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Auction Description for Adam's: Important Irish Art 7th December 2016
Sale Notes:
www.invaluable.co.uk/adams

Important Irish Art 7th December 2016 (211 Lots)

by Adam's


211 lots with images

December 7, 2016

Live Auction

Dublin 2, Dublin, Ireland

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Lelia Donnelly (b.1979)Dappled Light on the Back StepsOil on board, 25.5 x 20.5cm (10 x 8'')Signed and dated (20)15

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Description: Lelia Donnelly (b.1979)Dappled Light on the Back StepsOil on board, 25.5 x 20.5cm (10 x 8'')Signed and dated (20)15

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John Doherty (b.1949) 407Acrylic on board, 16 x 17.5cm (6¼ x 7'')Exhibited: The RHA  Annual Exhibition 2002.

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Description: John Doherty (b.1949) 407Acrylic on board, 16 x 17.5cm (6¼ x 7'')Exhibited: The RHA Annual Exhibition 2002.

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John Doherty (b.1949)Shark and its PreyOil on canvas, 76 x 104cm (30 x 41)Signed, inscribed with title and dated 2001 verso

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Description: John Doherty (b.1949)Shark and its PreyOil on canvas, 76 x 104cm (30 x 41)Signed, inscribed with title and dated 2001 verso

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Richard Kingston RHA (1922-2003)View on the Canal, DublinOil on canvas, laid on board, 101.5 x 57cm (40 x 22½)Signed (AR RK652)

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Description: Richard Kingston RHA (1922-2003)View on the Canal, DublinOil on canvas, laid on board, 101.5 x 57cm (40 x 22½)Signed (AR RK652)

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Donald Teskey RHA (b.1956)Oliver Bond Street, DublinOil on canvas, 168 x 213.5 cm (66 x 84'')Signed and dated 2004. Also signed, inscribed and dated versoDonald Teskey was born in Castle Matrix, Co. Limerick. He rose quickly to critical acclaim

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Description: Donald Teskey RHA (b.1956)Oliver Bond Street, DublinOil on canvas, 168 x 213.5 cm (66 x 84'')Signed and dated 2004. Also signed, inscribed and dated versoDonald Teskey was born in Castle Matrix, Co. Limerick. He rose quickly to critical acclaim after his first solo show, just two years after graduating from the Limerick College of Art and Design in 1978. Since then he has shown throughout Ireland as well as the U.S.A, the U.K, Canada and Germany to name but a few. His work has featured in many prominent collections both at home and abroad, including the Arts Council, The Irish Museum of Modern Art, AIB, KPMG, Limerick City Gallery of Art, OPW and the Ulster Bank. Arguably one of the best known painters of his generation, Teskey has received countless favourable reviews from numerous publications. He has also been the recipient of multiple awards from institutions such as the RHA, EV+A as well as the Royal Ulster Academy. Teskey is widely known for his depictions of the manmade world and urban landscape. In this instance, he deals with the historic Oliver Bond Street, named after the Irish revolutionary, situated in the heart of The Liberties. His use of rich texture details the dense muted brick of the newer developments. This contrasts strikingly with the oxidized copper roofing of the iconic St.Patricks tower, formally the largest smock windmill in Europe. Teskey’s exploration of the passing of time on a human scale as well as his consideration of the everyday allows us to reconsider historic Dublin architecture which is so often overlooked.Isobel Foley NCAD

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Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)Bank Holiday, KillineyWatercolour, 23 x 33cm (9 x 13)SignedThis work is thought to date from 1931 when a work of this title was exhibited at The Gieves Art Gallery, London March 1931, Catalogue No. 85. An oil versi

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Description: Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)Bank Holiday, KillineyWatercolour, 23 x 33cm (9 x 13)SignedThis work is thought to date from 1931 when a work of this title was exhibited at The Gieves Art Gallery, London March 1931, Catalogue No. 85. An oil version of this work was exhibited in the National Gallery Exhibition 'A Time and a Place' Exhibition 2006 (P 115).

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Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)God bless the work, said he politelyIllustration for 'The Crock of Gold' by James Stephens.Watercolour, 30.5 x 20.5cm (12 x 8)Signed and dated 1923Exhibited: possibly 'Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture', Dan

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Description: Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)God bless the work, said he politelyIllustration for 'The Crock of Gold' by James Stephens.Watercolour, 30.5 x 20.5cm (12 x 8)Signed and dated 1923Exhibited: possibly 'Exhibition of Paintings and Sculpture', Daniel Egan Gallery, May 1926;'Harry Kernoff Exhibition', The Gieves Gallery London March 1931, Catalogue No. 27. This work was used as the illustration for the front cover of the catalogue.Literature: Dublin Art Monthly, Oct 1927. illustrated (NLI Ref: PD2090TX Item 89)

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Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)A Woodland Park with FiguresCharcoal, 41 x 36cm (16¼ x 14¼'')Signed and dated (19)'31

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Description: Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)A Woodland Park with FiguresCharcoal, 41 x 36cm (16¼ x 14¼'')Signed and dated (19)'31

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Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)Mountain LandscapeCharcoal, 41 x 36cm (16¼ x 14¼'')Signed and dated (19)'31

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Description: Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)Mountain LandscapeCharcoal, 41 x 36cm (16¼ x 14¼'')Signed and dated (19)'31

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Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)Grace - West of Ireland GirlOil on board, 49 x 35.5cm (19¼ x 14'')Signed; inscribed with title verso

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Description: Harry Kernoff RHA (1900-1974)Grace - West of Ireland GirlOil on board, 49 x 35.5cm (19¼ x 14'')Signed; inscribed with title verso

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Cecil Ffrench Salkeld ARHA (1904-1969)Whatever Your Walk in Life (1956)Pen and ink on scraper board, 22 x 22cm (8½ x 8½'');Together with related preliminary sketches. (4)These were studies done as ads for The Irish Sweepstakes.

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Description: Cecil Ffrench Salkeld ARHA (1904-1969)Whatever Your Walk in Life (1956)Pen and ink on scraper board, 22 x 22cm (8½ x 8½'');Together with related preliminary sketches. (4)These were studies done as ads for The Irish Sweepstakes.

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Cecil Ffrench Salkeld ARHA (1904-1969)Reclining Nude with KittenOil on board, 29 x 24.5cm (11½ x 9¾'')SignedProvenance: From the collection of the writer Percy Arland Ussher (1899-1980), a friend of the artist and thence by descent.

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Description: Cecil Ffrench Salkeld ARHA (1904-1969)Reclining Nude with KittenOil on board, 29 x 24.5cm (11½ x 9¾'')SignedProvenance: From the collection of the writer Percy Arland Ussher (1899-1980), a friend of the artist and thence by descent.

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Mainie Jellett (1897-1944)Three ElementsGouache on card, 21.5 x 27.5cm (8½ x 10¾'')Provenance: Dr. Eileen MacCarvill and a gift to her daughter, Mrs. Éilis Brennan.Exhibited: 'Mainie Jellett: Abstracts', The Neptune Gallery, September/October 198

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Description: Mainie Jellett (1897-1944)Three ElementsGouache on card, 21.5 x 27.5cm (8½ x 10¾'')Provenance: Dr. Eileen MacCarvill and a gift to her daughter, Mrs. Éilis Brennan.Exhibited: 'Mainie Jellett: Abstracts', The Neptune Gallery, September/October 1980, Cat. No.18; later with the Peppercanister Gallery.This is a study for a large oil painting which was in the collection of Shane and Una de Blacam

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Mainie Jellett (1897-1944)CompositionGouache, 23.5 x 19cm (9¼ x 7½'')Provenance: Dr. Eileen MacCarvill and a gift to her daughter, Mrs. Éilis Brennan.Exhibited: 'Mainie Jellett: Abstracts', The Neptune Gallery, September/October 1980, Cat. No.13;

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Description: Mainie Jellett (1897-1944)CompositionGouache, 23.5 x 19cm (9¼ x 7½'')Provenance: Dr. Eileen MacCarvill and a gift to her daughter, Mrs. Éilis Brennan.Exhibited: 'Mainie Jellett: Abstracts', The Neptune Gallery, September/October 1980, Cat. No.13; later with the Peppercanister Gallery.

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Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)A Court TombOil on board, 22 x 27cm (8½ x 10½'')Signed

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Description: Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)A Court TombOil on board, 22 x 27cm (8½ x 10½'')Signed

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Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)Study for Stained Glass TriptychGouache, 26.5 x 6cm (2), 31 x 6cm (central panel) (10½ x 2¼'' and 12 x 2¼)Provenance: The Jorgensen Gallery

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Description: Evie Hone HRHA (1894-1955)Study for Stained Glass TriptychGouache, 26.5 x 6cm (2), 31 x 6cm (central panel) (10½ x 2¼'' and 12 x 2¼)Provenance: The Jorgensen Gallery

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Evie Hone (1894-1955)Abstract Composition (Opus III)Gouache, 21 x 18cm (8¼ x 7'')Provenance: With the Dawson Gallery; later with the Peppercanister Gallery.

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Description: Evie Hone (1894-1955)Abstract Composition (Opus III)Gouache, 21 x 18cm (8¼ x 7'')Provenance: With the Dawson Gallery; later with the Peppercanister Gallery.

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Marion King (1897-1963) La Charmeuse de Legendes Reverse painted on glass and contained within a fretwork frame, 75 x 45cm (29.5 x 17.75'') Signed, Inscribed exhibition label verso Trim born Marion King was something of an inventor with her techni

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Description: Marion King (1897-1963) La Charmeuse de Legendes Reverse painted on glass and contained within a fretwork frame, 75 x 45cm (29.5 x 17.75'') Signed, Inscribed exhibition label verso Trim born Marion King was something of an inventor with her technique of painting on glass which caused quite a stir in artistic circles. For information on her technique and her life see Theo Snoddy Dictionary of Irish Artists.

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May Guinness (1863-1955)Portrait of a WomanOil on canvas, 84 x 61cm (33 x 24'')Exhibited: 'Analysing Cubism' exhibition, IMMA, February/May 2013, The Crawford Gallery, Cork, June/September 2013 and F.E. McWilliam Gallery, September/November 2013.

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Description: May Guinness (1863-1955)Portrait of a WomanOil on canvas, 84 x 61cm (33 x 24'')Exhibited: 'Analysing Cubism' exhibition, IMMA, February/May 2013, The Crawford Gallery, Cork, June/September 2013 and F.E. McWilliam Gallery, September/November 2013.Literature: 'Analysing Cubism 2013', full page illustration, p.31.This undated work is likely to have been painted after 1922 when Guinness had thoroughly familiarised herself with modern French painting. She studied with the cubist Andre Lhote from 1922 to 1925 but had already spent many years in France. Born in 1863, Guinness first visited Paris before 1910 where she studied art with the Dutch artist Kees Van Dongen, an expressionist painter. She continued to visit the city regularly and to develop her understanding of modernism right into her sixties and beyond. This portrait depicts a young woman wearing a bright strikingly modern costume of coloured stripes with a pink band of material across her head. Her hands are held dutifully in her lap while her detached expression suggests the ennui associated with posing for long periods. Although called a portrait the work can be considered in terms of its abstract design and use of form. Guinness was strongly influenced by French expressionism or Fauvism and especially by the work of Henri Matisse and Van Dongen. This is evident in this painting. The thinly applied paint with its flat texture suggests the technique of fresco painting. It is a style that Matisse used in a number of his paintings most notably in his Portrait of André Derain (1905, Tate) which was shown in the inaugural Fauve exhibition at the Salon d’Automne in 1905. Guinness painted murals at her family home, Tibradden House in the 1920s (now destroyed) in which she may have deployed a similar effect. The strong pinks and oranges of the shadows cast on the face in Portrait of A Woman are typical of Fauvist art which exaggerates the effects of light and shade to create highly decorative and expressive paintings. Guinness was well aware of this idea. Her one-woman exhibition in London in 1922 was called ‘Decorative Paintings and Drawings’. In this painting she builds up the composition in blocks of strong colour to create a consciously modern work of art that exudes the artist’s energy and freshness of vision.Dr Roisin Kennedy November 2016

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Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)Still Life Study, Apples with a vase of FlowersWatercolour, 54.5 x 30.5cm (21½ x 12)Signed

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Description: Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)Still Life Study, Apples with a vase of FlowersWatercolour, 54.5 x 30.5cm (21½ x 12)Signed

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Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)Waterweeds on the NoreOil on canvas, 40.5 x 50.5cm (16 x 20'')SignedExhibited: 'Norah McGuinness Exhibition', The Dawson Gallery, June/July 1972, Catalogue No.23.

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Description: Norah McGuinness HRHA (1901-1980)Waterweeds on the NoreOil on canvas, 40.5 x 50.5cm (16 x 20'')SignedExhibited: 'Norah McGuinness Exhibition', The Dawson Gallery, June/July 1972, Catalogue No.23.

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Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)PortmarnockOil on board, 20 x 25.5cm (8 x 10'')Signed with initialsProvenance: With the Dawson Gallery Dublin, where purchased by N. de Chenn Esq.

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Description: Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)PortmarnockOil on board, 20 x 25.5cm (8 x 10'')Signed with initialsProvenance: With the Dawson Gallery Dublin, where purchased by N. de Chenn Esq.

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Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)The Meath Hunt Point-to-Point RacesOil on board, 12 x 17cm (4¾ x 6¾'')Signed with initials; original exhibition label versoExhibited: 'Irish Women Artists 1870-1970' exhibition, Adam's Dublin, July 2014, Ava

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Description: Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)The Meath Hunt Point-to-Point RacesOil on board, 12 x 17cm (4¾ x 6¾'')Signed with initials; original exhibition label versoExhibited: 'Irish Women Artists 1870-1970' exhibition, Adam's Dublin, July 2014, Ava Gallery Clandeboye, August/September 2014, Catalogue No.67.This is thought to be a study for a picture of the same title that won the artist a bronze medal at the Olympic Games Art Section in London.

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Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)The Kildare Hounds at MaynoothOil on board, 19 x 24cm (7½ x 9½'')Signed with initials

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Description: Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)The Kildare Hounds at MaynoothOil on board, 19 x 24cm (7½ x 9½'')Signed with initials

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Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)The Hunt MeetOil on board, 20.5 x 24.5cm (8 x 9½'')Signed with initialsExhibited: 'Irish Painting Exhibition', The Gorry Gallery, June 2001, Catalogue No.33, where purchased by current owner.

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Description: Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)The Hunt MeetOil on board, 20.5 x 24.5cm (8 x 9½'')Signed with initialsExhibited: 'Irish Painting Exhibition', The Gorry Gallery, June 2001, Catalogue No.33, where purchased by current owner.

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Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)View in a Formal GardenOil on canvas, 61 x 50cm (24 x 19¾'')Signed with initials

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Description: Letitia Marion Hamilton RHA (1878-1964)View in a Formal GardenOil on canvas, 61 x 50cm (24 x 19¾'')Signed with initials

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Eva Henrietta Hamilton (1876-1960)HaymakingOil on canvas, 35.5 x 45.5cm (14 x 18'')Signed and inscribed with title versoExhibited: 'Summer Exhibition 2000', The Frederick Gallery, Catalogue No.11, where purchased by current owner.

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Description: Eva Henrietta Hamilton (1876-1960)HaymakingOil on canvas, 35.5 x 45.5cm (14 x 18'')Signed and inscribed with title versoExhibited: 'Summer Exhibition 2000', The Frederick Gallery, Catalogue No.11, where purchased by current owner.

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Paul Henry RHA (1877-1958)Portrait of Stephen Gwynn (c.1921)Pencil and charcoal on paper, 22 x 15cm (8¾ x 6'')Provenance: Oriel Gallery, Dublin 1978.Literature: S.B. Kennedy 'Paul Henry: Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations', Yale University Press,

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Description: Paul Henry RHA (1877-1958)Portrait of Stephen Gwynn (c.1921)Pencil and charcoal on paper, 22 x 15cm (8¾ x 6'')Provenance: Oriel Gallery, Dublin 1978.Literature: S.B. Kennedy 'Paul Henry: Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations', Yale University Press, 2007; Catalogue No.219, illustrated.Dr. Kennedy notes that this was probably drawn in January or February 1921 when Henry and his first wife, Grace, stayed with Stephen Gwynn at Terenure in Dublin.

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Seán Keating PRHA (1889-1977)Portrait of MovitaCharcoal and pastel, 27 x 29cm (shaped) (10½ x 11½'')SignedMaria Movita Castaneda was a Mexican actress who starred in numerous Hollywood films including Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and the John

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Description: Seán Keating PRHA (1889-1977)Portrait of MovitaCharcoal and pastel, 27 x 29cm (shaped) (10½ x 11½'')SignedMaria Movita Castaneda was a Mexican actress who starred in numerous Hollywood films including Mutiny on the Bounty (1935) and the John Wayne Western Fort Apache (1948).Motiva came to Ireland in the 1940s as the singing partner of boxer, singer and playboy Jack Doyle (1913 - 1978). They were married in a celebrity wedding in Westland Row Church in Dublin. They were famed as a double act on stage which drew sell-out crowds when they toured the country. The couple divorced in 1945 and Movita went on to marry the actor Marlon Brando.Sean Keating would have known Movita and Doyle through the Dublin social scene, particularly as they were fellow habitues of the Wicklow Hotel. Movita died in 2015 at the age of 98.

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Seán Keating PRHA (1889-1977)Burning the KelpOil on board, 57 x 76cm (22½ x 30)Signed, also signed and dated (19)'74Provenance: Purchased from the artist by Mrs Noreen Barrett and thence by descent to the present owner.From the moment Seán Kea

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Description: Seán Keating PRHA (1889-1977)Burning the KelpOil on board, 57 x 76cm (22½ x 30)Signed, also signed and dated (19)'74Provenance: Purchased from the artist by Mrs Noreen Barrett and thence by descent to the present owner.From the moment Seán Keating first stepped onto the Aran Islands with his friend, Harry Clarke, sometime before World War One, it became a place of personal and political artistic identity for the artist. His habit was to visit Aran in the late summer or early autumn, before his teaching year began at the school of art in Dublin (later the NCA, 1937), where he’d spend two weeks or so sketching and painting. Keating also took photographs, and from the early 1930s onwards, cine footage of the islands, which he used to aid the completion of compositions throughout the rest of the year. Always interested in the atmospheric conditions, he’d make notes on sketches about the movement of cloud, the colour of the sea, and the effect of the sun on the landscape. Employed on a part time basis at the NCA, and after his retirement, left without a pension, Keating’s financial mainstay throughout his career was portraiture, followed closely by paintings of the Aran Island people and their traditional way of life, so his trips to the islands were essential, albeit enjoyable. However, after the death of his wife, May (née Walshe), in 1965, Keating stopped going to the islands. He depended instead on his vast store of successful vignettes from previous paintings, photographs, cine footage, notes on atmospheric conditions, and cut outs from magazines and newspapers to supply the constant demand for paintings of Aran. By the time he came to compose Burning the Kelp in 1973 Keating was eighty four years old and nearing the end of his life. Yet, as encouraged by his mentor, William Orpen so many years before, he worked every day to keep his eyes and hands in practice, and to earn a living. With his idea for the painting in mind, he returned to a successful vignette of an Aran woman burning kelp, first seen in paintings made in the 1940s, and to another of a man of Aran beside his currach, versions of which he had painted in the early 1930s. Although painted so late in his career, it is Keating’s attention to the atmospheric conditions, the light, and the calm reflections on the surface of the sea, that draw the eye to the work, and thus, Burning the Kelp represents a lifetime of memories, and of ‘accumulated wisdom’ about which the artist spoke in 1971:‘Aran was different. Aran was coherent … There was a natural background of quite a different palette … strong clear colours like the wonderful clear light … The hand is as good as ever … always enjoying a new sensation, like this morning, with all that powerful light, I can see things that I couldn’t see before … it’s practice … and all the accumulated wisdom behind it …’(Seán Keating - a life, RTE Guide, 10 December, 1971, reproduced in Éimear O’Connor, Seán Keating in Context: Responses to Culture and Politics in Post-Civil War Ireland (Dublin: Carysfort Press, 2009), p. 173-4).Dr Éimear O’Connor HRHAResearch Associate, TRIARC - Irish Art Research Centre, Trinity College DublinAuthor of Seán Keating: Art, Politics and Building the Irish Nation (Kildare: Irish Academic Press, 2013).

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Paul Henry RHA (1877-1958)Connemara Landscape with CottagesOil on canvas, 30 x 38cm (11¾ x 15'')SignedLiterature: “Smurfit Art Collection 2001” Full page illustration P 67Judged stylistically Connemara Landscape with Cottages seems to be a la

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Description: Paul Henry RHA (1877-1958)Connemara Landscape with CottagesOil on canvas, 30 x 38cm (11¾ x 15'')SignedLiterature: “Smurfit Art Collection 2001” Full page illustration P 67Judged stylistically Connemara Landscape with Cottages seems to be a late work by Paul Henry. The low horizon line, with band of blue hills which halt the eyes recession, the main narrative of the scene confined to a narrow strip of land in the middle distance are characteristic features of Henry’s compositional technique . The mood of the scene , with its overall sense of tranquillity is also a trait that pervades his whole oeuvre. Dated 1940 - 5 on stylistic grounds. “Connemara landscape with cottages ” is provisionally numbered 1310 in Dr S.B. Kennedy’s on-going catalogue Raisonné of Paul Henry’s work. Dr S.B. Kennedy

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Sir William Orpen RA RWS RHA (1878-1931)Self-Portrait (1912)Oil on canvas, 61 x 51cm (24 x 20'')Signed and dated 1912Exhibited: “An Ireland Imagined: An exhibition of Irish Paintings and drawings 1860 - 1960” The Pyms Gallery London Oct/Nov 1993

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Description: Sir William Orpen RA RWS RHA (1878-1931)Self-Portrait (1912)Oil on canvas, 61 x 51cm (24 x 20'')Signed and dated 1912Exhibited: “An Ireland Imagined: An exhibition of Irish Paintings and drawings 1860 - 1960” The Pyms Gallery London Oct/Nov 1993 Cat. No. 29Literature: “An Ireland Imagined: An exhibition of Irish Paintings and drawings 1860 - 1960” The Pyms Gallery London 1993 Pages 50 - 52 Colour illustration Page 53“Smurfit Art Collection 2001” Full page illustration Page 37Provenance: “Irish Sale” Sotheby’s London May 1996 Cat. No. 457 where purchased by current ownersThere are a series of framing devices within this work of self-portraiture by Orpen. He places a painting within paintings making reference to two of his own earlier works The Young Man of the West, 1909, Private Collection and The Dead Ptarmigan, 1909 National Gallery of Ireland to which this work is almost an identical study. In each case he has chosen a more close-up format to give a greater scrutiny to his features. If viewed as group his self-portraits crystallise his physiognomic peculiarities - you feel as if you recognise him, it looks like him- however is this likeness subjective The manner in which we speak or write about self-portraiture has changed greatly since the tradition of Rembrandt. Our desire now to associate the image of the artist with some kind of inner turmoil, an insight into their personality, emotions and fears was previously irrelevant. A reading of Rembrandt’s self-portraits in the manner of personality and individuality was only possible after Romantic age. The idea of the self or personhood did not exist in the 16th century, rather Rembrandt’s huge output of self-portraits related to the fact that the wanted to develop a strong association between his skill as a painter with his own image, thus reinforcing the connection as artist and model. However, elements of this thinking are still pertinent to a work such as this by Orpen, but there are some insights that we have into Orpen’s personal life that may colour how we perceive the self-portrait. Orpen was not particularly enamoured by his physical appearance, he was small in stature, measuring only 5ft 2in and the half-length portrait, placing his figure at the forefront of the picture plane with little background detail which would serve to give a sense of proportion and hence his small, possibly emasculating height. Equally his large protruding lip which he doesn’t disguise in the image rather by showing himself in profile he accentuates it while the dramatic lighting emphasizes the sharp angularity of the nose. The costume he adopts a striking scarf and black beret, his furrowed brow and dark piercing eyes projects a sense of taking oneself very seriously. The theatricality of his poses and compositions was influential for his followers in particular in the work of Sean Keating. We are aware of his positioning looking into a mirror while painting, however it is interesting that Orpen does not include his hands, the brush or palette in the image as identifiers of his profession, his skill - his art via his image. We acknowledge with thanks The Pyms Gallery and The Orpen Research Project whose previous writings formed the basis of this catalogue entry.Niamh Corcoran, November 2016

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Sir William Orpen RA RWS RHA (1878-1931)Portrait of Mrs Oscar Lewisohn, formerly Miss Edna MayOil on canvas, 202 x 92cm (79½ x 36¼'')SignedProvenance: Christies “Irish Sale” 22nd May 1998 Lot No. 29 where purchased by current owners. Literature

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Description: Sir William Orpen RA RWS RHA (1878-1931)Portrait of Mrs Oscar Lewisohn, formerly Miss Edna MayOil on canvas, 202 x 92cm (79½ x 36¼'')SignedProvenance: Christies “Irish Sale” 22nd May 1998 Lot No. 29 where purchased by current owners. Literature:The Artist’s Studio Book, 28-15/1915;Cara Copland Reference: LO3:11;Laib Glass Negative Number: 8154;P.G. Konody & S. Dark, Sir William Orpen: Artist and Man, 1932, p. 270, illustrated pl.6;Bruce Arnold, Mirror to an Age, 1981, p. 298“Smurfit Art Collection 2001” Full page illustration p. 39The figure is Edna Lewisohn - better known as Edna May - her stage name on Broadway in the leading roles of Edwardian Musical comedies. Born Edna May Pettie in September 1878 in Syracuse, New York, the daughter of a postman, her story is one of social migration, from a working class background to a renowned Broadway star. She started her career at the tender age of five, working as a child performer before leaving for New York at sixteen to study theatre at the New York Conservatoire, making her debut appearance on Broadway in 1896. Her big break came as Violet Grey in the musical comedy The Belle of New York, which after transferring to Shaftesbury Theatre became a huge success, running for 697 performances. The inclusion of both her names within the title of the painting is telling of her success, independent from that of her marriage to New York millionaire Oscar Lewisohn. After her marriage to Lewisohn in 1907 she retired from the stage to focus on her role as a devoted wife. The couple had no children and a decade later Lewisohn was dead. Edna outlived her late husband by thirty years returning to London in 1917 where she resided in The Ritz before leaving for Lausanne in Switzerland where she died in 1948. Orpen painted this work in 1915 when the couple were about to close their house at Cranbourne Court near Windsor and return to New York. There is a scrutiny to the painting, which makes it an incredibly compelling portrait. Our in-depth knowledge of Edna’s personal life has a direct impact on how we read the work. The emotional tenor of the painting is enhanced by our preconceived ideas of knowing the sitter, albeit considerably heightened for her contemporaries in early 20th century. In his portraiture Orpen attempts to read the character of the individual whether expressed through temperament or style, their faces or their clothes. In the same year Orpen would paint another two full length portraits of society women, Madame Eugenia Errazuriz (1915, Mildura Arts Centre, Australia) and Lady Idina Wallace (1915, Private Collection). The angling of the chequered floor and her pointed satin slipper emerging from beneath her dress draws the viewers eye up the length of her body to the her face. The details are subtle, nothing over powers the sitter, instead the dabs of pure white highlight on the sapphire ring or pearl necklace act as visual delights for the viewer’s eye to dance over as they peruse the painting. Or the rich blue cape draping along the floor as if it has slipped from her shoulders upon returning home from another glamorous cocktail party. The viewer is repaid for their attention to the details of texture and colour in the work as on closer inspection the white of the dress is in fact made up of a myriad of hues- blue, greens and brown undertones- to enhance the lustre and sheen of the silk dress. Though presented as a full-length portrait, a formidable and striking format, the face belies vulnerability. Her radiance as a performer and striking beauty is not diminished in the work despite the fact that she appears sad, her face flooded with emotion and feeling, her eyes almost glassy with tears. We can only speculate about the reason behind such melancholy, an unhappy marriage, a highly successful career abandoned in favour of being an attentive and dutiful wife There is nowhere for the figure to hide in Orpen’s portrait, set against the inky black backdrop, no character for her to adopt or costume to put on, Edna is utterly exposed. We acknowledge with thanks the Orpen Research Project whose research and writings formed the basis of this catalogue entry. Niamh Corcoran, November 2016

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Estella Frances Solomons HRHA (1882-1968)Woman Reading at a Desk by a WindowOil on canvas, 42 x 52cm (16½ x 20½)Provenance: From the artists studio

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Description: Estella Frances Solomons HRHA (1882-1968)Woman Reading at a Desk by a WindowOil on canvas, 42 x 52cm (16½ x 20½)Provenance: From the artists studio

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Estella Frances Solomons HRHA (1882-1968)Portrait of Elizabeth Lucy (Norah) HoultOil on canvas, 61 x 51cm (24 x 20'')Provenance: From the artist's studio. The estate of Geoffrey O'Connor, Co. Kerry.The writer Elizabeth Lucy Hoult known as ‘Nora

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Description: Estella Frances Solomons HRHA (1882-1968)Portrait of Elizabeth Lucy (Norah) HoultOil on canvas, 61 x 51cm (24 x 20'')Provenance: From the artist's studio. The estate of Geoffrey O'Connor, Co. Kerry.The writer Elizabeth Lucy Hoult known as ‘Norah’ was born in Dublin but due to the early death of her parents was mainly educated in English boarding schools.Her first book “Poor women! (1928)” gained her both popular and critical success. She married the English writer Oliver Stoner in 1929 but the marriage was only to last four years and after they split up she returned to live in Rathmines. She wrote critical reviews for a number of publications including the “Dublin Magazine” whose editor was Seamus O’Sullivan , Estella Solomons husband and she was a friend of both husband and wife. While in Ireland she wrote two novels based here “Holy Ireland”(1935) and “Coming to the Fair” published in 1937, the year she left Ireland for New York where she stayed for two years. She lived in London until 1957 after which she returned to Ireland living her life in relative solitude at Jonquil Cottage in Greystones earning a modest income from her writings. Our thanks to Nicholas Allen whose writings for the RIA “Dictionary of Irish Biography” formed the basis of this catalogue note.

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Henry Jones Thaddeus (1860-1929)A Lady of FashionOil on panel, 25.5 x 18cm (10 x 7'')Signed

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Description: Henry Jones Thaddeus (1860-1929)A Lady of FashionOil on panel, 25.5 x 18cm (10 x 7'')Signed

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Paul Henry RHA (1876-1958)Cottages (1930-35)Oil on board, 25.4 x 29.9cm (10 x 11¾'')SignedProvenance: Hugh Francis Carey and thence by descent; sale, Christies London, ‘The Irish Sale’, 12 May 2006, Lot 81, reproduced in colour; Private Collectio

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Description: Paul Henry RHA (1876-1958)Cottages (1930-35)Oil on board, 25.4 x 29.9cm (10 x 11¾'')SignedProvenance: Hugh Francis Carey and thence by descent; sale, Christies London, ‘The Irish Sale’, 12 May 2006, Lot 81, reproduced in colour; Private Collection.Literature: S. B. Kennedy, 'Paul Henry: with a catalogue of the Paintings, Drawings, Illustrations’, Yale University Press, New Haven & London, 2007, illustrated p. 252, catalogue number 762.It is impossible to say where this scene represents, but it is no doubt in Connemara. The fairly heavy impasto seen in the sky is characteristic of Henry’s work, as is the highlighting in the water in the foreground. The division of the picture plane into two halves is another Henry characteristic. Dated 1930-5 on stylistic grounds.Dr S.B.Kennedy November 2016

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Henry Harewood Robinson (Fl.1884-1904)Hide and SeekOil on panel, 47.5 x 37.5cm (18 x 14¼'')SignedExhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy 1887, Catalogue No.193 (thought to be the same work).Henry Harewood Robinson, along with his wife, Irish painter

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Description: Henry Harewood Robinson (Fl.1884-1904)Hide and SeekOil on panel, 47.5 x 37.5cm (18 x 14¼'')SignedExhibited: Royal Hibernian Academy 1887, Catalogue No.193 (thought to be the same work).Henry Harewood Robinson, along with his wife, Irish painter Maria Webb, was one of the central figures in the early years of the St Ives School, Cornwall. He was a painter of landscape, figure and harbour subjects in Brittany and Cornwall, which he exhibited at the RHA and the Royal Academy.He became the first secretary of the St Ives Art Club, founded in 1890, serving for nine years and later becoming its president. He was a popular and generous man, also knowledgeable about music and training as a barrister. (See Marian Whybrow, 'St Ives 1883-1993: Portrait of an Art Colony', Antique Collectors Club, Suffok 1994).Robinson visited Concarneau in 1884 and may have met Maria Webb from Ireland, also painting in Brittany at this period. (J. Campbell, 'Peintres Irlandais en Bretagne', Pont-Aven 1999). Upon moving to St Ives, the couple married in 1886 or 1887. They lived in a tower shaped house, with a studio at the top.He wrote for the magazine 'West Country Arts Review' in 1896. He also 'gave many concerts at St Ives for charitable purposes, arranging songs and conducting the orchestra.' (Whybrow, p.45). Robinson died at his house, Bellyars Croft, in 1904.Robinson's most important works are of Breton and Cornish subjects. He was a regular exhibitor at the RHA Dublin, 1887-1902, at The Royal Academy, 1884-1896, and at other venues in Britain. His major Breton subject, 'Market Girls, Brittany', was shown in the Liverpool Autumn Exhibition in 1885, the RA in 1886 and the RHA in 1887.The present picture may be that entitled 'Hide and Seek' which was also exhibited in Dublin in 1887. A girl with white cap, clogs and apron is shown peeping around the corner of a woodland chapel or cloisters, into which sun streams. Robinson delicately captures the fall of warm pink sunlight upon the stonework and the alluring glimpse of verdant trees through the archway. The picture is framed by a hand-made wooden frame, decorated with hob-nails, contributing to the individual vernacular effect.Dr Julian Campbell

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Erskine Nicol RSA ARA (1825-1904)Study for 'The Apple of her Eye'Oil on canvas, 122 x 94cm (48 x 37'')Signed

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Description: Erskine Nicol RSA ARA (1825-1904)Study for 'The Apple of her Eye'Oil on canvas, 122 x 94cm (48 x 37'')Signed

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Sir John Lavery RA RSA RHA (1856-1941)A Street in TangierOil on board, 25.5 x 35.5cm (10 x 14'')SignedProvenance: With The Pyms Gallery, LondonLiterature: Kenneth McConkey, 'The White City - Sir John Lavery in Tangier in The Irish Arts Review Y

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Description: Sir John Lavery RA RSA RHA (1856-1941)A Street in TangierOil on board, 25.5 x 35.5cm (10 x 14'')SignedProvenance: With The Pyms Gallery, LondonLiterature: Kenneth McConkey, 'The White City - Sir John Lavery in Tangier in The Irish Arts Review Yearbook 1989-90, Full page illustration Page 60From the 1830s North Africa and the Middle East became places of artistic pilgrimage, but while painters such as Lewis, Lear and Holman Hunt preferred the eastern Mediterranean, in Lavery's era an instant Orient was to be found by simply crossing the Straits of Gibraltar. Where Orientalist painters concentrated upon narrating the Eastern way of life, the rituals of the Mosque and the Harem, Lavery's generation looked to this environment for its colour. Lavery's first visit to Morocco took place in 1891, at the instigation of his friends, the Glasgow artists Arthur Melville and Joseph Crawhall. After almost annual visits, in 1903 he bought Dar-el-Midfah ('the House of the Cannon', for a half buried cannon in the garden), a small house in the hills outside Tangier which he continued to visit with his family over the next 20 years. It has been claimed that for Lavery the strong light, cloudless sky, white walls and bright colour of Arab dress helped to cleanse his eye after sustained periods of studio portraiture. Within a few years of visiting Morocco for the first time, the light sable sketching of his Glasgow period gave way to a richer and more sensuous application.In his article The White City - Sir John Lavery in Tangier in the Irish Arts Review Yearbook 1989-90 (Page 58) Kenneth McConkey mentions this work:- As an avid sketcher, he made frequent sorties into the bye-ways of the city and small pictures such as A street in Tangier' typify his fascination for the sun bleached walls and strong shadows tinged with violet.With thanks to Dr Kenneth McConkey whose research and writings formed the basis of this note.

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Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)Still Life with Champagne BottleOil on canvas, 51 x 71cm (20 x 28'')Signed; AR PH120 inscribed versoProvenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries.Exhibited: 'Patrick Hennessy Exhibition', The Victor Waddington Galleries, Dub

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Description: Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)Still Life with Champagne BottleOil on canvas, 51 x 71cm (20 x 28'')Signed; AR PH120 inscribed versoProvenance: Tom Caldwell Galleries.Exhibited: 'Patrick Hennessy Exhibition', The Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, March 1948, Cat. No.8; 'Patrick Hennessy Retrospective Exhibition', Dublin Painters Gallery, 1949, Cat No.18;'Patrick Hennessy Exhibition', The David Hendriks Gallery, November 1973, Cat. No.22; later shown at the Tom Caldwell Gallery, Belfast (label verso).This still life by Patrick Hennessy is very close to the onlooker. The subject takes up all the canvas with no background, just the rough timber table and the objects to be painted. The glass jar is central to the composition. All the other objects are off-centre to the right - an empty champagne bottle and two bright yellow lemons emerging from crumpled white wrapping paper. The large scale of the picture creates the need for greater detail. Hennessy obliges by the lettering on the bottle label, the texture of the lemons and the white paper edges seen through the glass of the jar and bottle. Perhaps this is just an academic exercise in painting but it adds to the visual pleasure and feeling that is not always evident in still life painting. It could be argued that the composition in this painting is not contrived but a natural combination.Kevin A. Rutledge November 2016Patrick Hennessy RHACork 1915 - London 1980The two recent exhibitions of Patrick Hennessy’s work have been held. In “The Language of Dreams (Dreams and the Unconscious in 20th Century Art)”, hosted by the Crawford Gallery Cork from October 2015 to February 2016, the Hennessy exhibits served as a mini-centenary tribute. In Dublin, IMMA, the tribute to Hennessy “De Profundis”, March - June 2016 was a welcome and long overdue event in the establishment of Hennessy as an important and often overlooked figure, seen by many as an outsider or a purely academic painter without an obvious Irish or nationalistic style. This current sale of four paintings gives a view of his varied subjects and talents.Sometimes Hennessy’s choice of subject bordered on the controversial and perhaps has been overanalysed to fit into a convenient controversial slot. The danger of this is that it distracts from the appreciation of what can only be called a fine painting, while attempting to find hidden detail or emotions that are not evident or don’t exist.Patrick Hennessy’s vast array of subject matter, painted with confidence and ease, moved him into the mainstream of successful artists of his era working in Ireland and it started from the date of his arrival back home from Scotland in 1939. He had a loyal group of patrons and collectors and never had to compromise to achieve popularity with them. The four paintings on sale are all different in subject matter, but consistent in demonstrating his very high technical standard.Kevin A. Rutledge2016

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Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980) The Bronze Horses of Saint Marks (1953)Oil on canvas, 101 x 76.5cm (39¾ x 30)SignedExhibited: RHA Annual Exhibition 1953 Cat. No. 67; “Patrick Hennessy Exhibition” Dublin Painters Gallery  November 1953  Cat. N

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Description: Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980) The Bronze Horses of Saint Marks (1953)Oil on canvas, 101 x 76.5cm (39¾ x 30)SignedExhibited: RHA Annual Exhibition 1953 Cat. No. 67; “Patrick Hennessy Exhibition” Dublin Painters Gallery November 1953 Cat. No. 8; The Royal Academy London Annual Exhibition 1955 Cat. No. 13; “The Language of Dreams : Dreams and the Unconscious in 20th Century Irish Art”; The Crawford Art Gallery Cork Oct 2015 - Feb 2016; “Patrick Hennessy : De Profundis Exhibition Irish Museum of Modern Art March - July 2016.Literature: “The language of dreams : Dreams and the Unconscious in 20th Century Irish Art”, The Crawford Gallery Cork 2015, full page illustration page 31; “Patrick Hennessy : De Profundis “ Exhibition Irish Museum of Modern Art 2016, illustrated page 31.The Lion of St. Mark and the Bronze Horses of St. Mark are the two emblematic symbols of the Republic of Venice. From the time the Bronze Horses were looted from the Emperor’s box in the Hippodrome in Constantinople in 1204 by the Venetians, signalling the end of the Byzantine empire, they became the emblem of Venetian power in the Adriatic and Mediterranean until it ended with the conquest and occupation of Venice by Napoleon Bonaparte in 1797 and the removal of the Horses to Paris. After the Congress of Vienna (1815), they were returned to Venice, but the power of Venice was over and the city slid into decline in the 19th century and rescued in the 20th century by the vast numbers of tourists seeking the treasures of the city.Patrick Hennessy’s painting of the Horses is dramatic in its viewpoint, composition and colour. The four prancing statues stand proud and arrogant, silhouetted against a dark brooding sky. Because we are looking up at them, they have a majestic appearance and set against the façade of St. Mark’s Cathedral, appear to be emerging from the stone. The colours are sombre and continue the mood of power and majesty - a good example of Hennessy’s ability to create an atmospheric mood with paint. This painting is one of Hennessy’s finest works, and this has been recognised by some eminent people.In conversation with the author the owner, Major Stephen Vernon, quoted Sir Kenneth Clark after viewing the painting in the Royal Academy, as saying about Hennessy’s 'The Bronze Horses of St. Mark', “In any country in any century, this would be viewed as a fine painting.” Praise indeed.Kevin A. Rutledge November 2016

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Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)The Temple of Concord - Agrigento, SicilyOil on board, 21 x 31cm (8¼ x 12¼)SignedProvenance: Thought to have been acquired directly from the artist in the 1950s.Patrick Hennessy’s painting tours of the Continent

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Description: Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)The Temple of Concord - Agrigento, SicilyOil on board, 21 x 31cm (8¼ x 12¼)SignedProvenance: Thought to have been acquired directly from the artist in the 1950s.Patrick Hennessy’s painting tours of the Continent were always faithfully recorded in the paintings shown in his annual exhibition in the Hendriks Gallery. These tours gave him subjects to paint that he relished, particularly the Classical and Antique. His body of work contains many examples of paintings depicting classical statues and ruins, of which several were shown in the De Profundis Exhibition at IMMA early this year, namely 'The Man-Made Man and Rose' and 'Horseman, pass by'. They gave him an opportunity to display his considerable expertise in the effect of trompe l’oeil.The ruined temple of Agrigento is different compared to a number of Hennessy Classical subjects. The low viewpoint in which the main subject takes up only one third of the bottom of the canvas is not unusual in his work. He liked to paint large expanses of blue cloudless skies, but the way in which he has framed the temple by positioning it between two cactus trees in the very near foreground is not his usual practice, but it is a nod towards classical landscape painting. The slight presence of colour in the flowers at the base of the painting serve to contrast with the otherwise arid ground, all perfectly painted.Kevin A. Rutledge November 2016

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Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)Still Life with Lemons and Pink FabricOil on board, 50.5 x 40.8cm (20 x 16)SignedProvenance: Thought to have been acquired directly from the artist in the 1950s.Exhibited: 'Patrick Hennessy: DC Profundis' exhibi

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Description: Patrick Hennessy RHA (1915-1980)Still Life with Lemons and Pink FabricOil on board, 50.5 x 40.8cm (20 x 16)SignedProvenance: Thought to have been acquired directly from the artist in the 1950s.Exhibited: 'Patrick Hennessy: DC Profundis' exhibition, IMMA, March/July 2016.This simple still life is an arrangement of a length of fabric hanging from the back of a chair with two lemons placed on the seat of the chair. Unusually, Hennessy chose a printed cloth. His usual choice was for heavy textured damasks and brocades. One could surmise this was to show his skill at rendering the textures and designs on canvas. But here in this painting the emphasis is on the folds, tucks and gathers in the draped pink cloth. The yellow of the lemons resting on the cloth is a stark contrast to the pink.Patrick Hennessy never tired of painting still lives. Every exhibition had its quota and they were commercially successful. His admiration for the 17th Century Dutch members of that genre, and Chardin and Vermeer, painters of quiet mood and emotion, fuelled his desire to emulate them. This was paramount to his success. His clients wanted simple decorative still lives, not broody contentious subject matter. Hennessy fulfilled this need perfectly.Kevin A. Rutledge November 2016

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Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)Glory to the Brave SingerOil on canvas, 61 x 91.5cm (24 x 36'')SignedExhibited: RHA Annual exhibition 1951 Cat. No. 172; 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, October 1953 Cat. No. 1;

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Description: Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)Glory to the Brave SingerOil on canvas, 61 x 91.5cm (24 x 36'')SignedExhibited: RHA Annual exhibition 1951 Cat. No. 172; 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Victor Waddington Galleries, Dublin, October 1953 Cat. No. 1; ‘Munster Fine Art Club Annual Exhibition’ Cork 1956; 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Waddington Galleries London, March/April 1963, Cat. No.28; 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Waddington Galleries London, Oct/Nov 1967, Cat. No.24; 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Waddington Galleries London, April/May 1971, Cat. No.24. Literature: 'Jack B. Yeats' exhibition catalogues, Waddington Galleries London 1963, 1967 both illustrated in B & W and 1971 illustrated in colour; 'Jack B. Yeats Catalogue Raisonne of Oil Paintings' by Hilary Pyle, London 1992, Cat. No. 1065 Vol II page 967.This late visionary work of Jack B. Yeats depicts a woman reclining in the landscape. She raises herself from the ground and extends her right arm in an exaggerated manner. She points towards a songbird which stands on the topmost branch of a tree, its neck extended and its beak open skywards as it fills the air with its music. The woman’s face is in profile and her closed eyes convey an expression of complete rapture as she listens to the singing of the thrush. Her serpentine pose, in which she looks over her shoulder, suggests that she has been aroused from her sleep by the mesmerising sound of the bird. The highly theatrical posture of the figure is reminiscent of a modern dancer or a classical actress. Her flamboyant appearance and strange gesturing make it appear that she is in abeyance to the bird, prostrate in the face of its splendour. The long dark hair, dangling gold earring and exotic costume of the woman suggest that she is a gypsy or travelling player who has come to rest in this wild location. She is the female equivalent of the wandering men found in so many of Yeats works, most notably the youth in The Singing Horseman, (1949, National Gallery of Ireland). She lies in a tree-lined bower contained by the vertical trunks of saplings that form a protective palisade of blues and reds which opens to a sky of blue and yellow. The colours of her dress; blue, white, pink and gold are enhanced by those of the flowers and plants of this lush setting. This part of the composition recalls those of other late paintings most notably A Rose Among Many Waters, (1952, Private Collection). The subject of a figure enthralled by a bird is also reminiscent of Yeats’s A Blackbird Singing in Tir na Nóg (1943, Private Collection). In this a child gazes upon a bird as it bathes in a rock pool in the midst of a lush and verdant landscape. The painting was exhibited at the RHA in Dublin in 1951 when its resemblance to the earlier and much larger work, There is no Night (1949, Dublin City Gallery) was noted by one writer. This iconic painting shows a male figure reclining in an open marshy landscape. He lifts himself up and gestures, in a similar fashion to the figure in this painting, to a distant white galloping horse. However in Glory to the Brave Singer the view into space is curtailed by the rich vegetation that encircles the woman. The title adds a sense of drama and intrigue with its connotations of subterfuge and danger. This is a highly romantic work, part of a series of Yeats’s later paintings that portray the enduring beauty of nature and its power over humanity. The painting was shown in the Munster Fine Art Club Exhibition in Cork in 1956 and several times at the Victor Waddington Gallery in London in the late 1950s and 1960s but it has rarely been exhibited in public since becoming part of a private collection in 1971. It belongs firmly with the other great epic paintings of Yeats’s late works. Dr Roisin Kennedy November 2016

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Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)Man Hearing an Old Song (1949)Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14'')SignedProvenance: The collection of Iris Winthrop, USA; later given by Victor Waddington for the benefit of the Israel Museum Jerusalem and sold So

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Description: Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)Man Hearing an Old Song (1949)Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14'')SignedProvenance: The collection of Iris Winthrop, USA; later given by Victor Waddington for the benefit of the Israel Museum Jerusalem and sold Sothebys, April 1967; later in the collection of Mrs. Bruce Wood, England.Exhibited: 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Waddington Galleries, London Sept/Oct 1967, Cat. No.21.Literature: 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition' Catalogue, London 1967, illustrated; 'Jack B. Yeats Catalogue Raisonne of the Oil Paintings', by Hilary Pyle, Cat. No.997, Vo.II p.901.This is an intensely moving study of the effects of music on the individual. It focuses on how this is manifested physically in the features of the listener. Yeats, a lover of theatre and music, was aware of the emotional power of song and expresses it in this painting in terms of a long remembered melody and its effect on one member of the audience. An old man listens with rapt attention to a musical performance. His hands are clasped to his face as he turns his eyes away from the stage so that he can hear the music more clearly. Behind him a young female singer in flamboyant costume performs. Her arms are extended before her in a dramatic pose while the strong theatrical lighting illuminates her face, making her appear like an angelic apparition. The head of her aging listener is by contrast solidly sculpted out of light and shade. The darkness of the auditorium is conveyed through intense deep blues with the features of the stage barely sketched in thin blue forms against the almost untouched canvas. The close-up perspective throws the two protagonists into a dramatic juxtaposition in which the other members of the audience are conveyed as abstract red and blue forms.Dr Roisin Kennedy

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Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)Lambay (1925)Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14'')SignedExhibited: 'Jack B. Yeats: Pictures of Irish Life', The Tooth Gallery London, March/April 1925, Catalogue No.32.Literature: 'Jack B. Yeats: Catalogue Raisonn

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Description: Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)Lambay (1925)Oil on board, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14'')SignedExhibited: 'Jack B. Yeats: Pictures of Irish Life', The Tooth Gallery London, March/April 1925, Catalogue No.32.Literature: 'Jack B. Yeats: Catalogue Raisonne of Oil Paintings' by Hilary Pyle, Catalogue No.261, page 236, Vol.1 (wrongly illustrated).Yeats sketched Lambay Island from the Malahide Road in 1925, (sketchbook 214 [138]). (He also produced a painting of Ireland’s Eye at the same time). This painting is based on that sketch in which he noted the yellow light of the sun above the horizon and on the left-hand side the grey blue of the sea. The foreground shows the dark green shoreline with brown sandbanks visible through the waves. The sky is overcast with blustery clouds of grey and blue. This dominates the upper most section of the composition while beneath an expanse of golden tinged sky prevails. Lambay, four miles off the coast, rises above the horizon line amidst this calm surrounding. The hazy mass of land appears mirage like in the distance.Dr. Roisin Kennedy

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Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)The False Morning Promise (1945)Oil on panel, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14'')SignedProvenance: Sold through the Waddington Galleries Dublin to Leslie Dacus 1945.Exhibited: 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Waddington Galleries

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Description: Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871-1957)The False Morning Promise (1945)Oil on panel, 23 x 35.5cm (9 x 14'')SignedProvenance: Sold through the Waddington Galleries Dublin to Leslie Dacus 1945.Exhibited: 'Jack B. Yeats Exhibition', Waddington Galleries London, April/May 1971, Cat. No13.Literature: 'Jack B. Yeats' exhibition catalogue, London 1971, illustrated in colour; 'Jack B. Yeats Catalogue Raisonne of Oil Paintings' by Hilary Pyle, London 1992, Cat. No.713.Yeats painted a number of pure landscapes of Dublin Bay, Sligo and Donegal in 1945. Like this bright painting, many of them focus on waterside scenery. The view looks across a span of water, with a pathway visible in the extreme left foreground, to a hill with a cow grazing on the other side of the inlet. Two small boats, one dark blue, the other a muted grey, bob on the surface of the water. In the middle left of the composition the water merges with the land forming a glistening surface of reflected light. This leads the eye to the distant shapes and forms of hills and mountains and to the sky beyond. The paint is applied in varied and seemingly rapid strokes, in which touches of brown amidst the blue and white suggest sand and dirt and the shadows of clouds above. Above all the physical surface of the painting conveys the idea of a water sodden landscape that is constantly changing. The title gives a clue as to why this is happening. A calm sunny morning is about to be overcome by threatening rain. The lightness of the palette creates, however, an optimistic mood and evokes the freshness of the Irish countryside. Dr Roisin Kennedy November 2016

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Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871 - 1957)Romantic ShadesPen and Ink, 40 x 56cm (15½ x 22½)Signed and inscribedTogether with two pencil studies / key towards same (various sizes) (3)Provenance: Victor Waddington Galleries, London, 1973 where acqui

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Description: Jack Butler Yeats RHA (1871 - 1957)Romantic ShadesPen and Ink, 40 x 56cm (15½ x 22½)Signed and inscribedTogether with two pencil studies / key towards same (various sizes) (3)Provenance: Victor Waddington Galleries, London, 1973 where acquired by the present ownersExhibition: London, The Waddington Galleries III, Jack B. Yeats, Watercolours and Drawings, 1973, cat. nos. 30-31Literature: “A Broadside” No. 12 Third year (May 1911) The Different Worlds of Jack B. Yeats: His Cartoons and Illustrations, Hilary Pyle 1994, no. 1848, p.255The drawing gathers together some literary characters who influenced the artists imagination including Don Quixote, Omar Khayam, Harvey Duff, Falstaff, Willie Reilly and champagne Charlie.

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PADRAIG PEARSE (1879 - 1916) THE FINAL ORDER OF SURRENDER, EASTER 1916. Written in Ink on Paper, 35 x 20.5cm (13 x 8’’) The single page having several drawing pin holes and crease marks, Signed and dated 30th April, 1916. ‘’In order to prevent f

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Description: PADRAIG PEARSE (1879 - 1916) THE FINAL ORDER OF SURRENDER, EASTER 1916. Written in Ink on Paper, 35 x 20.5cm (13 x 8’’) The single page having several drawing pin holes and crease marks, Signed and dated 30th April, 1916. ‘’In order to prevent further slaughter of the civil population and in the hope of saving the lives of our followers, the members of the Provisional Government present at headquarters have decided on an unconditional surrender, and commandants or officers commanding districts will order their commands to lay down arms. P.H.Pearse, Dublin, 30th April 1916 ‘’ Provenance: Fr. Columbus O.F.M. Cap.; Fr. Conrad, O.F.M. Cap. As Provincial (Superior) of the Capuchin Order. Thence by descent.Sale: Adam’s, St.Stephen’s Green, Dublin May 2005, Lot No. 31, €800,000Literature: Seamus O’Buachalla (Ed), The Collected Letters of Patrick Pearse. Peader O’ Donabhain, Doicimead Stairiuil O 1916, Comhar, Samhain, 1975. Piaras Mac Lochloainn, Last Words, Letters and Statements of the Leaders Executed after the Rising at Easter, 1916.Unconditional surrenderDiarmaid Ferriter, June 2016Historians have rightly made much of the importance of the First World War in relation to the staging of the Easter Rising in 1916. International conflict had a profound impact on those who became central leaders in the rebellion, including Patrick Pearse. He viewed the war as providing an opportunity for Irish republicans to organize, in a more serious manner, for rebellion but also to become preoccupied with the notion of blood sacrifice and the idea that the war presented an opportunity for redemption: “It is good for the world that such things should be done. The old heart of the earth needed to be warmed with the red wine of the battlefields. Such august homage was never offered to God as this, the homage of lives given gladly for love of country”.What that meant in practice, however, was brought home to Pearse by the end of Easter Week 1916. As noted by historian Joe Lee, “After he had hesitated about surrendering initially, the sight of the shedding of innocent blood seems to have revolted Pearse as much as the rhetoric of blood had excited him”. During the Rising, though the looting appalled him, he had refused to follow his own injunction to shoot captured looters. Now, from the rebel’s last headquarters in Moore Street, seeing three civilians with a white flag shot down, Pearse surrendered, in the hope of saving civilians and his followers, on the afternoon of Saturday, 29 April. There was nothing ambiguous about Pearse’s response to the demand of Brigadier-General William Lowe, who had commanded British military operations throughout most of the week, that the rebels “surrender unconditionally”. While the Provisional Government of the Republic had hoped to negotiate terms, Pearse, after his surrender to Lowe, was in no position to negotiate anything. Following a brief meeting with British commander in chief General John Maxwell at the British army headquarters in Parkgate Street, a quickly typed order to his subordinates was composed:“ In order to prevent the further slaughter of Dublin citizens, and in the hope of saving the lives of our followers now surrounded and hopelessly outnumbered, the members of the Provisional Government present at Headquarters have agreed to an unconditional surrender, and the commandants of the various districts in the city and country will order their commands to lay down arms”.Pearse signed it, and on the same page underneath this order was a handwritten note by James Connolly: “I agree to these conditions for the men only under my own command in the Moore Street District and for the men in the Stephen’s Green Command.”This is one of the best-known documents in modern Irish history and it is housed at the Imperial War Museum in London. Given the clarity of this order, it should have been the last official one Pearse composed. But just as the 1916 Rising commenced in confused circumstances, so it finished in confused circumstances due to the difficulties associated with relaying messages. How was this order from Pearse to be communicated and would it be believed or accepted Given the nature of the rebel’s military strategy in 1916 and the extent to which their limited numbers were spread throughout the city in a variety of buildings and outposts, some the scenes of intense battles, others quiet, and given the considerable British military presence by the end of the week, this was not going to be straightforward. After his brief visit to Parkgate, Pearse was taken to Arbour Hill detention barracks and copies of the surrender order were taken to Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell to be relayed to the sections of rebels at various points in the city, but there were difficulties in getting all them to agree to surrender. Various commanders were reluctant but were persuaded. Rebels at Boland’s Mill, Jacob’s Factory, St Stephen’s Green and Marrowbone Lane surrendered and as prisoners, were marched to Richmond Barracks where the leaders were identified. It has been noted, “except for a scattering of snipers in Dublin, the surrender was complete”. But it was not quite as straightforward as that.During Easter week the fighting in the Four Courts area, with its northern outposts at Church Street and North King Street, and its southern posts held at Church Street Bridge, and beyond the river at the Mendicity Institute, was exceptionally severe. General Maxwell subsequently stated “with the one exception of the place at Ballsbridge, where the Sherwood Foresters were ambushed, this was by far the worst fighting that occurred in the whole of Dublin.” This remark especially applied to the fighting at the intersection of Church Street and North King Street, and, a short distance further north, at the intersection of Church Street and North Brunswick Street. Despite relentless assaults down Church St., supported by an armoured car, British forces were unable to penetrate more than 150 yards between the morning of Friday 28 April and 2 p.m. on Saturday 29 April. On the Saturday evening, Capuchin Fr Albert Bobby helped arrange an overnight truce in the area to allow evacuation of the wounded. The role of the Capuchins during the Rising was very significant, partly because the rebels occupied several positions in the immediate vicinity of the Church Street Capuchin community, establishing a headquarters and first aid station in the Father Mathew Hall adjacent to the friary. Several friars ministered throughout the week to the physical, emotional and spiritual needs of the insurgents and civilians, especially to the wounded and dying, dividing their time between the Richmond hospital and the North Dublin Union (wherein many of the area’s residents sought refuge).Also on the Saturday evening, another Capuchin Fr Columbus Murphy, when returning from Jervis Street Hospital, met Elizabeth O’Farrell conveying the surrender order to Commandant Edward Daly at the Four Courts. Fr Columbus accompanied her, bearing a small white flag, and on reaching the Four Courts they interviewed Daly at the Chancery Place entrance. As recalled by John Shouldice in his Bureau of Military History Statement“Comt Daly addressed us and stated that orders had been received from General Pearse that we were to lay down our arms and surrender unconditionally. This was the cause of an outburst amongst the men and some of the officers who replied that they would fight on sooner than surrender….Daly, however, sympathised with them and stated that personally he would prefer to fight on under these conditions, but the orders from General Pearse were definite and had to be obeyed…the Four Courts was gradually being surrounded by strong military forces and the final surrender occurred about 7pm”At the surrender, the Volunteers’ arms were passed out through the railings at Chancery Place to the soldiers outside. Comdt. Daly, at the head of his men, was marched under heavy military guard along the quays, by Capel Street and Britain Street, to the northern end of O’Connell Street. They were afterwards placed inside the Rotunda railings and throughout the night were confined on the grass plot opposite the hospital. Several of the Cumann na mBan were taken prisoners at the same time.The complication, however, was that the outlying position at North King Street, a post held by about 69 Volunteers, which although only a few yards beyond the captured position, did not surrender. The Volunteers in this area continued to hold out under the armistice; there was still confusion in North King Street and in other locations as to whether this was a truce or a complete surrender. According to the witness statements of two other Franciscans, Fr. Augustine and Fr Aloysius, both went to Dublin Castle at 8am on Sunday morning, where General Lowe confirmed the authenticity of the typed copies of the Pearse surrender in circulation, but he could not produce a spare. While James Connolly was at the Castle, he confirmed the veracity of the order, and stressed that his signature pertained to men under his direct command in Dublin, but it was Pearse who led the national organisation. Lowe was aware of possible difficulty and put his car and chauffeur at the disposal of the Capuchins who, according to Fr Augustine “drove at once to Arbour Hill Detention Barracks to see Pearse who, after a short while, was ushered into the room by a soldier who then stood at the end with a loaded rifle…he said that he had signed a document of unconditional surrender stating the reasons why he had done so, but that one of our fathers had been here a short time previously, and as he assured him no copy of it could be found, he wrote another”.The “one of our fathers” referred to by Fr Augustine, was Fr Columbus. According to a diary kept by Fr Columbus, later discovered in the Capuchin Archives in Church Street, to clarify the situation for those Volunteers still fighting and who had not received proper notice of the Irish surrender, Fr. Columbus went to the Four Courts in an effort to retrieve Padraig Pearse’s note which had led to the surrender of Cmdt. Daly. Failing in this effort, Fr. Columbus crossed the river to Dublin Castle to see if someone there had the note. He met a British officer and explained to him that he needed the document to convince the Volunteers in the North King Street area that the Rising was over. The officer suggested he should go in person to Arbour Hill detention barracks and ask Pearse to rewrite the surrender note. Gen Maxwell received him courteously and, when Fr. Columbus asked to be allowed to see Pearse and the others held there, his request was granted. Fr Columbus wrote that Maxwell expressed his horror at the loss of life and destruction of property, but said “Oh, but we will make those beggars pay for it”. Fr Columbus replied, “The blood of martyrs is the seed of martyrs”.” Are you backing them up then” asked Maxwell. Concluding that prudence was the better part of valour, Columbus said nothing. Fr Columbus was taken to Arbour Hill barracks to see Pearse. He found him seated in his cell with his head bowed deep into his arms, resting on a little table. He looked a sad, forlorn, exhausted figure. Disturbed by the opening of the cell door, he slowly raised his head. He had the vacant, dazed look of someone waking from sleep. Then, recognising the Capuchin habit, he got up quickly, stretched out his hand and said: “Oh, Father, the loss of life, the destruction! But, please God, it won’t be in vain”.Fr. Columbus explained briefly why he had come, and asked Pearse to rewrite the surrender order. He agreed, saying his one wish was to prevent further loss of life and property. In the governor’s office, Pearse wrote the order, which differed slightly in wording from the original surrender order:“In order to prevent further slaughter of the civil population and in the hope of saving the lives of our followers, the members of the Provisional Government present at headquarters have decided on an unconditional surrender, and commandants or officers commanding districts will order their commands to lay down arms. PH Pearse, Dublin, 30th April 1916.”Shaking hands with Fr Columbus, Pearse said: “Hurry, Father, as time is precious and perhaps there are lives depending on it”. On reading the letter, Patrick Holohan, who had assumed command of a small detachment engaged in fighting in North Brunswick St. when his superior officer was wounded, ceased hostilities and surrendered. It was only the following day, 1 May, that General Maxwell could issue his statement saying “all involved in the insurrection have surrendered unconditionally”.Pearse’s final order is a document of immense historical significance. Unlike the surrender order that was composed in Parkgate, it was handwritten and signed by Pearse alone. Behind the single sentence of the communication lie many layers. It was the last official letter Pearse wrote, three days before his execution by firing squad on the morning of May 3rd 1916 and is therefore a vital part of the archive of the newly declared republic in 1916. It marked the end of the 1916 rebellion and underlined the role of both the rebel leaders and the British forces in bringing the fighting to a conclusion. It is also a reminder of some of the difficulties associated with the rebels’ military strategy in 1916, especially communications, but also the success in securing certain positions in the midst of urban warfare. Lessons were certainly learned as a result, and this would become strikingly apparent during the War of Independence when a wholly different military strategy was adopted. The document also illuminates other themes; the role the Catholic church during Easter week, a church that faced a dilemma in how to respond to the Rising, and also the concern for the deaths of civilians - in Pearse’s words, “the civil population”- who ultimately, experienced the most suffering in Dublin in 1916 as they bore the brunt of the warfare.Diarmaid Ferriter, June 2016

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