patina Exquisite polish Rear suspension Dimension: 17.5 x 8 cm (width x height) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An original brush holder made of a special Chinese wood resembling a scholar's stone This individual Chinese brush washer and rest, most certainly once decorating a scholar's desk, has an elegantly curved form, which resembles the elaborate rocks which scholars often placed on their desks as inspiration. The container shows the natural wood grain and a natural shine on its old zitan wood surface, shimmering in shades of black. It is a very earthy piece with its beautiful natural patina. The brush washer can be mounted with an attached suspension on the back. The zitan wood brush washer is in good condition with only superficial signs of use and a few, natural, age-related cracks in the wood. It measures 17.5 cm in width and 8 cm in height. Zitan Wood Zitan is a very slow-growing Chinese type of wood in the family of rosewoods, which had remained unknown in the Western world for a long time. The wood is dense and its colour varies between black-lilac and blackish red. Artworks made of zitan wood are rarely painted and only sometimes show carved decor. The wood is usually left untreated, only finished with a fine lacquer coat or high polish to bring out the natural gloss of this rare tropical wood.

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Traditional Wooden Suanpan Abacus, China, Qing, 19th C

Lot 33: Traditional Wooden Suanpan Abacus, China, Qing, 19th C

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Description: Wood China, Qing dynasty (1644-1912), 19th century Conventional Chinese abacus Appealing patina Dimensions: 18 x 39.5 x 2.5 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A traditional calculating tool, which is still being used in China today This Chinese suanpan abacus dates to the 19th century. These counting frames were known in the Indo-Chinese region as early as 1100 BC. The abacus consists of 15 bars, each with seven movable wooden beads. The combination of five beads in the lower deck and two beads on the top corresponds to the old, traditional arrangement. Each of the lower beads carries a value of one, each of the upper beads carries a value of five. To illustrate a number the beads are pushed toward the central beam, which, in this case, is carved with Chinese characters. With the co-called zhusuan technique even highly complex arithmetic problem can be solved. The abacus is in good condition with signs of age and wear such as light material loss and a few cracks on the back. Two wooden rods have been replaced by iron rods. The abacus measures 18 cm in height, 39.5 cm in width and 2.5 cm in depth.

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Large Huanghuali Cabinet with Metal Fittings, China, Qing

Lot 34: Large Huanghuali Cabinet with Metal Fittings, China, Qing

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Description: Huanghuali China, Qing dynasty (1644-1912) Fine grain Beautiful patina Dimensions: 219 x 108 x 53 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An imposing piece of furniture made of noble wood This cabinet dates to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) and is made of the precious wood Huanghuali. The two-part cabinet is of rectangular form, with two pairs of hinged doors and a set of three drawers in the center. All above an open work apron carved with scrolling motifs. The upper interior is fitted with a pair of drawers. The modest rectangular shape is otherwise without frills and only adorned with plain metal fittings in order to let the noble wood, which features a fine grain and beautiful patina, stand out. The cabinet is in visually good, restored condition with minor signs of wear. There is minimal material loss to one of the fittings on the front. The round and baluster-shaped elements of the apron are probably a later addition. The cabinet measures 219 cm in height, 108 cm in width and 53 cm in depth. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare rosewood type, which was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The colour varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Rare Mother-Of-Pearl Inlaid Traveling Vanity Chest, around 1800

Lot 35: Rare Mother-Of-Pearl Inlaid Traveling Vanity Chest, around 1800

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Description: Zitan wood with mother of pearl inlays, brass fittings China, around 1800 Fine inlay work Representations of blossoming prunus trees and butterflies Interior with mirror and many small drawers Export ware for the Portuguese market Dimensions: 20.5 x 25.5 x 31.5 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A rare antique, which exhibits the virtuosity of Chinese arts and crafts This traveling vanity chest was crafted in China around 1800. The box is made of zitan wood and decorated with delicate mother of pearl inlays. The base is adorned with archaic dragons on the front and sides. The four sides show blossoming prunus and cherry tree branches with different birds. A vase with peonies and butterflies, surrounded by scholarly objects, is rendered on the cover. Prominent brass fittings complete the elaborate design. The interior reveals a mirror on the lid and a total of eight drawers and compartments of various sizes. This rare antique was presumably made as export ware for the Portuguese market. The vanity chest has been restored and is in visually good condition. Slight signs of age and wear can be discerned. The box measures 20.5 cm in height, 25.5 cm in width and 31.5 cm in depth. Zitan Wood Zitan is a very slow-growing Chinese type of wood in the family of rosewoods, which had remained unknown in the Western world for a long time. The wood is dense and its colour varies between black-lilac and blackish red. Artworks made of zitan wood are rarely painted and only sometimes show carved decor. The wood is usually left untreated, only finished with a fine lacquer coat or high polish to bring out the natural gloss of this rare tropical wood.

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Ming Style Huanghuali Cabinet with Metal Fittings, China, Qing

Lot 36: Ming Style Huanghuali Cabinet with Metal Fittings, China, Qing

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Description: Huanghuali China, Qing dynasty (1644-1912) Fine grain Beautiful patina Dimensions: 205.5x 101 x 54 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An impressive piece of furniture made of valuable wood This Ming style cabinet dates to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) and is made of the precious wood Huanghuali. The cabinet is of rectangular form, with a pair of hinged doors and two drawers, all above plain aprons and slender legs. The interior is fitted with six drawers. The modest rectangular shape is otherwise without frills and only adorned with plain metal fittings in order to let the noble wood, which features a fine grain and beautiful patina, stand out. The cabinet is in a visually good, restored condition with minor signs of wear. It has been converted, the interior is a later addition. Only one of the aprons on the sides is carved. It measures 205.5 cm in height, 101 cm in width and 54 cm in depth. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare rosewood type, which was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The colour varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Set of Four Elegant Huanghuali Yoke Back Armchairs, 18th C

Lot 37: Set of Four Elegant Huanghuali Yoke Back Armchairs, 18th C

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Description: Huanghuali China, 18th century Carved decoration on the splat Elegant shape Dimensions: 95 x 55 x 40.5 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Four chairs with a beautiful patina, made from one of the world's most expensive woods These four armchairs date to 18th century Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) and are made from huanghuali, one of the most precious woods in the world. The rectilinear frame features an elegant shape. The slightly curved splat of the yoke back backrest shows a finely carved meander ornament. Curvate round bars form the armrests. The solid square seat rests upon square legs with beaded aprons on the front. The spandrels on the front are finely carved. Subtle features such as this as well as the combination of round and angular elements make these pieces of furniture especially rare and highly coveted amongst collectors of Chinese furniture. The beautiful patina rounds off the extraordinary aesthetic of these noble chairs. Traditionally yoke-back armchairs were reserved for distinguished guests or family members of the highest rank. The s-shaped backrest forces the sitter to sit straight, naturally imparting an air of power and importance. The four chair have been restored and are in visually good condition. Here and there the restoration is more noticeable. The chairs have a back height of 95 cm and a seat height of 51.5 cm. The seat width is 55 cm and the seat depth is 40.5 cm. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare type of rosewood that was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The color varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Carved Gilt-Wood and Lacquer Altar Box And Stand, Qing

Lot 38: Carved Gilt-Wood and Lacquer Altar Box And Stand, Qing

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Description: Carved gilt-wood, black lacquer Canton, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Fine high relief carving Rich reticulated design Elaborately rendered palace scene Cover with poem by Cheng Hao (1032-1085) Dimensions: 30.5 x 37 x 14.5 cm Provenance: from an Irish private collection An extraordinary piece whose intricate carving work one never tires looking at This opulent box was crafted in Canton and dates to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). It is painted in black lacquer and richly decorated with gilding. The front shows an elaborate openwork decoration in high relief depicting a lush figural scene in a palace. The garments and individual facial expressions are rendered in the finest manner. The sides show a still life with a flower vase in relief. The back shows an opulent depiction of a cherry blossom tree in relief. The stand also shows a reticulated decor with lotus vines and rats as a sign of wealth. It rests on four feet in the form of three-dimensional Fo lions. The cover is adorned with an inscription taken from a poem by Cheng Hao (1032-1085), a famous philosopher from the Song dynasty. Titled 'Occasional Poem on an Autumn Day', the poem illustrates the Tao principle, which one should follow in order to gain contentment and serenity. In China boxes of this kind were part of a shrine or altar. They were used to lay down offerings for ancestor worship. The box is in fair condition with some losses and damage. Some parts have been glued. The box measures 30.5 cm in height, 37 cm in width and 14.5 cm in depth.

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Huanghuali Bed with Open Work Apron, China, 18th/19th C

Lot 39: Huanghuali Bed with Open Work Apron, China, 18th/19th C

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Description: Huanghuali China, 18th / 19th century Fine carving Open work apron with inlays Voluted cabriole legs Dimensions: 55 x 219 x 153.5 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A significant piece of furniture whose elegant design makes it a tasteful and timeless piece This extravagant Huanghuali bed, one of the most valuable woods in the world, was crafted in China in the 18th / 19th century and exhibits a fine craftsmanship. The four voluted cabriole legs are beautifully carved. The front is decorated with an open work apron with archaic scrollwork and dragon heads as well as oval and round stone inlays. The sides are also decorated with carved scrolls. The simple rectangular deck area has a profiled frame and shows the graceful grain of the Huanghuali wood, which has a rich light brown color with reddish hues. The bed has been restored and is in visually good condition. Partially the woo inserts are visible. One of the inlays is missing. The bed measures 55 cm in height, 219 cm in length and 153.5 cm in width. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare type of rosewood that was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The colour varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Large Huanghuali Chest with Ornate Brass Fittings, China, Qing

Lot 40: Large Huanghuali Chest with Ornate Brass Fittings, China, Qing

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Description: Huanghuali China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Brass fittings Symbolic imagery of dragons and phoenixes Dimensions: 51 x 103 x 53 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A decorative chest with ornate fittings This chest was crafted in China during the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). Made of Huanghuali, one of the most valuable woods in the world, it features a beautiful grain and an appealing reddish brown color. The finely crafted fittings decorated with ornate dragons and phoenixes round off the elegant design. This highly symbolic imagery suggest that the chest is probably a marriage chest for in Chinese culture the dragon and phoenix are symbolic of blissful relations between husband and wife. There is a handle on each side. Three large and one small padlocks with matching keys are included. The chest is in visually good condition with signs of wear such as superficial scratches and color loss especially along the edges. The interior has been newly clad. The chest measures 51 cm in height, 103 cm in length and 53 cm in width. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare type of rosewood that was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The color varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Huanghuali Table with Subtle Meander Decor, China, Qing

Lot 41: Huanghuali Table with Subtle Meander Decor, China, Qing

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Description: Huanghuali China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Fine carving Open work spandrels Meander motif Beautiful patina Dimensions: 46 x 122 x 51 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An noble piece of furniture whose subtle design enhances any interior This table was crafted in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). Made of Huanghuali, one of the most valuable woods in the world, it exhibits a fine craftsmanship. The protruding table top rests over a beaded apron raised on hipped supports with ruyi pad feet. The open work spandrels feature an ornate meander pattern. The table, in appealing reddish brown, shows the beautiful grain of the Huanghuali wood. The table has been restored and is in visually good condition with minimal wear. The table measures 46 cm in height, 122 cm in length and 51 cm in width. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare type of rosewood that was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The color varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Shanghai Style Kang Table with Open Work Apron, China, c. 1800

Lot 42: Shanghai Style Kang Table with Open Work Apron, China, c. 1800

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Description: Huanghuali, zitan, root wood (huamu) China, around 1800 Shanghai style Fine carving Open work apron with a 'shou' motif Carved dragon heads Beautiful patina Dimensions: 36.5 x 97.5 x 40 cm Visually good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An eye-catching piece of furniture which exhibits the art of wood carving during the Qing Dynasty This so-called Shanghai style kang table was crafted in China around 1800. Made of Huanghuali, one of the most valuable woods in the world, and Zitan, it exhibits a fine craftsmanship. The extravagant open work apron with a central 'shou' motif is an eye-catching feature. The curved ends are adorned with panels of floral elements and end in carved dragon heads. The straight legs are also subtly carved. The table shows an inset of huamu root wood in a deep reddish brown color with a beautiful grain. These kinds of tables were traditionally used by the 'kang' (fireplace) to hold tea, meals and other everyday items. The table has been restored and is in visually good condition with minimal wear. Fine fissures in the top have been restored. The table measures 36.5 cm in height, 97.5 cm in length and 40 cm in width. Huang-hua-li Huanghuali (Dalbergia odorifera) is a rare type of rosewood that was used in China for traditional medicine and to make precious furniture. Originally known as huali or hualu, the specification 'huang' (yellowish-brown) was added in the 20th century to differentiate between aged Huanghuali with a yellowish brown patina and newer, so-called xinhuali. Huanghuali literally means 'yellowish blooming pear wood'. Very good Huanghuali wood has a shimmering, near translucent surface with a beautiful, abstract grain. The color varies from reddish brown to golden yellow. Huanghuali probably originally came from the island Hainan, but similar kinds also grow in northern Vietnam, Guangxi and Indochina.

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Important Pair of Extremely Large Stone Fo Lions, 17th C

Lot 43: Important Pair of Extremely Large Stone Fo Lions, 17th C

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Description: Carved stone China, 17th century Skilled carving giving vitality to the figures Ferocious expressions with bulging eyes Curlicues and tassels give impression of movement Pricked up ears implying alertness Height (with pedestal): approx. 201 cm Good condition Provenance: from a private collection Dallas/Texas; acquired from the Ming Museum in Anhui Province, China Two beautiful relics from the Ming Dynasty, bearing witness to the extraordinary material culture of ancient China; Buddhist lions of this age and size are extremely rare to find on the western market and nowadays mostly held in museums This pair of extremely large figures of Fo lions - the Chinese word 'Fo' meaning prosperity but also translating to Buddha - dates to the 17th century. The figures were carved in China during the late Ming Dynasty (1368-1644) with outstanding sculptural virtuosity. They are presented, in the conventional manner, as a male/female pair, a manifestation of yin and yang, with the male resting his paw on an embroidered ball 'xiù qiú' (绣球) - signifying supremacy over the world. The female is holding a playful lion cub as a symbol of nurture and compassion. Because this imagery has existed for so many years, the meaning of the symbols attached to the animals has evolved over time. Today, there is a myriad of interpretations for each element of the statues' iconography. Statues of guardian lions have traditionally stood in front of Buddhist temples, Chinese Imperial palaces but also wealthy private homes. The ferocious facial expressions, with bulging eyes, pricked up ears and wide-open mouths, bear witness to a masterful carving. The lions appear as if they were in motion due to the dynamically rendered curlicues and tassels which adorn the vigorous bodies. The figures stand on a square base incised with meander borders and stylized cloud motifs. Similar figures of guardian lions can be found on the famous Marco Polo Bridge southwest of the Beijing city center or in front of the gate of the Dajue Temple, a Buddhist temple located in the Haidian District of western Beijing. The sculptures were exported from the Ming Museum, Anhui Province, around 15 years ago with the authorization of the Chinese Central Government. The lions are in good condition with signs of wear consistent with age. They show weathering marks as well as fine cracks, natural fissures and some material loss. There are some traces of restoration all around. Nonetheless the lions' overall aesthetic is not lessened. The figures measure approx. 201 cm in height. Fo Lions Fo lions, also called guardian lions, enjoy high popularity in Chinese art. Their appearance reminds one of a mixture of a dragon and a lion. These mythical creatures usually come in pairs and were originally positioned to guard the entrance of Buddhist temples. In the arts and crafts, they are often refigured as doorknockers or decorative ceramic, marble, or bronze vessels.

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Large Gilt Bronze Figure of the God of Good Luck Budai, Qing

Lot 44: Large Gilt Bronze Figure of the God of Good Luck Budai, Qing

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Description: Gilt Bronze China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Unusually large Finely incised Base plate with double vajra symbol Smiling expression Weight: approx. 13.5 kg Dimensions: 36 x 39 x 24 cm (height x width x depth) Very good condition Provenance: from an Italian private collection Magnificent representation of the smiling god of good fortune in a relaxed position This gilded bronze figure was made in China and dates to the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912). It shows an unusually large Budai, the god of good luck, who is also known under the Japanese name Hotei. He is one of the seven Lucky Gods (Shichi Fukujin), mostly represented, as is the case here, as a monk with a large belly and broad smile. Hence, he is also often called 'laughing Buddha'. In this case Budai is shown in a relaxed, seated position calledmaharaja-lila. His left leg is crossed and the palm of his foot is turned upwards. The right leg is bent and his right hand is laid down on the knee. The left hand is placed in the knee bend holding the hem of his robe. His body is covered by a flowing garment, which leaves his belly and chest area bare. The bronze is closed by a base plate which is decorated with a double vajra symbol. The gilt bronze figure is in very good condition with slight signs of wear consistent with age such as gold abrasion. The height is 36 cm, the width 39 cm and the depth 24 cm. The weight is approx. 13.5 kg.

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Bronze and Cloisonné Enamel Figure of Buddha, China, Qing

Lot 45: Bronze and Cloisonné Enamel Figure of Buddha, China, Qing

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Description: Bronze and cloisonné enamel China, late Qing dynasty (1644-1911) Retrospective six character seal on the back 'Da Ming Xuan De Nian Zhi' 大明宣德年制 Jingtai blue of exceptional quality Depiction of Buddha Shakyamuni Seated in meditation posture with gesture of dhyana and abhaya Dimensions: 48 x 35 x 26 cm (height x width x depth) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An elaborately worked Buddha figure of considerable size This large bronze Buddha Shakyamuni figure was made in China during the late Qing dynasty (1644-1912) and is decorated with enamel colors using the cloisonné technique. Buddha is seated in the padmasana lotus position with the soles of his feet turned upward. His right hand is placed relaxed in his lap with an open palm and shows the dhyana mudra, the gesture of meditation. His left hand is raised to the chest and forms the abhaya mudra, the gesture of fearlessness and granting protection. The robe is adorned with floral ornaments and jingtai blue, covering the body in flowing folds. His shoulders are covered, only his chest and the belly are bare. The face has a meditative, serene expression with half-closed eyes, long ear lobes and deep neck folds. The third eye urna is found between the fine, curved eyebrows. Small curls adorn his head and a central semi-circular ushnisha, crowned by a small ketumala, towers on top. On the back the retrospective six character seal 'Da Ming Xuan De Nian Zhi' 大明宣德年制 can be found. This bronze figure is in good condition with a natural patina and hardly any signs of wear. Only small manufacturing flaws and damages as well as restorations on the back here and there are visible. The height is 48 cm, the width 35 cm and the depth 26 cm.

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Cloisonné and Bronze Moonflask 'Bianhu' with Lion Handles, Qing

Lot 46: Cloisonné and Bronze Moonflask 'Bianhu' with Lion Handles, Qing

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Description: Bronze, cloisonné enamel, wood China, Qing dynasty (1644-1912) Bronze handles in the form of lions Partly open work Lush, floral décor Height without base: 29 cm Visually appealing condition Provenance: from a German private collection A fine vase in polychrome enamels; a comparable piece was sold at Christie's London in 2010 for over 20,000 Euros This ornate bronze and cloisonné so-called moonflask 'bianhu' was made during the Qing dynasty (1644-1912) in China. The compressed circular body with accentuated shoulder rises on an oval foot rim, which shows an encircling meander border. The slim neck with a bulbous center ascends to form a flared mouth rim. An open work bronze handle in the form of a lion adorns each side. The wall is decorated in polychrome enamels and shows rich, floral ornaments. A large peony is placed in the center and surrounded by leaves and other flowers. The decorative vase sits on a matching wooden base. The Moonflask with cloisonné is in visually good condition with signs of wear consistent with age. On the back there is a larger notch with nicks on one of the flowers in the lower area. The height without base is 29 cm, the height with base is 34 cm.

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Imposing Ivory Carving of a Pine Tree, China, c. 1920

Lot 47: Imposing Ivory Carving of a Pine Tree, China, c. 1920

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Description: Auction announcements 20 March 2014 Shipping of this lot is only possible within the European Union. Ivory China, around 1920 Elaborate carving Appealing honey colored patina On an elegantly carved wooden base Height (with stand): 59.5 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection An exceptional example of Chinese ivory carving of considerable size This virtuously carved ivory sculpture dates to around 1920. The large and very elaborate carving, consisting of several lavishly carved parts, shows a pine tree growing out of a rock. Its front is vegetated with blossoming peonies. A bird is perched in the tree crown. The leaves and flowers are meticulously rendered. Next to the tree a peacock is displaying its plumage. Its glorious feathering is carved in the finest manner. The bird's feathers and the tree crown are highlighted in dark ink. A honey-colored patina covers the sculpture, giving it a beautiful aesthetic. The sculpture is in good condition with age and wear, such as fine dry cracks. On the back there is a natural degeneration of the material through the nerve. The height including the base is 59.5 cm, the tree measures 53.5 cm in height.

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Rare, Museum-Quality Ivory Turtle, late Qing/Republic

Lot 48: Rare, Museum-Quality Ivory Turtle, late Qing/Republic

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Description: Auction announcements 20 March 2014 Shipping of this lot is only possible within the European Union. Ivory China, late Qing Dynastie (1644-1912) / Republic era (1912-1949) With imperial seal Eyes made of tiger's eye gemstones Beautiful patina Dimensions: 69 x 42 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection A museum-quality, figural ivory sculpture of considerable size This rare ivory turtle dates to the late Qing Dynastie (1644-1912) / Republic era (1912-1949). Each scale is nailed onto a wooden core with ivory nails. The shell is partly inscribed in fine characters with Buddhist teachings. The seal of the Emperor Qianlong (reigned 1736-1795). The Emperor was a collector of turtles, which he also liked to consume for he was convinced of its healing powers. In Chinese culture, the turtle is one of the Four Fabulous Animals and a symbol of longevity. The historical Buddha Siddhartha Gautama told his students the following story: In an ancient river lived a charitable turtle. One day it fell asleep on the banks of the river. An ant discovered the reptile and called upon 80,000 ants to feed of it. The turtle awoke in great pain. To be saved from the pain, it had to plunge into the water, but then the 80,000 ants would have died. Instead the turtle decided to feed the ants with its own flesh and blood. The turtle shows the dating "the fourth day of June in the year 1759" (24th regnal year of Emperor Qianlong). It was presumably made for a Buddhist celebration. Sculptures of turtles were often adorned with Buddhist paintings for festive occasions. The ivory figure is in good condition with wear consistent with age. The head is a little loose. Some parts have been reattached. The turtle measures 69 cm in length and 42 cm in width.

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Ivory brush Pot with two Poems by Fu Qing, Rarity, dated 1803

Lot 49: Ivory brush Pot with two Poems by Fu Qing, Rarity, dated 1803

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Description: Auction announcements 20 March 2014 Shipping of this lot is only possible within the European Union. Ivory China, dated 1803 Fu Qing - Minister of rituals and later defense minister under the Qing emperor Jiaqing (1796-1820) Artist seal and signature of Fu Qing Two poems by Fu Qing (福 庆) in black accentuated calligraphy Fine chiseling Base with floral decoration and a central butterfly Rarity Height: 12.5 cm Provenance: From Belgian private collection An extraordinary piece of Chinese artisan craftwork; whose rarity collectors will appreciate This finely carved ivory brush pot was made in China during the Jiaqing reign (1796-1820) in the year 1803. It has a cylindrical body, which follows the original curvature of the tusk and is inscribed with poems by Fu Qing (福 庆), who was governor of Guizhou province at this time. One of the poems is about the good harvest. This auspicious omen predicts prosperity to the state and its people. The second poem is about the first snow of the year, which transforms the landscape around the mountain Kunlun into a magical fairy tale world. The snowfall promises a good harvest in the coming year for the region of Zang Ke (牂 柯), one of today´s provinces of Yunnan. The two poems on the brush pot, which relate to Fu Qing's personal biography and the history of the Jiaqing period, are an important and hitherto unknown document. In addition to the poetry book 'Bamboo Branches Poems from the Exotic Territory' (异域 竹枝词) by Fu Qing, they give information about the history and traditions of the remote state territory Xinjiang. At the end of the second poem the date '1803', the signature and the seal of Fu Qing can be discerned. The round base has a floral decoration with a butterfly in a medallion. The brush pot is in visually appealing condition with signs of age and wear. The base has been reattached and presumably a later addition. Paint residue on the inside and overall drying cracks are visible. The height measures 12.5 cm.

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Famille Rose Brush Pot with 'Faux Bois' Décor, Daoguang

Lot 50: Famille Rose Brush Pot with 'Faux Bois' Décor, Daoguang

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Description: Glazed porcelain, polychrome enamel colors China, Daoguang period (1821-1850) Underside with commemorating hallmark: Shen De Tang Zhi, 'Hall of Prudent Virtue' 'Faux Bois' ground Famille Rose décor Finely painted with a surrounding landscape Dimension: 14.5 x 14 cm (height x diameter) Good condition Provenance: from a Chinese private collection This brush pot shows a detailed painting with fine 'Faux Bois' ground This Chinese brush pot is decorated in the colors of the Famille Rose and dates back to the Daoguang period (1821-1850). The sides are adorned with a surrounding landscape in polychrome enamel colors. The 'faux bois' décor adorns the upper and the lower border as well as the interior of the porcelain pot. Underneath the commemorating hallmark Shen De Tang Zhi, 'Hall of Prudent Virtue' is visible on the underside. The brush pot is in good condition with signs of age and wear. Light color abrasion here and there and minor scratches are visible. The height measures 14.5 cm and the diameter is 14 cm.

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Inscribed Porcelain Brush Pot with Qianlong mark, Qing

Lot 51: Inscribed Porcelain Brush Pot with Qianlong mark, Qing

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Description: Porcelain China, Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) Base with presumably apocryphal four character mark of Qianlong in iron-red Signature and two seals by XIong Yujing in iron-red on the side Inscription finely executed in a free, cursive style Extract from the book 'The Family Rituals of Zhu Xi' Dimensions: 15.5 x 19 cm (height x width) Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Broad brush pot with beautiful white glazed and fine inscription This porcelain brush pot was made in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1912) and shows a fine encircling inscription. The brush pot has a narrow foot rim on which the broad, cylindrical body rises. The fine inscription is executed in a free, cursive style. The text is an extract from the book 'The Family Rituals of Zhu Xi' by the Neo-Confucian Zhu Xi. The signature and two seals by XIong Yujing in iron-red are visible on the side. The presumably apocryphal seal mark of the Qianlong period in iron red can be seen on the underside in a recessed, glazed area. The porcelain brush pot is in good condition with very minor wear consistent with age. Small manufacturing flaws are visible here and there. The height measures 15.5 cm and width 19 cm.

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Gilt Ground Famille Rose 'Hu' Vase with Lush Décor, Daoguang

Lot 52: Gilt Ground Famille Rose 'Hu' Vase with Lush Décor, Daoguang

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Description: Porcelain, glazed and with polychrome enamel colors China, Daoguang period (1821-1850) Gilt ground In the colors of the Famille Rose Archaic 'hu' type bronze Underside with commemorating hallmark: Shen De Tang Zhi, 'Hall of Prudent Virtue' Height: 42 cm Very good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Archaic vase with rich décor made for 'The Hall of Prudent Virtue', the residence of the Daoguang Emperor This Chinese Famille Rose porcelain vase in the shape of an archaic 'hu' type bronze was crafted during the Daoguang period (1821-1850). The commemorating mark indicates that the vase dates to the two decades between 1831 and 1850, when the Daoguang Emperor had his residence in Yuanming Yuan. The vase has a flared foot rim upon which the bulbous body rises. The shoulder is emphasized and the long neck forms a protruding lip. Two open work pomegranate tendrils are rendered in sharp relief and adorn the neck. The glazed sides are decorated with polychrome elements in rich enamel colors. Various flowers such as chrysanthemums and lotus, ornaments in roundels and landscape depictions in floral panels are rendered on the golden ground. Ruyi and meander borders adorn the foot, the shoulder and the lip. The interior and the base are glazed in light blue. The commemorating hallmark Shen De Tang Zhi, 'Hall of Prudent Virtue' is visible on the underside. The Famille Rose porcelain vase is in very good condition with hardly any signs of wear. Minor wear to gilding and some enamels can be found. The height is 42 cm.

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Famille Rose Lime Green Porcelain Basin, Jiaqing Mark & Period

Lot 53: Famille Rose Lime Green Porcelain Basin, Jiaqing Mark & Period

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Description: Enameled porcelain China, Jiaqing period (1796-1820) Base with seal mark of Jiaqing in iron-red Finely decorated with linked lotus scrolls Beautiful enamel colors on an intense lime green ground Famille Rose Diameter: 32 cm Good condition Provenance: from a German private collection Fine decorated porcelain basin with the vivid colors of the Famille Rose This Chinese porcelain basin is designed in the colors of Famille Rose and was made during the Jiaqing period (1796-1820). The body of the basin stands on a round foot rim and forms a broad, sweeping upper rim. The sides are adorned with different ornaments on a fresh lime green ground. Lotus tendrils, flowers, peaches and pomegranates adorn the cavetto, the inner as well as the outer rim. The vibrant enamel colors of Famille Rose create a brilliant look and feel. The perfectly set seal mark of the Jiaqing period in iron red is visible in the center underneath. The porcelain basin is in very good condition with minor signs of wear consistent with age. Minimal rubbing to enamels is visible and the diameter is 32 cm.

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