WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options
Auction Description for Alexander Autographs: American Revolution Documents, Arms & Relics

American Revolution Documents, Arms & Relics (339 Lots)

by Alexander Historical Auctions | Alexander Autographs


339 lots with images

December 10, 2016

Live Auction

Wilmington, DE, USA

Sort by:  
Lots with images first
Per page:  

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: "LIBERTY" GERMAN IMPORT GOBLET Ornately-painted Revolutionary War-era patriotic pitcher, depicts a European''s impression of an American eagle with outstretched wings surrounded by leaves and berries. The image is surmounted by the word "Liberti" painted in red. The white porcelain pitcher was at one time broken in several places but has been repaired. Attractive.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
COTTON MATHER

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: COTTON MATHER (1663 – 1728) New England Puritan minister, prolific author, and pamphleteer. He left a scientific legacy due to his hybridization experiments and his promotion of inoculation for disease prevention, though he is most frequently remembered today for his vigorous support for the Salem witch trials. MATHER TURNS AWAY A WOMAN SEEKING TO JOIN HIS CHURCH Especially rare A.Ms. (unsigned), 1p. 4 1/4" x 9", [n.p., n.d.], rejecting a woman who had hoped to join his church. In small part: "...Since I saw you, I have concerned myself to make inquiry upon ye acceptable matter upon which you proposed unto me... it is the opinion of some eminent persons, that tho'' they are full of a just esteem for both of you, yet ye testimony of your relations in ye churches in London...does not amount unto that legal validity which our churches have always required in ye admission of strangers to occasional communion with us...obtain ye necessary testimonials from home...you may then join to our churches...in the mean time, I hope the Lord will bless His more general ordinances here, for your improvement in piety..." Some chips to right margin, not affecting the text. Very nicely double-matted in marbled paper and black matting with a full transcript and copy engraving of Mather, set into a gilt wood frame.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
(SALEM WITCH TRIALS) SAMUEL SEWALL

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: (SALEM WITCH TRIALS) SAMUEL SEWALL SAMUEL SEWALL (1652 - 1730) Massachusetts judge who presided over the Salem witch trials, and the only one of the judges who publicly admitted his error. A.D.S. at the bottom of a manuscript document, 1p. legal folio, [n.p., likely Salem], Mar. 31, 1692. Sewall attests to the signature of one "Ralph Houghton" who has sold a parcel of land in Milton to another gentleman. At bottom Sewall writes: "March 31, 1692. Ralph Houghton Acknowledged this Instrument to be his Act & Deed Before me Saml Sewall Attest." A bit ragged at the margins with a small tear close to but not touching Sewall''s signature, matted with a portrait and a Salem witchcraft trial image. In the same year, 1692, Sewall was appointed one of the nine judges charged with trying those from Salem Town and elsewhere who were accused of witchcraft.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BENJAMIN CHURCH - THE FIRST ARMY RANGER

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BENJAMIN CHURCH - THE FIRST ARMY RANGER (c. 1639 - 1718) Founder of an armed force considered the forerunner of the U.S. Army''s Rangers when he led the first ranger force in America, 1676. Church was commissioned by the Governor of the Plymouth Colony, Josiah Winslow to form the first ranger company for King Philip''s War. He later employed the company to raid Acadia during King William''s War and Queen Anne''s War. Church designed his force primarily to emulate Indian patterns of war, and developed a special full-time unit mixing white colonists selected for frontier skills with friendly Indians to carry out offensive strikes against hostile Indians and French in terrain where normal militia units were ineffective. Excessively rare A.D.S. "Benja''n Church" as a justice of the peace, Little Compton, Rhode Island, Jan. 23, 1702, a sight bond relative to a case in which a woman is charged with "having a bastard child," boldly signed by Church at bottom. Heavily browned at left with chips causing the loss of a word or two and a few additional letters of text, but three-quartes of this document remains in very good condition. Matted with a reproduction engraving of the famous fighting woodsman and set into a wood frame.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
EDWARD HYDE, LORD CORNBURY

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: EDWARD HYDE, LORD CORNBURY (1661 - 1723) Corrupt colonial governor of New York and New Jersey and cousin of Queen Anne best known for his habit of wearing women''s clothes in public. Bold signature "Cornbury" cut from a 1706 document.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
THE NEW YORK WEEKLY JOURNAL, PRINTED BY JOHN PETER ZENGER

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: THE NEW YORK WEEKLY JOURNAL, PRINTED BY JOHN PETER ZENGER Fine and scarce pre -Revolutionary War newspaper. "The New-York Weekly Journal, Containing the freshest Advices, Foreign, and Domestic" (New York: printed by John Peter Zenger), April 29, 1734, no. 26, 4pp. 4to., an early issue of the first American newspaper to openly criticize the colonial government. Most of the paper is taken up with criticism of Zenger''s former employer and partner, William Bradford, the first printer in New York, whose conservatism and sycophantic approach to the injustices of colonial administration Zenger strongly opposed. JOHN PETER ZENGER (1697-1746) was born in Germany and emigrated to New York in 1710. Zenger used his paper to criticize the colonial governor of New York, William Cosby, who used his authority to replace the Chief Justice of the colony with his own appointee, thereby securing a larger salary for himself. Zenger''s controversial article finally earned him a charge of libel. His lawyers, Andrew Hamilton and William Smith, attempted to establish a precedent that a defamatory statement cannot be considered libelous if it could be proven to be true. The jury agreed, and returned a verdict of not guilty, although the precedent was not established, as evidenced by the later libel trial of Harry Croswell. Zenger''s case became an important milestone of freedom of the press in America. Disbound, minor toning, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
1728 BROADSIDE ADVERTISING THE SALE OF LAND IN DUTCHESS COUNTY, NEW YORK PROVINCE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 1728 BROADSIDE ADVERTISING THE SALE OF LAND IN DUTCHESS COUNTY, NEW YORK PROVINCE Very rare early advertising broadside, 1p. 4to, Sep. 2, 1728, for the sale of land in Dutchess County, New York, in part: "This Is to give Notice, that Capt. Albert Pawling, of Ulster County in the Province of New York, and Catherina his Wife, and Mr. Gilbert Livingstone, of said County, and Cornelia his Wife, Intend to apply to the Honourable House of Representatives of this Province of New-York, for an Act of Assembly of this province, to enable [them] ... to sell some Part of certain Lands in this County, and other Parts of this Province, formerly belonging to Coll. Henry Beekman, late of the said county of Ulster, deceased, and by him in his Life time, by his last Will and Testament, settled on them the said Catherina and Cornelia respectively... whereof all manner of Persons any ways concerned, are hereby directed to take Notice..." The broadside continues with an attestation by a Justice of the Peace, Jacob Kip, and a witness, Roslof Kip, that the above notice is a true copy of the advertisement drafted by Pawling and Livingstone, to be posted at" "... the Church at Rhine Creek in Dutchess County aforesaid..."At the conclusion are the mark of Jacob Kip and the signature of Roslof. Folds, minor toning at the edges, else very good. The Livingston, Pawling, Beekman and Kip families were among the most prominent New York settlers of the era, and this represents one of the earliest known advertising broadsides to be printed in the American colonies.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
MILITIA IS RAISED IN NEW YORK, 1684

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: MILITIA IS RAISED IN NEW YORK, 1684 Early manuscript D.S., 2pp. folio, New York, Aug. 27, 1684, a retained copy of a "Bill for settlemt. of the Militia". In part: "For the better Regulating of the militia within this Province for the Common Defence and preservation thereof Be it enacted by the Governor Councill & Representatives in assembly met and assembled and by the authority of the same that a Major be appointed in such County Capable thereof as Head of the Militia there ... that they be obliged to keep convenient armes and ammunition in their Houses as the law directs ... that the Governor do Chose appoint and Commisionate all officers of the militia within this Province Provided that all such officers be Chosen out of the freeholder Inhabitants within the Respective Townes and Counties where their Companyes are ... That is any servant upon pretence of going to warr against the enemy do run away from his Masters service he shall if taken be grievously punished att the direction of the Governor and the Councill and that other persons not excused by Law pretending Tender Consciences so not willing to bare armes do find a man to serve in [their] stead or pay the fines as the law directs..." Signed as : "A True Coppy Examined by me". Folds with minor splitting, with old archival tape repairs, else very good. The early colonists of America considered the militia an important social institution, necessary to provide defense and public safety in the absence of a standing army.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
RELIGIOUS IMPRINT PRINTED BY BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: RELIGIOUS IMPRINT PRINTED BY BENJAMIN FRANKLIN Two extracts from a religious publication, "The Solemn League and Covenant for Reformation and Defence of Religion, the Honour and Happiness of the King, and the Peace and Safety of the Three Kingdoms of Scotland, England, and Ireland" and "A Solemn Acknowledgement of Public Sins and Breaches of the Covenant" (Philadelphia: Benjamin Franklin), 1745, 20pp. 8vo.,, two complete disbound sections of a larger work, entitled "Westminster Confession of Faith". Each section fronted by a full titles page with Franklin''s name, adding the date and the place of publication. The first American publication of the complete "Westminster Confession of Faith" was done in Boston by S. Kneeland for D. Henchman in 1723, from Rothwell''s London edition of 1658. Franklin''s edition was based on the Thomas Lumisden of John Robertson edition, printed at Edinburgh in 1728, which with its completed ''canon'' and accurate texts based on William Dunlop''s edition of 1719 which represented the norm of Scottish editions. Bears an ink inscription inside the front title: "John Hagin his Confession of Faith, March 9th 1800". Front title slightly loose but attached, some damp staining, toning, and foxing, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE COLONIAL GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: SERMON PREACHED BEFORE THE COLONIAL GOVERNOR OF MASSACHUSETTS Very scarce bound pamphlet, "A Sermon Preached Before His Excellency Thomas Hutchinson, Esq., Governor: The Honorable His Majesty''s Council, And the Honorable House of Representatives, of the Province of the Massachusetts-Bay in New-England" by Charles Turner (Boston: printed by Richard Draper), 1773, 45pp. 8vo., given on the occasion of the election of the council, May 27, 1773, and bound with string at the left edge. Some notable excerpts, given the political situation of the time: "... Civil rulers are ordained by God; but the doctrine of their being divinely appointed, rightly understood, no more militates against the supposition that the people ought to have a voice in the elevation of those who are, in a civil sense, to rule them, than the doctrine of God''s appointing gospel ministers interferes with the supposition of a right in the churches to elect their own pastors. He never designed, mediately or immediately, to appoint rulers over the people, in state or church, so as to debar them from the privilege of choosing their own officers ... and they, who attempt to deprive the people of such a privilege, oppose themselves equally, to the will of God, and to the rights of mankind..." Some foxing throughout, with ragged edges, else very good, with the binding tight. THOMAS HUTCHINSON (1711-1780) was the Governor of the Province of Massachusetts Bay from 1769 to 1771, His home was ransacked by rioters protesting the Stamp Act in 1765, and he personally appeared before crowds protesting against the Boston Massacre to promise that the soldiers involved would be arrested and tried. He was replaced as governor by Thomas Gage in 1774, after which he went into exile in England.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
AN EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT OF A CONFRONTATION WITH

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: AN EYEWITNESS ACCOUNT OF A CONFRONTATION WITH "THE PAXTON BOYS" Fascinating content manuscript document, 3pp. folio, [n.p.], Jan. 24, 1766, a contemporary copy of an affidavit given before WILLIAM ALLEN (1704-1780), Chief Justice of the Province of Pennsylvania, by Jacob Whisler, a Mennonite yeoman charged with administering unsold land at Conestoga Township in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The affidavit describes an angry confrontation between Whisler and the Paxton Boys, a group of Scots-Irish frontiersmen who formed a vigilante group to retaliate against American Indians in the aftermath of the French and Indian War and Pontiac''s Rebellion, over land in what was then referred to as "Indian Town". In part: "...on Friday last the 17th day of this Instant January in the Morning [Whisler] having occasion to go to Abraham Hare''s Mill ... saw there Robert Poke (who came to live on part of the said Indian Town Land soon after the said Indians were destroyed by the Company of People commonly Called the Paxton Men as was generally reported and understood) and saw the said Robert Poke get from the said Abraham Hare, a kegg of Spiritous Liquor which this Affirmant afterwards understood and believes was for the use of a Company of the said People called Paxton Men, who met that day at the House on the said Indian Town land which was built by the said Poke, and the said Paxton Men at or near the Site of the Cabin late belonging to the Indian called Jo Hayes who was killed there ... that this affirmant on his return from the said Mill in the afternoon was told by his wife that Thomas Fisher ... had been at this Affirmant''s house ... that a great Company of the Paxton Men were ... at Poke''s and that the said Fisher wanted this affirmant to come to his House ... [Whisler] there found a large Company of Men with Horses being about 25 or 30 as this affirmant computed, many of them having Powder Horns and Pouches and several of them Guns ... one of them, a young Man, who called himself the Captain of Leader of the said Company demanded of this Affirmant in a very angry, outrageous, &menacing manner to know what authority he had to place the said Thomas Fisher on the said Indian Land or to meddle therewith, to which he answered that he had the Governor''s Commission or Written Orders to oversee and take Care of the said land, whereupon the said Young Man and several others of the said Company in the like angry and menacing Manner insisted on his shewing them his said Commission or Orders, to which he replied that he had them not with him and that he did not choose to shew them to all that Company least they should take or destroy them but that if they would send 2 or 3 of their Company with him to his house, he would there shew them his Orders; and thereupon the said Young Man and an Elderly Man ... joining the said two others went with this Affirmant to his House, & he there produced to them his said Commission or Orders, which when they had read they all said and insisted that the said Commission or Orders were good for nothing & that the Governor had no power to give any such orders, and that he nor the Proprietors had any [rights] to that Land, but that it belonged to the Indians ... killed there, and that they (meaning the said Company) ... the best right to it & would have and keep it in Spite of the Governor and Proprietors, and insisted in the like angry & menacing manner that this Affirmant should give up and concern himself no further with the said Land and not let the Governor or the Prop.rs Agents know any thing of their the said Company''s proceedings respecting the same ... and that on their returning to this Affirmant his said papers the said elderly man called him aside and in a pretended friendly manner advised him by all means to have nothing more to do with the said Land, but quit it entirely for that if he did concern himself any farther with it ... he might depend upon it that they would do him great Mischief ... And [Whisler] saith that the said Young Man and elderly Man who called themselves the heads or Leaders of the said Company then told this Affirmant that all the said Company then told this Affirmant that all the said Company had sworn to obey and stand by them, and would approve of every thing which they the said Leaders should do about the said Lands..." The affidavit was likely executed by a court clerk, and bears the facsimile signatures of Whisler and Allen at the conclusion. Long split along the center fold, damp stains obliterating some of the text, with minor paper loss at the left edge, else very good. The Paxton Boys, organized by the "Fighting Parson" JOHN ELDER (1706-1792), are best known for murdering 21 Susquehannock Indians, known as the Conestoga, in a reign of terror which would come to be known as the Conestoga Massacre. After the group attacked a Conestoga settlement in December 1763, killing six, the remaining Indians were given sanctuary in Lancaster. The Paxton Boys raided the town and killed, scalped and dismembered six adults and eight children. In January 1764, the Paxton Boys marched toward Philadelphia with about 250 men to challenge the government for failing to protect them. Benjamin Franklin led a group of civic leaders to meet them in Germantown, then a separate settlement northwest of the city, and hear their grievances. After the leaders agreed to read the men''s pamphlet of issues before the colonial legislature, the mob agreed to disperse. Many colonists were outraged about the December killings of innocent Conestoga, describing the murders as more savage than those committed by Indians. Benjamin Franklin''s "Narrative of the Late Massacres" concluded with noting that the Conestoga would have been safe among any other people on earth, no matter how primitive, except "''white savages'' from Peckstang and Donegall!"

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: "THE PENNSYLVANIA GAZETTE", PRINTED BY BENJAMIN FRANKLIN Fine content pre-Revolutionary War newspaper, "The Pennsylvania Gazette" (Philadelphia: printed by Benjamin Franklin), May 25, 1749, no. 1067, 4pp. 4to., featuring a front-page printing of a bill to regulate and restrain the printing of bills of credit in the American colonies. This restriction required Americans to obtain the approval of the king before issuing bills of credit, greatly restricting free trade in the colonies. The paper also contains several advertisements, including announcements for ships sailing to London and Newfoundland. A notice on the final page reads: "All persons indebted to B. Franklin, for a year''s Gazette, or more, are desired to pay." The bottom of this same page bears the credit: "Printed by B. Franklin, Post-Master, and D. Hall, at the New-Printing-Office, near the Market." The Pennsylvania Gazette was purchased by Franklin and Hugh Meredith in 1729, and quickly became the most popular newspaper in the colonies. It frequently featured articles written by Franklin under various aliases, including a third-person account of his famous kite experiment in 1752. The paper also featured the first American political cartoon, Franklin''s depiction of the colonies as a segmented snake, with the caption "Join or Die". Apparently disbound, with some slight toning and foxing, else very good to fine.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BENJAMIN FRANKLIN

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BENJAMIN FRANKLIN "PLUS ULTRA" MOTTO GLASS WAX STAMP Rare ca. early 1805 glass wax seal stamp, the 1" oval stamp bearing an excellent chest, up profile of Benjamin Franklin with the Latin motto beneath "PLUS ULTRA" ("FURTHER BEYOND"). The seal is set into a silver or similar metal frame which in turn is attached to a turned wood handle, the entire object 4 1/4" long. As Franklin was born in 1805, we believe this seal to have been issued upon the centenniel of his birth. A rare, attractive...and useful relic!

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BRITISH IMPRINT CONDEMNS SLAVEOWNING IN THE BRITISH EMPIRE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BRITISH IMPRINT CONDEMNS SLAVEOWNING IN THE BRITISH EMPIRE Excellent set of five colonial American imprints bound together, Philadephia, 1766-67, 6 3/4" x 4 1/4" and approx. 125 pages. Marbled paper on paper boards, worn, covers detached, a lady''s 1777 ownership signature and notes on pastedowns. The imprints include: ''The Emptiness and Vanity of A Life,'' Philadelphia: Henry Miler, 1767. Evans 10609. ''Daily Conversations with God,'' Philadelphia: Miller, 1767. Evans 10659. ''An Extract from a Treatise By William Law...'' Philadelphia: Miller, 1766, [Daniel DeFoe]. Evans 10352. ''The Dreadful Visitation ... Progress and Effects of the Plague, Philadelphia: Miller, 1767. Evans 10599. ''A Caution and Warning to Great Britain and Her Colonies... A Short Representation of the Calamitous State of the Enslaved Negroes...'' By Anthony Benezet, Philadelphia: Hall and Sellers, 1767. Lacking last four pages (not text), but contains the half-title. Evans 10555. The last text is a particularly telling anti-slavery tract, 52pp. in length: "...how many of those who distinguish themselve as the Advocates of Liberty , remain insensible and inattentive to the Treatment of Thousands and Tens of Thousands of our Fellow-Men...kept in the most Deplorable State of Slavery...Nothing could be more wretched than the Condition of this People...banished from their Country, and deprived of the Blessing Liberty..." with emotional first-hand accounts of the horors of the slave trade, warnings of divine retribution, etc. An interesting compendium of religious and spiritual views on political affairs of the 18th century.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
18TH CENTURY PLAN FOR A FORT

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 18TH CENTURY PLAN FOR A FORT Excellent ca. 1750s partial aerial view of a fort, a brown ink drawing, 17" x 12 1/2" mounted on a 19" x 29" sheet showing a portion of what would have been an enormous, star-shaped fort which, according to the scale provided, would have approached 2000'' in width overall. A river runs before the fort, and it has been partially diverted to provide water to the facility and to fill a moat separating a wood barricade from the fort''s stone walls. A small drawbridge also appears at right. This is a rather simple study, perhaps a preliminary plan or a work by an advanced student. Folds, some soiling.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
COLONIAL MINER''S LAMP WITH

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: COLONIAL MINER''S LAMP WITH "ROOSTER" KNOB Superb example of a mid-1700s miner''s lamp with decorative "rooster" knob design, 23" long overall, of French design in cast and forged iron, certainly one of the finest such examples extant. The lamp is 7 1/2" tall without the handle, and the pan measures 4" across. The "rooster'' securing knob is original, as is the brass nipple filler and spout lip. A fine Pennsylvania mining piece.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BOSTON BROADSHEET REPORTS LEAD-UP TO TEA PARTY

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BOSTON BROADSHEET REPORTS LEAD-UP TO TEA PARTY Fine content broadsheet, "Supplement to the Massachusetts-Gazette" (Boston: printed by Richard Draper), May 6, 1773, 2pp. folio, leading with an article on the London publication of the "Boston Pamphlet", written by the Boston Committee of Correspondence, outlining the rights of the American colonists, and indicating how those rights had been violated by the decision of the British government to pay the governor, lieutenant governor, and judges of the Massachusetts colony directly. This measure, the pamphlet argued, was a step away from responsible government, and made the leading officials of the colony less dependent on the electorate. The article presented here reprints the sympathetic editor''s preface which accompanied the pamphlet''s publication in London, in part: "All Accounts of the Discontent so general in our Colonies, have of late Years been industriously smothered, and concealed here; it seeming to suit the Views of the American Minister to have it understood, that by his great Abilities all Faction was subdued, all Opposition suppressed, and the whole Country quieted. - That the true State of Affairs there may be known, and the true Causes of that Discontent well understood, the following Piece (not the Production of a Private Writer, but the unanimous Act of a large American City) lately printed in New England, is republished here. This Nation, and the other Nations of Europe, may thereby learn with more Certainty the Grounds of a Differentiation, that possibly may, sooner or later, have Consequences interesting to them all ... he disposition to a good understanding was so prevalent, that possibly they might soon have relaxed in the Article of Tea also. But the System of Commissioners of Customs, Officers without end, with fleets and armies ... [and] their acting with much Indiscretion and Rashness, giving great unnecessary Trouble and Obstruction ... kept the People in a constant State of Irritation...". These tensions would culminate on Dec. 16, 1773, when the Sons of Liberty destroyed a shipment of East India Company tea, in what was known as the "Boston Tea Party". Moderate soiling and damp staining throughout, ragged left edge with small tears mended with cello tape, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: "STAMP ACT" CAST BRONZE STATUE Well-executed and dramatic cast bronze statue, 25 1/2" tall, 10" x 7" at the base, depicting a striding American patriot, in a fur cape and wearing a "liberty"-style cap, grasping a curved shortsword in his right hand, and the American flag (with thirteen stars, of course) in his left. A pistol is thrust into his waist sash, and his foot is stamping down on the infamous "Stamp Act", which was seen as levying an unnecessary and restrictive tax on American paper goods. Behind him is the stump of the "tree of liberty" which stood on Boston Common and served as a rallying point for American patriots until British loyalists cut it down in 1775. The right arm was broken off at some point in the past, but has been professionally repaired with a bronze pin. Unsigned and unmarked, still very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BROADSIDE PRINTING OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BROADSIDE PRINTING OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE Rare seen broadsheet printing of the Declaration of Independence, 1p. 23 1/2" x 28", printed by S. N. Dickinson, circa 1830, and published by the Boston Bewick Company, notable map-makers of the period. The broadsheet reproduces the declaration in its entirety, with each signature reproduced in facsimile. Bordering the text is a wreath design intertwined with the state seals of each of the original thirteen colonies. Horizontal and vertical folds with some splitting, which has been repaired with cello tape on the verso. It also shows small tears around the edges, with on larger at the top edge, and some foxing throughout, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
EPHRATA PRESS DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE CENTENNIAL

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: EPHRATA PRESS DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE CENTENNIAL Printed broadside, 2pp. folio, a printing of the Declaration of Independence in three columns, with the facsimile signatures of each signer grouped together at the end, produced at the Centennial Exposition held in Philadelphia in 1876. A note at the bottom states that the broadside was printed on the Old Ephrata Press; an explanation on the verso gives the history of this printing press, which was first used by the Society of the Seventh-Day Baptists, and at the end of the Revolutionary War printed the Declaration of Independence in five languages. This sheet also features illustrations of the printing press and the house in which Thomas Jefferson drafted the Declaration. Folds, with some small holes where the folds meet, and some minor damp staining, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BOSTON ORATORS REMEMBER THE BOSTON MASSACRE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BOSTON ORATORS REMEMBER THE BOSTON MASSACRE Interesting manuscript, 2pp. 4to., [n.p., n.d. ca. 1840], a copy of notes taken at the March 6, 1770 Boston town meeting listing the committee members appointed to wait upon Samuel Adams. Adams was to lead this committee in urging the lieutenant governor to remove all British troops from Boston. The pressure led to the evacuation of those troops to Castle William. Additional text, from the Mar. 19, 1771 meeting at Faneuil Hall, describes the appointment of a committee to select men to deliver annual orations to perpetuate the memory of the Boston Massacre. The text concludes with a list of those who delivered the oration between 1771 and 1784 and it includes Joseph Warren, John Hancock, Benjamin Church, and others. Worn, some fold splits.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CONNECTICUT PATRIOTS OFFER FOOD TO STARVING BOSTONIANS SUFFERING UNDER THE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CONNECTICUT PATRIOTS OFFER FOOD TO STARVING BOSTONIANS SUFFERING UNDER THE "BOSTON PORT ACT" Fascinating manuscript D.S., 1p. legal folio, Lebanon, Ct., July 18, 1774 in which local citizens pledge support to Bostonians suffering under "The Boston Port Act", one of the "Intolerable Acts" of 1774. The document enlists subscribers to pledge sums to the "Overseers of the Poor of the Town of Boston to be Employed for the Relief of such industrious & distressed People as are now suffering under the evil Oppression of a certain Act of Parliament called the Boston Port Bill..." At bottom, twenty signatories pledge not money but grain, "fat sheep", and lambs! Very good. The Boston Port Bill was undertaken as a response to the Boston Tea Party. King George III''s speech of 7 March 1774 charged the colonists with attempting to injure British commerce and subvert the Constitution, and on the 18th Lord North brought in the Port Bill. It ordered the blockade of Boston to all ships until such time as restitution was made to the King''s treasury (for customs duty lost) and to the East India Company for damages suffered. In other words, it closed Boston Port to all ships, no matter what business the ship had. Throughout the colonies, patriots pledged support to the beleaguered Bostonians - the first time the colonies would act in concert against British interests.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
JOSEPH WARREN PLEADS FOR GUNPOWDER FROM NEW YORK, DAYS BEFORE HIS DEATH AT BUNKER HILL

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: JOSEPH WARREN PLEADS FOR GUNPOWDER FROM NEW YORK, DAYS BEFORE HIS DEATH AT BUNKER HILL JOSEPH WARREN (1741-1775) American physician, President of the revolutionary Massachusetts Provincial Congress. He was killed when the British stormed the redoubt at Breed''s Hill during the Battle of Bunker Hill. Excellent, historic content signed document, 2pp. 4to., Cambridge, June 4, 1775, "To the Hon[ora]ble Congress for the Colony of New York". Warren, along with ARTEMAS WARD (1727-1800), General of the Massachusetts Army, and MOSES GILL (1734-1800), Chairman of the Committee of Supplies, describe the dire situation faced by the patriots in Boston, and issue a desperate plea to the New York Congress for supplies, in full: " Your noble Exertions in the common Cause, your Zeal for the Maintenance of the Rights of America & the Sympathizing Concern, with which we know you look on our suffering, encourages us to represent to you the distressed State of this Colony. Our Capital is filled with disciplined troops, thoroughly equip''d with every thing necessary to render them formidable. A train of Artillery as compleat as can be conceived of, a full supply of Arms and Ammunition, and an absolute command of the Harbour of Boston, which puts it in their Power to furnish themselves with whatever they shall think convenient by Sea, are such Advantages as must render our Contest with them in every view extremely difficult. We suffer at present the greatest Inconveniences from a want of a sufficient Quantity of Powder, without this every attempt to defend ourselves or annoy our Enemies must prove abortive; We have taken every step to avail ourselves of this Article, by drawing into our General Magazine whatever could be spared from the Respective Towns of this Colony; But the frequent Skirmishes we have had, has greatly diminished our Stock, and we are now under the most alarming Apprehensions; that notwithstanding the Bravery of our Troops, (whom we think we can without boasting declare are ready to incounter every Danger for the preservation of the Rights & Liberties of America) we shall barely for the want of the Means of Defence fall at last a prey to our enemies. We therefore most earnestly beseech you that you would if possible afford in some Relief in this Respect, by lending or selling to us some part of the Powder in your Colony, we readily conceive the Unwillingness with which you must part with so necessary an Article at this Time, we know you have not the Quantity you would wish to keep for your own use, we apply to you, not because we suppose you have a Surplussage, but because we are in the most distressing Want. We beg therefore that we may be not be suffered to perish, we have taken such Steps as we have great Reason to hope will in a short Time furnish us sufficiently with Powder, and if we can be assisted untill that arrives, we doubt not but that we shall be able to baffle the designs of our Enemies, and be greatly instroumental in preserving the Rights and Liberties of all America. We must request that whatever aid you shall find it in your Power to give us may be in the most secret Manner, as a knowledge of our Deficiency in the Article of Powder, before we are supplied might be attended with the most fatal consequences." The three patriots sign boldly at the conclusion, after which the writer adds the post script: "We beg what Powder you can possibly spare may be immediately conveyed to us by Land in the Way least liable to be suspected by any Persons who may correspond with the Enemy." It is unknown whether New York was able to provide these badly-needed supplies to their Massachusetts brethren, but it is doubtful: New Yorkers were already heavily involved in the raiding of armories and the seizure of the local government. On June 17, only thirteen days after this letter was written, Joseph Warren reported to the militia assembling at Bunker''s Hill under Gen. Israel Putnam, and asked where the heaviest fighting would be. Putnam directed him to nearby Breed''s Hill. Despite being commissioned a major general by the Provincial Congress, Warren chose to fight as a private soldier, deferring to officers with more experience in war. As the British stormed the redoubt at Breed''s Hill, Warren was reported to have repeatedly exclaimed: "These fellows say we won''t fight! By Heaven, I hope I shall die up to my knees in blood!" Warren and his fellow soldiers fought desperately until their powder and ammunition ran out, repelling two British assaults on the hill before being overcome by a third. Warren was killed by a musket ball to the head, after which his body was stripped, bayoneted, spit upon, and decapitated, before finally being buried in a shallow ditch. Warren''s death was seen as a galvanizing act of martyrdom for the American cause. The letter bears some chipping along the left edge, affecting a few letters of the text on the verso. It also bears two archival tape repairs on the verso, not affecting any text. The original docketed integral leaf is detached but present. In all, this exemplary document provides a vivid and striking testimony of one of the most dire moments in the birth of our nation, and serves as a striking monument to one of her most dedicated defenders.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
JOHN HANCOCK

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: JOHN HANCOCK (1737-1793) American Revolutionary politician and first signer of the Declaration of Independence, President of the Continental Congress and two-time Governor of Massachusetts. Historic content manuscript signed document: "By Order of Congress John Hancock Presid''y", 1p. 8" x 12", "In Congress" [Philadelphia], May 16, 1776. This document reflects the American commitment to sever ties with Great Britain at the price of bloodshed. In a hurried move to fortify Boston against a feared imminent attack by the British-and in the midst of congressional resolutions which would soon lead to the bold Declaration of Independence from Great Britain-Hancock signs this resolution authorizing recruitment of battalions of troops. In full: "In Congress May 14th 1776 Resolved, That the five Battalions now in Massachusetts Bay, be recruited to their full Complement, and that three additional Battalions be raised in the Eastern Department, for the service of the Continent, the Recruits to be taken into Continental Pay so soon as they shall be armed & mustered. May 16.th Resolved, that two of the additional Battalions be raised in Massachusetts Bay, and the others in Connecticut. That it be recommended to the general Assemblies of Massachusetts Bay & Connecticut to endeavor to have the Battalions enlisted for two years, unless sooner discharged by Congress, in which Case they are to be allowed one Month?s Pay on their Discharge; but if the Men cannot be prevailed on to enlist for two years, that they be enlisted for one year; and that they be ordered as soon as raised & armed immediately to march to Boston." The recently-ended siege of Boston provides the backdrop for these resolutions. General George Washington, with too few troops to defend Boston following his move to fortify New York, sought reinforcements for Boston in light of intelligence that British ships loaded with German mercenaries were bound for America. Following the battles at Lexington and Concord in April, 1775, the colonists drove the British back to Boston and then encircled the city with 15,000 troops in an effort to contain the enemy. Reinforced by sea, the British counter-attacked at Breeds (Bunker) Hill on June 17th and took the heights above Boston. reinforced its army by sea, however, since the Americans had no navy, and attacked the colonists The next month, Washington arrived in Boston to assume command of the Continental Army. Using cannons captured at Fort Ticonderoga, Washington?s army bombarded Boston for two days in early March 1776 before Washington moved more troops and cannon into position on Dorchester Heights above the city and Boston Harbor. Knowing that he could not dislodge the Americans, British General William Howe withdrew on March 17, 1776. Washington hurried the Continental Army to New York, recognizing its strategic importance and fearing that the British fleet was en route to that city. Boston was left protected only by four undermanned regiments. On May 7, 1776, Washington received several very credible reports that British ships carrying Hessian mercenaries had embarked for Boston and Quebec almost a month earlier. With sailing time of a month or less between England and North America, these reports meant that the Hessian troops could arrive any day if they had not already arrived, whether in Canada or somewhere in the colonies. Washington wrote immediately to Hancock to ask that Congress investigate the claims. Congress in turn appointed a committee to consider the issue. On May 10, the committee recommended that Congress urge Massachusetts "to assist the Officers of the five Continental Regiments now in that Colony in compleating their Enlistment" and that "they endeavour to prevail on their People to enlist, and those already enlisted to re-enlist for 3 years, unless sooner discharged, and then to receive a mo. pay." It also recommended that Washington "be desired to send such Genl. Officer as he can spare from the Army at New York to command in the Colony of Massachusetts Bay." Congress debated the issue further, however, and on May 14 and 16 it enacted the resolutions that appear in this document: The fervor for independence had reached a boiling point in Congress as it enlarged the Continental Army with these resolutions. On May 10, 1776, it had enacted the following resolution, with language that would appear six weeks later, in modified form, in the Declaration of Independence: Resolved, That it be recommended to the respective assemblies and conventions of the United Colonies, where no government sufficient to the exigencies of their affairs have been hitherto established, to adopt such government as shall, in the opinion of the representatives of the people, best conduce to the happiness and safety of their constituents in particular, and America in general. In other words, Congress authorized the colonies to throw off the British crown in favor of self-government. It appointed a committee of three, John Adams, Edward Rutledge, and Richard Henry Lee, to draft the preamble to the resolution: "Whereas his Britannic Majesty, in conjunction with the lords and commons of Great Britain, has, by a late act of Parliament, excluded the inhabitants of these United Colonies from the protection of his crown… the whole force of that kingdom, aided by foreign mercenaries, is to be exerted for the destruction of the good people of these colonies…it appears absolutely irreconcileable [sic] to reason and good Conscience, for the people of these colonies now to take the oaths and affirmations necessary for the support of any government under the crown of Great Britain…for the preservation of internal peace, virtue, and good order, as well as for the defence of their lives, liberties, and properties, against the hostile invasions and cruel depredations of their enemies…" On May 15, after vigorous debates over three days, Congress approved the preamble and ordered that it be published along with the resolution passed on May 10. To his wife, Abigail, John Adams wrote that Great Britain had "at last driven America, to the last Step, a compleat Seperation from her, a total absolute Independence, not only of her Parliament but of her Crown, for such is the Amount of the Resolve of the 15th." In a letter to James Warren, Adams called it "the most important Resolution, that ever was taken in America." Fold splits and edge chips have been very professionally mended, and none of these affect Hancock''s striking signature. The signature has not been affected by other defects, which have been professionally repaired. Overall the document is good to very good condition. This is a superb, significant document from the tense weeks in the Continental Congress leading up to adoption of the formal Declaration of Independence. It belongs in the finest of Revolutionary War collections. From the collection of H. H. Strong, 1919.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
GEORGE TAYLOR

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: GEORGE TAYLOR (1716 - 1781) Pennsylvania Signer of the Declaration of Independence, appointed a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1775 to replace a member of the Pennsylvania delegation who refused to support independence. He arrived too late to vote for independence, but in time to sign the Declaration of Independence. Taylor returned to Pennsylvania in March of 1777 to serve as a member of the Supreme Council, but retired due to ill health after only six weeks in office. During the Revolution, Taylor continued to oversee production of cannon shot and shells at Durham Furnace which he had leased from British sympathizer Joseph Galloway. ONE OF THE RAREST OF THE SIGNERS OF THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE Exceedingly rare manuscript D.S. "Geo Taylor", 3pp. small folio, Greenwich, New Jersey, Dec. 31, 1779, a deed poll, in which Taylor sells a parcel of land in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, to a group of buyers for the sum of three thousand pounds. Beside the original deed is a lengthy integral D.S. by one of the buyers, ROBERT LETTIS HOOPER, JR.(1730-1797), Trenton, Nov. 8, 1782 in which Hooper in turn sells one third of his share of the parcel to two other men. Hooper was a Quartermaster in the Continental Army and, like Taylor, was an iron worker. He was also named a member of the Society of the Cincinnati. The document bears splits along the original folds, which have been professionally mended, as well as some foxed spots and some minor loss at fold junctions, also mended, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
THOMAS JEFFERSON

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: THOMAS JEFFERSON (1743 - 1826) Third President of the United States, author and signer of the Declaration of Independence, ceased the importation of slaves to America. Printed signed document as Secretary of State under George Washington, 1p. 4to. (sight), New York, Aug. 4, 1790, a printed copy of an Act of Congress, providing for the monetary compensation of John Stewart and John Davidson. Stewart and Davidson, merchants and shipowners, sought the remission of duties on this cargo of salt which after landing had been stored in a basement in Annapolis. Within a day or so, the salt was destroyed by a storm-driven flood. Congress determined that since this product had never come to market, no duty should be payable. This case was used as precedent in similar cases for many decades thereafter. Signed boldly at the bottom in black ink. Slight foxing, else very good to fine. Professionally matted and set into a gilt frame, with a more recent print of Jefferson.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
THOMAS STONE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: THOMAS STONE (1743 - 1787) Signer of the Declaration of Independence from Maryland and a wealthy businessman, he later refused to sign the Articles of Confederation and declined to attend the Constitutional Convention. Especially rare A.D.S. "Thos. Stone", 2pp. 4to., "Charles County",[n.d.], a complaint accusing Justinian Coomsey, Jr. of defrauding James and Robert Buchanan of the sum of twenty pounds and seventeen shillings. Signed at the conclusion in black ink. The document has been expertly inlaid, and bears a few marginal chips costing only a few letters of text and all expertly repaired. Presented in a custom binder.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ALEXANDER HAMILTON

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ALEXANDER HAMILTON (1755 - 1804) American politician who, with Madison and Jay, supported the Constitution through contributions to The Federalist, first Secretary of the Treasury who built the national fiscal system, mortally wounded in a duel with Aaron Burr. Fine, bold signature: "A. Hamilton" cut from a January, 1792 document. Lightly mounted and matted with a printed color portrait of the patriot, ready to frame. Sold with a miniscule part of a hair from Hamilton''s head, with provenance signed by a well-known dealer of such relics. Two pieces.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
(AARON BURR) THEODOSIA BURR

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: (AARON BURR) THEODOSIA BURR (1783 - 1813) Daughter of U.S. Vice President Aaron Burr and Theodosia Bartow Prevost. Her husband, Joseph Alston, was governor of South Carolina during the War of 1812. She was lost at sea at age 29. Some claim that Alexander Hamilton''s suggestion of incest between Burr and Theodosia led to his fateful duel with Burr. Very rare A.L.S. "Theodosia", 2pp. 4to., Providence, Aug. 25, 1800 to "Mary". In small part: "...I was pleasantly surprised by a letter from you...you had so long neglected to perform your promise that I began to think you never would: your apology is however so good and your intention so much better that I must forgive you...henceforth you will write me more frequently...if Trenton is the gay place you describe, surely there can be no dearth of matter...We had an excellent passage of twenty two hours to Newport...we came here by land and found the yellow fever...only nine have died of it...". Matted with a portrait, near fine.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
(CONTINENTAL NAVY) CAPTAIN OF THE USS RANGER THOMAS SIMPSON

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: (CONTINENTAL NAVY) CAPTAIN OF THE USS RANGER THOMAS SIMPSON Continental Navy first lieutenant aboard the sloop-of-war USS RANGER under JOHN PAUL JONES (1747-1792), later captain of that ship. Rare and interesting war-date autograph endorsement, 1p. 5 3/4" x 2 3/4", [n.p.], May 10, 1779, on the verso of a receipt, dated April 25, 1779, for reimbursement of expenses, time, and horses supplied to Ebenezer Dearing "... to carey Leters from Thomo Simson esq to the Navey Bord at Boston...", payable by Continental Navy agent JOHN LANGDON (1741-1819). Simpson has endorsed the verso, in full: "Sir, please to pay the within bill for the Ship Ranger, Y[ou]r humble Serv[an]t, Thomas Simpson". Original folds, ragged edges, else very good. After fitting out, the RANGER sailed from France in November 1777, bringing word of British Gen. John Burgoyne''s surrender at Saratoga to the American commissioners in Paris. After completing this task, the RANGER began a career of harassing ships in British home waters. She raided the port at Whitehaven and captured the 14-gun sloop HMS DRAKE. During this cruise, Simpson fell out of favor with the RANGER''s Captain, John Paul Jones, who viewed his friendly relationship with the Portsmouth-raised officers and crew with suspicion. Eventually Simpson''s actions at Whitehaven and as prizemaster of the DRAKE, along with the captain''s conflicts with his rebellious crew, led to Captain Jones accusing Lieutenant Simpson of mutiny and ordering his arrest in France. Fortunately for the lieutenant, the officers and crew rallied to his defense and American Commissioner to France Benjamin Franklin ensured that Simpson escaped Jones'' wrath by placing him in command of the homeward-bound RANGER and offering the ambitious Jones command of the BONHOMME RICHARD. In early March 1779, Simpson next sailed the RANGER in company with Continental Navy ships USS WARREN and USS QUEEN OF FRANCE. The three vessels captured eight prizes in the North Atlantic before returning to Portsmouth in April 22, 1779. No doubt the letters that Ebenezer Dearing carried to the Navy Board at Boston three days later included Captain Simpson''s report on this highly productive cruise. The RANGER sailed to Boston and joined company with the USS PROVIDENCE and the QUEEN OF FRANCE. The RANGER and her companions captured eleven enemy vessels, "part of the Jamaica Fleet", off the Grand Banks of Newfoundland. Although only eight of the prizes were brought into Boston, they sold for over one million dollars. In command of the sloop-of war RANGER for her last voyage, Continental Navy Captain Thomas Simpson departed for Charleston, SC on November 23, 1779. The ship was surrendered there on May 11, 1780 when the city fell and was taken into the British Navy as the HMS HALIFAX. Simpson would later command the privateer ALEXANDER, with many in her compliment of 150 men sailors who were loyal to him since first enlisting on the RANGER four years earlier. Documents pertaining to the Continental Navy are far scarcer than those related to the Army.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
(CONTINENTAL NAVY) ELISHA HINMAN

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: (CONTINENTAL NAVY) ELISHA HINMAN (1734-1807) Continental Navy captain. Rare and interesting war-date manuscript D.S. "E. Hinman", 1p. 8 1/4" x 3 1/2", Portsmouth, Aug. 13, 1777, a receipt for fifty pounds from Continental Navy agent JOHN LANGDON (1741-1819): "... on a/c [account] of the Ship Alfred". Docketed on the verso, ragged edges, else very good. Elisha Hinman was initially appointed a Lieutenant in January 1776 aboard the 14-gun brig USS CABOT, one of four vessels to comprise the first Continental Navy squadron of the American Revolution. Having served with distinction during the fleet''s invasion of British-held New Providence (Nassau) and subsequently incurring a severe wound during an engagement with the 20-gun British ship HMS GLASGOW in April, Hinman was commissioned as captain in the Continental Navy on August 20, 1776. Hinman succeeded John Paul Jones in command of the ship USS ALFRED in January 1777 . A merchantman named Black Prince under the command of JOHN BARRY (1745-1803) before the war, the 30-gun ALFRED was acquired by the Continental Congress in November 1775. The ALFRED was taken by British warships HMS ARIADNE and HMS CERES near Barbados on March 9, 1778. Captain Hinman was carried to Gosport, England where he was examined before a Scotch magistrate who inquired: "How dare you fight His Majesty''s ships, you rebel of His Majesty''s Colonies." Hinman retorted: "I dare fight His Majesty himself, if I meet him on the high seas." Confined at Forton prison, Captain Hinman escaped with others by digging under the wall of the prison and finding sanctuary with an American sympathizer who arranged for a Londoner to spirit the captain off to safety in France. It probably helped that Hinman bribed the prison sentry with ten guineas along with ten more for the guard''s officers. Eventually returning to New London, Hinman was honorably acquitted in February 1779 by a court-martial investigating charges surrounding the loss of the Alfred, and briefly placed in charge of the Continental Navy frigate TRUMBULL in May, 1779. Hinman commanded the privateer sloop HANCOCK in 1779 and the 30-gun Connecticut and Massachusetts privateer DEANE between 1780 and June 1781. He then commanded the 20-gun brig MARQUIS LAFAYETTE on which he was at sea when in September 1781, British forces under Benedict Arnold burnt New London to the ground including Captain Hinman''s home. President John Adams offered Hinman naval command of the USS CONSTITUTION in 1794, but he declined citing his advanced age. However, four years later Hinman solicited from Adams command of New London''s revenue cutter ARGUS due to his family''s financial need of "a better support then what I am now able to give them." Hinman served as captain of the ARGUS until 1803, just four years before his death. Documents pertaining to the Continental Navy are far scarcer than those related to the Army.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ABIEL FOSTER

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ABIEL FOSTER (1735-1806) Continental congressman from New Hampshire, a minister and judge who also served as a member of the Federal Congress and was president of the State Senate. A.D.S. penned at the bottom of an indenture, 1p. legal folio, Canterbury, NH, Sep. 20, 1780. Foster attests to the indenture of Samuel Miles as being seller Miles'' "free Act & Deed". Very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ANTHONY WAYNE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ANTHONY WAYNE (1745 - 1796) "Mad Anthony", American Revolutionary brigadier general who distinguished himself at Brandywine, Germantown, Monmouth, and in the brilliant capture of the British garrison at Stony Point. Manuscript D.S. removed from a larger document but complete in itself, 1p. 12" x 4", [n.p., n.d. but Northwest Territory, ca. 1794 during the Northwest Indian War]. Recalled by Washington to enforce America''s rights to the land, Wayne outfits part of his command: "The Clothier General will deliver the above mentioned Articles of Clothing to the Paym''r of the Battalion of Artillery". Boldly signed by Wayne at conclusion, also signed by Adjutant Gen. JOHN MILLS who obtained his post in 1794. Text a bit light, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ARTHUR LEE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ARTHUR LEE (1740 - 1792) Propagandist and spy for the American Revolutionary cause and an agent in Europe for the Continental Congress. A.D.S. 1p. oblong 8vo., [n.p.], May 25, 1785 to "Colonel Fitzgerald" in Alexandria sending a draft: "...in part payment for the horse La Fayette...". With folded address leaf, fine.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
ARTHUR ST. CLAIR

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: ARTHUR ST. CLAIR (1734 - 1818) Revolutionary War major general serving at Trenton and Princeton, commanded Ft. Ticonderoga, President of the Continental Congress and first governor of the Northwest Territory. Good association A.L.S., 1p. 4to., Cincinnati, Dec. 29, 1799 to a cashier of the Bank of the Unites States. In part: "...By neglecting to enter some draughts I have made upon you...there is a balance due to me of between fifty and one hundred Dollars...I wish you will be pleased to pay it to the bearer Colonel John Armstrong who will give in my Bank Book..." At top, Armstrong signs his receipt: "Rec''d eighty seven Dolls 58/100". Boldly penned and signed, fine. JOHN ARMSTRONG (1758-1843) was an aide to generals Mercer and Gates. The distribution of his "Newburg letters", citing wrongs done unto soldiers and calling for organized action, alarmed Washington who took steps to avoid any insurrection.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BENJAMIN HUNTINGTON

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BENJAMIN HUNTINGTON 1736 - 1800) Continental Congressman and the first Senator from Connecticut. A.D.S. as Justice of the Peace, 1p. legal folio. [Connecticut], Aug. 26, 1786, a ruling concerning jurisdiction in a case which was already almost 12 years old. Very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BENJAMIN LINCOLN SELLS A SLAVE BOY

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BENJAMIN LINCOLN SELLS A SLAVE BOY (1733 - 1810) American Revolution major general, commanding an army in the south, he was captured at Charleston and later exchanged. Secretary of War (1781 - 1783). Fine content D.S. as "Benj. Lincoln, Jr." and also signed by his father, COL. BENJAMIN LINCOLN, 1p. 7" x 3 3/4", [Hingham, Ma.], June 9, 1755. In part: ''Authority to sell and dispose of this Negro servant boy...we do hereby promise for our selves, our heirs, Exc., & to warrant & defend this Cornelius his heir & assigns against the lawful claims or demands of any person or persons whatsoever to this servant during his natural life..." Signed by the slave''s purchasers, Samuel and Marcy Stodden, who, like the Lincolns, were from Hingham. The two Lincolns, the sellers of the slave, have signed at lower left. A vertical tape repair near center with an additional repair on verso and a piece of tape at margin, soiled and a bit worn, still quite good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BENJAMIN LINCOLN

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BENJAMIN LINCOLN (1733 - 1810) American Revolution major general, commanding an army in the south, he was captured at Charleston and later exchanged. Secretary of War (1781 - 1783). Partly-printed D.S. as Collector of Customs, 1p. oblong 8vo., Marblehead, July 10, 1804, certification of the importation of "one Pipe of Brandy...One hundred Twenty Six Gallons fourth proof...". Fine.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
BENJAMIN RUMSEY

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: BENJAMIN RUMSEY (1734 - 1808) American jurist, a delegate for Maryland in the Continental Congress in 1776 and 1777 and for over 25 years was chief judge of the Maryland Court of Appeals. Signature cut from a document, dated "1790" in another hand at bottom.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CADWALADER MORRIS

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CADWALADER MORRIS (1741 - 1795) American merchant and politician from Philadelphia, member of the First Troop Philadelphia City Cavalry, and a delegate to the Continental Congress 1783-1784. Also a founder of the Bank of North America. A.L.S. 1p. large 4to., [n.p.], Jan. 28, 1784 to an unknown general. In part: "...We were alarmed for about an hour yesterday with an account of the loss of the outward bound packet from New York on board of which Col. Harman[?] is...it''s said only 7 of the people are saved...I am told we are likely to have our friend Mr. James Wilson in the Deputation...I have reason to think he has come to serve..." Expertly inlaid at margins, a few lightly toned spots, else very good. James Wilson (1742-1798) would indeed represent Pennsylvania at the Constitutional Convention, where he was a driving force in the creation of the document.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CHARLES DEWITT

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CHARLES DEWITT (1727 - 1787) American miller and statesman from New York and a delegate to the Continental Congress. Partly-printed D.S., 1p, 8vo., New York, 1784, being his wages of 41 pounds made to him by the State of New York for his attendance as a representative in the state assembly. Mounted, fine.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CHARLES LEE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CHARLES LEE (1731 - 1782) American Revolution second-ranking major general, taken prisoner and thereafter secretly conspired with Howe to defeat the Americans. He was later exchanged and while engaged at Monmouth his retreat nearly cost the battle. Dismissed, 1780. Good content A.L.S. as major in the British army, 1p. 4to., [London], Nov. 2, 1761. While on leave from his post in Portugal and successfully serving in the Seven Years War, Lee seeks the appointment of a surgeon to his headquarters. In part: "...As the number of men We have at Headquarters renders it absolutely necessary that a Surgeon should be immediately appointed; I beg leave to mention a Mr. Wood to you for this purpose. He has been recommended in the strongest manner by both Dr. Middleton and Dr. Barnet as very well qualified for the station. If Mr. Townsend will indulge...He shall set out for the Reg''t without delay..." Mounted, with address leaf addressed to: "Thomas Bradshaw Esq."

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CHARLES LEE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CHARLES LEE (1731 - 1782) American Revolution second-ranking major general, taken prisoner and thereafter secretly conspired with Howe to defeat the Americans. He was later exchanged and while engaged at Monmouth his retreat nearly cost the battle. Dismissed, 1780. Holograph note signed in the third person in the text, 1p. 8vo., n.p., "Fryday", a thank you note also declining an invitation. In full: "Gen. Lee''s compliments to Miss London {He] is extremely obliged to her for her generous present - and will drink her health with every holy day and Sunday - He is very sorry He cannot have the pleasure of dining with Mrs and Mr Redone as he is engag''d at the Delaney''s". Tiny hole at folds well away from text, toning, very bold ink, overall good. Sold with a scarce contemporary engraving, 8 1/2" x 13": "Engraved for Barnard''s New Complete Authentic History of England" showing Lee being taken prisoner by the British. Stained a bit at top, soiled. Two pieces.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CHARLES O''HARA

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CHARLES O''HARA (1740 - 1802) British military officer who served in the Seven Years'' War, the American Revolution and the French Revolution, and later served as the Governor of Gibraltar. He had the dubious distinction of surrendering personally to both George Washington (at Yorktown) and Napoleon Bonaparte (at Toulon). WAR-DATE LETTER FROM VIRGINIA TO GEORGE III''S BROTHER Fine content war-date A.L.S. "Chas. O''Hara B[rigadier] G[eneral]", 3pp. 8vo., "Camp near Suffolk in Virginia", July 15, 1781, to "H.R.H. the Duke of Gloucester", PRINCE WILLIAM HENRY (1764-1805), the brother of King George III. O''Hara writes shortly before the Siege of Yorktown, in part: "... The Detachment lately arrived from England, has not yet joined the Brigade, they are at Portsmouth & march from there to Morrow to join us upon the ground. It is a justice due to the Zeal & Spirit of Lieut. Colonels Conway & Lake of your Royal Highness''s Regt. that you should be informed, that those Gentlemen immediately upon their arrival at Portsmouth hearing that the Rebel Army [was] so near Lord Cornwallis that a general action would probably ensue, determined to join us as soon as possible which they effected with much fatigue, not unattended likewise with danger - they were so fortunate as to join the Brigade at Williamsburg a few days after to have their share of the Honor & Danger of Repulsing the Rebel Army which attacked Lord Cornwallis near James City Island the 6th of this Month..." Three months after the events discussed in this letter, O''Hara and the rest of the force under Lord Cornwallis would find themselves besieged by a combined American and French land and naval force at Yorktown. It would fall to O''Hara to personally surrender to the victors, as Cornwallis claimed to be ill. Their defeat there would force the British to open peace negotiations, spelling the beginning of the end for their hopes of retaining the Colonies. Folds, damp staining at the right side of both sheets, causing significant fading of the text there, some slight ink erosion, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CHARLES PETTIT

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CHARLES PETTIT (1736 - 1806) American Revolution patriot and financier, and a powerful advocate for the acceptance of the Constitution. A.L.S., 1p. 4to., Burlington, Apr. 15, 1774 to Philadelphia merchant John Mitchell. Pettit states that he has issued a writ against a debtor but suspects that the man will evade making payment. The debtor''s financial situation is described as poor, and he asks if he may be permitted to settle a debt with another debtor. Tipped to a larger sheet, near fine.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CHARLES STEWART

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CHARLES STEWART (1729 - 1800) American officer during the American Revolution and a Continental Congressman, colonel of a battalion of Minutemen, commissary general of issues, 1777, and New Jersey delegate to the Continental Congress in 1784 and 1785. A.L.S. with integral address leaf, 1p. 4to., Kingwood, New Jersey, Aug. 9, 1774, a letter of condolence to Philadelphia merchant John Boyle. Stewart is surprised at the sudden death of their mutual friend "Bob Glenn" and mentions his own lingering fever hoping to make a trip to Susquehanna. Paperclip stain at top, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CLEMENT BIDDLE

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CLEMENT BIDDLE (1740 - 1814) "The Quaker General" organized and led the "Quaker Blues" against the British and fought under Nathanial Greene as well. Manuscript D.S., 2pp. legal folio, Pennsylvania, Dec. 4, 1799, an accounts ledger of repairs made to the ship COMMERCE, itemizing the exact amount owed to each individual, institution, or business, including sailmakers, carpenters, painters, blacksmiths, the customs house, and the Insurance Company of the State of Pennsylvania. Signed boldly at the conclusion by Biddle in black ink. Folds, chipped at the edges, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
COMMISSARY GENERAL JOSEPH TRUMBULL RECEIVES FUNDS IN MANHATTAN SHORLTY AFTER HARLEM HEIGHTS

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: COMMISSARY GENERAL JOSEPH TRUMBULL RECEIVES FUNDS IN MANHATTAN SHORLTY AFTER HARLEM HEIGHTS JOSEPH TRUMBULL (1737 - 1778) Son of Connecticut Gov. Jonathan Trumbull and the first commissary general of the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War. Important D.S., 1p. 7 1/4" x 3", Kings Bridge, Oct. 3, 1776. In part: "Rec''d...of Wm. Palfrey Pay Mr Genl [and aide to George Washington] and Mr. [John] Lawrence Eight Thousand dollars, [with] which I am to procure a Warrant for from Genl. Washington...". At bottom he notes additional sums received over the next two days for a total of $60,000 received. Very good. On Sep. 16th Washington had achieved his first significant victory of the war, defeating the British at Harlem Heights. In early October, fearing he would be cut-off in northern Manhattan, he set forth north for White Plains where he would be defeated at White Plains on October 28th.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CONGRESS APPOINTS COMMISSIONERS TO NEGOTIATE AND SIGN TREATIES WITH THE IROQUOIS CONFEDERACY

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CONGRESS APPOINTS COMMISSIONERS TO NEGOTIATE AND SIGN TREATIES WITH THE IROQUOIS CONFEDERACY CHARLES THOMSON (1729-1824) Irish born American patriot, unanimously elected first Secretary of the Continental Congress in 1774 and held the post until 1789, chosen to notify Washington of his election to the Presidency. NEGOTIATING PEACE WITH THE IROQUOIS AND EXPENDING AMERICA WESTWARDS Historically important manuscript D.S. "Chas Thomson Scy.", 1p. legal folio, [Philadelphia], June 3, 1784, a resolution of the Continental Congress, naming GEORGE ROGERS CLARKE (1752-1818), OLIVER WOLCOTT (1726-1797), NATHANIEL GREENE (1742-1786), RICHARD BUTLER (1743-1791), STEPHEN HIGGINSON (1743-1828), and PHILLIP SCHUYLER (1733-1804) as commissioners, charged with negotiating treaties of peace with Native American tribes within the contemporary boundaries of the United States, with specific mention made of the Six Nations of the Iroquois Confederacy. In part: "... Whereas we have judged it proper that one or more Convention or Conventions be held with the Indians residing within the boundaries of the United States of America in the northern and middle Departments, comprehending the whole of the Indians known by the name of the Six Nations [Iroquois], and all to the northward and westward of them, and as far south as the Cherokees exclusive, for the purposes of receiving them into the favour and protection of the United States and of establishing boundary lines of property for separating and dividing the settlements of the Citizens of the United States of America from the Indian Villages and hunting grounds, and thereby extinguishing as far as possible, all occasion of future animosities, disquiet and vexation ..." The document also notes that Greene and Higginson have declined the offer, and appoints BENJAMIN LINCOLN (1733-1810) and ARTHUR LEE (1740-1792) to replace them. Two of these commissioners, Wolcott and Butler, negotiated the Second Treaty of Fort Stanwix with the Iroquois, which granted the U.S. all lands of the Ohio Territory west of the Niagara River. As the status of Indian lands had been overlooked in the creation of the Treaty of Paris between the United States and Great Britain, this treaty sought to establish peace between the Iroquois and the nascent nation. Many of the Six Nations refused to recognize the treaty; they held that their delegates had not been granted the power to give away such large tracts of land, and also because the majority of the Six Nations did not live in the Ohio territory. The tribes who did reside in the Ohio Country, including the Shawnee, the Mingo, and the Delaware, rejected the treaty. Commissioners Clarke, Butler and Lee also negotiated the Treaty of Fort McIntosh in 1785, and Clarke negotiated the Treaty of Fort Finney in 1786. These two treaties, negotiated with the above-listed tribes, solidified American claims in Ohio. The document is engrossed at the introduction and conclusion in Thomson''s hand, with a blind-embossed Great Seal, and is docketed on the verso, with a separate docketed cover identifying this copy of the commission as that granted to Oliver Wolcott. A 2" vertical tear at the bottom edge affects Thomson''s signature, and the document bears extensive old archival tape repairs to splits on the verso, else very good.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
CONTINENTAL CONGRESSMEN

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: CONTINENTAL CONGRESSMEN Lot of three signed items, includes JONATHAN STURGES (1740-1819) American lawyer, jurist and politician, represented Connecticut as a delegate to the Continental Congress and in House of Representatives, A.L.S. 1p. large 4to, Hartford, June 5, 1783 to William Seymour discussing fees due to him and his friend''s ability to travel, seal tear in body of letter with minor loss; LEONARD GANSEVOORT (1751-1810) American political leader from New York who served as a delegate to the Continental Congress in 1788, A.D.S. at the bottom of a folio statement of account for various merchandise, Albany, 1790; and CHARLES HUMPHREYS (1714-1786), delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress from 1774-76. He voted against the Declaration of Independence, since he believed it would inevitably escalate the Revolutionary War and that conflicted with his Quaker beliefs, A.D.S. 1p. 16mo., [n.p.], 1762, a receipt for funds paid to him. Three pieces.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Sign in to continue
Email
Please enter your email.
Password
Please enter your password.
Forgot Your Password?
Enter Your Email
Please enter a valid email.
No user is registered with that email address.
Request Sent
Check to find your temporary password and password reset instructions.
Use your new password to Sign In.
 
Per page:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7