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Historic Patriot's Day Auction

by Early American


569 lots with images

April 20, 2013

Live Auction

P. O. Box 3507

Rancho Santa Fe, CA, 92067 USA

Phone: 00 1 858 759 3290

Fax: 00 1 858 759 1439

Email: auctions@earlyamerican.com

569 Lots
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JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 1825-Dated, Rare Re-use Document Signed, As President

Lot 1: JOHN QUINCY ADAMS 1825-Dated, Rare Re-use Document Signed, As President

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Description: AutographsRare Type Document Signed "J. Q. Adams" as PresidentJOHN QUINCY ADAMS. Sixth President of the United States (1825-29), James Monroe's Secretary of State, largely devising the Monroe Doctrine and in later years one of the earliest Anti-Slavery Leaders.April 1, 1825-Dated, Rare "Re-use" Partly-Printed Document, being "JAMES MONROE" Headed, yet Signed, "J. Q. Adams" as President, 1 page, 13.25" x 9.25" upon Vellum, Washington(DC), Very Fine. This original 1825 Land Grant is made to John Norton, assignee of Robert W. Norris of Howard County, purchased at Franklin, Missouri. This very rare use printed Document was printed with "James Monroe," Adams predecessor, as President, at top. Monroe's name was crossed out and "John Quincy Adams" was penned above. Also Signed by Commissioner of the General Land Office, George Graham. Well printed with typical folds and minor soiling, manuscript portions fully readable though somewhat light. The White Paper and Wax Embossed Official Seal is fully intact at the lower left, with a nice clear deeper brown "J. Q. Adams" signature at the lower right.

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Commander ROBERT ANDERSON, Signed Letter 4 Pages, 1856

Lot 2: Commander ROBERT ANDERSON, Signed Letter 4 Pages, 1856

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Description: Autographs"Robert Anderson" Union Commander of Fort Sumter Signed Military Letter Mentioning The "Secretary of War" Jefferson Davis !ROBERT ANDERSON (1805-1871). Historic Union Commander of Fort Sumter at the Outbreak of Civil War.1856-Dated, Pre-Civil War, Manuscript Letter Signed, "Robert Anderson," 4 pages, measuring 8" x 5.25" (no location), Choice Extremely Fine. Addressed to Capt. Bowman, regarding the proper building of a military construction project, this letter reads, in part:"...I hope you will not forget to send me the receipt for mixing cement... You will find that I was compelled to assume a responsibility in reference to a point not belonging to my duties--but, the circumstances were apparently so urgent, that there was no other remedy. I went over the whole question... and all agreed that the plan adopted would answer as well as the one it was intended to replace. We would have preferred... to have placed the two beams close together, but this would have diminished the size of the hoistaway... I shall... confine my attention to a general supervision of the painters and an inspection of their work... The Clerk is still engaged making out a list of the work that has been done for the Dept... I would like to know whether the Secy wishes to keep me on this duty or not. I told the Secy of War [Jefferson Davis] when in Washington, that my wife's health was not improving as well as I had anticipated...."Written and Signed in dark brown ink. There is some expected light folds, a few ink smudges and circulation. Ex: EAHA Auction, February 11, 2006, Lot 7, where it sold for $1,062. Letters that are Signed by Robert Anderson are very scarce. This example indirectly mentions his, along with the entire Union's, future adversary Jefferson Davis, then Secretary of War who became the President of the Confederacy. Jefferson Davis was the United States Secretary of War at the time this letter was written.Robert Anderson (1805-1871) a pro-slavery Kentuckian but absolutely loyal to the Union, was considered an ideal choice for commander in Charleston Harbor during the 1860 secession crisis. Having graduated from West Point (1825), he had risen to major, 1st Artillery, by the time of his assignment on November 15, 1860. "The Hero of Fort Sumter," Anderson refused to surrender the fort to the Confederacy in April 1861 and ultimately endured two days of bombardment before capitulating during the first battle of the Civil War.

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ROBERT ANDERSON, Signed Carte de Visite, c. 1863 by Photographer Matthew Brady

Lot 3: ROBERT ANDERSON, Signed Carte de Visite, c. 1863 by Photographer Matthew Brady

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Description: AutographsRare "Robert Anderson" Signed Carte de Visite PhotographROBERT ANDERSON (1805-1871). Civil War Union Hero, Commander who surrendered Fort Sumter to Southerners following their bombardment of the South Carolinian fort in April 1861.c. 1863 Civil War Period, Carte de Visite Photograph, by Photographer Matthew Brady, boldly Signed, "Robert Anderson - Major Gen. USA" in the lower margin being under his image, Choice Very Fine. This original Matthew Brady Carte de Visite measures 2.5" x 4" and has excellent tone and contrast to the image, with an outstanding rich brown signature being slightly clipped at the corner tips for prior album placement. Matthew Brady's famous studio stamp appears below the signature, as well as upon the verso.Days after Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox and the effective conclusion of the Civil War, Anderson returned to Charleston in the uniform of a Brevet Major General (ranking as of February 3, 1865) and, four years after lowering the 33-star flag in surrender, raised it in triumph over the recaptured but badly battered Fort Sumter during ceremonies there (The same evening, April 14, 1865, President Abraham.A great image, with an impressive appearance making this rare "Robert Anderson" Signed Carte de Visite Photograph excellent for display. Lincoln was assassinated). When South Carolina seceded In December 1860, Major Anderson, a pro-Slavery, former slave-owner from Kentucky, remained loyal to the Union. He was the commanding officer of United States Army forces in Charleston, South Carolina-the last remaining important Union post in the Deep South.Acting without orders, he moved his small garrison from Fort Moultrie, which was indefensible, to the more modern, more defensible, Fort Sumter in the middle of Charleston Harbor. South Carolina leaders cried betrayal, while the North celebrated with enormous excitement at this show of defiance against secessionism.In February 1861 the Confederate States of America was formed and took charge. Jefferson Davis, the Confederate President, ordered the fort be captured. The artillery attack was commanded by Brig. Gen. P. G. T. Beauregard, who had been Anderson's student at West Point. The attack began April 12, 1861, and continued until Anderson, badly outnumbered and outgunned, surrendered the fort on April 14. The battle began the American Civil War. No one was killed in the battle on either side, but one Union soldier was killed and one mortally wounded during a 100-gun salute.The modern meaning of the American flag, according to Adam Goodheart (2011), was forged in December 1860, when Anderson, acting without orders, moved the American garrison from Fort Moultrie to Fort Sumter, in Charleston Harbor, in defiance of the overwhelming power of the new Confederate States of America. Goodheart argues this was the opening move of the Civil War, and the flag was used throughout the North to symbolize American nationalism and rejection of secessionism.Before that day, the flag had served mostly as a military ensign or a convenient marking of American territory, flown from forts, embassies, and ships, and displayed on special occasions like the Fourth of July. But in the weeks after Major Anderson's surprising stand, it became something different. Suddenly the Stars and Stripes flew -- as it does today, and especially as it did after September 11 -- from houses, from storefronts, from churches; above the village greens and college quads. For the first time American flags were mass-produced rather than individually stitched and even so, manufacturers could not keep up with demand. As the long winter of 1861 turned into spring, that old flag meant something new. The abstraction of the Union clause was transfigured into a physical thing: strips of cloth that millions of people would fight for, and many thousands die for. Robert Anderson's telegram announcing the surrender of Fort Sumter. Anderson's actions in defense of American nationalism made him an immediate national hero. He was promoted to brigadier general, effective May 15. Anderson took the fort's 33-star flag with him to New York City, where he participated in a Union Square patriotic rally that was the largest public gathering in North America up to that time.Days after Robert E. Lee's surrender at Appomattox and the effective conclusion of the Civil War, Anderson returned to Charleston in the uniform of a Brevet Major General (ranking as of February 3, 1865) and, four years after lowering the 33-star flag in surrender, raised it in triumph over the recaptured but badly battered Fort Sumter during ceremonies there (The same evening, April 14, 1865, President Abraham Lincoln was assassinated).

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General JOHN ARMSTRONG  Signed 1759 French & Indian War Petition

Lot 4: General JOHN ARMSTRONG Signed 1759 French & Indian War Petition

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Description: AutographsMajor General John Armstrong Signed 1759 French & Indian War Period Manuscript PetitionJOHN ARMSTRONG (1725-1795). The Hero of Kittanning, was one of George Washington's bravest and most successful generals, the First Brigadier General Commissioned (March 1, 1776) by the Continental Congress.JAMES STACKPOLE (2nd) Early Pennsylvania Settler, did not flee in the French and Indian War and he became a noted leader and Indian Fighter.Excellent (1759) French & Indian War Manuscript Petition Document Signed By "John Armstrong," "James Stackpole" and Other Carlisle, Pennsylvania Leaders. (1759) Manuscript Document Signed, "James Stackpole," being a Petition, further Endorsed by leading members of Carlilse, Pennsylvania, including Colonel JOHN ARMSTRONG who led the Armstrong Expedition or the Battle of Kittanning militia, and during the Forbes Expedition of 1758, Very Fine.This original, Fine Content Manuscript Document has 2 written pages, folded, legal folio, measuring 12.5" x 8" at Carlisle, Pennsylvania, (1759), being an official written Petition, also endorsed by a number of additional leading citizens of Carlisle. This Petition begs relief for James Stackpole, who was fined by the Province for selling liquor to soldiers, stationed in Carlisle in 1758. It is nicely tipped onto a larger protective collector sheet, having a couple of trivial marginal and fold reinforcements. Overall, it is extremely well written in rich brown ink, boldly signed, and in easily readable condition with above average quality. This original petition reads, in part:"...That your Petitioner a Mason by Trade being about two years free from Indenture, Ser'vd in the Town of Carlisle afors'd, And building at these Time of General Distress -- Your petitioner having a Family to maintain was induc'd last Summer at the Time Colo. Stanwix's Battalion lay at said Town to Sell to the Soldiers Liquors by Retail without having your Honours License, the Profits arising thereon being too small to support it -- for which Misdemeanor your Petitioner was Indicted last October Term... That under these Circumstances your Petitioner is like to be reduc'd to extream[sic] Poverty... humbly Prayeth that your Honour will be pleased to... extend your Charity to the distres'd Condition of your Poor Petitioner...".A docket on the blank reverse of the final page reads: "Petition - James Stackpole - Carlisle." This is on fine quality laid watermarked period paper, that is quite clean. This petition is boldly supported on the second page by the vivid, large brown signatures of "Fra(ncis) West", "John Armstrong," "Jno. Byers" and "Jno. McNight". James Stackpole, came to Pennsylvania's Juniata Valley from Carlisle previous to 1776. He was one of the few settlers who did not flee from the valley because of the incursion of the French and Indians, and their destruction of Fort Granville, situated a short distance west of Lewistown, Pa., on July 30, 1756. He had others, by petition "to the Hon. Robert H. Morris, Esq., Lieutenant, Governor of the Province of Pennsylvania," read in general council August 21, 1756, called for troops to protect them while gathering in their harvests, from the attacks of the Indians and their equally save French allies, and other renegades, who were harassing this section of the province.

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General WILLIAM BARTON Letter Regards His 1777 Congressional Presentation Sword

Lot 5: General WILLIAM BARTON Letter Regards His 1777 Congressional Presentation Sword

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Description: AutographsGeneral William Barton's Presentation Sword Authorized In 1777 By The Continental Congress For His Revolutionary War Capture of British General Prescott(WILLIAM BARTON) (1748-1831). Officer in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War a Lt. Colonel, who later served as Adjutant General of the Rhode Island Militia. By Resolution of Congress, 25 July 1777, an "elegant sword" to be presented for his capturing British General Richard Prescott and Major William Barrington, his Aide-de-Camp.This is an original Autograph Letter Signed, "Wm. Barton Jr.," dated 1810, at Providence, Rhode Island, Very Fine. By resolution of Congress, 25 July 1777 an "elegant sword" to be presented to Lt. Colonel William Barton of Rhode Island for his capturing British General Richard Prescott and Major William Barrington, his Aide-de-Camp. Journal of the Continental Congress Volume VIII, page 580. This very sword is now owned by the Rhode Island Historical Society."Lieutenant-Colonel Barton, of the Rhode Island militia, planned a bold exploit for the purpose of surprising and taking Major-General Prescott, the commanding officer of the royal army at Newport. Taking with him, in the night, about forty men, in two boats, with ours muffled, he had the address to elude the vigilance of the ships of war and guard boats, and, having arrived undiscovered at the General's quarters, they were taken for the sentinels, and the General was not alarmed till his captors were at the door of his lodging chamber, which was fast closed. A negro man, named Prince, instantly thrust his head through the panel door and seized the victim while in bed. The General's aid-decamp leaped from a window undressed, and attempted to escape, but was taken, and, with the General, brought off in safety." (Thacher's Military Journal, August 3, 1777).During the Revolutionary War era, military medals were just being created, but they were large, 4.5" in diameter and made of precious metals. They were not worn, but used as a table decoration. A promotion or a presentation of a sword were the more common rewards for victory or exceptional gallantry. The American colonies did not have any professional sword makers, although some of our silver and gold smiths were able to hand make a few beautiful examples. Most swords came from Europe. In fact, many officers possessed two swords - a dress or as it was called small sword, and a saber which they carried into battle. When captured, these swords were often presented by senior officers to officers serving under them. We know of several instances where swords were presented by the Continental Congress. They kept records on the fifteen presentation swords they authorized with flowery language, and then not have the sword to give. Ten of the fifteen presentation swords were purchased by Congress in 1786, three years after the war and as long as eleven years after being authorized. Colonel David Humphrey, one time Aide-de-Camp to General Washington, brought the ten swords back from France where they were purchased. Nine of these ten swords are known to exist. This historic letter is 8" x 11" with expected letter folds, being well written and easily readable in deep brown ink on laid period paper being quite clean and in overall nice quality. Here, William Barton, Jr. has relinquished his rights to four lots of land in his namesake town of Barton, Vermont. However, he wants to make it clear that he expects to get his father's (General William Barton) Sword, presented to him by the United States Congress for the capture of General Prescott. This letter is Signed by William Barton, Jr., in the presence of witnesses, John B. Barton and Elizabeth Cushman. Docket on the blank reverse reads, "Wm Barton, Rt - For Proportion of Estate of his Father - July 15th, 1810".It is interesting that the children of General Barton were already seemingly fighting over his estate, at least to protect their heritage and his treasured interests, though General Barton would live another 25 years after this letter was written.An extraordinary, original Post Revolutionary War letter regarding the fate of one of America's very first Congressional Authorized Presentation Swords. William Barton's Presentation Sword, Authorized July 25, 1777 by the Continental Congress being just the Third such Congressional Presentation Sword in American history!Barton was born in Warren, Rhode Island on May 26, 1748. He worked as a hatter in Providence, Rhode Island. In 1771, he married Rhoda Carver. In 1775, he enlisted in the Continental Army as a corporal. He fought in the Battle of Bunker Hill. In 1777, as a major in the Rhode Island state troops, he planned and led a raid on British headquarters, capturing Major General Richard Prescott. For this exploit, he was promoted to lieutenant colonel and honored by a resolution of the Continental Congress.When Rhode Island ratified the Constitution of the United States in 1790, Barton was sent to New York to notify George Washington. Later in life, about the year 1811, Barton became embroiled in a suit in Barton, Vermont, which he helped to found. He refused to pay a fine and as a result, at the age of sixty-four, he was confined under house arrest. In 1825, at the age of seventy-seven, he was released at the initiative of the visiting Marquis de Lafayette, who agreed to pay the balance of the fine.

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JAMES BUCHANAN, Autograph Letter Signed 1839 Handsome Letter Political Content

Lot 6: JAMES BUCHANAN, Autograph Letter Signed 1839 Handsome Letter Political Content

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Description: AutographsImpressive "James Buchanan" Autograph Letter SignedJAMES BUCHANAN (1791-1868). 15th President of the United States (1857-1861). His Indecisiveness is often cited as a significant factor contributing to the outbreak of the US Civil War.July 31, 1839-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "James Buchanan" as Senator from Pennsylvania, 1 page, 10" x 8", at Bedford Springs, Choice Extremely Fine. This is an incredibly handsome Letter has good Political content. Here, amidst the organized riot that was mid 19th century Pennsylvania politics, Buchanan attempts to ascertain to whom he should next dispense patronage - with an eye, of course, to wrangling the 1844 Democratic presidential nomination. James Buchanan writes to Col. Richard Frazer, in part:"I enclose you a letter which will explain itself from Mr. Johnson. Will you be good enough to ascertain for me who would be the most suitable successor of Mr. Michael? What can be the reason of his gross negligence?... Write to me as soon as possible. I expect to be here a week yet... Governor Porter has not yet arrived here... This watering place is always agreeable although I have found but few of the old set..."Buchanan, having long used his influence to secure political jobs for the entire Frazer clan ever since the senior Frazer presented him with a law library, and helped him to build up his Law practice. By 1845 he had placed most of the Frazer family and their in-laws, on the public payroll. Still, Col. Richard Frazer wanted more, and when Buchanan finally said "enough!" (Frazer became his bitter enemy.) This Letter remains bright fresh and clean, boldly written upon fresh looking period wove paper. Usual mailing folds, the vivid, highly impressive "James Buchanan" signature is eye-popping measuring about 3.25" long. Exceptional quality and quite rare as such and being perfect for display.Virginia's vote was safely behind Buchanan's candidate, fellow Democrat President Martin Van Buren. But the Senator's own Pennsylvania was not, nor was the President's home State of New York, both of which went to the ultimate victor, the Whig Party Candidate William Henry Harrison.

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Governor WILLIAM BURNET Signed Twice Exceptionally Handsome Document From 1724

Lot 7: Governor WILLIAM BURNET Signed Twice Exceptionally Handsome Document From 1724

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Description: Autographs1724 William Burnet Signature as Governor of New YorkWILLIAM BURNET, Royal Governor of New York, New Jersey, Massachusetts and New HampshireApril 28, 1724-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed (twice), "W Burnet" boldly as Governor of New York, 12.25" x 7.5" tipped into a slightly larger sheet, dated at New York. A smattering of tiny almost imperceptible pinpricks at top, otherwise quite fresh and remarkable Choice Very Fine in condition. William Burnet's first signature, measuring 2.5" by 1", attests that three men witnessed John Theobald, deceased, sign his Last Will and Testament; the second signature, is only slightly smaller. Here he certifies that the Executers named in said Will have taken the Oath of Administration. An exceptionally handsome, early Colonial New York, William Burnet signed document.

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GEORGE CLARKE Rare Autograph Document Signed 1726

Lot 8: GEORGE CLARKE Rare Autograph Document Signed 1726

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Description: Autographs1726 New York Governor George Clarke Administers An "Oath"GEORGE CLARKE, Colonial Royal Governor of New York.Rare Autograph Document Signed, 1 page, 6" by 8", Queen's County, New York, February 8, 1726. In Choice Very Fine. By virtue of the power and authority vested in him by His Excellency the Governor, Clarke writes that he has "administered the Oath of an Administratrix to Sarah Cornwall" for the estate of her deceased husband Richard.

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GEORGE CLARKE, NY Manuscript Document Signed 1797

Lot 9: GEORGE CLARKE, NY Manuscript Document Signed 1797

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Description: Autographs1707 Early Colonial New York Governor George Clarke & Land Grant Document Signed For "Viscount Cornbury"GEORGE CLARKE (Born 1676). Appointed Secretary of the Province of New York in 1703, Acting Governor of New York from 1736-1743, built an Estate named Hyde Park on Long Island.February 20, 1797-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed, "Geo. Clarke," as probate clerk of New York for "Edmund Viscount Cornbury," being an issued Land Grant, Fine. This original document dated 1707, measures 10" x 13" where George Clarke has signed a grant of probate as the Clerk to Lord Cornbury, to Mary Kniffen, the wife of the late Samuel Kniffen. She has inherited his entire estate, but must also be responsible for paying any debts owed. Samuel Kniffen, was the Constable and Tax Collector of Rye, New York in 1701. It is Signed by George Clarke at lower right. The Document itself having a fully intact embossed wax and paper Official Seal at the upper right. There are some archival strips of tape for reinforcement on the blank reverse side where some fold lines were splitting. Overall, a very collectable document even condition.George Clarke, born 1676, was appointed Secretary of the Province of New York in 1703. In 1724, he and his wife, Anne Hyde, purchased land in Hempstead, Long Island and built an estate named Hyde Park. He was Acting Governor of New York from 1736-1743, and during this time acquired over 120,000 acres of land. George's children did not remain in New York; his eldest son returned to England, two other children had close ties with Jamaica, and another died on an expedition to Oswego in the mid-Eighteenth century.His wife Anne Hyde, a cousin of Queen Anne, and at the time they came to New York Lord Cornbury (Edward Hyde) was the governor. Mrs. Clarke was one of the most accomplished and charming of women. She was regarded with such enthusiastic affection by the people, that when she died, in 1740, the whole city was thrown into the deepest affliction. Her generosity to the poor had given her the title of " Lady Bountiful," and on the day of her funeral the corporation ordered " that, as it was a pleasure to her in life to feed the hungry, a loaf of bread should be given to every poor person who would receive it.Samuel Kniffen, was constable and collector of Rye in 1701. He married a daughter of Francis Purdy. His petition to the govenor (about 1701) states that he is 'a prisoner in the common Gaol of the County, being destitute of many friends.' The inhabitants of the town of Ryde had made choice of him for constable, and afterwards the collector's place was laid upon him; 'and being a young man verry ignorant of any office was flattered by the people so that the Rates which he was to collect through his simplicity are great part in arrears.' This has brought him into this desitute condition; and 'haveing a poor distressed wife at home big with child expecting every hour her deliverance, and no body to help her,' he implores his excellency to grant him enlargement, 'so that he may go and collect said taxes with all severity.' (N.Y. Col. MSS., vol. xxxviii, p. 215.) These taxes were those that had accumulated during the revolt of the town to Connecticut. The inhabitants evidently did not blame the collector for his lenity; and the governor must have granted his petiton; for he was made one of the townsmen of Rye the next year, 1702. He died before 1707.

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GROVER CLEVELAND, Autograph Letter Signed 1898

Lot 10: GROVER CLEVELAND, Autograph Letter Signed 1898

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Description: AutographsOnly President To Serve Two Non-Consecutive TermsGROVER CLEVELAND (1837 - 1908). 22nd and 24th President of the United States. Cleveland is the only President to serve Two Non-Consecutive terms (1885-1889 & 1893-1897) and therefore is the only individual to be counted twice in the numbering of the Presidents.October 25, 1898-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Grover Cleveland," upon his "Westland, Princeton, New Jersey" Letterhead, 1-1/4 pages, measuring 6.75" x 5.5", Choice Extremely Fine. To the Hon. D. Magow, thanking him for a gift of apples, reading in part: "The apples arrived in first rate condition... and we have enjoyed them already... You have the hearty thanks of our entire household for your generosity and friendly remembrance." Clean and fresh with some minor archival fold repairs. Cleveland retired to Princeton in 1897 after leaving the presidency and this Letter is a lovely example.

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JOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE, 30th President  Signed Presidential Appointment

Lot 11: JOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE, 30th President Signed Presidential Appointment

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Description: AutographsChoice "Calvin Coolidge" Signed Presidential AppointmentJOHN CALVIN COOLIDGE (July 4, 1872 - January 5, 1933). 30th President of the United States (1923-1929) a Republican, born on the 4th of July.February 24, 1925-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Calvin Coolidge" as President, 1 page, measuring 23" x 19" at Washington, DC, Choice Crisp Near Mint. This is an official Presidential Appointment for "Walter F. Boyle, of Georgia" to serve as a "Foreign Service Officer of Class five." Countersigned by "Charles E. Hughes" as Secretary of State. Magnificent Federal Embossed White Paper Seal being distinct and fully intact. There is one small corner handling crease in the bottom left and a vertical crease at left that should hardly be noticed once properly matted and framed for display. A lovely quality, fresh Document boasting a huge crisp 3.75" long "Calvin Coolidge" signature.

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Choice PETER COOPER, Autograph Signature

Lot 12: Choice PETER COOPER, Autograph Signature

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Description: AutographsChoice PETER COOPER, Autograph SignaturePETER COOPER, American Industrialist and Inventor.Autograph Signature, "Peter Cooper," on pale pink paper with blue lines, undated, 2.5" x 4.5," mounted on a slightly larger card, Choice Extremely Fine. This huge vanity signature measures 3.75" in length and 2" in height. Also included, another card on which a previous collector has written: "Peter Cooper - Philadelphia inventor & industrialist. Built 1st locomotive engine constructed on this continent in 1830 -- saving the B & O RR [Baltimore & Ohio Railroad] from bankruptcy." Some light pencil notations at the bottom indicating where and when this piece was obtained.

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1874 GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER 7th Cavalry Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory

Lot 13: 1874 GEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER 7th Cavalry Fort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory

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Description: Autographs1874 George Armstrong Custer 7th Cavalry SignedFort Abraham Lincoln, Dakota Territory DocumentPlus Signed by Augustus Henry Seward as PaymasterGEORGE ARMSTRONG CUSTER (1839-1876). Historic Civil War Union Brigadier General at age 23, he fought in nearly every battle of the Army of the Potomac, including Gettysburg, later to be killed and his troops annihilated by Sioux and Cheyenne warriors led by Sitting Bull and Crazy Horse at Little Bighorn.June 23, 1874-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "G A Custer" as "Lieut Colonel 7th Cavalry, Brevet Maj Gen'l, U.S.A., Commanding," at Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory, on Vellum, Fine. This original "ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES" Document, measures 7.5" x 9.5 having full margins, as printed upon vellum, with manuscript pen and ink insertions. This official US Army Discharge being issued to William Gambrill, Sergeant in Company D, Seventeenth US Infantry, at Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory after five years of service. It is Signed by George Armstrong Custer, as Commanding officer, and by Captain Charles E. Clarke, Company D, 17th Infantry. As a comment written upon this discharge, Captain Clarke notes at the bottom under the section header "CHARACTER" that Gambrill was, "Sober, honest, and faithful in the discharge of duty." Captain Charles E. Clarke was a Civil War veteran who served as Lt. Colonel of the 6th Michigan Infantry, brevetted for "Gallant and Meritorious Service at the Siege of Port Hudson" and served at Fort Lincoln from 1873 until the Battle of the Little Big Horn.This historic, original Fort Lincoln, Dakota Territory 7th Cavalry document is evenly worn and quite typical of folded discharge documents which were usually personally carried by the veteran. There is some light conservation to remove surface soiling. Some written text is dark and sharp, while other penned portions, including Custer's signature are clearly readable yet faded in equal proportion to the other portions, in a lighter tan ink.Also Signed by "A. H. SEWARD" as Paymaster USA - June 27, 1874" where he has distributed the final pay of $723.15. Augustus Henry Seward (1826-1876) was a U.S. Army officer. The Eldest Son of celebrated American statesman William H. Seward. Augustus Henry Seward graduated from the U.S. Military Academy at West Point and spent much of his life in the West, serving as an officer in the Paymaster Corps. During the attempted assassination of his father on April 14, 1865, by John Wilkes Booth's coconspirator Lewis Powell, he was among the members of the Seward family and household who were injured. Fort Abraham Lincoln was established in 1872 first as an infantry post. In 1873 the 7th Cavalry was stationed at the enlarged post and Lt. Colonel (Brevet Major General) George A. Custer was the First Post Commander. He served at Ft. Lincoln from 1873 until the Battle of the Little Big Horn. While this authentic George Armstrong Custer "Lieut Colonel 7th Cavalry Brevet Maj Gen'l, U.S.A. Commanding" Signed Document is complete and ready for display, the condition is average for such a Vellum document. A remarkable, significant and historic piece of American history.

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Mayor ABRAHAM CUYLER 1774 Freemans Agreement Document Signed Last Loyalist Major

Lot 14: Mayor ABRAHAM CUYLER 1774 Freemans Agreement Document Signed Last Loyalist Major

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Description: Autographs1774 Mayor of Albany New York Signed "Freeman's Agreement" by Abraham C. Cuyler Its Last Loyalist MajorABRAHAM CUYLER. Last British Loyalist Mayor of Albany New York (1770-1778).September 27, 1774-Dated, original Manuscript Document Signed, "Abrm. C. Cuyler," at Albany, New York, Choice Very Fine. This Document is 6" x 11" with light folds, and retains its original, nice official red wax seal of the City of Albany at left. Mayor Abraham Cuyler has signed a rare Freeman's Certificate for Peter Van Bergen, to have all the rights and privileges. In the 18th century and into the early 1800s; men who owned land were considered Freeman; those that did not own property were not allowed the same rights and privileges.The main one being that only Freemen were allowed to vote; allowing them to set legislation over those that were in servitude, manufacturing laborers or renters. In Albany, many immigrants were tenant dwellers and did not have this right to vote; allowing land holders to always control the conditions and ways of living. There is a small edge chip at the left of the seal, otherwise, it is boldly written and very clear. A lovely, superior quality clean document on period laid paper, having bold brown text on excellent period laid paper.Petrus Van Bergen was a member of an Albany militia company in 1767 and witnessed a will in March 1771. In 1775, he contributed for the relief of Ticonderoga. His first ward property was configured on the assessment rolls in 1779. After the war, he was accorded a land bounty right in conjunction with the Albany militia regiment. In 1785, he was appointed assessor for the first ward and in 1789 served as election inspector. His first ward household was configured on the Albany census in 1790. In 1797, a Peter Van Bergen was identified as a "yeoman" living in the first ward on a list of Albany freeholders. From census records, Peter Van Bergen of Albany was a Slaveholder as well.Abraham C. Cuyler was the last mayor of colonial Albany. This native son lost everything as a result of the American Revolution. He held a commission in the provincial militia and succeeded to his father's seat on the Albany Common Council. Prospering from importing metalware and the patronage of Sir William Johnson, the city assessment rolls for 1766 and 1767 show him to be among the wealthiest of the young Albany merchants. Unlike other city fathers, he did not inherit extensive family lands. Thus, opportunity for future real property acquisition was dependant on his connection to the royal government. In 1767, he was the captain of an Albany militia company. In September 1770, twenty-eight-year old Abraham C. Cuyler became the third member of his family to be appointed mayor of Albany. What would soon become a dubious honor was based on his standing within the Albany community and on his willingness to cooperate with the royal government during a time of increasing tension between British and American interests.In 1775 Cuyler's administration was curtailed when escalating conflict between colonists and king led to suspension of royal government across New York. It ended in June 1776 when he was among those arrested by the Revolutionies and exiled to Connecticut. Later transferred to prison at Fishkill, he escaped to the British but made several trips to Albany to visit his family. By 1778, his wife and children had joined him in New York. Abraham C. Cuyler suffered greatly from his attachment to the British government. Deprived of his property and condemned to death under the Act of Attainder in 1779, a destitute Cuyler sailed to England to seek relief. Granted an annuity, he returned to New York. After the peace treaty, he attempted to come home. This American Tory soon learned there was no place for him in the new Albany. Even though many of his kinsmen were prominent revolutionaries, he was unable to reclaim his Albany property. Shunned by the new and old people of his birthplace, Abraham C. Cuyler took his family to upper Canada, founded the town of Yorkfield, and died there in 1810.

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1848 RICHARD HENRY DANA JR. Personal Endorsed Check

Lot 15: 1848 RICHARD HENRY DANA JR. Personal Endorsed Check

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Description: Autographs1848 Richard Henry Dana Personal Endorsed CheckRICHARD HENRY DANA, JR. (1815 - 1882). American lawyer and politician from Massachusetts, the author of "Two Years Before the Mast," Abolitionist and defender of Seamen and Fugitive Slaves.December 2, 1848-Dated Partly-Printed Document Signed, Original Bank Check, Choice Extremely Fine. Issued to Richard Henry Dana, Jr. and Signed by him on the back. This blue printed Check is drawn on the State Bank of Boston, Massachusetts, being written by fellow Boston lawyer William Sohier, paying Dana $50. Measures approximately 2" x 6" small cancel at center, some ink smudge at right, overall bright and clean. Though born into a prominent family, in 1834 Richard Henry Dana chose to join a merchant ship bound for the West coast as a seaman and spent two years at various posts in California, then under Mexican rule. He returned to Massachusetts and in 1840, published Two Years Before the Mast about his experiences and travels, still one of the best descriptions of early California while under Mexican control. His book was also useful to the gold seekers of the late 1840's as one of the few useful accounts for California travellers.Back in Boston, he became an attorney and in 1848 helped to found the Abolitionist "Free Soil" Party, which later became part of the Republican Party. In 1854, he unsuccessfully defended the escaped Slave, Anthony Burns, in a famous Federal trial held in Boston challenging the Fugitive Slave Law. Burns was sent back to Virginia, but later purchased by Bostonians to become a Free Black man.After the Civil War, Dana helped to prosecute ex-Confederate President Jefferson Davis. He died in Rome in 1882. His son married the daughter of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

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1858 Declaration of Independence Solid Copper Plaque by Koppel Rare Type

Lot 16: 1858 Declaration of Independence Solid Copper Plaque by Koppel Rare Type

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Description: Autographs1858 "The Declaration of Independence" Decorative Copper High Relief Plaque by Koppel(Declaration of Independence) 1858-Dated. "The Declaration of Independence" by Charles Koppel. Copper High Relief Plaque. Maryland. With Its Top Hanger Attached. Extremely Fine.This a most impressive, large 6" diameter inner Copper Plaque them measuring fully to 8" in diameter inclusive of an original outer Brass surround. The registration by Koppel is contained in a credit line located just above the exergue bracket, which reads: "Entered... in the Year 1858 by Charles Koppel... District Court of Maryland. It features a superbly detailed central Relief depiction, after the famous original painting by John Trumbull, as made and registered by Charles Koppel. This dramatic version is bright and highly detailed. It has some minor flaws as the face of the main signer standing at the desk is lacking, a small loss to the back of the chair in which Washington is seated. This wonderful Plaque was made as a electrolytic copper deposit process, depicting a very famous piece of Americana."The solid Brass frame is slightly dented in several locations, and the back panel of the two-piece brass frame is filled to provide support and rigidity. Complete, with the looped hanger still attached at top and wonderful, clean patina to the metal. A highly unusual, rarely encountered and vastly more expensive version than the S. H. Black made Plaque, and the only example of this rare design type and size that we have offered. If you do not own one, here is your opportunity.

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DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 1876 Centennial, Advertising Broadside

Lot 17: DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE 1876 Centennial, Advertising Broadside

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Description: AutographsCentennial Broadside of the Declaration of Independence(DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE). 1876, Advertising Broadside: "1776-1876 Centennial Memorial" Declaration of Independence, Copyright by James D. McBride, Printed in Philadelphia, Choice Extremely Fine.c. 1876, Advertising Broadside: "1776-1876 Centennial Memorial" Declaration of Independence, Copyrighted by James D. McBride, Engraved and Printed by the Continental Publishing Co., Philadelphia, PA. This detailed document celebrates the United States' centennial by reproducing the Declaration of Independence and its facsimile signatures. 19.5" x 14.5", printed in black on thin, cream-colored paper. Atop is the image of an eagle flanked by American flags. In the lower left-hand corner is the Department of the Interior's seal and a facsimile signature by the Secretary of the Interior, certifying that this is a "Fac.Simile of the original..." Very light age toning and numerous storage folds, but in otherwise very nice condition. This impressive piece was printed by the Continental Publishing Company of Philadelphia as a Centennial Memorial to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In the lower right-hand corner is an advertisement for "Ettlinger Bros., The Largest and Most Reliable Clothing House in Adams County... Quincy, Ill." Interestingly, a tiny notice at the bottom of the broadside offers a plate paper version with a red seal and no advertising panel--for only one dollar!

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DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. (1843) Peter Force Printing on Rice Paper

Lot 18: DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. (1843) Peter Force Printing on Rice Paper

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Description: AutographsBeautiful Printing of Peter Force's Historic Rice Paper "Declaration of Independence" From "American Archives"DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. (1843) Peter Force Printing, From the Original Plate with "W.J. Stone SC. WASHn." Imprint. Crisp Rice Paper. Choice Extremely Fine.This is a highly important opportunity to obtain one of the best, and earliest, original copies of one of America's greatest documents. This original, very beautiful and impressive, crisp Rice Paper copy of The Declaration of Independence, which measures fully and properly to about 29.75" high x 25.75" wide size. It is one of the nicest we've seen or offered, having been carefully removed from its book for display with the standard trim at the right outer margin. There are the confirming light creases in the rice paper from its original folded position within the book which further attests to its full, absolute authenticity. Overall, it is bright and clean having bold black printed text and just the slightest faint tone at a couple of folds and marginal edges that does not show through to the front. It has the essential "W.J. Stone SC. WASHn." plate imprint at the lower left and superior visual eye appeal.The highest price we've achieved for a similar Peter Force W.J. Stone copy, not held within the book was $25,875 in our February 9, 2002 Sale, Lot 72. In our Early American History Auction Sale of August 26, 2006 we sold Lot 21 at $27,562. Their scarcity and collector demand, continues to appreciate.In 1843, Peter Force used the original Stone copperplate to print additional copies of the Declaration of Independence on rice paper for inclusion in Volume I of his multi-volume book, "American Archives". Congress authorized up to 1500 copies of that book to be printed, but subscriptions fell far short of that number. The actual number of copies printed is unknown, with estimates ranging from about 500 copies to upwards of 1,000 copies. All examples of the rice paper Declaration were folded for insertion in the inside front cover of Volume I of the Fifth Series, but today, most have been removed. It is not known how many of the rice paper copies could have survived. Speculation suggests estimates of far less than half of this printing have survived, and in varying states of preservation. This cataloger believes the number of surviving presentable copies to be in the 200 range.The Stone and Force copies represent a double-edged sword. Certainly, they allowed additional people and institutions to obtain an identical facsimile of this most beloved of all historic American documents, but Stone's Wet-Ink transfer process contributed to the deterioration of the original signed copy of the Declaration. Parchment does not respond well to water. The unfortunate result is that the Declaration of Independence, now on display in Washington, DC, is a rather sad-looking, faded document. Conversely, the Stone and Force printings that have survived are much nicer in appearance and they generally retain the fresh appearance with which the original was once endowed.As you read this auction description, there is another noted major dealer offering a similar example with a price listed at $48,500. This lovely, high quality example is certainly ready for Archival Framing to display its impressive, beautiful overall quality.1823 Broadside printing of Declaration of Independence brings $597,500! With a price worthy of its historic stature, a recently discovered 1823 printing of the Declaration of Independence, painstakingly engraved and printed by William Stone to celebrate the 45th anniversary of the founding of The United States, sold for $597,500 - more than doubling its presale estimate. It was purchased by an anonymous East Coast buyer and was considered the centerpiece of Heritage Auctions' historical manuscripts auction.In 1820, English-born engraver William J. Stone of Washington, D.C. was commissioned to produce an exact copy of the original Declaration of Independence onto a copperplate, a process which took him three years to complete," said Sandra Palomino, Director of Historic Manuscripts at Heritage. "It was almost 45 years after the Revolution, only six years after the War of 1812 and smack dab in the middle of President James Monroe's 'Era of Good Feelings,' the most significant period of growth in the young nation's history up to that point. Interest in the Declaration surged."In all, 200 official parchment copies were struck from the Stone plate in 1823, with one extra struck for Stone himself. Each copy is identified as "ENGRAVED by W. I. STONE for the Dept of State, by order" in the upper left corner, followed by "of J. Q. ADAMS, Sect. of State July 4th 1824" in the upper right."We know from a 1991 census of the manuscripts that there 31 total known to survive, with only 12 copies in private hands," said Palomino. "This auction represented a singular chance for someone to acquire a prime piece of American history and collectors jumped at the chance." Overall, choice pieces of Early American History were greatly in demand at the auction.This beautiful printing of Peter Force's Historic Rice Paper "Declaration of Independence" From "American Archives" has Superb Presentation.

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c. 1840, Hand-Colored Lithograph Print Titled, THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

Lot 19: c. 1840, Hand-Colored Lithograph Print Titled, THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE

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Description: AutographsTHE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE July 4, 1776c. 1840, Hand-Colored Lithograph Print titled, "THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, July 4th, 1776," Published by J. Baillie, New York, Choice Very Fine. Lovely original, Hand-colored Lithograph measuring 13.75" x 9.5" upon a heavy period stock. The full title reads, "THE DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE, July 4th 1776." Imprint at bottom reads, "Published by J. Baillie 87th St. near 3d Avenue N.Y." There are two very small outer edge splits not touching the image, several scattered white spots and vertical line appear to be original printing flaws, overall quite handsome.J. Baillie (James S. Baillie), began in the late 1830's as a picture framer in New York City. Trained as an artist, he later worked as a colorist for Currier & Ives, before setting up his own business around 1843-1844. For about the next decade, he issued a wide variety of popular lithographs, mostly small folio images of the type published by his former employers.

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VICTOR EMMANUEL III, Last King of Italy Signed Document

Lot 20: VICTOR EMMANUEL III, Last King of Italy Signed Document

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Description: AutographsDocument Signed "Vittorio Emanuele" at Rome, ItalyVICTOR EMMANUEL III, Last King of Italy.1933-Dated, Document Signed "Vittorio Emanuele," Rome, 14.5" x 9.5," Very Fine. An official government document taken from a bound volume. Some pencil notations, otherwise quite clean. Contains the usual official stamps and markings. A nice, 6" long signature. Surprisingly, Victor Emmanuel's signature alone is rarer than when combined with that of Mussolini!

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(FIRST LADIES), Four Items Signed by 3 First Ladies CLEVELAND, HARRISON, HOOVER.

Lot 21: (FIRST LADIES), Four Items Signed by 3 First Ladies CLEVELAND, HARRISON, HOOVER.

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Description: AutographsThree "First Lady" Autographs with President Benjamin Harrison's Widow Quotes His Tribute to Abraham Lincoln! (FIRST LADIES), FRANCES CLEVELAND, MARY LORD HARRISON, LOU H. HOOVER.1. January 8, 1907, Autograph Letter Signed, "Frances F. Cleveland," in black ink on embossed stationery, "Westland, Princeton, New Jersey," Choice Very Fine. Addressed to Mr. Johnson, advising that "Mr. Cleveland & I shall be glad to attend... the entertainments for the Keats-Shelley Memorial" if it is possible for them to be in New York at the time, adding: "This isn't promising to be there! We are uncertain folks - & we couldn't think of saying more than a month ahead that we will surely do a thing... The Committee are very good to suggest a box for us. Mr. Cleveland joins me in thanks and all good wishes..." Grover Cleveland died a year and a half later, having served as a trustee of Princeton University after leaving the White House.2. November 22, 1927, Autograph Note Signed, "Mary Lord Harrison," in fountain pen ink, no location, quoting a portion of her late husband's tribute to Lincoln on his 1898 birthday, 9" x 4", Very Fine. Titled "Lincoln." The text reads: "He stands like a great lighthouse to show the way of duty to all his countrymen and to send afar a beam of courage to those who beat against the winds." She then identified the quotation as being "from a speech made by Ex-President Harrison at the Marquette Club Chicago Feb. 12th 1898. Copied for Mr Boos..." Very unusual! Accompanied by a print engraving of Lincoln, his Gettysburg Address, measuring 9" x 6.25", and a note written at the bottom: "'Lest we forget!' Mary Lord Harrison December 2nd 1938." Mary Lord Harrison was Benjamin Harrison's second wife; his first wife died while he was in office in 1892, and he married Mary Scott Lord Dimmick in 1896.3. February 24, 1928, Typed Letter Signed, "Lou Henry Hoover," 2300 S. Street, Washington, DC, 10" x 7.75", two pages, Fine. Mrs. Hoover pays a doctor's bill that was sent unanswered to an address in Europe. This toned, waterstained letter has a large, expressive signature.(3 items)

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JOHN T. FORD (Fords Theater) Document Signed, 1883

Lot 22: JOHN T. FORD (Fords Theater) Document Signed, 1883

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Description: AutographsDocument Signed "J.(ohn) T. Ford" of Ford's TheaterJOHN T. FORD. Manager of Ford's Theater where Lincoln was Assassinated on the evening of April 14, 1865.Invoice Autograph Endorsement Signed: "J. T. Ford," July 26, 1883, Baltimore, MD, 1 page, 7" x 8.25", Fine. The invoice has been printed on pictorial stationery of Coolahan & Evans, Furnishing Undertakers, for $87.00 for "Funeral Expenses of Miss Mary McGinn". At the lower left is an Autograph Note Signed: "Wm. E. Starn - Corpus Christie". The document reads, in full: "To Mr. Jno. T. Ford, City Hall, This bill is for the funeral of one of the victims at Tivoli. ($50)" Beneath this, Ford has penned: "The City will pay $50 on account of this bill." Part of Ford's handwriting is somewhat dampstained and along the left portion of the "J" of the signature. Overall this document remains in fine condition.On the night of July 25, 1883, Maryland's worst maritime disaster claimed the lives of 63 people (34 women, 23 children, six men) when a wooden pier at the old Tivoli picnic grounds collapsed. Tivoli was an excursion resort on the Patapsco River, ten miles from Baltimore. John T. Ford had served as a Baltimore city council member and was acting Mayor of the city for two years.

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JAMES A. GARFIELD Speech 1st Anniversary Death of Abraham Lincoln April 14, 1866

Lot 23: JAMES A. GARFIELD Speech 1st Anniversary Death of Abraham Lincoln April 14, 1866

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Description: AutographsJames Garfield Broadsheet Print of His Speech Made On The First Anniversary of the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln - Made In Congress - April 14, 1866(JAMES A. GARFIELD) (1831 - September 19, 1881). 20th President of the United States, who's presidency lasted just 200 days, from March 4, 1881, until his death on September 19, 1881, after he was shot by Assassin Charles J. Guiteau, on July 2, 1881.April 14, 1866-Dated, Printed Broadsheet titled, "REMARKS OF HON. JAMES A. GARFIELD, IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES, APRIL 14, 1866. ON THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF THE DEATH OF ABRAHAM LINCOLN.," Choice Very Fine. This special Official Printed Broadsheet is historic, very rare and superbly ironic. It is 2 page (front and back), measuring 5.5" x 8.5" being the publication of James Garfield's April 14, 1866 Memorial Speech, on the First Anniversary of the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln.This speech is made by the future President, who himself would later suffer the same fate! This printing does not appear to have been removed from a larger publication and was a stand-alone item. The first we have seen and offered of one future President of the United State, James Garfield's first Anniversary "Remarks" on the Assassination of President Abraham Lincoln. Simply an extraordinary 1866 James Garfield Printed Broadsheet of His Speech in the House of Representatives, On the First Anniversary of the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln - April 14, 1866.James Abram Garfield (November 19, 1831 - September 19, 1881) served as the 20th President of the United States, after completing nine consecutive terms in the U.S. House of Representatives. Garfield's accomplishments as President included a controversial resurgence of Presidential authority above Senatorial courtesy in executive appointments; energizing U.S. naval power; and purging corruption in the Postal Service. Garfield made notable ambassador and judiciary appointments, including a U.S. Supreme Court justice. Garfield appointed several African Americans to prominent federal positions. Garfield, the scholar President, successfully managed a national debt crisis without having to call a special session of Congress.Garfield was a self-made man who came from a modest background, having been raised in obscurity on an Ohio farm by his widowed mother and brothers. Garfield ambitiously worked his way doing manual labor jobs to obtain and finance his education. Achieving his goal in 1856, Garfield graduated from Williams College, Massachusetts. A year later, Garfield entered politics as a Republican, after campaigning for the party's antislavery platform in Ohio. He married Lucretia Rudolph in 1858, and in 1860 was admitted to practice law while serving as an Ohio State Senator (1859-1861). Garfield opposed Confederate secession, served as a Major General in the Union Army during the American Civil War, and fought in the battles of Shiloh and Chickamauga. He was first elected to Congress in 1863 as Representative of the 19th District of Ohio.Throughout Garfield's extended Congressional service after the Civil War, he fervently opposed the Greenback, and gained a reputation as a skilled orator. He was Chairman of the Military Affairs Committee and the Appropriations Committee and a member of the Ways and Means Committee. Garfield initially agreed with Radical Republican views regarding Reconstruction, then favored a moderate approach for civil rights enforcement for Freedmen. In 1880, the Ohio legislature elected him to the U.S. Senate; in that same year, the leading Republican presidential contenders - Ulysses S. Grant, James G. Blaine and John Sherman - failed to garner the requisite support at their convention. Garfield became the party's compromise nominee for the 1880 Presidential Election and successfully defeated Democrat Winfield Hancock in the election.Garfield's presidency lasted just 200 days-from March 4, 1881, until his death on September 19, 1881, as a result of being shot by assassin Charles J. Guiteau on July 2, 1881. Only William Henry Harrison's presidency, of 32 days, was shorter. Garfield was the second of four United States Presidents who were assassinated. (From Wikipedia)

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Continental Army General HORATIO LLOYD GATES, Autograph Document Signed Rev. War

Lot 24: Continental Army General HORATIO LLOYD GATES, Autograph Document Signed Rev. War

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Description: AutographsContinental Army General Horatio Gates Requests The Favor That Congress Acts to Grant Two French Soldiers Military CommissionsGeneral HORATIO LLOYD GATES (1727-1806). American General during the Revolutionary War who took credit for the American victory at the Battle of Saratoga only after General Benedict Arnold, who led the attack, was finally forced from the field when he was shot in the leg and was blamed for the defeat at the Battle of Camden.c. August 1778 Revolutionary War Period, Autograph Document Signed in the text, "General Gates," 1 page, measuring 9.25" x 7.5" no date, no place, Very Fine. This very finely penned, easily readable document is written upon clean period laid paper, being his personal request to the Continental Congress to issue two Military Commissions. It reads, in full:"General Gates Requests the Favor, That Congress will be please to Grant, a Colonels Commission, to Lieut. Col. the Chevallier de Fallie; & a Majors Commission to Captain the Chevallier de Luce. These gentlemen served with reputation all the last Campaign to the Northward." Docket written upon the blank reverse reads: "Gen. Gates recom. Lt. Coll. Failly."The mentioned "Campaign to the Northward" mentioned within this letter is most probably the Saratoga Campaign, thus it would have been written circa August of 1778, as it was about the only time Gates was successfully in command. Only three words of text are very faint due to a fold line and some light tone, not affecting "General Gates" which heads this historic Revolutionary War Period request to the Continental Congress.Horatio Gates was a British soldier who served in North America during the French and Indian War and became a Major General in the American Revolutioanry War Continental Army. He claimed victory at Saratoga (1777) and was involved in the Conway Cabal; he was Relieved of his Command and his conduct was questioned after the Battle of Camden in 1780. In 1782 General Gates was allowed back into service under Commanding General George Washington.

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EDMOND CITIZEN GENET Autograph Letter Signed 1782 To U.S. Rep. Henry Laurens

Lot 25: EDMOND CITIZEN GENET Autograph Letter Signed 1782 To U.S. Rep. Henry Laurens

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Description: Autographs1782 Edmond-Charles Genêt "Citizen Genêt" Writes To Representative Henry Laurens at Calais During Peace TalksEDMOND-CHARLES GENET, "CITIZEN GENET" (1763-1834). 1782 French Chief of Foreign Affairs, who is best known as the Rabble-rousing First French Minister to the United States, 1793 and the "Citizen Genêt Affair".February 14, 1782-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Genet" as "Chief of Foreign Affairs". Edmond Genet was the scion of pre-Revolutionary French gentry. After an aristocratic upbringing and education, in 1781 Genet followed his father into the French Foreign Ministry at the extraordinary young age of 19. In November 1782, Henry Laurens received instructions from Congress to join Benjamin Franklin, John Jay, and John Adams in Paris to negotiate a Peace Treaty with the British, officially ending the American Revolutionary War.This original Letter is dated in 1782, being boldly written deep rich brown ink, completely in French, Signed "Genet." In this letter Genet has written to Henry Laurens, stating that he has just received a letter, which was just received, and that he (Genet) did not know that Laurens had already left. Also, that he has sent along a package under the care of Mr. Desridellier... "I will write to you at Calais with the attachment - Genet" while as Chief of Bureau of Foreign Affairs. It is an impressive looking, vivid and historic double paged letter, in overall choice quality, measuring 6" x 9" and appears to be docketed in the hand of Henry Laurens. The addressed outer panel has been removed from blank reverse second page outer leaf, not affecting the context or pages of this letter. It reads (to our best ability to translate French), in full:"Monsieur - I have just received the letter you did me the honor to write the 10th this month and I hasten to let you know that not having been informed at all of your early departure I have sent ... under the care of my friend Mr. Moux ... the package that you await from Mr. Buidgou. I shall write to Mr. Henry Laurens at Mr. Pierre Userwood Calias. Mr. Le Moux is to ask your address at Calais and I shall be at the ... of my ... if you ... and ... to give you the evidence attachment respectful with which I have the Honor - Sir - Your very humble and very obedient servant - Genet - Head Office of Foreign Affairs - 1782"Henry Laurens succeeded John Hancock as President of the Second Continental Congress (1777-1778). Laurens also ran the largest Slave trading house in North America. In the 1750s alone, his Charleston, South Carolina Slave trading firm oversaw the sale of more than 8,000 Enslaved Africans. He was for a time, the Vice-President of South Carolina and a diplomat. During the Revolutionary War, in 1779 the Continental Congress sent Henry Laurens to negotiate a treaty with the Dutch. He left Philadelphia in August 1780 and was captured by the British off of Newfoundland. Laurens threw his papers overboard, but the British succeeded in fishing out a draft of the treaty. They charged Laurens with high treason and took him to England, where he was confined in the Tower of London from October 1780 until December 1781. Although the fifty six-year-old Laurens was taken seriously ill, the English officials gave him no medical attention. They charged him for all of his upkeep at the tower, even including the salaries of his warders (a common practice at the time). Laurens was placed in solitary confinement and was not allowed writing materials. Even so, he frequently managed to smuggle out letters to the American press. Laurens resisted the efforts of his British friends to bring him to their side, but at the same time he felt neglected by Congress. While in the tower he wrote two petitions to the English authorities that were considered too submissive by some Americans back home, including James Madison, who called for an annulment of Laurens's diplomatic commission. Benjamin Franklin and the British statesman Edmund Burke fought to secure his release, and in December 1781 Laurens was freed in exchange for General Charles Cornwallis, who had surrendered to George Washington at York-town, Virginia. In November 1782 Laurens received instructions from Congress to join Franklin, Jay, and John Adams in Paris to negotiate a Peace treaty with the British. During this period Laurens was also acting as an "unofficial minister" from the United States to England, so he was ultimately not present when the final Peace treaty was signed on September 3, 1783.The "Citizen Genêt Affair" began in 1793 when he was dispatched to the United States to promote American support for France's wars with Spain and Britain. Genêt arrived in Charleston, South Carolina on the warship Embuscade on April 8. Instead of traveling to the then-capital of Philadelphia to present himself to U.S. President George Washington for accreditation, Genêt stayed in South Carolina. There he was greeted with enthusiasm by the people of Charleston, who threw a string of parties in his honor.Genêt's goals in South Carolina were to recruit and arm American privateers which would join French expeditions against the British. He commissioned four privateering ships in total: the Republicaine, the Anti-George, the Sans-Culotte, and the Citizen Genêt. Working with French consul Michel-Ange Mangourit, Genêt organized American volunteers to fight Britain's Spanish allies in Florida. After raising a militia, Genêt set sail toward Philadelphia, stopping along the way to marshal support for the French cause and arriving on May 18. He encouraged Democratic-Republican Societies, but President Washington denounced them and they quickly withered away. His actions endangered American neutrality in the war between France and Britain, which Washington had pointedly declared in his Neutrality Proclamation of April 22. When Genêt met with Washington, he asked for what amounted to a suspension of American neutrality. When turned down by Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson and informed that his actions were unacceptable, Genêt protested. Meanwhile, Genêt's privateers were capturing British ships, and his militia was preparing to move against the Spanish. Genêt continued to defy the wishes of the United States government, capturing British ships and rearming them as privateers. Washington sent Genêt an 8,000-word letter of complaint on Jefferson's and Hamilton's advice - one of the few situations in which the Federalist Alexander Hamilton and the Democratic-Republican Jefferson agreed. Genêt replied obstinately.The Jacobins, having taken power in France by January 1794, sent an arrest notice which asked Genêt to come back to France. Genêt, knowing that he would likely be sent to the guillotine, asked Washington for asylum. It was Hamilton - Genêt's fiercest opponent in the cabinet - who convinced Washington to grant him safe haven in the United States.Genet challenged Washington's authority by threatening to appeal to the American people, and the U.S. government demanded (1793) his recall. Before he could go back to France, his party, the Girondists, had fallen, and his return would have meant the guillotine. Washington therefore refused to allow his extradition. Genet remained in the United States and married the daughter of Governor George Clinton of New York.

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KING GEORGE III, 1771 Signed Appointment of Wm. Axtell, NY Loyalist Commander

Lot 26: KING GEORGE III, 1771 Signed Appointment of Wm. Axtell, NY Loyalist Commander

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Description: AutographsKing George III Signed Appointment of William Axtell The Future New York Loyalist & The Commander of the Nassau Blues RegimentKING GEORGE III (1738-1820). King of Great Britain and Ireland from 1760 during the French & Indian War through the American Revolutionary War, until his death in 1820.May 4, 1771-Dated Pre-Revolutionary War, Manuscript Document Signed, "George R," as King, two pages, measuring 8" x 12.5" and is Choice Extremely Fine. In this historic original document, King George officially Appoints William Axtell as Council of the Province of New York. Axtell (1720-1795) can be located as listed in "Biographical Sketches of Wealthy Men of the Colonial Era in New York." He gained a sinister reputation during the Revolutionary War. As a member of the Governor's Council in 1776, Axtell was Commissioned Colonel and Commander of a Loyalist Regiment known as the Nassau Blues. That Loyalist unit was much feared for its exaltations against those who embraced the Patriot cause. His headquarters was the county seat, "Melrose Hall," which allegedly became the scene of tortured rebel prisoners, whilst still retaining its fame for lavish entertainment, now just limited to the Loyalist Elite.This document is nicely Signed at the top left "George R" in brown ink, and is also Countersigned at the bottom by Lord Hillsborough. There is a second integral page which bears several dockets and additional endorsements. Overall this impressive document is very clean, well written and easily readable, being in choice condition. There is some trivial expected scattered light tone, light storage folds, and reinforcement to edges of second page. Document by King George III which have a direct connection to the American Colonies and especially the Revolutionary War, are very scarce and significantly more rare and valuable to collectors.William Axtell was born in Jamaica, the son of a successful sugar trader and plantation owner. His father, Daniel Axtell, had also acquired a large land tract in New Jersey, which the young man inherited, along with the rest of his father's large estate. In 1746, the twenty six year of heir came to New York, with the intentions to dispose of his New Jersey land and make some useful acquaintances with the city's leading merchants. He enjoyed New York's colonial society and was particularly attired by young Margaret De Peyster, whom he courted and eventually married, settling in a comfortable mansion on Broadway. She was the daughter of Abraham de Peyster jr and through her mother, a Van Cortlandt.William Axtell was well appreciated for his lavish entertaining, both at his Broadway mansion and on his country seat, "Melrose Hall" at Flatbush, Long Island NY. Nicknamed "William the Gay" (when that word still meant joyful) in his younger years, he gained a decidedly more sinister reputation during the Revolutionary War. A member of the Governor's Council in 1776, he was commissioned Colonel and commander of a Loyalist regiment known as the Nassau Blues and much feared for its exaltations against those who embraced the patriot cause. Melrose Hall allegedly became the scene of tortured rebel prisoners, whilst still retaining its fame for lavish entertainment, now limited to the Loyalist Elite. No wonder, the Axtell properties were prominent on the list of estates to be confiscated, according the New York Act Of Attainder of 1779. When they were sold in 1784, "Melrose Hall" was acquired by 'Colonel' Aquila Giles of the Continental Army. He offered the place to his newly wed bride, the former Elizabeth Shipton, who happened to be the adopted daughter of William Axtell and Margaret De Peyster, who had no children of their own. Giles had fallen in love with Elizabeth in the pre-revolutionary days, when he was a frequent guest at Melrose Hall. But the Independence War had separated the lovers. William Axtell returned to England and died at Beaumont Cottage, Surrey, in 1795. Like other Tories, he had been partially indemnized for his losses due to the American Revolution. But most of his estate had anyway always been in England and the West Indies.

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1962 JOHN GLENN Signed First Day Project Mercury Cover

Lot 27: 1962 JOHN GLENN Signed First Day Project Mercury Cover

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Description: Autographs1962 John Glenn Signed First Day Project Mercury CoverJOHN HERSCHEL GLENN, JR. First American to orbit the Earth and the third American in space.March 2, 1962-Dated, Autograph upon Project Mercury Cachet Postal Cover; signed at his United Nations visit, Choice Near Mint. His bold Hand-Signed Autograph, "J H Glenn, Jr" written in vivid deep black ink upon a fresh, colorful vignette cover. Cover with Project Mercury FDC cachet -- signed 10 day after that flight when Glenn visited the United Nations. As fresh and exciting in appearance as it was 51 years ago!

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ALEXANDER HAMILTON 1789 Treasury Department Letter Signed 1st Treasury Secretary

Lot 28: ALEXANDER HAMILTON 1789 Treasury Department Letter Signed 1st Treasury Secretary

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Description: AutographsAlexander Hamilton 1789 Treasury Department Letter Signed "A Hamilton" First United States Secretary of the Treasury Serving Under President George WashingtonALEXANDER HAMILTON (1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804). A Founding Father of the United States, Revolutionary War Soldier, Economist, Political Philosopher, one of America's first Constitutional Lawyers and the First United States Secretary of the Treasury under President George Washington. Killed in his famous Duel with Aaron Burr.December 5, 1789-Dated Federal Period, Treasury Department Autograph Letter Signed, "A Hamilton" as Secretary of the Treasury, Choice Very Fine. The Letter content is rather routine, addressed to Jedediah Huntington (1743-1818), who was the Collector of Customs for the Port of New London (CT.), and former American General in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War.The Letter is in choice condition with the usual folds present and well away from Hamilton's 1.5" long signature with flourish below. Trivial tone at the outer edges from prior display with light signs of a previous display mounting on the blank reverse. This historic, 1 page, official United States Treasury Letter measures 7.25" x 9" and is very well written in rich brown upon clean, period laid paper and having both of its paper and wax small seals cleanly attached upon the lower portion. It reads, in full:"Treasury Department - December 5, 1789Sir, I am favored with your Letter of the 20th of last month and agreeably to your request have directed the Register of the Treasury to forward to you by Mr. Timothy Parker Fifty Registers. -- I am, Sir, your Obedient & Humble Servant. -- (Signed) A Hamilton". A short docket on the blank reverse reads: "Secy of the Treasury re Book of Registration - 1 Dec. 1789".There are a small number of auction records for similar Alexander Hamilton signed letters with sales results from $3,600 for a very similar item in 2006 to $5,500 for somewhat better content more recently. This current example is nicely presented and has a strong signature that will display nicely.Alexander Hamilton (January 11, 1755 or 1757 - July 12, 1804) was a Founding Father of the United States, soldier, economist, political philosopher, one of America's first constitutional lawyers and the first United States Secretary of the Treasury.As Secretary of the Treasury, Hamilton was the primary author of the economic policies of the George Washington administration, especially the funding of the state debts by the Federal government, the establishment of a national bank, a system of tariffs, and friendly trade relations with Britain. He became the leader of the Federalist Party, created largely in support of his views, and was opposed by the Democratic-Republican Party, led by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison.Hamilton served in the American Revolutionary War. At the start of the war, he organized an artillery company and was chosen as its captain. He later became the Senior Aide-de-camp and confidant to General George Washington, the American Commander-in-chief.He served again under Washington in the army raised to defeat the Whiskey Rebellion, a tax revolt of western farmers in 1794. In 1798, Hamilton called for mobilization against France after the XYZ Affair and secured an appointment as commander of a new army, which he trained for a war. However, the Quasi-War, although hard-fought at sea, was never officially declared. In the end, President John Adams found a diplomatic solution that avoided war.Born out of wedlock and raised in the West Indies, Hamilton was effectively orphaned at about the age of 11. Recognized for his abilities and talent, he was sponsored by people from his community to go to the North American mainland for his education. He attended King's College (now Columbia University), in New York City. After the American Revolutionary War, Hamilton was elected to the Continental Congress from New York. He resigned to practice law and founded the Bank of New York.Hamilton was among those dissatisfied with the Articles of Confederation- the first attempt at a national governing document- because it lacked an executive, courts, and taxing powers. He led the Annapolis Convention, which successfully influenced Congress to issue a call for the Philadelphia Convention in order to create a new constitution. He was an active participant at Philadelphia and helped achieve ratification by writing 51 of the 85 installments of the Federalist Papers, which supported the new constitution and to this day is the single most important source for Constitutional interpretation.In the new government under President George Washington, Hamilton was appointed the Secretary of the Treasury. An admirer of British political systems, Hamilton was a nationalist who emphasized strong central government and successfully argued that the implied powers of the Constitution could be used to fund the national debt, assume state debts, and create the government-owned Bank of the United States. These programs were funded primarily by a tariff on imports and later also by a highly controversial excise tax on whiskey.Embarrassed when an extra-marital affair from his past became public, Hamilton resigned from office in 1795 and returned to the practice of law in New York. He kept his hand in politics and was a powerful influence on the cabinet of President Adams (1797-1801).Hamilton's opposition to Adams' re-election helped cause his defeat in the 1800 election. When in the same contest Thomas Jefferson and Aaron Burr tied for the presidency in the electoral college, Hamilton helped defeat Burr, whom he found unprincipled, and elect Jefferson despite philosophical differences. After failing to support Adams, the Federalist candidate, Hamilton lost some national prominence within the party. Vice President Burr later ran for governor in New York State, but Hamilton's influence in his home state was strong enough to prevent a Burr victory. Taking offense at some of Hamilton's comments, Burr challenged him to a duel and mortally wounded Hamilton, who died within days.(From Wikipedia)

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(JOHN HANCOCK) 1783 American Revolution Receipt of John Hancocks Casks

Lot 29: (JOHN HANCOCK) 1783 American Revolution Receipt of John Hancocks Casks

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Description: Autographs1783 American Revolution Receipt of John Hancock Casks (JOHN HANCOCK) (1737-1793). Prominent Merchant, Patriot of the American Revolution, served as President of the Second Continental Congress and was both the First & Third Governor of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. Remembered for his large and stylish First Signature on the United States Declaration of Independence, so much so that the term "John Hancock" became, in the United States, a synonym for "signature".[No month] 11th, 1783-Dated American Revolutionary War Period, Manuscript Document Signed, "Silas Hussey," 1 page, 84 x 180 mm, at Boston, Very Fine. This is an original period Receipt boldly written upon period laid paper, in part:"... John Hancock Esqr twenty one shillings Lawful Money for three Groos (gross) Casks Delivered by Joseph Hussey some years ago..." Docketed on verso, "Governor Hancock's Bill" and apparently paid "Sylvanus Hussey Rect. 1783."There is one light vertical fold, torn at bottom margin, old tape reinforcements along the outer margin edges have toned, overall in very nice condition.

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JOHN HANCOCK, Signed 1767 Faneuil-Hall Boston LOTTERY TICKET

Lot 30: JOHN HANCOCK, Signed 1767 Faneuil-Hall Boston LOTTERY TICKET

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Description: Autographs1767 "John Hancock" Signed "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Historic Boston, Massachusetts Winning Lottery TicketJOHN HANCOCK. First Signer of the Declaration of Independence, President of the Continental Congress, Governor of Massachusetts.April, 1767-Dated Pre-Revolutionary War, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "John Hancock," being a "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Boston, Massachusetts, Winning Lottery Ticket, measuring 1.75" x 3.5", Choice Very Fine. This original, fully authentic Colonial Period Lottery Ticket is boldly Signed in rich brown "John Hancock," being a winning "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Boston, Massachusetts, Lottery Ticket with the signature of the owner "Jeremiah Allen" written on the blank reverse as was the typical method of the day, no amount is noted. Traces of a prior collector mounting on either side of the reverse and a small deft repair is not very distracting. John Hancock, was the famous First Signer of the Declaration of Independence, Acted as the President of the Continental Congress and the Governor of Massachusetts. This important "John Hancock" signed lottery ticket, is important because it is from early in his public career. He signed this Lottery Ticket in the year after his first election to the Massachusetts General Court.This ticket has sharp black printed text, is very well centered with full margin border designs. It has some light circulation and has a deft sealed split near at the lower centerfold at the "h" of the signature and a tiny paper repair that is basically invisible and light traces of a prior album mounting on the blank reverse right and left outer edges. Overall, this extremely rare and historic lottery ticket has a nice even appearance and the large deep brown signature "John Hancock" is very attractive.A similar "John Hancock" signed Faneuil Hall lottery ticket has sold for about $26,450 in a major Stack's New York City auction in about the same condition, back in 2007. This is truly an impressive, museum quality item which is certain to be an important highlight centerpiece for the owner's collection.John Hancock's (1737-1793) political career began in 1764, the year he inherited his uncle's fortune and shipping business, when he became a Boston Selectman (member of the city council). In 1766 he was elected to the Massachusetts General Court. During the 1770's his fame as a Patriot spread, and he was elected or appointed to increasingly important offices.

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(JOHN HANCOCK) 1764, Shipping Document of a Bag Containing 500 Dollars

Lot 31: (JOHN HANCOCK) 1764, Shipping Document of a Bag Containing 500 Dollars

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Description: AutographsJohn Hancock Ships a Bag Containing "500 Dollars" Document Completed Entirely In John Hancock's Hand(JOHN HANCOCK).September 30, 1764-Dated, Partially-Printed Shipping Document, at Boston, unsigned, the completed Manuscript Text in the hand of John Hancock, Fine. This original form is printed on early laid period paper, measures 4.5" x 9" with its original black wax seal appearing very distinct in the upper left corner. Some small edge chinks affect some of the manuscript text in the upper right corner. It is even in tone with some deeper tone areas and tipped to a larger sheet. There is very bold, clear rich brown manuscript portions by John Hancock and deep black printed text. It is also accompanied by a circa 1850 Engraved Print of John Hancock with his famous engraved facsimile signature below, 9" x 5" Very Fine. Below the seal is the notation:"1 Bag of 500 Dollars." This late French and Indian War period document is a receipt for the transfer and shipping of a bag of 500 (Spanish Milled "Pillar" Dollars) from the Hancock's Wharf Office to "JOSIAH STOVER." This money to be transported to "Thomas Williams Esq., StoreKeeper & Paymaster to the Honorable Board of Ordinance ... Port of Annapolis, Royal."At this time in his life, young John Hancock was employed as a clerk in the office of his uncle and surrogate father, Boston merchant, Thomas Hancock. This rare document shows the importance of hard silver coinage payment being transferred and made to fund the British American War efforts of the period. (Manuscript text confirmed as that of John Hancock by John Reznikoff.) A most important Early American financial and shipping document. (2 items).

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WARREN G. HARDING, Typed Letter Signed 1916

Lot 32: WARREN G. HARDING, Typed Letter Signed 1916

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Description: Autographs1916 Typed Letter Boldly Signed By "W. G. Harding" WARREN G. HARDING (1865 - 1923). 29th President of the United States, serving from 1921 until his death from a heart attack in 1923.March 13, 1916-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "W. G. Harding" on United States Senate Official Letterhead, measuring 10.5" x 8," 1 page, Washington, DC, Choice Very Fine+. Harding writes to W. W. Eccles regarding a government exam. It reads, in part, "Under date of March 8, the President of the United States Civil Service Commission advises me that the bar to your examination for scientific assistant has been removed, and that you will be permitted to enter any examination held by this Commission for which you may be qualified." This cataloger has never seen a nicer, bolder Harding signature as with this 2.25" long vivid brown example upon "Crane's 1914 - ALL LINEN" watermarked paper.

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RUTHERFORD B. HAYES, Document Signed As President 1879

Lot 33: RUTHERFORD B. HAYES, Document Signed As President 1879

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Description: Autographs"Pardon" Document Signed "R. B. Hayes" as PresidentRUTHERFORD B. HAYES (1822 - 1893). Ninteenth President of the United States 1877-1881.June 30, 1879-Dated, Document Signed, "R. B. Hayes" as President, Washington, D.C., measuring 10" x 8", 1 page, tri-fold, Choice Extremely Fine. President Hayes signs a Warrant Document authorizing the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to "a warrant for the pardon of Robert Mosely." Trivial tone to this original, period pale blue page. Signature "R.B. Hayes" as President is strong and clear, in brown ink. A scarce Presidential Pardon Document.

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Signer FRANCIS HOPKINSON, WILLIAM BINGHAM Plus JOHN BENEZET 1779 Document Signed

Lot 34: Signer FRANCIS HOPKINSON, WILLIAM BINGHAM Plus JOHN BENEZET 1779 Document Signed

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Description: AutographsFrancis Hopkinson Signer of the Declaration of Independence from New Jersey & Other Noted AmericansFRANCIS HOPKINSON (1737 - 1791) & WILLIAM BINGHAM (1752 - 1804), Plus JOHN BENEZET (see text).Hopkinson was an American Author, was one of the Signer of the Declaration of Independence as a Continental Congress Delegate from New Jersey and helped in the design of the First American National Flag, First graduate of what is now the University of Pennsylvania.William Bingham was an American Statesman from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress from 1786 to 1788, and later served in the United States Senate from 1795 to 1801 and as President Pro Tempore of the United States Senate.March, 1st, 1779-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "F. Hopkinson" as Continental Congress Treasurer of Loans, Third Bill of Exchange $60 Sight Draft, printed in Violet, Green and Black, Very Choice Crisp About Uncirculated. This bright, clean and fresh Continental Treasury form being beautifully printed upon watermarked "UNITED STATES 3" fine quality laid period paper. It is made to "Jacob Cook" on interest due on Money borrowed by the United States. This form is made:"To the Commissioner or Commissioners of the United States of America, at Paris. - Countersigned, Tho(mas) Smith - Commissioner of the Continental Loan-Office in the State of Pennsylvania -- (Signed) F(rancis) Hopkinson - Treasr. of Loans."This form is in superb, bright overall quality having a bold brown signature of Hopkinson measuring fully 2.5" long. The blank reverse is endorsed at top by Jacob Cook, being signed to William Bingham, authorized by John Benezet, and then further endorsed and noted in French on July 13, 1779, Signed by "Wm. Bingham" with his bold signature with a lovely flourish below.John Benezet was a native of Philadelphia and the son of Daniel Benezet, a prominent Philadelphia merchant. Benezet briefly attended the College of Philadelphia in 1757 and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1768. In 1775, he married Hanna Bingham, and with that, his father gave him £3,000 plus £6,000 in stock to set up an import business. Benezet became active in political affairs, but only briefly. In early 1775, John Benezet served as one of the Secretaries who recorded proceedings at the Pennsylvania Provincial Congress. In August of that year, he was named to Philadelphia's Committee of Correspondence. Two years later, in 1777, the Continental Congress appointed Benezet as Commissioner of Claims in the Treasury Office, later resigned and returned to his business interests. Benezet died in the Winter of 1780-81, when his ship, the Shillelagh, was lost at sea during a voyage to France.Francis Hopkinson, signer of the Declaration of Independence, signs this bill of exchange as Treasurer of Loans. Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 - May 9, 1791), an American author, was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey.He later served as a federal judge in Pennsylvania. His supporters believe he played a key role in the design of the first American flag. Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson. He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his masters degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes. In 1763, he was appointed customs collector for Salem, New Jersey. Hopkinson spent from May 1766 to August 1767 in England in hopes of becoming commissioner of customs for North America. Although unsuccessful, he spent time with the future Prime Minister Lord North and his half-brother, the Bishop of Worcester Brownlow North, and painter Benjamin West. After his return, Francis Hopkinson operated a dry goods business in Philadelphia and married Ann Borden on September 1, 1768. They would have five children. Hopkinson obtained a public appointment as a customs collector for New Castle, Delaware on May 1, 1772.He moved to Bordentown, New Jersey in 1774, became an assemblyman for the state's Royal Provincial Council, and was admitted to the New Jersey bar on May 8, 1775. He resigned his crown-appointed positions in 1776 and, on June 22, went on to represent New Jersey in the Second Continental Congress where he signed the Declaration of Independence.He departed the Congress on November 30, 1776 to serve on the Navy Board at Philadelphia. As part of the fledgling nation's government, he was Treasurer of the Continental Loan Office in 1778; appointed Judge of the Admiralty Court of Pennsylvania in 1779 and reappointed in 1780 and 1787; and helped ratify the Constitution during the Constitutional Convention in 1787.On September 24, 1789, he was nominated by President George Washington to the newly created position of Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Pennsylvania. He was confirmed by the United States Senate, and received his commission, on September 26, 1789.As a Federal Judge, Hopkinson died in Philadelphia at the age of 53 from a sudden epileptic seizure. He was buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. He was the father of Joseph Hopkinson, member of the United States House of Representatives and Federal judge.

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Rare HARRY HOUDINI Signed Stock Certificate for the Houdini Picture Corporation

Lot 35: Rare HARRY HOUDINI Signed Stock Certificate for the Houdini Picture Corporation

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Description: AutographsRare "Harry Houdini" Signed Stock Certificate for the "Houdini Picture Corporation"HARRY HOUDINI (1874-1926). Legendary American Stage Magician and Escape Artist, (true name: Ehrich Weiss).October 26, 1922-Dated, Document Signed, "Harry Houdini" as president, 1 page, measuring 11.75" x 8.25", New York, Choice Crisp Extremely Fine. This is an original printed Stock Certificate for Five Shares with a face value of $10 each, in the "Houdini Picture Corporation" as issued to Josephine K. Doelker, Certificate number 2118. The Houdini Picture Corp. produced just 2 films before it folded in 1923.This is an extremely rare and popular "Harry Houdini" Signed Stock Certificate printed is deep black and brown, having a sharp, clear deeply embossed "Houdini Picture Corporation" Seal impression at the lower left. It is trifolded for storage and has an early Transfer Agent sticker for this specific form, stating in light blue print "HOUDINI PICTURE CORP" on the reverse. This Certificate is significantly nicer in quality than the last example we offered in our EAHA Auction of February 11, 1006, Lot 54, graded Choice Very Fine, selling for $4,130 half a decade ago. Since that sale, these rare "Harry Houdini" Signed Stock Certificates for the "Houdini Picture Corporation" have increased in collector popularity. An excellent specimen for display.The Houdini Picture Corporation was formed by Harry Houdini in 1920. He directed and produced only two movies: the first, "The Man from Beyond", was successful; the second, "Haldane of the Secret Service", proved a dismal failure. At that point, Houdini abruptly ended his film career. The Houdini Picture Corporation went out of business less than 6 years after its creation.Known as the greatest stage magician of his and perhaps any era, he invented or perfected many of the illusions that still thrill audiences today. Houdini was killed at age 51 when a fan punched him, simply to test his claim that he could handle any blow, and inadvertently ruptured his infected appendix.

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DAVID HUMPHREYS, 1813 Autograph Letter Signed - Known as The Hartford Wit

Lot 36: DAVID HUMPHREYS, 1813 Autograph Letter Signed - Known as The Hartford Wit

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Description: Autographs"Hartford Wit" David Humphreys Signed Letter Born in Derby, Connecticut, next to neighboring town AnsoniaDAVID HUMPHREYS (1752-1818). American Revolutionary War Colonel and Aide-de-camp to General George Washington, American Minister to Portugal and then to Spain, Entrepreneur who brought Merino sheep to America and Member of the Connecticut State Legislature, also Poet and Author, he was one of the "Hartford Wits."July 17, 1813-Dated War of 1812 Period, Autograph Letter Signed, "D. Humphreys", 1 page, measuring 10.75" x 8" at Humphreysville (now Seymour, CT.), Choice Very Fine. David Humphreys as an Aide-de-camp, friend and confidant to George Washington, was entrusted with carrying the Surrendered British Standard from the victory at the Battle of Yorktown to the Continental Congress, then in Philadelphia, which now hangs at the headquarters of the New Haven Museum and Historical Society, which also has a ceremonial sword that Congress voted be presented to Humphreys.This Letter written to: "Gen. Eben(ezer) Huntington - Com(manding) Gen(eral) - State of Connect." This cover letter enclosing "the result of the Election of Officers in the Humphreysville Compy of Volunteer Exempts, & request that Commissions may be issued accordingly" (list not present) - (Signed) "D. Humphreys." This Military Letter is very clean and lightly folded, some marginal faint tone, nicely written in fine dark brown in Humpreys' hand. Bold brown Docket on the perfectly clean, blank reverse reads: " Humphreysville Choice of Officers 26 July 1813." Any document or letter signed by David Humphreys is quite rare, specially during his War of 1812 military service.He was born in what was then Derby, Connecticut, and now a part of the neighboring town of Ansonia, in the First Congregational Church parsonage, a spaceous two-story house at 37 Elm St. called the David Humphreys House. He was the youngest of five children (four sons and a daughter) of the Rev. Daniel and Sarah Riggs Bowers Humphreys.Humphreys' father was parson of the church from 1733, the year after he graduated from Yale, to 1787-a run of 54 years. Daniel Humphreys was the second husband of Sarah Riggs Bowers, known in Derby as "Lady Humphreys" for her "dignity and refinement of character," according to author Leo T. Molloy.

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Union General DAVID HUNTER, Union Civil War General Signed 1861 Civil War Orders

Lot 37: Union General DAVID HUNTER, Union Civil War General Signed 1861 Civil War Orders

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Description: AutographsUnion General David Hunter Signed Civil War OrdersDAVID HUNTER, Union Civil War General, sanctioned the organization of the First African American Regiment, and presided at the trial of the Lincoln Assassination Conspirators.September 11, 1861-Dated Civil War Period, Autograph Letter Signed, "D. Hunter," as Major General of Volunteers, Chicago, IL, 9.5" x 7.5", Choice Very Fine. War date, orders to members of his staff to report for duty in Chicago, then to accompany him to St. Louis. Included are; Capt. J.W. Turner, Capt. J. Wilson Saffer, Lt. S.W. Stockton, Lt. E.W. Smith, and Surgeon J.K. Barnes.David Hunter sanctioned the organization of the first African American regiment during the Civil War which caused the Confederate government to label him a felon to be executed if captured. He also presided at the trial of the Lincoln assassination conspirators. There is a small light brown stain, however it does not affect the document.

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Colonial Royal British Governor THOMAS HUTCHINSON Letter Signed

Lot 38: Colonial Royal British Governor THOMAS HUTCHINSON Letter Signed

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Description: Autographs"Thomas Hutchinson" Royal British Colonial Governor of Massachusetts During The Boston Massacre Letter Signed THOMAS HUTCHINSON. (1711-1780) The Royal British Colonial Governor of Massachusetts (1771-1774) at the time of the Boston Massacre, and later Exiled from Boston.A rare, Manuscript Autograph Letter Signed, "Tho Hutchinson," one page, 6" x 7" (sight), no place, October 20, no year, Very Fine. To "Mr. Benjamin Cushing" regarding a possible meeting. It is most elegantly displayed in 15.5" x 13" ornate wooden frame, with an nice inset portrait of Hutchinson, and short typed biographical summary at the lower right. Small light tone spot at bottom edge of signature and one very minor instance of ink blotting within text. It reads, in full:Sir - I have seen Mr. Daniel Smith & he is so kind as to agree to undertake the affair which prevents my sitting out in the mornings. I shall be much obliged to the Gentleman to meet tomorrow as early as they can as I have some Publick business in Boston on Friday. I will attend at time and place agreed on. - Your most humble Ser. - Tho. Hutchinson"A historic signature of this controversial Colonial Massachusetts British Governor who was a major figure in the Pre-Revolutionary War era fervor in Boston and New England, leading towards the Revolutionary War.W. Benjamin Cushing (1739-1792) was an American soldier in the Revolutionary War and father of Thomas Cushing, a prominent Free Mason.

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Royal Governor of Colonial Massachusetts THOMAS HUTCHINSON, 1760 Document Signed

Lot 39: Royal Governor of Colonial Massachusetts THOMAS HUTCHINSON, 1760 Document Signed

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Description: AutographsRoyal Governor Thomas Hutchinson Signed Document THOMAS HUTCHINSON (1711-1780). Royal Governor of American Colonial Massachusetts who was a staunch defender of English Colonial policy, Jurist and Historian.April 7, 1760-Dated French and Indian War period, Partially-Printed Document Signed "Tho(mas) Hutchinson," Province of Massachusetts Bay, Boston, Extremely Fine. This boldly printed original Document measures 12.25" x 7.75" and is beautifully printed on fine laid period paper. It is fresh and clean, amazingly having significant amounts of original press text embossing from the printing press still seen within the paper. It is Signed by Thomas Hutchinson as the Judge of Probate of Wills, appointing Jonah Sprague as administrator of his late father's estate and has a short list of valued goods written upon the blank reverse edge and has a docket at the top central edge. An exceptional quality document with an impressive signature.Thomas Hutchinson (born Sept. 9, 1711, Boston, Mass. & died June 3, 1780, London, England.) American colonial administrator. The son of a wealthy Boston merchant, he entered Harvard at the age of 12, graduating 3 years later. He pursued business ventures before serving in local and provincial legislatures (1737 - 49) and as a delegate to the Albany Congress.He served as lieutenant governor (1758 - 71) and as Chief Justice of the state Superior Court (1760 - 69). As governor (1771 - 74), he strictly enforced British rule. After he was accused of initiating the hated Stamp Act, a mob attacked his home, and he barely escaped with his life. His insistence that a shipment of tea be landed in Boston led to the Boston Tea Party. He was replaced as Governor by British General Thomas Gage.

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1830 ANDREW JACKSON Presidential Appointment of the Indian Agent on Red River

Lot 40: 1830 ANDREW JACKSON Presidential Appointment of the Indian Agent on Red River

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Description: AutographsOutstanding "Andrew Jackson" Signed Presidential Appointment of Jehiel Brooks "Indian Agent on Red River"ANDREW JACKSON (1767-1845). Seventh President of the United States (1829-1837), a Politician and Army General who defeated the Creek Indians at the Battle of Horseshoe Bend (1814), and the British at the Battle of New Orleans (1815).March 23rd, 1830-Dated, Manuscript Document Signed, "Andrew Jackson" as President, and Cosigned by John Eaton, as the 13th Secretary of War, at the City of Washington, Choice Very Fine. This impressive Document is beautifully handwritten in deep brown ink upon quality, watermarked official period wove paper, 1 page, 15.75" wide x 10" high (Large Folio), having its full original star shaped paper and wax Embossed Official Seal properly attached at lower left in virtually perfect condition. There is a fine vertical centerfold split which is archivally reinforced with a few trivial fold chips that could be easily conserved. The right side is somewhat of slightly deeper tone from this document having that portion touching something that caused the tone at some point. An important Louisiana and Indian Nation related Document for many reasons.John Henry Eaton (1790-1856) was an American politician and diplomat from Tennessee who served as U.S. Senator and as Secretary of War in the administration of Andrew Jackson. He was the youngest U.S. Senator in history, as he was 28 years old when he took his oath of office.Colonel Jehiel Brooks (April 8, 1797 Albans, Vermont - February 6, 1886) was a Soldier, Territorial Governor, and Plantation owner. He was First Lieutenant, in the First Regiment of Infantry with the Ohio Militia, in the War of 1812. He came to the District of Columbia to secure political appointment, but with the exception of an appointment in the Red River Indian Agency in Louisiana during the administration of Andrew Jackson (1829-1837), Brooks had little luck. Instead, he assumed the role of the gentleman farmer on a tract of land adjacent to property that later became part of The Catholic University of America.The "Red River Indian Agency" (Louisiana) An agency was established in 1804 and was located at Natchitoches. About 1821, the agency was moved to Sulphur Fork in Arkansas Territory and at that time was called the Red River Agency. In 1825, it was moved about 25 miles down-stream to Caddo Prairie. That site was flooded and, as a result, in 1831 it was again moved about 50 miles even further down-stream to Peach Tree (or Orchard) Bluff, on the Bayou Pierre Channel, south of the site of Shreveport, Louisiana.The agency was most commonly called the "Red River Agency," although it was sometimes referred to as the Caddo Agency in Louisiana. The agency was discontinued in 1834 as the Caddo moved to Texas. A Treaty was signed on July 1, 1835 at the Caddo Agency in the State of Louisiana and the United States. The Articles of the Treaty were between Jehiel Brooks, commissioner on the part of the United States, and the Chiefs, head men and warriors of the Caddo nation of Indians. In 1859, the Caddo Indians moved to the Wichita Agency in Indian Territory. The Quapaw, who once were under the Caddo Agency in Louisiana, eventually moved to their reservation in Indian Territory and were placed under the Neosho Agency. Other Indian Tribes Associated With This Agency include; Caddo, Quapaw, Pascagoula, Apalachee, Biloxi, Koasti, Taensa, Alabama, Shawnee, Delaware, other small bands including roaming Indians from Texas (then part of Mexico).This historic 1830 "Andrew Jackson" Signed Presidential Appointment of Jehiel Brooks "Indian Agent on Red River" is housed in a custom protective folio, not framed. It is attractive being nice in its appearance and presentation, making it an excellent candidate for proper framing and display.Letters received by the Office of Indian Affairs from the Red River Agency, 1824-1830, have been microfilmed by the National Archives as part of their Microcopy Number M234, Roll 727. Copies are available at the National Archives and at the Family History Library and its family history centers (their microfilm roll number 1661457). Agents and Appointment Dates: John Sibley 1804, Thomas Gales 1814, John Jamison 1816, George Gray 1819, Thomas Griffith 1829, Jehiel Brooks 1830As one of the largest holders of real estate in the District, Nicholas Louis Queen ran the Queen's Hotel near the Capitol until his death in 1850. The Brooks and Queens families united in 1828, when Jehiel Brooks and Ann Margaret Queen, the daughter of Nicholas Queen, married. They built the Brooks Mansion. His son, John Henry Brooks, later sold his parents' real estate to early twentieth-century developers of the Brookland neighborhood

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HENRY LAURENS, 1763 Bold Financial Document Nicely Signed

Lot 41: HENRY LAURENS, 1763 Bold Financial Document Nicely Signed

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Description: Autographs"Henry Laurens" Signed 1763 Bold Financial DocumentHENRY LAURENS (1724 - 1792). Succeeded John Hancock as President of the Congress, Signatory to the Articles of Confederation.June 23, 1763-Dated, Autograph Document Signed, "Henry Laurens," 1 page (written upon both sides by five persons), 12" x 8" page, Charles-Town (South Carolina), Choice Fine. This documents Laurens signing in receipt of monies paid by a George Saxby, the King's Receiver General, in part:"...Two hundred pounds sterling, in One Thousand four hundred & forty two pounds Curr[en]t money by virtue of a power of Attorney from John Rutherford Esqr & Frances his wife as Executors of the last will & Testament of the late Governor Johnston of North Carolina under His Majesty's Warrant to the representatives of the said Governor Johnston."Boldly written in deep rich brown, some irregular ragged edges, not affecting Laurens' text or signature, which are impressively penned and signed. Likely a page from a ledger since the two sides have four other notations, being also similarly signed by other people, as the official statement of payments received from George Saxby. This is a very rare early Document that is very nicely Signed by Henry Laurens.Henry Laurens (1724 - 1792) was an American merchant and rice planter from South Carolina who became a political leader during the Revolutionary War. A Delegate to the Second Continental Congress, Laurens succeeded John Hancock as President of the Congress. He was a signatory to the Articles of Confederation.Laurens had earned part of his wealth by operating the largest Slave-trading house in North America. In the 1750s alone, his Charleston firm oversaw the sale of more than 8,000 enslaved Africans. He was for a time Vice-President of South Carolina and a diplomat to the Netherlands during the Revolutionary War. He was captured at sea and imprisoned for some time by the British in the Tower of London.His son John Laurens, persuaded the Continental Congress to allow Slaves to enlist in exchange for freedom and was authorized to recruit a regiment (3000 men). He believed that Americans could not fight for their own freedom while Slaves were held. After John died during the war, the senior Laurens later freed his Slaves, as his son had urged.

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1859 ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Rare Signed Personal Check

Lot 42: 1859 ABRAHAM LINCOLN, Rare Signed Personal Check

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Description: AutographsAbraham Lincoln Signed Check Made Out To His Historic Law Partner William Henry HerndonABRAHAM LINCOLN (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865). 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April of 1865.June 13, 1859-Dated, Partially-Printed Document, Check Signed, "A Lincoln" at Springfield (Illinois), measuring 7.5" x 3" with Blue Printed text and vignette design, two bank cut cancels, Choice Very Fine. This is an original bank check, as issued by the "Springfield Marine & Fire Insurance Company." It is made out in brown ink, by Lincoln's hand, in the amount of Seven (dollars and) 25 cents "IN CURRENT BANK NOTES." being written to "W. H. Herndon," who at the time was Abraham Lincoln's law partner. A fine vertical tear near center has been archivally repaired, with conservation performed with Japanese tissue to stabilize the paper, to the blank verso only. (The detailed professional conservation report is included with item.)This check is made out to Lincoln's famous law partner William Henry Herndon. Additional information about him on our auction website: www.EarlyAmerican.com. This great rarity is in surprisingly clean and lightly circulated condition overall. Towards the conclusion of the payees name the pen began to lighten from lacking ink. "A. Lincoln" is very sharply written and clearly readable. This Check is attractive to the eye, being printed in a colorful blue, all of the text and manuscript portions clear and fully readable upon the white wove period paper. The left margin includes a nice oval vignette showing a Steaming Paddlewheel Ship and two other Sailing Ships, within an ornate, decorative box, with a tiny spindle hole, as made, towards the edge. Any Check by Abraham Lincoln is highly collected and prized as an important rarity. This example, being made directly from Lincoln to his law partner Herndon, is a true prize for any Autograph, Presidential or Abraham Lincoln collection.William Henry Herndon (1818-1891) was born in Greensburg, Kentucky, Herndon and his family moved to Illinois in 1820, and they settled in Springfield when he was five. Herndon attended Illinois College from 1836-1837. In 1840 he married Mary J. Maxey with whom he had six children. Mary Herndon died on August 18, 1860, and the following summer Herndon married Anna Miles with whom he had two more children.Following college, he returned to Springfield, where he clerked until 1841, when he went into law practice with Lincoln. Both men were members of the Whig Party and joined the fledgling Republican Party after the dissolution of the Whigs. In 1858, Herndon conducted opposition research in the Illinois State Library to be used against Stephen A. Douglas in the 1860 Presidential race.Herndon was a much stauncher opponent of Slavery than Lincoln and claimed that he helped change Lincoln's views on the subject. He felt that Lincoln acted too slowly against the issue following his election as President. Herndon felt that the only way to rid the country of slavery was "through bloody revolution."Herndon claimed that through the whole of his partnership and friendship with Lincoln he was never invited to Lincoln's home due to his contentious relationship with Mary Todd Lincoln. He also admitted that his frustration with Lincoln's overly permissive parenting of his two younger sons, Willie and Tad, who he recalled as undisciplined and disruptive brats in the law offices caused some harsh words during their partnership.His final meeting with Lincoln occurred in 1862 when he visited Washington, D.C., hoping to secure a presidential appointment as postmaster for the brother of his second wife. Lincoln received him amicably but he was not invited into the family's private quarters in the White House due to the enmity of Mary Lincoln.(From Wikipedia)

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN and WILLIAM H. SEWARD Signed Appointment - Vice Consul of Russia

Lot 43: ABRAHAM LINCOLN and WILLIAM H. SEWARD Signed Appointment - Vice Consul of Russia

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Description: Autographs"Abraham Lincoln" & "William H. Seward" Signed Official Appointment for the United States "Vice Consul of Russia"ABRAHAM LINCOLN (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865). 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April of 1865.May 31, 1862-Dated Civil War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed "Abraham Lincoln" as President, and "William H. Seward" as Secretary of State, 1 page, measuring about 17.25" x 14.25" (Folio), at the City of Washington (DC), Very Fine. This particular Document is vastly more interesting than most, as it indirectly ties "William H. Seward" who acted as Secretary of State for both Presidents Abraham Lincoln and Andrew Johnson, to Russia, whom Seward would later purchase Alaska from in 1867.The Czarist government of Russia, which had established a presence in Alaska in the mid-18th century, first approached the United States about selling the Territory during the administration of President James Buchanan, but negotiations were stalled by the outbreak of the Civil War. After 1865, Seward, a supporter of territorial expansion, was eager to acquire the tremendous land mass of Alaska, an area roughly one-fifth the size of the rest of the United States.Lincoln signs this Document using his full rich brown ink signature, "Abraham Lincoln" which is flawlessly and beautifully written, measuring a large 3.25" long at the lower right. The embossed official white paper and red wax Seal of the United States is fully intact and well defined at the lower left. There are some scattered faint show-through from the blank verso from an ink smear, expected folds, plus some archival tape was added as fold and edge reinforcement previously on the blank reverse. All of the manuscript portions are very nicely written in large letters in bold brown and are easily readable. This important Document reads, in part:"ABRAHAM LINCOLN -- President of the Unites States of America -- To All Whom It May Concern --- Satisfactory evidence having been exhibited to me that Martin Klinkowstroem, has been appointed Vice Consul of Russia, for the Port of San Francisco, California; I do hereby recognize him as such, and declare him free to exercise and enjoy such functions, powers and privileges as are allowed to the Vice Consuls of the most favored Nations in the United States. -- (Signed) By the President, "Abraham Lincoln" -- (Countersigned) "William H. Seward," Secretary of State."Historically important, as on March 30th, 1867 United States Secretary of State, William H. Seward, Signs a Treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska for $7 million. Despite the "bargain" price of roughly two cents an acre, the Alaskan purchase was ridiculed in Congress and in the press as "Seward's Folly," "Seward's Icebox," and then President Andrew Johnson's "polar bear garden." (See even more in our online version.) Overall, an impressive "Abraham Lincoln" & "William H. Seward" Signed Official Appointment for the United States "Vice Consul of Russia that will be nice for display.U.S. Secretary of State William H. Seward signs a treaty with Russia for the purchase of Alaska for $7 million. Despite the bargain price of roughly two cents an acre, the Alaskan purchase was ridiculed in Congress and in the press as "Seward's folly," "Seward's icebox," and President Andrew Johnson's "polar bear garden."The Czarist government of Russia, which had established a presence in Alaska in the mid-18th century, first approached the United States about selling the territory during the administration of President James Buchanan, but negotiations were stalled by the outbreak of the Civil War. After 1865, Seward, a supporter of territorial expansion, was eager to acquire the tremendous landmass of Alaska, an area roughly one-fifth the size of the rest of the United States.He had some difficulty, however, making the case for the purchase of Alaska before the Senate, which ratified the treaty by a margin of just one vote on April 9, 1867. Six months later, Alaska was formally handed over from Russia to the United States. Despite a slow start in U.S. settlement, the discovery of gold in 1898 brought a rapid influx of people to the territory, and Alaska, rich in natural resources, has contributed to American prosperity ever since.

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ABRAHAM LINCOLN Authorizes & Signs - My Proclamation - August 18, 1864

Lot 44: ABRAHAM LINCOLN Authorizes & Signs - My Proclamation - August 18, 1864

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Description: Autographs"Abraham Lincoln" Authorizes & Signs "My Proclamation"ABRAHAM LINCOLN (February 12, 1809 - April 15, 1865). 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April of 1865.August 18, 1864-Dated Civil War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Abraham Lincoln" as President, 1 page (upon a folded 4 page sheet), measuring about 10" x 8" (Quarto), Washington (DC), Very Fine. Signed during the Civil War, Lincoln recognizes the Port of Newport, Vermont as a key point of commerce for trade between the United States and Canada. Minor outer edge tone from a prior display, somewhat light manuscript portions, nicely printed in black upon fine period wove light blue paper, overall in nice condition. The primary word "Proclamation," measuring a huge 4.5" long. Lincoln writes his full name for the signature, "Abraham Lincoln" which is well written in deeper brown ink and appears as the most prominent item upon the page, drawing one's eye immediately to it, measuring over 2.5" long. Docket on the blank reverse reads: "18th August, 1864." This Document reads, in full: "I hereby authorize and direct the Secretary of State to affix the Seal of the United States to my Proclamation, dated this day, and signed by me and for so doing this shall be his warrant. -- (Signed) "Abraham Lincoln" --- Washington, August 18,1864."The "Proclamation" specifically referred to in this Authorization Document was also issued on that same day of August 18, 1864. That Document recognizes the Port of Newport, Vermont, as "entitled to all the privileges in regard to the exportation of merchandise in bond to the British North American Provinces adjoining the United States...". Considered a part of the "Northeast Kingdom," the City of Newport sits on the southern edge of Lake Memphremagog. Its shared proximity to the Canadian border which actually bisects that lake, made it an important gateway for commerce between the U.S. and the Canadian Province of Quebec during the American Civil War Era and 19th century in general. Accompanied with a photocopy of the printed text of the "Proclamation".

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MARY TODD LINCOLN, Superb Framed Presentation Cut Signature

Lot 45: MARY TODD LINCOLN, Superb Framed Presentation Cut Signature

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Description: AutographsFramed Presentation Signature "Mrs A. Lincoln"MARY TODD LINCOLN (1818-1882). First Lady to President Abraham Lincoln.Superb Cut Signature, "Mrs A. Lincoln" written in rich brown ink, measuring 1" x 3.25" in an impressive professional framed display, Choice Near Mint. The Signature, has an Engraving of Mary Lincoln above, measuring 5.5" x 3.75" and an engraved brass biographical plaque below, measuring 3.5" x 5", all professionally double-matted and within a gold-gilt wooden frame to create the overall size of 19.5" x 11.5". The engraved brass plaque reads:"Mary Todd met Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, Illinois where he practiced law. In 1842, they were married. During her time in the White House, she received much criticism and saw the death of her son, Willie, in 1862. After her husband's death, Mary suffered mentally and fell into a deep depression and lived a life of poverty. The death of her other son, Tad, left a judge declaring her insane."This is a wonderful, apparently costly display, highlighting the rare signature "Mrs A. Lincoln". We sold this outstanding piece in our EAHA Auction of January 14, 2006 where it sold for $2,450 over half a decade ago. One of the finest quality signatures we have seen, and ready for hanging on prominent display.

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JOHN FRANCIS MERCER 1792 Autograph Letter Signed as US Congress Representative

Lot 46: JOHN FRANCIS MERCER 1792 Autograph Letter Signed as US Congress Representative

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Description: Autographs1792 "John F. Mercer" Autograph Letter Signed as U.S. Representative to Congress from MarylandJOHN FRANCIS MERCER (1759-1821). American Revolutionary War Officer who served as Lieutenant in the Third Virginia Regiment; promoted to Captain in 1777, and was Aide-de-camp to General Charles Lee in 1778 and 1779; Lieutenant Colonel of Virginia Cavalry; Delegate from Virginia to the Continental Congress 1783-1784; Governor of Maryland (1801-03).August 31, 1792-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "John F. Mercer" as U.S. Representative to Congress from Maryland, 1 page, measuring 9" x 7" at Strawberry Hill (Likely Creagerstown, Maryland - Strawberry Hill is a Georgian style farmhouse near Thurmont, Maryland, built in 1783), with Integral Postal Cover, Choice Very Fine. John Francis Mercer as Aide-de-camp to General Charles Lee, resigned after Lee's court martial, reentered the Virginia militia and served briefly under Lafayette in Virginia, and was at the Battle of Yorktown.This Letter to a "A. S. Ennals Esq." in Baltimore, regarding some hearths of "Dark Country Marble" which Mercer wanted to purchase. Docket on the reverse reads: " Colo. Mercer - Augst 31, 179- Hearth Stone." Inlaid to an outer paper border for display and reinforcement. Period notation to the right, written in deep brown as an apparent tribute and keepsake regarding Mercer. It reads: "Col. Mercer was an officer of the Army with Monroe was at the Seige of York - He was afterwards Memb. of Congress & Governor of Maryland - The letter is addressed to the sender."John Francis Mercer, (brother of James Mercer), a Delegate from Virginia and a Representative from Maryland; born at "Marlborough," Stafford County, Va., on May 17, 1759; after receiving his education at home from private teachers was graduated from the College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, Va., in 1775; studied law; was admitted to the bar and commenced practice in Williamsburg, Va., in 1781; during the Revolutionary War served as lieutenant in the Third Virginia Regiment; promoted to captain in 1777, and was aide-de-camp to Gen. Charles Lee in 1778 and 1779; lieutenant colonel of Virginia Cavalry; Delegate from Virginia to the Continental Congress 1783-1784; moved to West River, Anne Arundel County, Md.; delegate from Maryland to the Federal Convention in Philadelphia in 1787 but withdrew before signing the Constitution; delegate to the state convention which ratified the Federal Constitution in 1788; member of the state house of delegates in 1788, 1789, 1791, and 1792; elected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the Second Congress to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of William Pinkney; reelected as an Anti-Administration candidate to the Third Congress and served from February 5, 1792, until his resignation April 13, 1794; again a member of the state house of delegates in 1800 and 1803-1806; governor of Maryland 1801-1803; retired to his estate "Cedar Park," West River, Md.; died in Philadelphia, Pa., August 30, 1821; remains deposited in a vault at St. Peter's Church, Philadelphia, Pa.; subsequently interred in a private cemetery at "Cedar Park," West River, Anne Arundel County, Md.

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JAMES MONROE, Signed 1800 Virginia Military Appointment

Lot 47: JAMES MONROE, Signed 1800 Virginia Military Appointment

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Description: Autographs"JAMES MONROE" Signed Virginia Military AppointmentJAMES MONROE (1758-1831). 5th President of the United States. During the War of 1812, Monroe held the critical roles of both Secretary of State and the Secretary of War under President James Madison.July 29, 1800-Dated Federal Period, original Partly-Printed Document Signed, "Jas Monroe" as Governor of Virginia, at Richmond (VA.), 1 page, measuring 13.25" x 8", Very Fine. This being a very rare type Official Form, a Commission, Appointing Matthew Robertson a "Captain of a company in the First Battalion of the Thirty-Second Regiment, in the Seventh Brigade, and Third Division" of the Virginia Militia. Original laid period which has been folded for storage, its full official Paper and Wax Seal at lower left is fully intact. It is very well printed in black and remains clean overall with a very bold deep brown signature of James Monroe. Some original press text embossing remains within the paper and there is a short statement written upon the blank reverse. This is the very first of this historic Virginia Military form we have offered and looks quite impressive for display. It reads, in full:"At a Court held for Augusta County on Monday the 27th day of April 1801. Matthew Robertson presented in Court this Commission from his Excellency the Governor of Virginia, appointing him a Captain in the First Battalion and 32nd Regiment, and qualified thereto according to law. -- (Signed) Chesly Kinney, C.C. (Count Clerk). Also Signed on the lower central panel, "Matthew Robertson."

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JAMES MONROE, 1816-Dated, Document Signed Signed Check

Lot 48: JAMES MONROE, 1816-Dated, Document Signed Signed Check

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Description: AutographsRare 1816 Dated "JAMES MONROE" Signed CheckJAMES MONROE (1758-1831). 5th President of the United States. During the War of 1812, Monroe held the critical roles of both Secretary of State and the Secretary of War under President James Madison.October 21, 1816-Dated War of 1812 Era, Manuscript Document Signed, "Jas Monroe," while serving as Secretary of State under James Madison, being a Handwritten Check, Very Fine. This check made out on the Bank of Columbia, to pay "Mr Woodward" a sum of "one hundred & fifty dollars," fully written in James Monroe's own hand, measuring 4.75" x 4" with a standard cut cancel at center located to the left of the signature and not touching the signature. Docket on the reverse "Timothy Woodward - No. 3" as Cashier. James Monroe's brown signature measures nearly 2" long. A very scarce signed check, written upon period wove paper, drawn upon one of the very earliest, most prominent Banks in America.

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Signer ROBERT MORRIS, 1795 Signed North American Land Company Stock Certificate

Lot 49: Signer ROBERT MORRIS, 1795 Signed North American Land Company Stock Certificate

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Description: AutographsFinancier of the American Revolution 1795 "Robt Morris" Signed Stock Certificate as President of the North American Land Company, PhiladelphiaROBERT MORRIS, Signer to the United States Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the United States Constitution, Financier of the American Revolution. March 10, 1795, Partly-Printed Document Signed, "Robt Morris," as President of the North American Land Company, Philadelphia, 1 page, on laid watermarked paper measuring 9.75" x 12.75", Choice Crisp About New. Countersigned by James Marshall (Morris' son-in-law, and brother of Chief Justice John Marshall). This magnificent looking Document has a scalloped left edge, and is a stock certificate of the North American Land Company, for twenty-five shares in the name of Sylvanus Bourne. Morris' large 2.75" long, extremely bold brown signature is found at lower right with a fine manuscript cancel with document is fresh and clean with some light creases. A beautiful specimen that is perfect for framing or display.April 18, 1795-Dated, Ornate Partially-Printed Document Signed, "Rob. Morris," as Company President, Philadelphia, PA, large size 10" x 12.25" Share Certificate on beautiful laid watermarked "HS - SANDYRUN" laid period paper, Choice Extremely Fine+. This bold brown signature is on this very low Certificate number 178. The document reads, in full:"This is to Certify that Sylvanus Bourne is entitled to 25 Shares in the entire Property of the North American Land Company; the Dividend whereof shall not be less than Six Dollars on each Share Annually, conformably to Articles of Agreement Daily Executed: dated at Philadelphia the twentieth day of February 1795. Transferable only at the Company's Office in that City by the Owner in Person or by his Executor, Administrator, Attorney, or Legal Representative. Signed in the presence and by Order of the Board of Managers at Philadelphia this eighteenth day of April One thousand seven hundred and ninety five. "James Marshall," Secretary; "Rob. Morris President."Sylvanus Bourne (1761 - 1817) was a Massachusetts businessman and United States Consul in Santo Domingo (1790-1791) and in Amsterdam, the Netherlands (1794-1817). Drafts and photocopies of Bourne's personal and diplomatic correspondence, business and commercial papers, a scrapbook, and account books. Consists primarily of correspondence relating to commerce between the United States and European countries, primarily France and Great Britain, and United States foreign relations and politics. Other material concerns Bourne's business in Massachusetts and the Bourne family are part of the Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, in Washington, D.C.. The collection also includes family correspondence and a scrapbook with material relating to Thomas Jefferson, Tobias Lear, and George Washington.Robert Morris arranged for financing supplies for Washington and his troops, was a member of the Continental Congress, a Signer of the Declaration of Independence, founder and organizer of the Bank of North America, delegate to the Constitutional Congress, and U.S. senator from Pennsylvania. He and his partners speculated heavily in Western lands, believing that Europeans fleeing revolutions would buy, but this did not happen. A minor creditor had Morris arrested and he spent 3-1/2 years in "Prune Street," the debtor's prison. He was released in 1801 with the passage of the national bankruptcy law, but died in poverty and obscurity.

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SAMUEL F. B. MORSE, American Inventor 1861 Civil War Date Autograph Letter

Lot 50: SAMUEL F. B. MORSE, American Inventor 1861 Civil War Date Autograph Letter

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Description: Autographs1861 Civil War Date Samuel F.B. Morse Autograph LetterSAMUEL F. B. MORSE, American Inventor who Developed Telegraphy and the "Morse Code".December 31, 1861-Dated Civil War Period, Manuscript Letter Signed, "Saml. F.B. Morse" seven-lines, measuring 8" x 5" and addresses the lecture committee of the Mercantile Library Association, Washington, D.C., Choice Extremely Fine. Here, Morse is accepting his invitation to an address to be delivered by the famous Civil War Era politician Edward Everett, boldly Signed, "Saml. F. B. Morse" on the last day of the 1861, during the Civil War and is even more historic and valuable, as such.

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