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Auction Description for TimeLine Auctions: Antiquities: Day 4

Antiquities: Day 4 (621 Lots)

by TimeLine Auctions


621 lots with images

December 9, 2016

Live Auction

London, United Kingdom

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North American Inuit Bone Face Mask

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Description: 19th century AD or earlier. A whale bone carving of a male head with large nose with flaring nostrils, engraved eyes with pupils deeply drilled, one eye larger than the other; deeply cut philtrum under nose in the form of an inverted triangle; wide mouth with fleshy lips and drilled to the corners; drilled to the back with suspension hole with modern hook; to the base an ink inscription, 'Eskimo Point Hope Alaska 1862'. 351 grams, 11cm (4 3/4"). Property of a Sussex, UK collector; acquired UK 1990s; collected from Eskimo Point Hope, Alaska, 1862.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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North American Inuit Bone Face Mask

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Description: 19th century AD or earlier. A whale bone carving of a male face with large prominent nose and deeply drilled nostrils; almond shaped eyes with drilled pupils, low brow ridge above eyes; shallow philtrum below nose; wide mouth with fleshy lips twisted to the left; to the back a drilled suspension hole and to the side an ink inscription, 'Eskimo Point Hope 1862'. 459 grams, 12.5cm (5"). Property of a Sussex, UK collector; acquired UK 1990s; collected from Eskimo Point Hope, Alaska, 1862.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Akan Frog Trade Weight

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Description: 15th-19th century AD. A substantial trade weight in silver-coloured metal or silver-plate (95% silver by XRF surface analysis) depicting an amphibian in sitting posture with forelimbs held tight to the chest, rump positioned on a block. 1.5 kg, 10cm (4"). Property of a West London gentleman; acquired before 2000. Akan weights comprise a diverse range of forms, most notably animals, and served for weighing gold dust. They were used by the Akan and Akan-related peoples of southern Ghana and the neighbouring regions of the Ivory Coast. From around the fourteenth century gold was mined in the Akan forest and a standardised system of weighing was introduced, most likely influenced by the Sahelian trading partners. The weights take on a variety of forms, many influenced by nature, but some also of geometric type. There was a complex array of other apparatus including scales, spoons, shovels, sieves, gold-dust boxes, brushes, touchstones and small cloth packets that resulted in Akan gold weighing becoming a complicated and time consuming art. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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African Carved Monkey Head

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Description: Congo, 19th century AD. A carved wooden head of a monkey with arched and thick brow ridges, almond shaped eyes below with drilled pupil; flat nose with drilled nasal holes; leaf shaped ear to the left, low, open mouth with long neck curving back to a blunt hook shape; traces of fur, pigment and resin to surface; mounted on a custom made stand. 825 grams, 30.5cm (12"). Property of a Sussex, UK collector; acquired UK 1990s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Ethnographic Coco De Mer Nut

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Description: 19th century AD. A large Coco de Mer nut, or Lodoicea, with fibrous husk and bi-lobed shape. 925 grams, 32cm (12 1/4"). Property of a Sussex, UK collector; acquired UK 1990s. Formerly Lodoicea was known as Maldive coconut. Its scientific name, Lodoicea maldivica, originated before the 18th century when the Seychelles were uninhabited. In centuries past the coconuts that fell from the trees and ended up in the sea would be carried away eastwards by the prevailing sea currents. The nuts can only float after the germination process, when they are hollow. In this way many drifted to the Maldives where they were gathered from the beaches and valued as an important trade and medicinal item. They were also valued as fertility symbols due to their shape resembling female reproductive organs or buttocks.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Pre-Columbian Olmec Mask Pendant

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Description: 1st millennium BC. A carved jadeite D-shaped panel with holes to the upper and lateral edges; to one face a facing mask with narrow eyes, broad nose, downturned mouth, flanked by arched lines. 86 grams, 75mm (3"). From the private collection of a German gentleman; acquired prior to 1999. The Olmecs were the first people in Mesoamerica to create a codified religious universe that we can recognise today through the surviving art. Olmec deities had features of the powerful animals of the tropical rain forests, with the principle deity being a were-jaguar, brought to life through the mating of a human female and a male jaguar. These deities display a mix of human and feline features and the most enduring of these were-jaguar deities is the Rain Baby, a deity whose tears were believed to bring the life giving rains. The mix of human and feline features could relate to the Shamanic practice of trance rituals where the practitioner was believed to enter the body of an animal, such as a jaguar, in order to communicate with the spirit world. The creation of luxury objects from jade required a material which didn't occur in the heart of Olmec culture. Therefore rulers dispatched parties to procure the stone, and over these jade routes the Olmec empire reached into what is now Honduras, as well as to Mexico city area and the Pacific Ocean. This way, the culture expanded through the Mesoamerica and create the base for later Maya culture, traceable in art style, rituals and ballgame. The facial expression with the narrow eyes and crescentic mouth resembles that of the Olmec jadeite mask displayed in the The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York under accession number 1977.187.33.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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South American Aztec Double-Curved Knife

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Description: 6th-15th century AD. A finely made S-curved biconvex obsidian knife with two cutting edges. 122 grams, 18cm (7"). Property of a European collector; formerly from the collection of Prof. RNDr. Jan Jelínek, DrSc., anthropologist, and Director of the Moravian museum, and the president of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM) for eight years; thence by descent 2004. Professor RNDr. Jan Jelinek, DrSc. Born 26th February 1926 in Brno, Czech Republic, Jan Jelinek studied anthropology at Brno University and graduated from the faculty of Sciences in 1949. After graduation, he spent two years taking special courses in the Medical Faculty and made postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Philosophy at the same institution. Jelinek started his scientific work at the Moravian Museum where he founded the Anthropos Institute, covering several scientific disciplines including the study of man in the Pleistocene environment, physical and cultural anthropology, prehistory and palaeontology. The Institute’s exhibition building, the Anthropos Pavilion, opened in 1962 to accommodate a unique exhibition on the origins and evolution of man. In the same year, Jelinek began to publish the quarterly journal Anthropology, and was its editor for 33 years. He also edited a series of Anthropos monographs containing articles by outstanding Czech and foreign anthropologists. In 1958, Jelinek was appointed director of the Moravian Museum. He launched an extensive reconstruction programme for the museum’s premises. His name is connected with the foundation of the Genetics Department, and of the Department for Research into the Karst Phenomenon. The scientific activities of Jan Jelinek focused mainly on palaeoanthropology, on the study of Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene populations with special emphasis on the physical and cultural evolution of man. The beginnings of his scientific work are connected with the anthropological research of Cézavy, a Hallstatt locality near Blu?ina (Southern Moravia"). This work developed into extensive research and studies of other prehistoric periods, including the Old Slavonic period in the Early Middle Ages. Jelinek was in charge of the excavation of the Palaeolithic finds in the Mlade? caves, of the Brno II finds, of Dolni V?stonice III and Staré M?sto. He initiated the research of the Old Pleistocene site on Stránska Skála. The results of this research have made Moravia one of the oldest inhabited territories of Europe. Another research project lasting many years was carried out in the Kûlna cave. Jelinek’s research and studies in prehistoric anthropology and palaeoanthropology have resulted in a large number of publications, including: The Great Picture Atlas of Prehistoric Man, 1975, published in 14 languages; The Great Art of the Early Australians, 1989; Disappearing Sahara, published in Czech, in press; Le Sahara Libyen – l’art le plus ancient, published in French, in press. The total number of publications exceeds 250 titles. His extensive international contacts have enabled Jan Jelinek to undertyake a number of scientific expeditions, including two to Australia (1969, 1973), to the interior of Arnhem Land, stimulated by the study of prehistory, anthropology and ethnography of the Aboriginals, especially the Rembrranga tribe. During these expeditions, he documented a rich anthropological and ethnographical material, bark paintings and other unique finds. Jelinek studied rock art also during his expeditions to Eastern Siberia. In 1977-81 he organised five expeditions to the Sahara Desert and during 1976-85 he was commissioned by UNESCO and the Libyan government to take charge of the construction of the National Museum of Libya. Although primarily a scientific worker, Jan Jelinek was also active as a university lecturer. He read cultural anthropology and museology at Brno University. He later taught palaeoanthropology at the Charles University in Prague and anthropology at the Comenius University in Bratislava. One of Jelinek’s pioneering acts was the foundation of the Department of Museology at the J.E. Purkyn? University in Brno in 1964. It was the first department of museology in Europe. In 1990 Jelinek qualified as an ordinary professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Masaryk University, Brno. Over the years, Jelinek organised a number of international congresses and held important posts in various scientific societies and organisations: 1962-6 – chairman of the International Section of Regional Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); 1965-71 – President of the Advisory Committee of ICOM; 1971-7 – President of ICOM; 1977 – Honorary Member of ICOM; 1973 – President of the Czechoslovak Anthropological Society; 1980 – Honorary Member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, London; 1981-4 – President of the European Anthropological Association, etc. For his distinguished work in the field of anthropology, he received a number of distinctions: Aleš Hrdli?ka Medal (1963), the State Distinction for Reconstitution Services (1968), Pešina’s Medal (1971), J.E. Purkyn? University Medal (1979"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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South American Aztec Beaked Knife

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Description: 6th-15th century AD. A finely made curved biconvex obsidian knife with two cutting edges, one end hooked. 108 grams, 14.5cm (5 3/4"). Property of a European collector; formerly from the collection of Prof. RNDr. Jan Jelínek, DrSc., anthropologist, and Director of the Moravian museum, and the president of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM) for eight years; thence by descent 2004. Professor RNDr. Jan Jelinek, DrSc. Born 26th February 1926 in Brno, Czech Republic, Jan Jelinek studied anthropology at Brno University and graduated from the faculty of Sciences in 1949. After graduation, he spent two years taking special courses in the Medical Faculty and made postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Philosophy at the same institution. Jelinek started his scientific work at the Moravian Museum where he founded the Anthropos Institute, covering several scientific disciplines including the study of man in the Pleistocene environment, physical and cultural anthropology, prehistory and palaeontology. The Institute’s exhibition building, the Anthropos Pavilion, opened in 1962 to accommodate a unique exhibition on the origins and evolution of man. In the same year, Jelinek began to publish the quarterly journal Anthropology, and was its editor for 33 years. He also edited a series of Anthropos monographs containing articles by outstanding Czech and foreign anthropologists. In 1958, Jelinek was appointed director of the Moravian Museum. He launched an extensive reconstruction programme for the museum’s premises. His name is connected with the foundation of the Genetics Department, and of the Department for Research into the Karst Phenomenon. The scientific activities of Jan Jelinek focused mainly on palaeoanthropology, on the study of Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene populations with special emphasis on the physical and cultural evolution of man. The beginnings of his scientific work are connected with the anthropological research of Cézavy, a Hallstatt locality near Blu?ina (Southern Moravia"). This work developed into extensive research and studies of other prehistoric periods, including the Old Slavonic period in the Early Middle Ages. Jelinek was in charge of the excavation of the Palaeolithic finds in the Mlade? caves, of the Brno II finds, of Dolni V?stonice III and Staré M?sto. He initiated the research of the Old Pleistocene site on Stránska Skála. The results of this research have made Moravia one of the oldest inhabited territories of Europe. Another research project lasting many years was carried out in the Kûlna cave. Jelinek’s research and studies in prehistoric anthropology and palaeoanthropology have resulted in a large number of publications, including: The Great Picture Atlas of Prehistoric Man, 1975, published in 14 languages; The Great Art of the Early Australians, 1989; Disappearing Sahara, published in Czech, in press; Le Sahara Libyen – l’art le plus ancient, published in French, in press. The total number of publications exceeds 250 titles. His extensive international contacts have enabled Jan Jelinek to undertyake a number of scientific expeditions, including two to Australia (1969, 1973), to the interior of Arnhem Land, stimulated by the study of prehistory, anthropology and ethnography of the Aboriginals, especially the Rembrranga tribe. During these expeditions, he documented a rich anthropological and ethnographical material, bark paintings and other unique finds. Jelinek studied rock art also during his expeditions to Eastern Siberia. In 1977-81 he organised five expeditions to the Sahara Desert and during 1976-85 he was commissioned by UNESCO and the Libyan government to take charge of the construction of the National Museum of Libya. Although primarily a scientific worker, Jan Jelinek was also active as a university lecturer. He read cultural anthropology and museology at Brno University. He later taught palaeoanthropology at the Charles University in Prague and anthropology at the Comenius University in Bratislava. One of Jelinek’s pioneering acts was the foundation of the Department of Museology at the J.E. Purkyn? University in Brno in 1964. It was the first department of museology in Europe. In 1990 Jelinek qualified as an ordinary professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Masaryk University, Brno. Over the years, Jelinek organised a number of international congresses and held important posts in various scientific societies and organisations: 1962-6 – chairman of the International Section of Regional Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); 1965-71 – President of the Advisory Committee of ICOM; 1971-7 – President of ICOM; 1977 – Honorary Member of ICOM; 1973 – President of the Czechoslovak Anthropological Society; 1980 – Honorary Member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, London; 1981-4 – President of the European Anthropological Association, etc. For his distinguished work in the field of anthropology, he received a number of distinctions: Aleš Hrdli?ka Medal (1963), the State Distinction for Reconstitution Services (1968), Pešina’s Medal (1971), J.E. Purkyn? University Medal (1979"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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South American Aztec Lancehead

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Description: 6th-15th century AD. A finely made biconvex obsidian leaf-shaped lancehead with two cutting edges, flat butt. 59 grams, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a European collector; formerly from the collection of Prof. RNDr. Jan Jelínek, DrSc., anthropologist, and Director of the Moravian museum, and the president of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM) for eight years; thence by descent 2004. Professor RNDr. Jan Jelinek, DrSc. Born 26th February 1926 in Brno, Czech Republic, Jan Jelinek studied anthropology at Brno University and graduated from the faculty of Sciences in 1949. After graduation, he spent two years taking special courses in the Medical Faculty and made postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Philosophy at the same institution. Jelinek started his scientific work at the Moravian Museum where he founded the Anthropos Institute, covering several scientific disciplines including the study of man in the Pleistocene environment, physical and cultural anthropology, prehistory and palaeontology. The Institute’s exhibition building, the Anthropos Pavilion, opened in 1962 to accommodate a unique exhibition on the origins and evolution of man. In the same year, Jelinek began to publish the quarterly journal Anthropology, and was its editor for 33 years. He also edited a series of Anthropos monographs containing articles by outstanding Czech and foreign anthropologists. In 1958, Jelinek was appointed director of the Moravian Museum. He launched an extensive reconstruction programme for the museum’s premises. His name is connected with the foundation of the Genetics Department, and of the Department for Research into the Karst Phenomenon. The scientific activities of Jan Jelinek focused mainly on palaeoanthropology, on the study of Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene populations with special emphasis on the physical and cultural evolution of man. The beginnings of his scientific work are connected with the anthropological research of Cézavy, a Hallstatt locality near Blu?ina (Southern Moravia"). This work developed into extensive research and studies of other prehistoric periods, including the Old Slavonic period in the Early Middle Ages. Jelinek was in charge of the excavation of the Palaeolithic finds in the Mlade? caves, of the Brno II finds, of Dolni V?stonice III and Staré M?sto. He initiated the research of the Old Pleistocene site on Stránska Skála. The results of this research have made Moravia one of the oldest inhabited territories of Europe. Another research project lasting many years was carried out in the Kûlna cave. Jelinek’s research and studies in prehistoric anthropology and palaeoanthropology have resulted in a large number of publications, including: The Great Picture Atlas of Prehistoric Man, 1975, published in 14 languages; The Great Art of the Early Australians, 1989; Disappearing Sahara, published in Czech, in press; Le Sahara Libyen – l’art le plus ancient, published in French, in press. The total number of publications exceeds 250 titles. His extensive international contacts have enabled Jan Jelinek to undertyake a number of scientific expeditions, including two to Australia (1969, 1973), to the interior of Arnhem Land, stimulated by the study of prehistory, anthropology and ethnography of the Aboriginals, especially the Rembrranga tribe. During these expeditions, he documented a rich anthropological and ethnographical material, bark paintings and other unique finds. Jelinek studied rock art also during his expeditions to Eastern Siberia. In 1977-81 he organised five expeditions to the Sahara Desert and during 1976-85 he was commissioned by UNESCO and the Libyan government to take charge of the construction of the National Museum of Libya. Although primarily a scientific worker, Jan Jelinek was also active as a university lecturer. He read cultural anthropology and museology at Brno University. He later taught palaeoanthropology at the Charles University in Prague and anthropology at the Comenius University in Bratislava. One of Jelinek’s pioneering acts was the foundation of the Department of Museology at the J.E. Purkyn? University in Brno in 1964. It was the first department of museology in Europe. In 1990 Jelinek qualified as an ordinary professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Masaryk University, Brno. Over the years, Jelinek organised a number of international congresses and held important posts in various scientific societies and organisations: 1962-6 – chairman of the International Section of Regional Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); 1965-71 – President of the Advisory Committee of ICOM; 1971-7 – President of ICOM; 1977 – Honorary Member of ICOM; 1973 – President of the Czechoslovak Anthropological Society; 1980 – Honorary Member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, London; 1981-4 – President of the European Anthropological Association, etc. For his distinguished work in the field of anthropology, he received a number of distinctions: Aleš Hrdli?ka Medal (1963), the State Distinction for Reconstitution Services (1968), Pešina’s Medal (1971), J.E. Purkyn? University Medal (1979"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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South American Aztec Obsidian Lancehead

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Description: 6th-15th century AD. A finely made D-section obsidian leaf-shaped lancehead with two cutting edges. 81 grams, 17.5cm (6 3/4"). Property of a European collector; formerly from the collection of Prof. RNDr. Jan Jelínek, DrSc., anthropologist, and Director of the Moravian museum, and the president of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM) for eight years; thence by descent 2004. Professor RNDr. Jan Jelinek, DrSc. Born 26th February 1926 in Brno, Czech Republic, Jan Jelinek studied anthropology at Brno University and graduated from the faculty of Sciences in 1949. After graduation, he spent two years taking special courses in the Medical Faculty and made postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Philosophy at the same institution. Jelinek started his scientific work at the Moravian Museum where he founded the Anthropos Institute, covering several scientific disciplines including the study of man in the Pleistocene environment, physical and cultural anthropology, prehistory and palaeontology. The Institute’s exhibition building, the Anthropos Pavilion, opened in 1962 to accommodate a unique exhibition on the origins and evolution of man. In the same year, Jelinek began to publish the quarterly journal Anthropology, and was its editor for 33 years. He also edited a series of Anthropos monographs containing articles by outstanding Czech and foreign anthropologists. In 1958, Jelinek was appointed director of the Moravian Museum. He launched an extensive reconstruction programme for the museum’s premises. His name is connected with the foundation of the Genetics Department, and of the Department for Research into the Karst Phenomenon. The scientific activities of Jan Jelinek focused mainly on palaeoanthropology, on the study of Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene populations with special emphasis on the physical and cultural evolution of man. The beginnings of his scientific work are connected with the anthropological research of Cézavy, a Hallstatt locality near Blu?ina (Southern Moravia"). This work developed into extensive research and studies of other prehistoric periods, including the Old Slavonic period in the Early Middle Ages. Jelinek was in charge of the excavation of the Palaeolithic finds in the Mlade? caves, of the Brno II finds, of Dolni V?stonice III and Staré M?sto. He initiated the research of the Old Pleistocene site on Stránska Skála. The results of this research have made Moravia one of the oldest inhabited territories of Europe. Another research project lasting many years was carried out in the Kûlna cave. Jelinek’s research and studies in prehistoric anthropology and palaeoanthropology have resulted in a large number of publications, including: The Great Picture Atlas of Prehistoric Man, 1975, published in 14 languages; The Great Art of the Early Australians, 1989; Disappearing Sahara, published in Czech, in press; Le Sahara Libyen – l’art le plus ancient, published in French, in press. The total number of publications exceeds 250 titles. His extensive international contacts have enabled Jan Jelinek to undertyake a number of scientific expeditions, including two to Australia (1969, 1973), to the interior of Arnhem Land, stimulated by the study of prehistory, anthropology and ethnography of the Aboriginals, especially the Rembrranga tribe. During these expeditions, he documented a rich anthropological and ethnographical material, bark paintings and other unique finds. Jelinek studied rock art also during his expeditions to Eastern Siberia. In 1977-81 he organised five expeditions to the Sahara Desert and during 1976-85 he was commissioned by UNESCO and the Libyan government to take charge of the construction of the National Museum of Libya. Although primarily a scientific worker, Jan Jelinek was also active as a university lecturer. He read cultural anthropology and museology at Brno University. He later taught palaeoanthropology at the Charles University in Prague and anthropology at the Comenius University in Bratislava. One of Jelinek’s pioneering acts was the foundation of the Department of Museology at the J.E. Purkyn? University in Brno in 1964. It was the first department of museology in Europe. In 1990 Jelinek qualified as an ordinary professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Masaryk University, Brno. Over the years, Jelinek organised a number of international congresses and held important posts in various scientific societies and organisations: 1962-6 – chairman of the International Section of Regional Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); 1965-71 – President of the Advisory Committee of ICOM; 1971-7 – President of ICOM; 1977 – Honorary Member of ICOM; 1973 – President of the Czechoslovak Anthropological Society; 1980 – Honorary Member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, London; 1981-4 – President of the European Anthropological Association, etc. For his distinguished work in the field of anthropology, he received a number of distinctions: Aleš Hrdli?ka Medal (1963), the State Distinction for Reconstitution Services (1968), Pešina’s Medal (1971), J.E. Purkyn? University Medal (1979"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Central American Mesoamerican Javelin Head

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Description: 13th-15th century AD. A finely made D-section obsidian barbed and tanged javelin head with square butt to the tang. 96 grams, 13.5cm (5 1/4"). Property of a European collector; formerly from the collection of Prof. RNDr. Jan Jelínek, DrSc., anthropologist, and Director of the Moravian museum, and the president of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM) for eight years; thence by descent 2004. Professor RNDr. Jan Jelinek, DrSc. Born 26th February 1926 in Brno, Czech Republic, Jan Jelinek studied anthropology at Brno University and graduated from the faculty of Sciences in 1949. After graduation, he spent two years taking special courses in the Medical Faculty and made postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Philosophy at the same institution. Jelinek started his scientific work at the Moravian Museum where he founded the Anthropos Institute, covering several scientific disciplines including the study of man in the Pleistocene environment, physical and cultural anthropology, prehistory and palaeontology. The Institute’s exhibition building, the Anthropos Pavilion, opened in 1962 to accommodate a unique exhibition on the origins and evolution of man. In the same year, Jelinek began to publish the quarterly journal Anthropology, and was its editor for 33 years. He also edited a series of Anthropos monographs containing articles by outstanding Czech and foreign anthropologists. In 1958, Jelinek was appointed director of the Moravian Museum. He launched an extensive reconstruction programme for the museum’s premises. His name is connected with the foundation of the Genetics Department, and of the Department for Research into the Karst Phenomenon. The scientific activities of Jan Jelinek focused mainly on palaeoanthropology, on the study of Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene populations with special emphasis on the physical and cultural evolution of man. The beginnings of his scientific work are connected with the anthropological research of Cézavy, a Hallstatt locality near Blu?ina (Southern Moravia"). This work developed into extensive research and studies of other prehistoric periods, including the Old Slavonic period in the Early Middle Ages. Jelinek was in charge of the excavation of the Palaeolithic finds in the Mlade? caves, of the Brno II finds, of Dolni V?stonice III and Staré M?sto. He initiated the research of the Old Pleistocene site on Stránska Skála. The results of this research have made Moravia one of the oldest inhabited territories of Europe. Another research project lasting many years was carried out in the Kûlna cave. Jelinek’s research and studies in prehistoric anthropology and palaeoanthropology have resulted in a large number of publications, including: The Great Picture Atlas of Prehistoric Man, 1975, published in 14 languages; The Great Art of the Early Australians, 1989; Disappearing Sahara, published in Czech, in press; Le Sahara Libyen – l’art le plus ancient, published in French, in press. The total number of publications exceeds 250 titles. His extensive international contacts have enabled Jan Jelinek to undertyake a number of scientific expeditions, including two to Australia (1969, 1973), to the interior of Arnhem Land, stimulated by the study of prehistory, anthropology and ethnography of the Aboriginals, especially the Rembrranga tribe. During these expeditions, he documented a rich anthropological and ethnographical material, bark paintings and other unique finds. Jelinek studied rock art also during his expeditions to Eastern Siberia. In 1977-81 he organised five expeditions to the Sahara Desert and during 1976-85 he was commissioned by UNESCO and the Libyan government to take charge of the construction of the National Museum of Libya. Although primarily a scientific worker, Jan Jelinek was also active as a university lecturer. He read cultural anthropology and museology at Brno University. He later taught palaeoanthropology at the Charles University in Prague and anthropology at the Comenius University in Bratislava. One of Jelinek’s pioneering acts was the foundation of the Department of Museology at the J.E. Purkyn? University in Brno in 1964. It was the first department of museology in Europe. In 1990 Jelinek qualified as an ordinary professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Masaryk University, Brno. Over the years, Jelinek organised a number of international congresses and held important posts in various scientific societies and organisations: 1962-6 – chairman of the International Section of Regional Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); 1965-71 – President of the Advisory Committee of ICOM; 1971-7 – President of ICOM; 1977 – Honorary Member of ICOM; 1973 – President of the Czechoslovak Anthropological Society; 1980 – Honorary Member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, London; 1981-4 – President of the European Anthropological Association, etc. For his distinguished work in the field of anthropology, he received a number of distinctions: Aleš Hrdli?ka Medal (1963), the State Distinction for Reconstitution Services (1968), Pešina’s Medal (1971), J.E. Purkyn? University Medal (1979"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Central American Mesoamerican Arrowhead

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Description: 13th-14th century AD. A finely knapped flint barbed and tanged flat-section arrowhead. 6.17 grams, 52mm (2"). Property of a European collector; formerly from the collection of Prof. RNDr. Jan Jelínek, DrSc., anthropologist, and Director of the Moravian museum, and the president of the International Committee of Museums (ICOM) for eight years; thence by descent 2004. Professor RNDr. Jan Jelinek, DrSc. Born 26th February 1926 in Brno, Czech Republic, Jan Jelinek studied anthropology at Brno University and graduated from the faculty of Sciences in 1949. After graduation, he spent two years taking special courses in the Medical Faculty and made postgraduate studies in the Faculty of Philosophy at the same institution. Jelinek started his scientific work at the Moravian Museum where he founded the Anthropos Institute, covering several scientific disciplines including the study of man in the Pleistocene environment, physical and cultural anthropology, prehistory and palaeontology. The Institute’s exhibition building, the Anthropos Pavilion, opened in 1962 to accommodate a unique exhibition on the origins and evolution of man. In the same year, Jelinek began to publish the quarterly journal Anthropology, and was its editor for 33 years. He also edited a series of Anthropos monographs containing articles by outstanding Czech and foreign anthropologists. In 1958, Jelinek was appointed director of the Moravian Museum. He launched an extensive reconstruction programme for the museum’s premises. His name is connected with the foundation of the Genetics Department, and of the Department for Research into the Karst Phenomenon. The scientific activities of Jan Jelinek focused mainly on palaeoanthropology, on the study of Pleistocene and post-Pleistocene populations with special emphasis on the physical and cultural evolution of man. The beginnings of his scientific work are connected with the anthropological research of Cézavy, a Hallstatt locality near Blu?ina (Southern Moravia"). This work developed into extensive research and studies of other prehistoric periods, including the Old Slavonic period in the Early Middle Ages. Jelinek was in charge of the excavation of the Palaeolithic finds in the Mlade? caves, of the Brno II finds, of Dolni V?stonice III and Staré M?sto. He initiated the research of the Old Pleistocene site on Stránska Skála. The results of this research have made Moravia one of the oldest inhabited territories of Europe. Another research project lasting many years was carried out in the Kûlna cave. Jelinek’s research and studies in prehistoric anthropology and palaeoanthropology have resulted in a large number of publications, including: The Great Picture Atlas of Prehistoric Man, 1975, published in 14 languages; The Great Art of the Early Australians, 1989; Disappearing Sahara, published in Czech, in press; Le Sahara Libyen – l’art le plus ancient, published in French, in press. The total number of publications exceeds 250 titles. His extensive international contacts have enabled Jan Jelinek to undertyake a number of scientific expeditions, including two to Australia (1969, 1973), to the interior of Arnhem Land, stimulated by the study of prehistory, anthropology and ethnography of the Aboriginals, especially the Rembrranga tribe. During these expeditions, he documented a rich anthropological and ethnographical material, bark paintings and other unique finds. Jelinek studied rock art also during his expeditions to Eastern Siberia. In 1977-81 he organised five expeditions to the Sahara Desert and during 1976-85 he was commissioned by UNESCO and the Libyan government to take charge of the construction of the National Museum of Libya. Although primarily a scientific worker, Jan Jelinek was also active as a university lecturer. He read cultural anthropology and museology at Brno University. He later taught palaeoanthropology at the Charles University in Prague and anthropology at the Comenius University in Bratislava. One of Jelinek’s pioneering acts was the foundation of the Department of Museology at the J.E. Purkyn? University in Brno in 1964. It was the first department of museology in Europe. In 1990 Jelinek qualified as an ordinary professor at the Faculty of Sciences of the Masaryk University, Brno. Over the years, Jelinek organised a number of international congresses and held important posts in various scientific societies and organisations: 1962-6 – chairman of the International Section of Regional Museums of the International Council of Museums (ICOM); 1965-71 – President of the Advisory Committee of ICOM; 1971-7 – President of ICOM; 1977 – Honorary Member of ICOM; 1973 – President of the Czechoslovak Anthropological Society; 1980 – Honorary Member of the Royal Society of Antiquaries, London; 1981-4 – President of the European Anthropological Association, etc. For his distinguished work in the field of anthropology, he received a number of distinctions: Aleš Hrdli?ka Medal (1963), the State Distinction for Reconstitution Services (1968), Pešina’s Medal (1971), J.E. Purkyn? University Medal (1979"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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South America Figural Libation Cup

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Description: 1st millennium AD. A squat terracotta libation cup with flared base, applied facial features to the upper outer face to one side, hole to the centre. 270 grams, 98mm (4"). Property of a Salisbury, Wiltshire, UK collector. The offering of incense was considered an act of purification that linked a sacrificial object or person to the gods. The most common incense for the Maya was copal, a resin from the Bursera tree.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Recuay Carved Sitting Figure

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Description: South America, 1st millennium AD. A carved stone Recuay culture(?) figure, sitting with hands clasped to the sides of the head, elbows resting on the knees. 608 grams, 14cm (5 1/2"). Acquired on the German art market in the 1990s. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition, chipped.

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Natural History - Large Amethyst 'Crystal Cave'.

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Description: A large geode of fine, dark amethyst, the amethysts with goethite inclusions, and with calcite overgrowths. See Bonewitz, Dr. Ronald Louis, Rocks & Minerals, 2008, p.222-223. 41.7 kg, 38cm (12"). From Brazil, from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ and later collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex)

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition. A very fine example.

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Natural History - Large Amethyst Geode.

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Description: A large amethyst geode, with large crystals to the front of the opening creating a large, crystal-lined hollow within. See Bonewitz, Dr. Ronald Louis, Rocks & Minerals, 2008, p.222-223. 13.9 kg, 33cm (13"). From Brazil, from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ and later collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex)

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Rare Precious Diamond in Matrix Mineral Specimen.

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Description: An octahedral diamond crystal with stepped faces weighing approximately 1/4 ct in a matrix of kimberlite, from the Sakha Republic of Russia. See Bonewitz, Dr. Ronald Louis, Rocks & Minerals, 2008, p.122-123. 29 grams, 46mm (1 3/4"). Found Sakha Republic of Russia; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ collection and later of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex)

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition. Diamonds in matrix are rare.

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Natural History - Brazilianite Mineral Specimen.

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Description: A cluster of yellow-green brazilianite crystals consisting of four large terminated crystals and numerous smaller crystals, in white card tray with handwritten label reading: 'Brazilianite xls, Minas Greais, Brazil, ? 220'. See Bonewitz, Dr. Ronald Louis, Rocks & Minerals, 2008, p.193. 155 grams, 69mm (2 3/4"). Found Brazil; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ and later collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex)

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Large Museum Quality Calcite Scalenohedra Display Specimen.

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Description: A museum-quality display specimen of calcite on matrix, comprising two large, double-terminated yellow calcite scalenohedra on a dark, brecciated limestone matrix. See Bonewitz, Dr. Ronald Louis, Rocks & Minerals, 2008, p.177. 2.4 kg, 23cm, largest scalenohedron 12cm (9, 4 3/4"). Found Tri-State, USA; previously in the very important 1960s Miller Collection, USA; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ and later collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex)

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition. Rare and exceptional specimen.

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Natural History - Isle of Sheppey Fossil Turtle

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Description: Eocene Period, 50 million years BP. A large septarian nodule with almost entire upper carapace and bones of the fossil turtle Argillochelys cuniceps, with an A4 laminated information display card illustrating the piece. See Clouter, Mitchell, Rayner & Rayner, London Clay Fossils of the Isle of Sheppey, Medway, 2000, p.76. 1.89 kg, 23cm (9"). Property of a Kent, UK collector; acquired UK market, 1970-2000; from the foreshore at Hen's Brook, Isle of Sheppey, Kent, UK.

Condition Report: Fine condition, extremely rare.

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Natural History - German Woolly Mammoth Jaw with Tooth

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Description: Pleistocene Period, 70,000-30,000 years BP. The major portion of the lower adult jaw of Mammoth primigenius, the Woolly Mammoth, with complete lower tooth; with label. 11.8 kg, 50cm (19 3/4"). Property of a Kent, UK collector; acquired UK market, 1970-2000; from Otterstadt, Germany.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Woolly Mammoth Fossil Tooth

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Description: Devensian Period, 110,000-12,000 years BP. A Mammuthus primigenius tooth from Brown Bank, Lowestoft, UK, with stand. 1.6 kg, 2.5cm including stand (8 1/2"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill; collected between 1930 and 1960.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Woolly Mammoth Fossil Tooth

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Description: Pleistocene Period, 2.6 million years-11,700 years BP. A Mammuthus primigenius tooth from Brown Bank, Lowestoft, UK, with stand. 1.3 kg, 21cm including stand (8 1/4"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill; collected between 1930 and 1960.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Hadrosaur Fossil Dinosaur Egg

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Description: Cretaceous Period, 145-65 million years BP. A fossil hadrosaur Charonosaurus egg on matrix, retaining evidence of the original leathery surface. 2.5 kg, 14cm (5 1/2"). Property of a London gentleman; from Xixia basin, Henan Province, China. The hadrosaurs are known as the duck-billed dinosaurs, due to the similarity of their heads to those of modern ducks. In addition to the duck bill, Charonosaurus also had a large head crest.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Hadrosaur Fossil Dinosaur Egg Group

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Description: Cretaceous Period, 145-65 million years BP. Three fossil hadrosaur Charonosaurus eggs on matrix, retaining evidence of the original leathery surface. 8.4 kg, 28cm (11"). Property of a London gentleman; from Xixia basin, Henan Province, China. The hadrosaurs are known as the duck-billed dinosaurs, due to the similarity of their heads to those of modern ducks. In addition to the duck bill, Charonosaurus also had a large head crest.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Hadrosaur Fossil Dinosaur Egg Pair

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Description: Cretaceous Period, 145-65 million years BP. Two fossil hadrosaur Charonosaurus eggs on matrix, retaining evidence of the original leathery surface. 5 kg, 26cm (10 1/4"). Property of a London gentleman; from Xixia basin, Henan Province, China. The hadrosaurs are known as the duck-billed dinosaurs, due to the similarity of their heads to those of modern ducks. In addition to the duck bill, Charonosaurus also had a large head crest.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Large Fossil Mosasaur Jaw

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Description: Lower Cretaceous Period, 146-100 million years BP. A section of Mosasaur sp. jaw in matrix with seven fine teeth with very good enamel. 1.28 kg, 29.5cm (11 1/2"). Property of a Kent, UK collector; acquired UK market, 1970-2000; from the Albian, Tegona Formation, Morocco.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Spinosaurus Fossil Tooth Group

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Description: Cretaceous Period, Aptian Stage, 125-113 million years BP. A group of six large dinosaur teeth of Spinosaurs maroccanus from Tegana Formation, Taouz, Morocco. 98 grams total, 47-70mm (1 3/4 - 2 1/2"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill, collected between 1930 and 1960. The Spinosaurus was both a beachcomber-type scavenger and an active hunter taking small stranded plesiosaurs, pterosaurs, turtles and large fish. [6, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Spinosaurus Dinosaur Tooth Group

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Description: Cretaceous Period, Aptian Stage, 125-113 million years BP. A group of four large teeth from Spinosaurs maroccanus from Tegana Formation, Taouz, Morocco. 125 grams total, 51-63mm (2 - 2 1/2"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill; collected between 1930 and 1960. The Spinosaurus was both a beachcomber type scavenger and an active hunter taking small stranded plesiosaurs, pterosaurs, turtles and large fish. [4, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Megalodon Fossil Tooth

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Description: Pliocene Period, 5.2-2.5 million years BP. A large Carcharocles megalodon shark tooth from the Georgia, USA with good serrations and tooth enamel. 265 grams, 130mm (5 1/4"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill; collected between 1930 and 1960.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Megalodon Fossil Shark Tooth

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Description: Pliocene Period, 5.2 - 2.5 million years BP. A large Carcharocles megalodon shark tooth from Georgia, USA, with good serrations and tooth enamel. 342 grams, 13.5cm (5 1/4"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill; collected between 1930 and 1960.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - T-Rex Dinosaur Fossil Tooth

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Description: Cretaceous Period, 145-65 million years BP. A large example of a dinosaur tooth, Carcharodontosaurus saharicus (the African T-rex) from the Tegana formation of the Sahara Desert, Morocco. 31 grams, 75mm (3"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill, collected between 1930 and 1960. The Carcharodontosaurus saharicus was one of the largest predators (larger than its distant North American T-Rex cousin) of all time and is related to Allosaurus and the South American Gigantosaurus.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Mosasaurus Fossil Tooth

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Description: Lower Cretaceous Period, 120 million years BP. A large Mosasaurus tooth in a matrix together with vertebrae and bone sections, from the Tegona Formation, Khouribgha Phosphate Mines, Morocco. 486 grams, 107mm (4 1/4"). From an old Bristol paleontological collection, acquired 1950s-1960s. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Mosasaurus Fossil Tooth

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Description: Lower Cretaceous Period, 120 million years BP. A Mosasaurus tooth complete with root, from Tegona Formation, Khouribgha Phosphate Mines, Morocco. 143 grams, 120mm (4 3/4"). From an old Bristol paleontological collection, acquired 1950s-1960s. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Pterosaur Fossil Tooth Group

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Description: Cretaceous Period, 145-65 million years BP. A group of fifteen pterosaur teeth Siroccopteryx moroccensis, found south of Taouz, in the Moroccan Sahara. 8 grams total, 12-29mm (1/2 - 1"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill, collected between 1930 and 1960. So far, Siroccopteryx is the only named flying reptile from Africa and its narrow, curved teeth were probably used to catch fish. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Rebbachisaurus Dinosaur Fossil Tooth Group

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Description: Early Cretaceous Period, 146-100 million years BP. A group of five Rebbachisaurus dinosaur teeth from the Tegana Formation (Campian), Kem-Kem Basin, south of Taouz, Morocco. 11 grams total, 25-26mm (1"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill, collected between 1930 and 1960. Rebbachisaurus was a four-legged plant-eating dinosaur with a small head, a long, graceful neck and a whip-like tail. [5, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Complete Ichthyosaur Skeleton Replica.

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Description: A museum-quality reproduction of a complete juvenile Ichthyosaur skeleton (Jurassic Period, 150 million years BP) from Holzmaden, Germany. 3kg, 87cm (34 1/4"). Ichthyosaurus was a dolphin-like reptile up to 75 feet long. It could swim at 25 mph (40 kph"). Ichthyosaurs had a tall dorsal fin, a half-moon-shaped tail, paddle-like flippers and smooth skin. The nostrils were near the eyes on the top of the head. It had massive ear bones and large eyes, probably giving it acute hearing and sight. These marine reptiles gave birth to live young. Their diet was mostly fish, but also included cephalopods (like belemnites"). Hundreds of Ichthyosaurus fossils have been found in England, Germany, Greenland, and Alberta, Canada. They lived during the early Jurassic to the early Cretaceous periods. It was not a dinosaur, but another type of extinct reptile. Ichthyosaurus, which means “fish lizard,” was named by Charles Koenig in 1818.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Natural History - Hadrosaur Dinosaur Fossil Vertebra

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Description: Upper Cretaceous Period (Campanian), 76-75 million years BP. A large Lambeosaurus sp. dinosaur fossil vertebra, from the Judith River Formation, Montana, North America. 1.1 kg, 13cm (5 1/4"). From the Pradi Collection, Boston, USA; acquired during 1980s. Lambeosaurus is a genus of hadrosaurid dinosaur, bipedal or quadrupedal and herbivorous, known for its distinctive hollow cranial crest, which in the best-known species resembled a hatchet.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Iguanodon Fossil Leg Bone & Rib Sections

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Description: Lower Cretaceous Period, 120 million years BP. A pair of iguanodon bone sections from the Wealden Clay, Isle of Wight, U.K. 546 grams grams total, 87-96mm (3 1/2 - 3 3/4"). From the collection of the palaeontologist R Gledhill, collected between 1930 and 1960. [2, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

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Natural History - Velociraptor Mongoliensis Foot Replica.

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Description: A museum-quality reproduction of a Velociraptor mongoliensis foot with killing claw on a rectangular base, from the Late Cretaceous Period (70 million years) from the Flaming Cliffs, Mongolia. 179 grams, 23cm (9").

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Natural History - Therizinosaurus Dinosaur Claw Replica.

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Description: A museum-quality reproduction of a claw of the Therizinosaurus of the Cretaceous Period, from Inner Mongolia. 602 grams, 48cm (19"). This holds the record for being the longest dinosaur claw ever found.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Natural History - Velociraptor Mongoliensis Foot and Leg Replica.

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Description: A museum-quality reproduction of a Velociraptor mongoliensis foot and leg with killing claw on a rectangular base, from the Late Cretaceous Period (70 million years) from the Flaming Cliffs, Mongolia. 529 grams, 48.5cm (19").

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Natural History - Tyrannosaurus Rex Lower Jaw Replica.

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Description: A life-size museum quality reproduction of a juvenile Tyrannosaurus Rex lower right jaw from the Late Cretaceous, 65 million years ago, from Hell Creek Formation, Montana, U.S.A. 2.7 kg, 101cm (39 3/4").

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Natural History - Oviraptor Egg Museum Replica.

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Description: A museum quality reproduction of an Oviraptor philocerataops egg being an exact copy, cast in resin directly from the actual fossil itself; original fossil came from the Upper Cretaceous period of the Gobi Desert, Mongolia. 289 grams, 15cm (6"). [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

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Natural History - Chondrite Meteorite with Ablation Crust.

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Description: A brown meteorite from an unidentified locality, probably an L-chondrite, based on its relatively light weight and ablation crust; their name comes from their relatively low iron abundance. See: Korochantseva et al. 'L-chondrite asteroid breakup tied to Ordovician meteorite shower by multiple isochron 40Ar-39Ar dating' Meteoritics & Planetary Science 42, 1, pp. 3-150, Jan. 2007. 17 grams, 27mm (1"). From the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ and later collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex) [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Meteorite with Ablation Crust.

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Description: A brown meteorite from an unidentified locality, probably an L-chondrite, based on its relatively light weight and ablation crust; their name comes from their relatively low iron abundance, in white card tray. See: Korochantseva et al. 'L-chondrite asteroid breakup tied to Ordovician meteorite shower by multiple isochron 40Ar-39Ar dating' Meteoritics & Planetary Science 42, 1, pp. 3-150, Jan. 2007. 22 grams, 35mm (1 1/4"). From the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ and later collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2016 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex) [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Tindouf Fall Meteorite.

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Description: A very large piece of one of the most interesting Chondrites found in northwest Africa; a much studied meteorite, classified variously as L4 to L6, with some examples showing brecciation and higher metal content than others; this example seems to be an L4/5 and shows some regmaglypting and primary fusion crust. Cf: Meteoritical Bulletin #90 classified as NWA 869, an L4-6 fragmental breccia with a Shock Rating of S3 and a Weathering Level of W1. 39 grams, 36mm (1 1/2"). Found near Tindouf, Algeria, North West Africa; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2015 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex) [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Tindouf Fall Meteorite.

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Description: A very large piece of one of the most interesting Chondrites found in northwest Africa; a much studied meteorite, classified variously as L4 to L6, with some examples showing brecciation and higher metal content than others; this example seems to be an L4/5 and shows some regmaglypting and primary fusion crust. Cf: Meteoritical Bulletin #90 classified as NWA 869, an L4-6 fragmental breccia with a Shock Rating of S3 and a Weathering Level of W1. 62 grams, 48mm (2"). Found near Tindouf, Algeria, North West Africa; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2015 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex) [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Tindouf Fall Meteorite.

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Description: A very large piece of one of the most interesting Chondrites found in northwest Africa; a much studied meteorite, classified variously as L4 to L6, with some examples showing brecciation and higher metal content than others; this example seems to be an L4/5 and shows some regmaglypting and primary fusion crust. Cf: Meteoritical Bulletin #90 classified as NWA 869, an L4-6 fragmental breccia with a Shock Rating of S3 and a Weathering Level of W1. 79 grams, 48mm (2"). Found near Tindouf, Algeria, North West Africa; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2015 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex) [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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Natural History - Tindouf Fall Meteorite.

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Description: A very large piece of one of the most interesting Chondrites found in northwest Africa; a much studied meteorite, classified variously as L4 to L6, with some examples showing brecciation and higher metal content than others; this example seems to be an L4/5 and shows some regmaglypting and primary fusion crust. Cf: Meteoritical Bulletin #90 classified as NWA 869, an L4-6 fragmental breccia with a Shock Rating of S3 and a Weathering Level of W1. 113 grams, 59mm (2 1/4"). Found near Tindouf, Algeria, North West Africa; from the historic ‘Victorian Museum’ collection of Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd (Gregory's); formerly Gregory, Bottley & Co. (1932-1981) and previously J. R. Gregory & Co. (1898-1932); originally James Reynolds Gregory (1858-1898"). This item is part of a historic collection of fossils and minerals which has recently been reviewed by leading geological expert Dr. Ronald Bonewitz. The firm Gregory, Bottley and Lloyd (Gregory's), was acquired by TimeLine Auctions in 2016. London-born James Reynolds Gregory (1832-1899) founded the company, which is the second longest-running gem and fossil dealership in the world. James was educated at Archbishop Tennison's School, and afterward found employment in a jewellery company on Regent Street. In 1858 he established his own business in King William Street. A few years later he moved to ‘very extensive premises’ in Golden Square, Covent Garden. He was one of the best known dealers in London, exhibiting at major commercial shows throughout the world and winning awards for excellence in Paris in 1867, Sydney in 1879 and London in 1862, 1883 and 1884. James primarily bought his stock at auction, from collectors and other dealers, and supplied many major collectors and scientists of his day. He built superb personal collections, a selection going to the British Museum. He wrote many papers and was a member of several learned societies including the Society of Arts. The business became known as J.R. Gregory & Company in 1896, still under James' management with the assistance of his son Albert Gregory (b.1864"). When James died three years later, the business passed to Albert. At the end of the 19th century most London dealers had folded or retired, many selling out to J.R. Gregory & Co. Albert continued by acquiring Russell and Shaw (Est. 1848) in 1925 and Francis H. Butler (Est. 1884) in 1927. Percy Bottley (1904-1980) took over the company in 1931, renaming it Gregory, Bottley & Company with respect to his predecessors. Percy’s company survived the 2nd World War by buying out all of its competitors, including the supplier to Pitt-Rivers, Samuel Henson (Est. 1840) and G.H. Richards (Est. 1897) in 1936. Percy also added many important collections to his stock including those of Rev. F. Holmes in 1940, and the Graves collection in 1943. Following Percy's death in 1981, the business was sold to Brian Lloyd, whereupon it became Gregory, Bottley & Lloyd. Brian had been Sotheby’s main Natural History expert in the 1960s and 1970s, and subsequently traded from Pall Mall. The business continued to thrive, and Brian purchased the Joseph Neeld (1789-1856) collection in 1974 and the historic gold collection of H.S. Gordon, first exhibited at the Empire Exhibition, South Africa in 1936. Brian moved the business to 12-13 Rickett Street in 1982, and to 13 Seagrave Road in 1993. He carried on the company's specialization in historic collections, most recently acquiring that of Robert Ferguson (1767-1840) in 2000. The business moved to Walmer in Kent in 2008, and was acquired by TimeLine in April 2016. Trading History Est. 1858 (59 Frith Street, Soho) 1859 - 1861 (3 King William Street, Strand) 1862 - 1866 (25 Golden Square, Covent Garden) 1866 - 1874 (15 Russell Street, Covent Garden) 1874 - 1895 (88 Charlotte Street, Fitzroy Square) 1896 - 1906 (1 Kelso Place, Kensington) 1907 - 1926 (139 Fulham Road, Chelsea) 1926 - 1981 (30 (Old) Church Street, Chelsea) 1982 - 1993 (12-13 Rickett Street, Fulham) 1993 - 2007 (13 Seagrave Road, Fulham) 2008 - 2015 (59 Liverpool Road, Walmer, Kent) 2016 - (363 Main Road, Harwich, Essex) [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Extremely fine condition.

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