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Auction Description for Profiles in History: Historical Documents Auction 63

Historical Documents Auction 63

(407 Lots)

by Profiles in History


407 lots with images

June 13, 2014

Live Auction

26662 Agoura Rd

Calabasas, CA, 91302 USA

Phone: 310-859-7701

Email: info@profilesinhistory.com

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Adams, John. Extraordinary letter signed (

Lot 1: Adams, John. Extraordinary letter signed ("John Adams") as President; 5 July 1798.

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Description: 1. Adams, John. Extraordinary letter signed (“John Adams”) as President, 2 pages (8 x 9.8 in.; 203 x 249 mm.), Philadelphia, 5 July 1798, To the Inhabitants of the Town of Canonsborough and its Vicinity in the County of Washington & State of Pennsylvania. Exhibits toning; nearly separated above horizontal fold with .5-inch diagonal separation from fold intersection.With America facing war with France following the XYZ Affair, President John Adams hopes to unite the division among its citizens.I regret with you that any circumstances should have given a foreign Government ground to believe, that when the safety of the Government, Liberty, Independence and Prosperity of the United States are menaced there can be a division of opinion among the people of America… It is not unnatural therefore for them to conclude that a free Republican Government can never stand against their policy and Power – It is our duty in America to convince them of their Error. Adams writes in full: Gentlemen A respectful address to the President, Senate and House of Representatives, subscribed by a respectful number of your Names, has been presented to me by the Honorable Alexander Addison Esquire. I regret with you that any circumstances should have given a foreign Government ground to believe, that when the safety of the Government, Liberty, Independence and Prosperity of the United States are menaced there can be a division of opinion among the people of America – this is not however surprizing [sic]; that Government experiences divisions among their own people which it has been able to control only with the Guillotine and Cayenne – In Poland, Geneva, Switzerland, Venice, Genoa, in short in every Republic in Europe, they have seen such divisions, as have ended in partition, dissolution or subjugation – It is not unnatural therefore for them to conclude that a free Republican Government can never stand against their policy and Power – It is our duty in America to convince them of their Error. John AdamsAn American diplomatic commission was sent to France in July 1797 to negotiate problems that were threatening to break out into war. The diplomats, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, John Marshall and Elbridge Gerry were approached through informal channels by agents of the French Foreign Minister Talleyrand, who demanded bribes and a loan before formal negotiations could begin. The Adams administration released documents substituting the letters X, Y and Z for the names of French diplomats, hence, the label XYZ Affair. Although such demands were not uncommon in mainland European diplomacy of the time, the Americans were offended by them, and eventually left France without ever engaging in formal negotiations. Gerry, seeking to avoid all-out war, remained for several months after the other two commissioners left. His exchanges with Talleyrand laid groundwork for the eventual end to diplomatic and military hostilities.The failure of the commission caused a political firestorm in the United States when the commission’s dispatches were published. Although a formal declaration of war was scrupulously avoided, all preliminary arrangements for military action were made, including the reactivation of George Washington to head the enlarged provisional army (3 July), and the passage of the Alien and Sedition Acts (July 6 and 14). Amid this legislative turmoil, Adams found time to respond to the expressions of local sentiment, which were inundating his office from all areas of the country. The present letter is his response to the “respectful address” from “The Inhabitants of the Town of Canonsborough, State of Pennsylvania.” The French soon adopted a conciliatory posture, fearful of a possible Anglo-American alliance and preoccupied by Napoleon’s dream of a colonial empire. Adams reciprocated by appointing a diplomatic mission which negotiated the Convention of 1800, following Napoleon’s victory at Marengo. Excellent letter exhibiting Adams’ keen diplomatic skills amidst the greatest crisis that would last for the duration of his Presidential term. $20,000 - $30,000

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Adams, John. Letter signed (

Lot 2: Adams, John. Letter signed ("John Adams") as President, 1 page. 30 January 1801, to Honble.

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Description: 2. Adams, John. Letter signed (“John Adams”) as President, 1 page (8 x 9.75 in.; 203 x 248 mm.), [Washington, D.C.], 30 January 1801, to Honble. Theodore Foster, Esqr. Senator for the State of Rhode Island, boldly headed To the Senators of the United States respectively. Mounting remnants on top edge; paper loss over “Wednes” of “Wednesday.” Jefferson or Burr? Defeated in the General Election, Adams asks a Federalist Senator to remain in the capital until the new President [Thomas Jefferson] is chosen and inaugurated.Adams writes in full: Sir, It appearing to me proper and necessary for the service that the Senate of the United States should be convened on Wednesday the 4th of March of the next, you are desired to attend in the chamber of the Senate on that day at 10 o’clock in the forenoon to receive and act upon any communication which the President of the United States may then lay before you, touching their interests, and to do and consider all other things which may be proper and necessary for the Public service for the Senate to do and consider.” [signed] John Adams President of the U. StatesThe election of 1800 “stands almost alone in United States history as a drama with the fate of the Constitution at stake” (Bernard A. Weisberger, America Afire: Jefferson, Adams and the First Contested Election, p. 299). The election exposed a serious flaw in the Constitution. According to the Constitution, electors could only vote for President, each elector could vote for two candidates, and the Vice President was the person who received the second largest number of votes during the election. Because both Burr and Jefferson had received 73 electoral votes, and Burr refused to concede that his votes had been intended to elect him Vice President, it became, constitutionally, the task of the House of Representatives to choose between them. The unprecedented balloting began on 11 February and continued through 36 ballots before Jefferson was finally chosen on 17 February. Here, rather formally, Adams writes to a Federalist Senator requesting he remain in the Senate on the day of the inauguration of the new President – whether Burr or Jefferson.The aftermath of the 1800 election resulted in the passage of the Twelfth Amendment in 1804 requiring that electors vote specifically for the offices of President and Vice President. It also marked the last time an incumbent Federalist engaged himself in a contest for the presidency. Small chip to right margin repaired on the verso, two words carefully corrected by the clerk (to change the date), leaving a small hole in the sheet; otherwise, fine condition. No other letter of Adams as lame-duck President during the 1801 electoral stalemate has been offered at auction for 30 years. $6,000 - $8,000

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Adams, John. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 3: Adams, John. Autograph letter signed ("John Adams"), 2 pages, 23 February 1814.

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Description: 3. Adams, John. Autograph letter signed (“John Adams”), 2 pages (7.6 x 9.25 in.; 193 x 235 mm.), 23 February 1814, Quincy, Massachusetts, to William Adams, Esq., of Chelmsford, Mass., a town some 45 miles northwest of Quincy, near Lowell. Some bleed-through; overall, in good condition with minor age toning.Former President John Adams traces his family history back six generations to 1680!My Father was John Adams, who died in 1761, his Father was Joseph Adams who died in 1737, his Grandfather was Joseph Adams who died at advanced Age about 1680, his great Grandfather was Henry Adams who came from England with Eight Sons…Adams pens in full: Sir My late Neighbour, Mr. Caleb Hayden has presented me in your Name some handsome wheat of the growth of your Estate, and pray you to accept my best Thanks. If I live, I shall cultivate this wheat by way of experiment, according to the best of my knowledge, but have very little confidence in any skill in this Neighborhood in this kind of village. How is it that Quincy and Chelmesford should be Rivals? We thought ours was possession of the richest granite in the Country till you ‘drove us out of date.’ But enough of this. As I claim a relation of consanguinity to you, though it must be somewhat remote I should be glad to be informed of its degree. My Father was John Adams, who died in 1761, his Father was Joseph Adams who died in 1737, his Grandfather was Joseph Adams who died at advanced Age about 1680, his great Grandfather was Henry Adams who came from England with Eight Sons, one of whom returned to England, two of whom went to Chelmesford, four of whom went to Midfield, and Joseph the eldest alone remained with his Father in Quincy then called Mount Wollaston, I, the fifth generation am soon to be buried, with the four that preceded me, in this Town where I have already buried the Sixth and Seventh generation before me. Will you be so good as to inform me whether there are any Records of your Town, Precinct, Parish or Church, or any Family Deeds, Wills Contracts or traditions by which it can be ascertained. What were the Names of the two Brothers who went from Mount Wollaston or Braintree to Chelmesford, who built the first Church and the first Mills in that Town, and the date of the Erection of those Buildings? Twenty Eight years are too great an Age for Travel. Other wise I would make you a visit. You are young enough to travel with ease and pleasure. I should be happy to receive a Visit from you, and talk over all we know of Family Antiquities. I am, Sir, very respectfully your Relation And obliged humble Servant John AdamsThe first Adams ancestor to arrive in the colonies was his great-great-grandfather Henry Adams, a farmer and brewer, who left Somersetshire, England, with his wife, Edith Squire Adams, and some nine children to settle in Braintree, Mass, by 1640. $6,000 - $8,000

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Adams, John Quincy. Presentation copy of his Eulogy on James Monroe signed (

Lot 4: Adams, John Quincy. Presentation copy of his Eulogy on James Monroe signed ("J.Q. Adams").

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Description: 4. Adams, John Quincy. Presentation copy of his Eulogy on James Monroe signed (“J.Q. Adams”), Boston: J.H. Eastburn, City Printer, 1831, 100 pp. (6.25 x 9.5 in.; 159 x 241 mm.) The full title is Mr. Adams’s Eulogy on the Life and Character of James Monroe, Fifth President of the United States. Delivered at the Request of the Corporation of the City of Boston, on the 25th of August, 1831. By John Quincy Adams. Inscribed by Adams on the front wrapper, Dr. David Hosack With the Respects of J. Q. Adams. Separations on the original wrappers with scattered foxing. Housed in a custom linen slipcase. John Quincy Adams’ greatest diplomatic service was his role as Secretary of State during James Monroe’s two terms as President. In that role, Adams suggested and outlined the Monroe Doctrine, establishing one of the major foundations of all future American foreign policy. Adams’ views concerning territorial expansion guided President Monroe’s policies, including Adams’ brilliant diplomacy with Spain which led to the Adams-Onís Treaty of 1819 which was largely responsible for the acquisition of Florida and the U.S. assumption of Spain’s claim to the Oregon country. $3,000 - $5,000

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Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 5: Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed ("John Quincy Adams"), 19 December 1842.

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Description: 5. Adams, John Quincy. Autograph letter signed (“John Quincy Adams”), as U.S. Representative from Massachusetts, 1 page (7.8 x 9.8 in.; 198 x 249 mm.), Washington, 19 December 1842, to the gentlemen of the Committee of the New England Society: Thomas Fessenden, Edward J. Gould, Lyman Draper, Edmund Coffin, and Elijah H. Kimball. Slight soiling; edges tipped to another border.“The Plymouth rock – reposing on the rock of ages – Fire Water and Acid proof”Adams writes in full: Fellow Citizens, My attendance on public duties assigned to me by the children of those pilgrims who in 1620 landed upon that wilderness, which they taught to blossom like the rose, deprives me of the pleasure, which your kind and cordial invitation tenders me, of writing with you, in that form of devotion to their memory and of reverence for their character which blends the generous dispensation of the hospitable board, with the enjoyment of convivial festivity. Gladly would I share it with you and propose as a sentiment congenial to the spirit of the day. The Plymouth rock – reposing on the rock of ages – Fire Water and Acid proof. Respectfully, your friend and fellow Citizen John Quincy Adams.Stirring content from the 6th President of the U.S., paying homage to our forbears, the Mayflower pilgrims. $800 - $1,200

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Allen, Ethan. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 6: Allen, Ethan. Autograph letter signed ("Ethan Allen"), 3 pages, 30 April 1786.

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Description: 6. Allen, Ethan. Autograph letter signed (“Ethan Allen”), 3 pages (7.5 x 12 in.; 190 x 304 mm.), front and verso on 2 conjoined sheets, Wyoming [Valley, Pennsylvania], 30 April 1786, addressed by Allen to Matthew Griswold, Governor of Connecticut. The address leaf is also free franked by him, “E Allen”, a unique example, by our records. No postal markings. In the philatelic world, this frank could carry more value than a superb Benjamin Franklin free frank, of which there are many. Fine condition.One of the finest letters of Ethan Allen extant. The great general’s last hurrah, defending the Connecticut-based owners of the Susquehanna Company for their land based in the Wyoming Valley. I arrived to the hostile grounds and found a territory which has been distressed by Britons, Tories, Savages, and the more Savage and avaricious land-jobbers.The letter concerns the troubles in the settlements of the Susquehanna Company in the northern part of Pennsylvania, which was inhabited by settlers from Connecticut. The Wyoming Valley is an area that is now Wilkes-Barre. The area was also claimed by Pennsylvania, who ignored the Connecticut titles. In Allen’s last hurrah, he went to the area, being promised land and stirred up not only the Pennsylvanians, but his long-time nemesis, Governor Clinton of New York, by proposing that a new State be carved out of the area, and include several counties of New York. Allen’s presence undoubtedly contributed to the resolution, when Pennsylvania finally agreed to honor Connecticut’s claims. At this exact time, Allen was involved in another challenge to our infant nation, in that he was approached by Daniel Shays of Shays Rebellion. Although he was offered to become “King of Massachusetts”, Allen dismissed Shays as an opportunist. Allen writes in full: Sir, the 28th instant. I arrived to the Hostile ground and found a territory which has been distressed by Britons, Tories, Savages, and the more Savage and avaricious land-jobbers. (I had almost said Government) of Pennsylvania. Every exertion of government in the consequences has hitherto been attended with cruelties and injustice, every similar to the cruelties perpetrated by the Spaniards towards the Peruvian Indians, or that of the British in the East Indies towards the natives. Law, order and Government are the Hobby Horses of the Pennsylvanians with which they alias their land schemers, design to dispossess the Connecticut settlers, and obtain and assimilate to themselves their lands and labours. The Congressional decree of Trentown, has put it into their power, legally speaking to denominate every noble exertion of the Inhabitants to maintain their rightful possessions to be criminal, licentious, and disorderly, although in the reason and fitness of things, the alteration of Jurisdiciton does not at all alter or transfer the property of the subject to others. By threats, intrigues and arms, our opponents are striving to evail themselves of this rich and fertile country which we purchased of the aboriginals, and of Connecticut, whose Charter in express words covers it, and have been in the occupancy of it twenty six years last past, defended it through the late revolution, at the expense of the blood of the principal part of our inhabitants, and the buildings and the movable estate of the whole settlement, in all which conflicts we were a frontear barrier to Pennsylvania, but notwithstanding all this, such a handle is made by the Jurisdictional decree of Trentown, as to leave us no alternative (in the enjoyment of our lands and labours) but to defend our Persons and Possessions by force Arms which the Government of Pennsylvania call high treason against the State, and we are apprehensive that the procuring to the Trentown decree was much of a piece with the intrigues we have experienced.In the month of August 1784 a detachment of armed troops under the command of Col. Armstrong the then Secretary of the State was sent by Government to Wyoming as he and the Sheriff and Sundry other leading men of the Government gave out, to quiet a disturbance there subsisting, and a parley between them and the Inhabitants who were also under arms ensued in which it was agreed that hostilities should cease on both sides and that the inhabitants would in future submit and demean themselves conformably to the Laws and Government of Pennsylvania in consequence whereof the inhabitants (by an agreement) grounded their arms, and Col. Armstrong’s detachment took possession of them and have detained them to this day, and at the same time demanded the armless and indiscreet inhabitants to surrender themselves prisoner or they would shoot them dead, which they were obliged to do, upon which they were loaded with irons, taken to gaol and tried for high Treason, but acquitted by the Jury. Your Excellency will readily perceive what a thraldom of perplexity, and evil, the decision of Trentown has thrown us into. By the specious pretext of Law we must give up our lands and labours to our opponents, which if we oppose we are charged with high treason. We are however determined to defend our possessions and persons at all Events. We hear that a Mr. Arnold, one of the members of the Congressional Court, has given such intelligence to the Government of Connecticut respecting the tryal, that they are about to exhibit to Congress reasons for a new tryal, and hope it may be true, pray consider that notwithstanding the decree of Trentown we are your distressed children and hope and Expect the aid and protection of your Government as far as possible. I am, Sir, your Excellency’s most obedient Humble Serv’t [signed] Ethan Allen.This letter is ex-Oliver Barrett, and has not seen the light of day for 60 years. It is by far the finest letter that has ever come to market of this great Patriot. Recently at Swann Auction, a mere DS of Colonial date, and with condition problems, fetched nearly $60,000. Over 20 years ago, a letter sold at Christie’s with nice content (not as good as the one offered here) for well over $40,000. $30,000 - $50,000

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Ali, Muhammad. (47) Rare and historic handwritten lined speech index cards (unsigned).

Lot 7: Ali, Muhammad. (47) Rare and historic handwritten lined speech index cards (unsigned).

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Description: 7. Ali, Muhammad. (47) Rare and historic handwritten (8 x 5 in.; 203 x 127 mm.) lined speech index cards (unsigned) from 3-time boxing heavyweight champion. Handwritten in black ink (with some punctuation added in blue ink) from the late 1960s when Ali was speaking at schools and colleges during his ban from professional boxing. Most cards have a sequential number written or written and circled in the upper right hand corner. Exhibiting wear from age and handling. Bumped corners. In good legible condition.Incredible set of (47) handwritten speech note cards by Muhammad Ali – his master presentation of the teachings of Elijah Muhammad for his lecture tour of schools and colleges in the late 1960s when he was barred from boxing.Ali has written in part (excerpts with misspellings uncorrected): The white man is trying to build up every excutse against the Muslims to charge us with hate and violents, or perpareing for war against the (symbol) White Man. This is lies, and a bould lie... The white race know that god wants the negro to be free. And everything they can do to oppose it they will try to do it…The Muslims are not going to do anything than what we are doing./ and that is trying to deliver the truth to our people the negroes./ and teach them that they are Muslim by nature.We live here only with the white man of America./ and we have been here for 400 years,/ and they say that we are free,/ but yet they keep us from Exercising the rights as equals or a free people, this the Hon Elijah Muhammad wants you and I to know and the white people understand today, we are tired of suffering – brutality Beating’s killing’s “why” just because the white man don’t like us. And absolutely hate us. And absolutely knowing that we have nothing to fight back with. Knowing that they have all the odds against us./ they the white race are absolutely the boss/ and we the poor so called negro are asking to leave them. We can be peaceful all day and all night, after a while that worries them. They will send someone around to see what is going on over there in that house. This is why we want to separate from a people like the white race…These master presentation cards represent the most complete and complex Ali material we have ever encountered. They represent his opinions on his Muslim faith, race relations and life itself. Ali did not fight from March 1967 through October 1970 due to his refusal to be inducted into the armed forces. During that time he was systematically denied a boxing license in every state and stripped of his passport. During this time of inactivity, as opposition to the Vietnam War began to grow and Ali’s stance gained sympathy, he spoke at colleges across the nation, criticizing the war and advocating African American pride and racial justice.Born Cassius Clay in Louisville, Kentucky, he won a gold medal as a lightweight at the 1960 Olympics and earned a reputation for his flamboyance and self-promotion. In 1963, he upset Sonny Liston for the title. The next day, he announced his conversion to Islam and changed his name to Muhammad Ali. Convicted of draft evasion, he was stripped of his title in 1967 but regained it in 1974. He lost it four years later to Leon Spinks, who he defeated seven months later, becoming the only three time champion. $8,000 - $12,000

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Anderson, Robert. Autograph statement on the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter signed (

Lot 8: Anderson, Robert. Autograph statement on the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter signed ("Robert Anderson").

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Description: 8. Anderson, Robert. Autograph statement on the Bombardment of Ft. Sumter signed (“Robert Anderson”), 1 page (4.5 x 7.1 in.; 114 x 180 mm.), no place or date. Extended margins with soiling on edges and mounting remnants on verso. Anderson writes in full: The bombardment of Fort Sumter commenced at 3 ½ am. Apl. 12. 1861 & that work was evacuated in the afternoon of Apl. 14th / 61 Yours Respectfully Robert Anderson U.S. Army Accompanied by a Robert Anderson Autograph letter signed, 1 page (5 x 7.5 in.; 127 x 190 mm.), Fort Sumter, S.C., 24 January 1861, to John M. Burt. Fine. Anderson writes in full: Sir. Thanking you for the compliment, you pay me, in your favor of the 17th inst. I am very truly yours Robert Anderson Major USA.On 20 November 1860, at the request of Southern members of Congress, Secretary of War Floyd sent Robert Anderson (then a Major, having been promoted in 1857) to take over the command of the three forts in Charleston Harbor, S. C. (only one of which – Fort Moultrie – was garrisoned) when secession became imminent. Evidently, Floyd supposed that Anderson’s Kentucky background would render him faithful to the Southern cause. However, Anderson’s fidelity to the Union resulted in one of the most dramatic episodes of the entire Civil War - the defense of Fort Sumter during its lengthy bombardment. For five weeks after his appointment, Anderson called upon the War Department for reinforcements, but no assistance in men or munitions was provided. After South Carolina passed the ordinance of secession (20 December 1857), Anderson secretly spiked the guns at Fort Moultrie and shifted its garrison to Fort Sumter, which (due to its location on a shoal in the harbor) could not be approached by land. Reinforcements arrived on the Star of the West (9 January 1861), but enemy gunfire (without support from Anderson’s garrison in Fort Sumter) forced it to turn back. Confronted with a formal demand to surrender his post, he defended the fort against a bombardment that lasted nearly 34 hours until surrender was his only available course of action (April 14, 1861). $2,000 - $3,000

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Armstrong, Neil. Exceedingly rare early autograph letter signed (

Lot 9: Armstrong, Neil. Exceedingly rare early autograph letter signed ("Neil Armstrong") 1 page.

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Description: 9. Armstrong, Neil. Exceedingly rare early autograph letter signed (“Neil Armstrong”) 1 page (5.25 x 8 in.; 133 x 203 mm.), Houston, Texas, no date, to “Mrs. Wilson”. On watermarked NASA stationery. Lightly creased at top. Fine condition.Armstrong writes in full: Dear Mrs. Wilson – Thank you very much for your letter and the clan information. I will forward it to my mother whom maintains the family genealogy. I’m sure she will find it of interest as I have. Sincere Best Wishes – Neil Armstrong.Neil Armstrong became an astronaut in 1962. In July 1970, he was appointed Deputy Associate Administrator for Aeronautics in Washington and resigned from NASA in September 1971 to become Professor of Aerospace Engineering at the University of Cincinnati. $4,000 - $6,000

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Armstrong, Neil. Menu signed (

Lot 10: Armstrong, Neil. Menu signed ("Neil Armstrong Apollo 11") on the front, no date (circa June, 1970).

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Description: 10. Armstrong, Neil. Menu signed (“Neil Armstrong Apollo 11”) on the front, no date (circa June, 1970), signed in flight on the maiden voyage of Alitalia’s 747-100 named “Neil Armstrong”, which left from Tripoli, Italy. The attractive four-page menu (6.75” x 9.5 in.; 171 x 241), is heavy stock paper depicting a color image of the Greek celestrial map “Hemisphaerium Australe” with a spectacular Armstrong signature in bold blue ink. The signature was obtained by a young girl who was on that historic maiden flight. Her father encouraged her to request Armstrong’s autograph, and he complied. Fine. $1,500 - $2,000

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Historic oversize NASA color photograph signed (

Lot 11: Historic oversize NASA color photograph signed ("Neil Armstrong", "M. Collins" and "Buzz Aldrin")

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Description: 11. Apollo 11 Mission. Historic oversize NASA color photograph signed (“Neil Armstrong”, “M. Collins” and “Buzz Aldrin”) on the (16 x 20 in.; 406 x 508 mm.) photographer’s matt. The (10.75 x 13.75 in.; 273 x 349 mm.) color photograph of Buzz Aldrin was taken by Neil Armstrong on 20 July 1969, the day Apollo 11 landed on the Moon. NASA described the historic moment: “Astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module pilot of the first lunar landing mission, poses for a photograph during an Apollo 11 Extravehicular Activity (EVA) on the lunar surface, and the footprints of the astronauts are clearly visible in the soil of the Moon. Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, took this picture with a 70mm Hasselblad lunar surface camera. While Astronauts Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM, the ‘Eagle,’ to explore the Sea of Tranquility region of the Moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Module (CSM) ‘Columbia’ in lunar-orbit.” A magnificent and historic display piece. Light toning on matt. Housed in a custom archival frame. $2,000 - $3,000

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Armstrong, Neil. NASA photograph signed (

Lot 12: Armstrong, Neil. NASA photograph signed ("Neil Armstrong"), color (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.)

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Description: 12. Armstrong, Neil. NASA photograph signed (“Neil Armstrong”), color (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.) Captioned in narrow lower margin “Neil A. Armstrong.” Tiny nick on image, mounting remnants on verso, pinholes at blank corners; otherwise, fine condition.This NASA image was taken on 1 July 1969, 20 days before Neil Armstrong became the first to walk on the Moon. NASA caption on verso: “Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong was named by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration as the prime crew commander of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. He was one of nine astronauts selected by NASA in September, 1962.” $2,000 - $3,000

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Baker, Josephine. Extraordinary photograph signed (

Lot 13: Baker, Josephine. Extraordinary photograph signed ("Josephine Baker"), of Baker in costume.

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Description: 13. Baker, Josephine. Extraordinary photograph signed (“Josephine Baker”), a beautiful (8.5 x 10.6 in.; 216 x 269 mm.) black & white photograph of Baker in costume as “Dora” in the 1934 production of La Créole. In bold ink, Baker has inscribed on the image, “ A Mr. Michel Breuil En Souvenir de Josephine Baker 1935” Imprinted at the bottom of the photograph is “Joséphine Baker dans ‘La Créole’”. In fine condition. $1,500 - $2,000

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[Astronomy]. Airy, George Biddell. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 14: [Astronomy]. Airy, George Biddell. Autograph letter signed ("G.B. Airy"), 3 pages, 5 July 1860.

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Description: 14. [Astronomy]. Airy, George Biddell. Autograph letter signed (“G.B. Airy”), 3 pages (4.75 x 7.5 in.; 120 x 190 mm.), Greenwich, London, 5 July 1860, on “Royal Observatory, Greenwich, London, S.E.” letterhead stationery, written to Major Tennant. Separation and toning at the vertical fold.Important Astronomy letter of famed Royal Observatory Astronomer G.B. Airy.Your clear view of the mottling of the Sun’s disk is a certain sign that you saw it very well. The Galvanic storm was observed here in great force. I believe that here also the force of the earth was diminished. It is to be desired that the Telegraph Clerks should record the times, directions and magnitudes, of the disturbances of their needles.Airy writes in full: Dear Sir, I am obliged to reply in extreme haste to your letters of March 23 and April 12, which I have been compelled to put off till I am just starting for the total eclipse of the sun. (I will mention that, if you would write successive short letters, I could probably attend to everyone with little delay.) Your note about Lescashault sent to R. Astronomical Society. Your clear view of the mottling of the Sun’s disk is a certain sign that you saw it very well. The Galvanic storm was observed here in great force. I believe that here also the force of the earth was diminished. It is to be desired that the Telegraph Clerks should record the times, directions and magnitudes, of the disturbances of their needles. Your reports on Equatorial, Refraction, Tables and transit Circle, though not perfectly satisfactory, are very interesting. There can be no doubt of the good policy of your removing a microscope from the range of lamp-heat: and I think that your general policy of using 5 microscopes (as certainly not used in the original division) is good. But I am led, by my own examination, to have great trust in Simms’ dividing engine. (Simms died a few weeks ago, I think his son will prove an able man). I cannot tell you how difficult, or rather how impossible, it is, to learn anything about the silk for the magnets. I never had any of Sabine’s mountings, there is no person in London who has used them; and Sabine himself professes to know nothing or remember nothing about them. Surely you could find silk in India (the fibres in the first process of union by the manufacturer). In regard to photography, probably you will have no difficulty when you have discovered the proper rules; but these rules must be different from ours. A temperature of 80 or 90 makes our ordinary photographing impracticable. I have never found change of illumination error from change of illumination. The application of the heat of a lamp may doubtless have some effect: and a small effect may be produced by illuminating one side of a wire rather than another. I am, dear sir, very faithfully yours, G.B. Airy. Sir George Biddell Airy (1801 – 1892) English scientist who was astronomer royal from 1835 to 1881. Airy graduated from Trijity College, Cambridge in 1823. He became Lucasian professor of mathematics at Cambridge in 1826 and Plumian professor of astronomy and director of the Cambridge observatory in 1828. In 1835 he was appointed the seventh astronomer royal, i.e., director of the Royal Greenwich Observatory, a post he would hold for more than 45 years.Airy completely reorganized the Greenwich observatory, installing new apparatus and rescuing thousands of lunar observations from oblivion. Most importantly, he modernized the observatory’s system for making extremely precise observations of stellar positions. He wielded great power within the British scientific community, and he opposed government support of pure science, arguing that original research was best left to private individuals and institutions.This letter was purchased in 1950 from the Carnegie bookshop. $600 - $800

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Begin, Menachem. Autograph manuscript signed (

Lot 15: Begin, Menachem. Autograph manuscript signed ("M. Begin"), in Hebrew, 3 separate pages.

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Description: 15. Begin, Menachem. Autograph manuscript signed (“M. Begin”), in Hebrew, 3 separate pages (5 x 7 in.; 127 x 177 mm.), Israel, 1951. Headed “Goodbye and Not to See You Again”. Heavily edited by Begin. In fine condition.Outstanding handwritten and signed final draft of an early original speech of future Prime Minister Menachem Begin, then leader of the opposition Herut party, urging defeat of Ben-Gurion’s Mapai party in the election of the second Knesset, referring to “Ben-Gurion’s disturbed soul…Ben-Gurion claims: there is no solid government unless it is my party – Mapai…”Begin writes in part: In [Ben-Gurion’s] eyes there is no stable government unless it is his government! It seems that Mr. Ben-Gurion thinks about two possibilities. One is … Ben-Gurion submits his letter of resignation to the President; the President accepts his resignation but at the same time reaches the conclusion that there is no other Prime Minister except for the one that has just resigned, and Mr. Ben-Gurion who resigned continues ‘to fulfil his role.’ Till when?...The second option which is imagined in Mr. Ben-Gurion’s disturbed soul is new elections … if in the second Knesset there is no ‘solid majority’ about which Mr. Ben-Gurion thinks, it is possible that he will propose to turn again to the voter, until … the voter is tired and says ‘let it be, we would rather have Mapai as a ruling party than have new and unexpected elections’ … Mapai destroyed the economy … If the nation wants to end the aggressive demoralization, it has to overcome Ben-Gurion’s accusations. The voter has to make sure that it will be possible to assemble a government without Mapai … Ben-Gurion claims: there is no solid government unless it is my party – Mapai – who rules but the truth is that stability will only be reached without Mapai. To Mapai: ‘No and Goodbye and Not to See You Again’The election of the second Knesset was held on 30 July 1951. Mapai won 45 seats (37.3%) and formed a coalition government as they had done in the first Knesset. Ben-Gurion continued as Prime Minister. Begin served in the first 10 Knessets and as Prime Minister from 1977-83, the first government formed by a party other than Ben-Gurion’s. $8,000 - $12,000

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Beethoven, Ludwig van. Important autograph letter signed (

Lot 16: Beethoven, Ludwig van. Important autograph letter signed ("Ludwig van Beethoven"), in German.

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Description: 16. Beethoven, Ludwig van. Important autograph letter signed (“Ludwig van Beethoven”), in German, 2 pages (7.4 x 8.75 in.; 188 x 222 mm.), [Vienna], 4 May 1806, to Baron Peter von Braun, court banker and theater director. In extraordinary condition with bright text; address overleaf exhibits minor paper loss; red wax seal with Beethoven’s imprint still mostly intact.During one of the famous revisions to his only opera, Fidelio, Beethoven writes court theater director Baron Peter von Braun a conciliatory request after arguing over royalties.Please be so kind as to let me have just a few words in your handwriting, stating that you grant me the permission to have the following parts of my opera fetched from the Chancery of the Wiedner Theatre, namely, the first flute, the three trombones and the four horn parts…Prince Lobkowitz is thinking of having a performance of the opera at his palace and has asked me for the score… Beethoven writes in full: Vienna, 4 May 1806Most Highly Born and Worthy Baron!Please be so kind as to let me have just a few words in your handwriting, stating that you grant me the permission to have the following parts of my opera fetched from the Chancery of the Wiedner Theatre, namely, the first flute, the three trombones and the four horn parts – I need them for just one day in order to have those trifling details copied for me which for lack of space could not be entered in the score; and also because Prince Lobkowitz is thinking of having a performance of the opera at his palace and has asked me for the score – it so happens that I am not very well, or I would have come myself to pay my respects to you – With the greatest esteem, Ludwig van BeethovenThe Leonore LetterThis letter, the only written communication with Baron Peter von Braun, manifests the culmination of the chaos surrounding the creation and production of Beethoven’s only opera. It began as Leonore which title was abandoned in favor of Fidelio when it was discovered that three composers had written Leonore operas based upon the same text by the French playwright Bouilly. Beethoven rejected the suggestion of many other libretti in favor of Leonore because of its resistance to tyranny and its idealistic portrayal of conjugal love (the actual subtitle of Fidelio). The first performance was 20 November 1805 during Napoleon’s brief occupation of Vienna. Since the public was afraid to go out the small audience consisted mostly of French officers. There were only three performances – a fiasco – musically, critically and publically. Beethoven’s childhood friend Stephan von Breuning, now a member of the Court’s War Council, arranged with Prince Lichnowsky for a meeting with Beethoven, the entire cast and a few friends to play through the opera with the goal of tightening the libretto and reducing the three acts to two. Beethoven resisted any changes shouting, “Not a note.” The Princess Lichnowsky managed to calm him to accept the changes. Stephan von Breuning helped Beethoven with the revisions. Peter von Braun, whom Beethoven distrusted, had in the meantime taken over the Theater-an-der-Wien. The second version was given 29 March 1806 and was a great success.After the first performance, Beethoven accosted Peter von Braun claiming that he had been cheated. Von Braun had contracted to give Beethoven 10% of the box office receipts. This had never been done previously and von Braun made the tragic mistake of telling Beethoven that Mozart operas appealed to the multitude and that if he had had such an arrangement he would have been a wealthy man. Beethoven shouted, “I do not write for the multitude – I write for the cultured! Give me back my score! I want my score – my score, at once!” Thus ended the run of Fidelio after one performance. A couple of weeks later Beethoven realized that during rehearsal he had made some changes in the flute, horn and trombone parts which he had not entered into the score and had obviously forgotten what they were. He then wrote this uniquely supplicatory letter to von Braun. He needed the completed score since he had high hopes (unfulfilled) of getting performances elsewhere. Beethoven might not have been entirely wrong in his accusation of von Braun since a petition was sent to the Emperor accusing von Braun of skimming from the three Court Theaters. He retired in luxury shortly thereafter. From all of Beethoven’s correspondence, only ten letters in 1806 seem to reflect his turbulent involvement with Fidelio.Finally a third version of Fidelio was produced in 1814 at the large Redoutensaal under different auspices to a great success and has remained in the world repertory ever since. Published in The Letters of Beethoven, Vol. 1, letter number 131, by Emily Anderson, St. Martin’s Press, New York, 1961.Provenance: From the collection of classical pianist and conductor Daniell Revenaugh. $150,000 - $250,000

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Ben-Gurion, David. A Life in Letters: signed photograph, 9 autograph letters signed, 18 TLS.

Lot 17: Ben-Gurion, David. A Life in Letters: signed photograph, 9 autograph letters signed, 18 TLS.

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Description: 17. Ben-Gurion, David. A Life in Letters: a signed photograph, (9) autograph letters signed, (18) typed (or printed) letters signed, all with exceptional content, signed 1920s Histadrut Teachers’ Union Membership Registrar, and 1948 Independence issues of “Ha’aretz” and “The Palestine Post.”Ben-Gurion: A Life in Letters – an historic archive comprised of (27) signed letters with exceptional content dating from the 1920s to the early 1970s – embodying his integral participation in the formation of the modern State of Israel.The archive comprises of the following, with brief notes on content:1. Photograph signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”) in English, black & white (7.75 x 9.75 in.; 197 x 248 mm.) 2. A teacher’s Histadrut Membership Registrar signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”) in the 1920s as Secretary General of Histadrut.3. Printed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), no date, to a graduating class of teachers. “Today you join the company of good teachers…establish generations of achievers, people of ideals and action, who in their hands is the fate of the State and its future…”4. Autograph letter signed (“D.B.G.”), no date, to Mr. Warhaftig. “There are no secrets and the members of the Knesset know as much as members of the committee…” 5. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 21 October 1929, no recipient named. “meeting regarding the Arab situation in Eretz [Israel]…” 6. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 12 September 1939, to the Histadrut Poali Agudath Israel, Tel-Aviv. “Understanding the joint responsibility of all now … we accept the willingness to lend a hand to any action...” 7. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 5 February 1948, to Moshe Novomeysky, Jerusalem. “loan of machines for central industry in Tel-Aviv, and specifically a direct current electric generator with a diesel engine and the equipment associated with such a plant…” 8. Original four-page issue of Hebrew-language newspaper “Ha’aretz,” 17” x 23”, May 16, 1948, picturing Ben-Gurion on the first page.9. Original four-page issue of English-language newspaper “The Palestine Post,” 16” x 23”, May 16, 1948, picturing Ben-Gurion on the first page. Third & fourth pages blank.10. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 7 January 1949, on rare “Interim Government” stationery, to Dr. Alexander Carmon, Tel-Aviv concerning the shortage of manpower and discussing a “suitable field of action”.11. Printed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 1949, mourning a soldier who died on 7 January 1949 in the War of Independence.12. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 26 October 1949, a letter of condolence to a mother who has lost her son; reminiscing about a voyage both she and Ben-Gurion had to Israel.13. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 1 February 1959, to Rabbi Zorach Warhaftig, also a Signer of the Israeli Declaration of Independence, asking for “the name of the man in Haifa – to make our investigation easier…” 14. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 26 September 1951, to “Jerusalem Post” editor Gershon Agron reacting to his publishing the erroneous statement that he has agreed to the demands of the opposing General Zionists Party and had nominated two of their members to ministries.15. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 3 November 1953, to poet Anda Amir-Pinkerfeld. “We cannot truly know what happened in the days of yore … whatever we do have that is written in our history books as miracles that transpired we cannot guarantee is the whole truth …Man must hear the voice of God talking to him and to his heart…” 16. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 14 January 1954, to the Chief Rabbi of Petach Tikva. “There is room in Israel fir varying opinions and perspectives, but it is the love of Israel that binds us together…” 17. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 19 April 1954, to Y. Palmon, Advisir for Arab Affairs. “[The Druze] were revealed to me as excellent fighters, disciplined and loyal … I hope that this tribe will cast in its lot with our people and will find complete freedom and equality in the State of Israel…” 18. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 29 November 1954, to the parents of a newlywed. “May they have a happy life full of love. May they build a blessed home in Israel. Mazel Tov.” 19. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 14 March 1955, to MP Meir Yaari of the Mapam Party. “Maybe the Party you belong to has no disagreements … The Party I have a privilege of being attached to us not of that sort … but I do not know of another Party in Israel that is more loyal to the state, the Israeli people, and the vision of Jewish and human redemption…” 20. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 14 May 1955, to MP Seif E-Din E-Zoubi of Nazareth. “Following the coup d’etat which was carried out by the present heads of Egypt, the Government which I headed welcomed the rebels against King Farouk, and I expressed my hope that the revolution would … pave a new road of peace for itself. It is regrettable that the heads of Egypt have disappointed our hope…” 21. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 7 July 1955, to a Communist MP of the Knesset. “You can’t ignore what’s going on in Asia with Egyptian rulers & murderous group the Fadayin who attack all Israeli citizens … [Nasser] told the ‘New York Post’ that he is not fighting only Israel, but the Jewish nation & Jewish fortune. The tone is reminiscent of ‘Mein Kampf…” 22. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 22 July 1955, to Nahum Goldmann, Executive of the Zionist Federation. “We must act with renewed efforts and in every legitimate way, to bring about the day when the Jews of the Soviet Union will also be permitted to participate in the rebirth of their homeland…” 23. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 24 December 1955, to Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett, with carbon copy to Moshe Dayan. “I have no doubts in regards to General Haim Laskov’s credentials, ability, and suitability for the position of deputy Chief of Staff … his vast experience as a commander of British units and the Hebrew brigade will make him a great asset to the IDF…” 24. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 31 March 1956, to the Editor of “Ha’aretz”. “Every nation under attack and especially us, is obligated to protect itself, self-defense is a holy responsibility, it is so inscribed in the Charter of the United Nations…” 25. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 10 April 1956, to author S.Y. Agnon (later Nobel laureate). “Some seventy million Arabs live across our borders, and they extend to the Atlantic … Israel has a serious security problem with only two solutions: military preparedness and constant striving for peace, for war is a bankruptcy of diplomacy…” 26. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 31 July 1957, to architect Richard Kaufman. “Your plans seem to me fundamental. I will find out from the Minister of Development the fate of Eilat.” 27. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 9 January 1958, to Kahana and Mintz.“Your vote in the Knesset against the Government will not diminish the promise you were given about the schools, or any other matter. When I offered you what I offered on the political level – I did not associate it in any way with a financial reward…” 28. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 10 May 1960, to the Presidium of the Knesset and Knesset Committee. “I do not know which of the two bodies is responsible for the arrangement that was made yesterday in the Knesset in remembrance of Herzl’s century anniversary … I see it my moral and public duty to express my deep disappointment of the arrangements made for the Memorial Day which did not add honor neither to the Knesset nor the memory of the seer of the Jewish State…” 29. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 2 November 1964, to a friend in Tel-Aviv. “The State will establish society solely and exclusively on the foundations of truth and justice and moral values. I will fight for disclosure of the truth. In this matter, I have no fear, even if they expel me from the Party, and I will fight with all of the means at my disposal…” 30. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 13 May 1968, to Naeim Giladi, Tel-Aviv. “I was not ‘forced to’ resign – not because of misunderstanding with those around me – but for my own personal reasons – in which no other motivation, person, or external event had any role. It is correct that the Prime Minister of Burma attempted, at my request, to speak with Nasser – but like all other attempts with Nasser – it was unsuccessful…” 31. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), 25 February 1972, to Ari Kaplan, Haifa. “I always was in favor of changing the election system and my party accepted my suggestion … but later they reconsidered this decision. Now I’m not a member of any party and I’m not dealing with these matters anymore bit I haven’t changed my opinion…” 32. (32) informal photographs of David Ben-Gurion ranging in size from 1.75 x 2.25 in to 7 x 9.5 in. (45 x 58 mm. to 178 x 241 mm.), (127) contact prints (1.3 x .9 in.; 33 x 23 mm.) on four proof sheets depicting photographs of Ben-Gurion taken 10-13 June 1969. Many extras included. Housed in a high quality album (11.5 x 12 in.; 292 x 305 mm.) An extraordinary assemblage from the primary founder and first Prime Minister of Israel. $30,000 - $50,000

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Ben-Gurion, David. Typed letter signed (

Lot 18: Ben-Gurion, David. Typed letter signed ("D. Ben-Gurion") as Prime Minister and Minister of Defense.

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Description: 18. Ben-Gurion, David. Typed letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”) as Prime Minister and Minister of Defense, in Hebrew, 1 page (6.25 x 7.75 in.; 128 x 196 mm.), on official State of Israel stationery, Jerusalem, Israel, 10 August 1956, to Eliezer Livne (1902-1975), member of Ben-Gurion’s Mapai party and served in the Knesset (1949-1955). Two file holes in blank right margin and folds; overall, fine condition.While Ben-Gurion was planning an invasion of the Sinai, he would not give the reason behind the recent forced resignation of his Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett, which was to prevent Sharett from mobilizing cabinet votes that had blocked his previous proposals to capture the Gaza Strip or the Straits of Tiran.There are things that at the moment have to remain secret during this crucial period concerning the State of Israel.Ben-Gurion writes in full: I am still not supposed to tell all that has recently happened between me as Prime Minister and my comrade Sharett. Maybe I have something to tell of which I am not ashamed. I am honored to take full responsibility for Israel’s foreign policy. There are things that at the moment have to remain secret during this crucial period concerning the State of Israel. So therefore, I cannot say words that summarize the situation and I cannot answer – your question. D. Ben-GurionOn 18 June 1956, “The New York Times” reported the “ouster” of Foreign Minister Moshe Sharett which gave Ben-Gurion “a tighter grip on his Government’s reins” replacing “an official who was cautious and temporizing and who occasionally put a brake on the Premier’s daring ideas.” Neil Caplan wrote, in The 1956 Sinai Campaign … Selections from Moshe Sharett’s Diaries (“Israel Studies,” Vol. 7 No. 1, Spring 2002), “During 1955 and 1956 … Sharett mobilized cabinet votes that blocked Ben-Gurion’s proposals that the IDF capture [from Egypt] the Gaza Strip or the Straits of Tiran…” On 29 October 1956, Israeli military forces invaded Egypt “to eliminate the Egyptian fedayeen [commando squad] bases in the Sinai.” On Nov. 7th, Ben-Gurion announced the conclusion of the Sinai campaign adding that “we have returned to the place where the Torah was given” and that “the previous border with Egypt is now obsolete and Israel is willing to begin peace negotiations with Egypt.” $1,500 - $2,000

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Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 19: Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed ("D. Ben-Gurion"), in English, 1 page, 1 December 1964.

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Description: 19. Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), in English, 1 page (5 x 8.5 in.; 127 x 216 mm.), on his lined pad, perforated at the right, Tel-Aviv, 1 December 1964. To Mrs. Mark Gerald. Fine condition. In full: Dear Mrs. Gerald / I read your letter to Mr. Sharett, and I must confess I don’t agree with you. I am terribly sorry I cannot find the drawing you left with me in Hotel Sharon. Perhaps it is in Sdeh Boker; I am returning there next week, and if I find it there - it will be immediately sent you with my thanks. Yours, D. Ben-Gurion. The disagreement with Moshe Sharett was about who was responsible for what was called The Lavon Affair. The Lavon Affair refers to a failed Israeli covert operation, code named Operation Susannah, conducted in Egypt in the summer of 1954, so named after the Israeli Defense Minister, Pinhas Lavon. Ben-Gurion blamed him for the fiasco and forced his dismissal. Lavon was exonerated by the Israeli cabinet in 1960, but in 1964, Ben-Gurion claimed to have new evidence against Lavon and demanded the government reopen the investigation. Moshe Sharett defended Lavon and ultimately Ben-Gurion lost the battle and retired from government to live in relative obscurity.Two Ben-Gurion handwritten letters in English, one expressing his disagreement with Moshe Sharett, most likely regarding the re-investigation of the Lavon Affair, the other expressing appreciation for a gift - a book on the History of Zionism.Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), in English, 1 page (5 x 8.5 in.; 127 x 216 mm.), on his lined pad, perforated at the right, Sdeh Boker, 17 December 1970. To Dr. Celina Sokolow, London, England. Light paper clip rust stain in upper left. In full: Dearest Dr. Celina Sokolow I am most greatful for sending me your father’s History of Zionisme in one volum. This is the best book on the History of Zionism. It should be translated in to Hebrew. With the best wishes D. Ben-Gurion.Nahum Sokolow (1859-1936) was a prolific author and translator. He was the first to translate Herzl’s utopian novel “Altneuland” (1902) into Hebrew, titling it “Tel Aviv,” literally, “An Ancient Hill of Spring.” In 1909, the name was chosen for the new suburb of Jaffa. Sokolow’s “History of Zionism: 1600-1918” was published in 1919. Sokolow served as President of the World Zionist Congress from 1931-1935; Ben-Gurion was President from 1946-1956. Celina Sokolow (1886-1984) was her father’s secretary for many years. After serving in Israel’s Knesset since 14 February 1949, Ben-Gurion retired on 27 May 1970. $2,000 - $3,000

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Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 20: Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed ("D. Ben-Gurion"), in Hebrew, 1 page, 24 October 1967.

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Description: 20. Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (“D. Ben-Gurion”), in Hebrew, 1 page (4.75 x 8.25 in.; 120 x 210 mm.), Sdeh Boker [Israel], 24 October 1967. To Ilan Zeindel, Haifa. Lightweight paper. Ink offset at top and bottom from dampness. Near fine condition.Four months following the Six-Day War, Ben-Gurion discusses politics.Ben-Grion writes in part: I supported ‘Ichud’ of the Ha’avodah Party in Israel-presuming that this is the movement that considered itself as representing the mission of the whole nation based on the eternal values of our prophets. When I saw that the leaders of Mapai alienated themselves from significant parts of these values-the values of justice, truth and similar ones-I do not see myself as part of it since the name ‘Poel’ or a different name does not mean anything to me. The name ‘Zionist’ was dear to me … but when I realized that the Zionists in the Diaspora do not see an obligating relation between being a Zionist and making Aliyah to Israel, I understood that this name is void and I announced that I am not a Zionist. I was a Mapai member not for its name and because of its name I shall not return to the party but I do not disagree with the ethics, the deeds and the values which should guide it…In London on 23 March 1967, Ben-Gurion had defined Zionism as “Jewish people on their way to Israel…I am not a Zionist; I am a Jew, and that is enough for me…”In the year 1919, Ben-Gurion participated in the founding of the ‘Achdut Avoda’ [Ha’avodah] party, and was elected as its leader…In 1930, the party merged with ‘HaPoel Hatza-ir’ and formed the ‘Labor Party of the Land of Israel’ (‘Mapai’) … In June 1965, he split off from Mapai – together with Dayan, Peres, and others – and established the ‘Rafi’ party…After the Six Day War, Rafi merged with Mapai and Achdut Avoda-Poalei Zion to form the Israel Labor Party. Ben-Gurion refused to join the Labor Party. $1,500 - $2,000

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Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 21: Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed ("David Ben-Gurion"), in Hebrew, 1 page, 28 February 1968

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Description: 21. Ben-Gurion, David. Autograph letter signed (“David Ben-Gurion”), in Hebrew, 1 page (4.63 x 8 in.; 118 x 203 mm.), 28 February 1968, addressed to Shifra Golombian (a war widow). Paper loss at upper and right edges, not affecting text.David Ben-Gurion writes a touching letter to a war widow about Bar Mitzvah celebrations for orphans of soldiers killed in the recent Six-Day War.Ben-Gurion praises the Habad Youth initiative to make a Bar Mitzvah ceremony to orphans of soldiers who were killed in the Six-Day War only a year earlier. He regretfully rejects her invitation to take part in the ceremony due to previous engagements and acknowledges her pain and grief. Ben-Gurion was among the founders of Mapai which governed Israel during the first three decades of its existence. He stepped down as Prime Minister, on personal grounds (as he explained) in 1963, and, in fact, nominated Levi Eshkol to be his successor. One year later a rivalry developed between the two on the issue of the Lavon Affair. Ben-Gurion broke with the party in June 1965 over Eshkol’s handling of the Lavon Affair and formed a new party, Rafi which won ten seats in the Knesset. As tensions loomed before the outbreak of the Six-Day War in 1967, Ben-Gurion strongly urged that Israel must have a Great Power on its side. After the war ended with large Israeli territorial gains, Ben-Gurion argued that Israel should not keep any territorial gains of the Six-Day War, other than a united Jerusalem and the Golan Heights. In 1968, when Rafi merged with Mapai to form the Alignment, Ben-Gurion refused to reconcile with his old party due to it postponing plans to reform the electoral system (Ben-Gurion wanted to see a constituency-based system introduced to replace the chaotic proportional representation method). He formed another new party, the National List, which won four seats in the 1969 election. $1,000 - $1,500

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Bell, Alexander Graham. Rare oversize photograph signed (

Lot 22: Bell, Alexander Graham. Rare oversize photograph signed ("Alexander Graham Bell").

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Description: 22. Bell, Alexander Graham. Rare oversize photograph signed (“Alexander Graham Bell”), a wonderful profile portrait of the eminent inventor (9.75 x 13.75 in.; 247 x 349 mm. - image size 6 x 9 in.; 152 x 228 mm.). Embossed photographer stamp, “Harris & Ewing, Washington, D.C.”, at lower margin. Faint stain at lower edge; otherwise, fine condition.Inscribed by Bell in black ink at the lower margin and signed: “To Mrs. Roland Granville Fortescue, with much love, from her uncle, Alexander Graham Bell.”Grace Hubbard Fortescue (née Grace Hubbard Bell) was the niece of Alexander Graham Bell, and her husband Granville was a Rough Rider who served with his cousin Theodore Roosevelt in Cuba. A wonderful association between Alexander Graham Bell and his niece. $4,000 - $6,000

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Berlin, Irving. Photograph signed (

Lot 23: Berlin, Irving. Photograph signed ("Irving") with autograph musical quotation.

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Description: 23. Berlin, Irving. Photograph signed (“Irving”) with autograph musical quotation (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.), a handsome head-and-shoulders portrait of the famous composer and songwriter. Black and white with light sepia-tone. This Berlin has drawn a staff with musical notation and lyric handwritten, “Come on and hear come on and hear” from his song “Alexander’s Ragtime Band”. Inscribed and signed boldly to the left of the image his image, “For Harry with the best in the world always from Irving”. Photographer’s ink stamp on the verso, “George Maillard Kesslere.” at the lower right. Slight spotting on lower left and upper right margins; otherwise, in fine condition. $2,000 - $3,000

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Berlioz, Hector. Autograph musical quotation signed (

Lot 24: Berlioz, Hector. Autograph musical quotation signed ("H. Berlioz") from Romeo and Juliette.

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Description: 24. Berlioz, Hector. Autograph musical quotation signed (“H. Berlioz”) from Romeo and Juliette, 1 page (2.5 x 9.8 in.; 65 x 252 mm), [no place], 1 December 1856. Light browning and spotting.A musical quotation from Romeo and Juliette. Berlioz elegantly writes out seven bars from his Romeo and Juliette on an oblong piece of paper. Beneath the quotation, Berlioz dates and signs with a particularly large and bold signature. $3,000 - $5,000

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[Bonaparte, Napoleon]. Pair of manuscript documents (ca. 1797).

Lot 25: [Bonaparte, Napoleon]. Pair of manuscript documents (ca. 1797).

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Description: 25. [Bonaparte, Napoleon]. Pair of manuscript documents (ca. 1797) for articles relating to capitulation of the arsenal of the Republic of Venice. (1) Document, in French, 3 pages (8 x 11.25 in.; 203 x 285 mm.) bi-folded paper containing nine articles for “Draft for the Rules of Procedure for the Interior Functions of the Arsenal of Venice”, (2) document, in French, 2 pages (12.5 x 8 in.; 304 x 203 mm.) bi-folded paper containing eight articles for the “Rules and Proposals for the Interior Functions of the Venetian Arsenal”. The articles categorize use and administration of Venetian arsenals by the French Navy for “construction and armament of venetian ships”. Both documents are written in ink and are nearly identical in content; the only material difference is the second document lacks “Article 5.” as stated below. Undated. Unsigned. In fine condition.Napoleon manuscript documents regarding the Rules and Procedures for the Interior Functions of the Arsenal of Venice.The documents state in part: Article 1. The dispositions of all work relating to the construction and arming of the three ships and frigates destined for the French Navy, within the arsenal workshops, will be administered by the French Navy in accord with the committee of the Venetian Navy. Article 2. The committee of the Navy will comply with the dispositions instigated for the method of operation as well as for the use of workers and materials without needing any other authorization. Article 3. All Engineers, overseers and managers of workshops will satisfy the demands of the French Administration. Article 4. In the situation where an urgent decision must be made, the advice of agents of the French Navy will be provisionally taken; except in the case of a dispute where the ultimate decision will be made by a united administration based on the accounts of the Committee of the Venetian Navy and their respective agents. Article 5. The orders will always be given in the workshops and warehouses by the officers of the Venetian Navy; but the orders will have been discussed with the administration of the French Navy. Article 6. Appeals by workers will be decided according to usual practice by the Arsenal; their functions, determined by the French Administration, will be implemented by the Venetian government with encouragements which could augment the enthusiasm of the workers thereby accelerating the work. Article 7. The current method used in the Arsenal for the accounting of materials will be observed and maintained by agents of the Venetian Navy, as long as these methods do not interfere with the delivery of material or are demanded in a manner detrimental to the swift delivery of the operations. Article 8. The police of the Arsenal will remain in the hands of those who are now charged with them. Their accounts will be communicated to the French Administration; the officers in charge of surveillance will comply with the orders of this administration when appropriate. Article 9. The Commissioner of the French Navy will oversee all accounting concerning the two nations. He will sign the workers roll sheets employed in construction and armament of the Venetian ships, only as controller; but he will keep a record of expenditures of materials and days for each French ship; thus, nothing will be delivered or used on either a worker or ship belonging to the French Republic without being signed by him. The Administration will give knowledge to the Committee of the Navy of the name of the administrator in charge and an example of his signature.During his famed Italian Campaign, Napoleon conquered the Republic of Venice 12 May 1797 during the First Coalition. On 12 October that same year, Napoleon signed the Treaty of Campo Formio and Venice became Austrian territory on 18 January 1798. It was taken from Austria by the Treaty of Pressburg in 1805 and became part of Napoleon’s Kingdom of Italy, but was returned to Austria following Napoleon’s defeat in 1814 when it became part of the Austrian-held Kingdom of LombardyVenetia. $3,000 - $5,000

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Bonaparte, Napoleon. Letter signed (

Lot 26: Bonaparte, Napoleon. Letter signed ("NP") as Emperor to the French, 1 page, Paris, 28 May 1809.

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Description: 26. Bonaparte, Napoleon. Letter signed (“NP”) as Emperor to the French, 1 page (7.25 x 8.8 in.; 184 x 224 mm.), in French, Paris, 28 May 1809, to General Henri Clarke, Napoleon’s Minister of War. Mounting remnants on verso; otherwise, fine condition. Napoleon writes in full: Monsieur le General Clarke, I approve the proposal that you made to me to use General MacDonald in the Italian Army; Give him orders to proceed to Milano to the Viceroy. On this I pray God that he keep you in his holy protection. [signed] NPOn 21-22 May 1809, a week prior to this letter, Napoleon attempted a forced crossing of the Danube near Vienna, but the French and their allies were driven back by the Austrians under Archduke Charles. Known as the Battle of Aspern-Essling, it was the first time Napoleon had been personally defeated in over a decade. However, Archduke Charles failed to secure a decisive victory, as Napoleon was able to successfully withdraw most of his forces. $1,200 - $1,500

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[Bonaparte, Napoleon]. Swatch of silk used to create the French flag accompanying Napoleon's coffin

Lot 27: [Bonaparte, Napoleon]. Swatch of silk used to create the French flag accompanying Napoleon's coffin

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Description: 27. [Bonaparte, Napoleon]. Swatch of silk used to create the French flag accompanying Napoleon’s coffin from St. Helena to France with attached 1853 notarized letter. The swatch of fine white silk (2.25 x .75 in.; 57 x 19 mm.) is affixed, with red wax seal, to a 1-page letter (5.25 x 8.5 in.; 133 x 216 mm.), New York, 10 January 1853, written by “Hy. H. Gidron, Notary Public of St. Helena.” Silk exhibits slight foxing. Housed in a modern frame, matted on linen.The letter reads in full: I hereby certify that the piece of silk hereunto attached is a portion of that of which the French Flag was made by the Ladies of St. Helena at the request of the Prince of Joinville at the time of the exhumation and removal of the remains of the late Emperor Napoleon, from that Island, and that the said Flag accompanied the remains to France and was afterwards deposited in the Hotel des Invalides at Paris. New York, Jany. 10th 1853 Hy. H. Gidron, Noty. Public of St. Helena. $600 - $800

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Booth, John Wilkes. Printed pamphlet signed (

Lot 28: Booth, John Wilkes. Printed pamphlet signed ("John W. Booth").

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Description: 28. Booth, John Wilkes. Printed pamphlet signed (“John W. Booth”), being his personal copy of the play Lend Me Five Shillings, by John Maddison Morton, Esq., New York: William Taylor n.d. [c.1855-1858?]. 32 pp, (4.5 x 7.5 in.; 114 x 190 mm.). Original publisher’s printed orange wrappers, back cover very slightly torn, light dampstain to upper portions of text. Booth has signed in ink at the upper portion, “John W. Booth Arch St., June 1858.”John Wilkes Booth’s signed personal copy of the play Lend Me Five Shillings.At age 18, Booth made his debut on stage in 1855. Growing in popularity, in 1858 he performed in 83 plays. Among them were William Wallace and Brutus, having as their theme the killing or overthrow of an unjust ruler. Booth said that of all Shakespearean characters, his favorite role was Brutus – the slayer of a tyrant. Also included is a Handsome Carte-de-Visite, with secretarial signature originally placed on the CDV for identification purposes. The CDV measures 2.25 x 4 in. (57 x 102 mm.). This un-attributed studio portrayal, the most famous image of Booth ever taken, shows the dashing actor clad in formal theater attire, with walking cane in his right hand. $8,000 - $12,000

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Booth, John Wilkes. Rare autograph letter signed (

Lot 29: Booth, John Wilkes. Rare autograph letter signed ("J. Wilkes Booth"), New York, 18 October [1863].

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Description: 29. Booth, John Wilkes. Rare autograph letter signed (“J. Wilkes Booth”), 2 pages (5.1 x 7.9 in.; 130 x 200 mm.), New York, 18 October [1863], to John Adam Ellsler, Booth’s actor friend and owner of the Acadamy of Music in Cleveland, Ohio. Archival reinforcement on left margin; single spot present near to top edge; otherwise, fine.John Wilkes Booth, one of the most famous actors in the U.S., plans his next stage appearances in a rare handwritten letter dating from the Civil War.Booth writes in full: Dear John Have not heard from you of late. Nov. 23d and 30th is the only time I have for Cleveland. I asked for Feb 1st and 8th in Columbus. I can still give you that time I guess but let me hear from you at once as I must answer Evansville. If you can not arrange that time for Columbus I may be able to give you Feb 29th and March 7th for Columbus, but you must answer at once by telegraph. I play tomorrow Monday the 19th here in Providence - the next night in Hartford. Yours truly, J. Wilkes BoothIn the letter’s body, Booth makes plans for the Theater season of 1863-64. February 29th of the next year is mentioned, conclusively dating the letter to October of 1863, as 1864 was a leap year. Booth’s signature is considered to be one of rarest of all American autographs. His handwritten letters are even more scarce, as the nation-wide manhunt after Lincoln’s assassination prompted many of those who possessed his papers to destroy them, fearful that they would be implicated in the conspiracy. This is one of the few surviving handwritten letters, and it wonderfully illustrates his capacity for making long-range plans – a personal trait that would serve him well just 18 months later as his plan to assassinate Lincoln came to fruition. A member of the famous Booth family of actors, John Wilkes Booth, the son of Junius Brutus Booth (1796-1852), is best remembered as the assassin of President Abraham Lincoln, during a performance of “Our American Cousin” at Washington’s Ford Theatre on the evening of 14 April 1865. While the President was enjoying the play with his wife, Booth, with a derringer pistol in his right hand, and a dagger in his left, opened the unguarded door of the presidential box and aimed his pistol at Lincoln’s head. Leaping to the stage to make his escape after fatally shooting the President and slashing Major Henry Rathbone (there with his fiancee Clara Harris), Booth broke his left shin as he cried out “Sic semper tyrannis!” At 7:22 AM on 15 April 1865, Lincoln finally died. Booth was the organizer of a group of conspirators (Lewis Paine, George A. Atzerodt, and David Herold - sheltered by Mary E. Surratt) in a plot to kill not only the President and his Vice-President, but also the other prominent members of the cabinet. On April 26th, Union cavalry trapped Booth in a Virginia tobacco barn. His accomplice David Herold surrendered. Booth would not, preferring death to surrender. The orders were to take him alive. The barn was set on fire to force him out. A shot was heard, and, when the barn door was opened, Booth was found face down with a revolver in his hand. He was shot below the right ear, the ball passing out his neck on the other side. Booth was dragged to the porch of a nearby farmhouse, where he whispered “Tell Mother that I died for my country...I did what I thought was best” before he died. Published in The Writings of John Wilkes Booth (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1997), p. 92. $12,000 - $15,000

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Buchanan, James. Remarkable political autograph letter signed (

Lot 30: Buchanan, James. Remarkable political autograph letter signed ("James Buchanan"), 28 April 1852.

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Description: 30. Buchanan, James. Remarkable political autograph letter signed (“James Buchanan”), 2 pages (7.75 x 10 in.; 197 x 254 mm.), with integral leaf docketed on verso. Wheatland, near Lancaster, 28 April 1852. Marked Private to David Lynch (Mayor of Pittsburgh). Lightly dampstained. In a light blue, three flap, presentation folder, “James Buchanan – A.L.S. – April 28, 1852” gilt lettered on spine “Fine condition. Seven weeks before the Whigs nominate Gen. Winfield Scott for President, Buchanan writes, “Scott, in order to secure all the free soil votes of the non-slaveholding States, will refrain from signing a pledge to sustain the Fugitive Slave Law; but yet he will give assurances to his Southern friends that he will faithfully execute this law & there will be proclaimed every where in the South…” About Stephen A. Douglas, he writes, “He possesses fine talents, a strong character & decided energy; & although I cannot approve all his conduct or that of some of his friends, he is not liable to so many objections as his western competitor [Lewis Cass]. With a few years good training, he would make an excellent President…”During the winter of 1851, while his niece Harriet Lane made a visit of several months to friends in Pittsburgh, Buchanan relied upon her to confirm the support for his potential presidential candidacy in 1852 from Pittsburgh Mayor David Lynch, the state’s western region political boss. She succeeded in aligning Lynch’s political commitment to her uncle.Buchanan writes in full: I have received your favor of the 24th Inst: I should have written to you ‘ere this; but had supposed from your letter of the 6th Instant that you had left for home. I am much gratified that my old friend Ovid F. Johnston, supports me for the Presidency. He possesses fine talents & great energy of character & wields a powerful pen. He was estranged from me for several years; & I hail his voluntary return with peculiar satisfaction. Please to present me to him my kind regards. Your review of some matters relating to General [Lewis] Cass contains nothing but facts; & yet should it ever be traced to you from our known friendship & intimacy it will be employed by the his friends to injure me. For this reason I am inclined rather to doubt the policy of the publication. Neither Cass nor his leading friends in Pennsylvania deserve any forbearance at our hands; but he has friends in other States, who, I know, are strongly inclined in my favor, & we ought not to pursue any course which would drive them from their purpose. I am not sure but I judge incorrectly relative to the policy of the publication. I am glad that ‘the friends of [Stephen A.] Douglas are now talking in the right way.’ Had I the choice to make between the two, I would prefer him to Cass. He possesses fine talents, a strong character & decided energy; & although I cannot approve all his conduct or that of some of his friends, he is not liable to so many objections as his western competitor. With a few years good training, he would make an excellent President. Why does [Clerk of the House Pennsylvanian John W.] Forney suspect [former Pennsylvania Gov. David R.] Porter’s fidelity? I do not doubt him in the least. On the contrary I confidently expect much from his support. Indeed, I owe him my grateful thanks for what he has already done. But Forney is a noble fellow. It would be vain for me to write you my speculations on the result of the Baltimore Convention. This I can say, however, that from all the information I receive from different quarters, the prospect appears very fair. Should I be nominated, I do not entertain a doubt that we shall carry Pennsylvania by an old fashioned Jackson Democratic Majority. The Whigs are exceedingly anxious for the nomination of General Cass. They expect that this event would re-unite their party. But whether or not, I anticipate that their leaders will all be yet together. [Gen. Winfield] Scott, in order to secure all the free soil votes of the non-slaveholding States, will refrain from signing a pledge to sustain the Fugitive Slave Law; but yet he will give assurances to his Southern friends that he will faithfully execute this law & there will be proclaimed every where in the South on the slump. Indeed they will assert that Scott used his personal exertions in favor of its passage; whilst Cass & his immediate friends in the Senate dodged the vote. From your friend, very faithfully, James BuchananAt the Democratic National Convention held at Maryland Institute Hall in Baltimore, June 1-5, 1852, on the first ballot for the presidential nomination, Lewis Cass received 116 votes while Buchanan received 93. William L. Marcy had 27, Stephen A. Douglas 20, and Joseph Lane 13. Five others, including Sam Houston, received a total of 18 votes. Franklin Pierce, who was finally nominated on the 49th ballot with 282 of the 289 ballots cast, received no votes on the first ballot.Gen. Winfield Scott was nominated by the Whigs on the 53rd ballot at their June 17-20, 1852 convention also held at Maryland Institute Hall, and was soundly defeated in November by Pierce, 296-42 electoral votes, winning just four states, Kentucky, Tennessee, Massachusetts, and Vermont.Four years later, Pierce became the only U.S. President to be denied renomination at his own party’s convention, when Buchanan was unanimously nominated on the 17th ballot. On the first ballot, Buchanan had 135.5 votes, Pierce 122.5, Douglas 33, and Cass 5 votes. After their defeat in 1852, the Whigs lost their power nationally. Most of the southern Whigs joined the Democrats and most of the antislavery northern Whigs eventually joined the new Republican Party which nominated Gen. John C. Fremont for President. Buchanan won 19 states, including all southern states, and defeated Fremont 174-114 (11 states) electoral votes with Maryland’s 4 votes going to former President Millard Fillmore, nominee of the American (Know-Nothing) Party. $4,000 - $6,000

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Bush, George H.W. Rare autograph letter signed (

Lot 31: Bush, George H.W. Rare autograph letter signed ("George Bush") as President, 10 April 1992.

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Description: 31. Bush, George H.W. Rare autograph letter signed (“George Bush”) as President, 2 pages (5 x 3.5 in.; 127 x 89 mm.), front and verso. [Washington], 10 April 1992. To Joseph Kingsbury-Smith). On both sides of a Presidential correspondence card with Presidential seal in gilt and “The President” imprinted to the right. Fine condition.The day a “New York Times” article calls the arrival in Washington of George W. Bush a symbol of the President’s alarm at the state of his campaign, President George H.W. Bush tells 84-year-old Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Joseph Kingsbury-Smith he wishes “there were more people out there who had your values and decency in this rather ugly Presidential year…” Bush writes in full: Dear Joe, That was a lovely lunch at Bartletts. Your kind note to me was correct about that. It was a great pleasure being with you. In this rather ugly Presidential year I wish there were more people out there who had your values and decency. With Respect, George Bush. In an unusually long press conference held the day he wrote this letter, President Bush took issue with an article in that day’s “New York Times” which quoted an unnamed Republican strategist as saying “George Jr. has been talking to a lot of Republicans around the country and picking up alarm. He’s also been saying his dad complains that the speeches are not too good and wants to know why can’t he have initiatives to present to the public.” The article went on to say that “his son’s arrival [in Washington]...was a symbol of the President’s alarm at the state of his campaign.” At the hour-long press conference in the White House Rose Garden, President Bush acknowledged that his son was in town but insisted that the “Times” story “simply is not true. If I were dissatisfied you’d know about it loud and clear...” Hence the President’s comment in this letter about it being a “rather ugly Presidential year.” In the November election, Arkansas Governor Bill Clinton defeated President Bush and businessman Ross Perot, running as an independent. Journalist Joseph Kingsbury-Smith (1908-1999), a national editor and chief foreign writer for Hearst Newspapers, won the 1956 Pulitzer Prize for Distinguished Reporting of International Affairs as a member of a three-man team that included William Randolph Hearst, Jr. and Frank Connif and which had conducted a series of interviews in 1955 with Nikita Khrushchev and other top Soviet leaders. Handwritten letters of President Bush on his “President” cards are rare and desirable. $1,000 - $1,500

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[Byrd, Richard E.]. Studio Key Book from With Byrd at the South Pole (Paramount, 1930).

Lot 32: [Byrd, Richard E.]. Studio Key Book from With Byrd at the South Pole (Paramount, 1930).

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Description: 32. [Byrd, Richard E.]. Studio Key Book Photograph Album from the adventure documentary With Byrd at the South Pole (Paramount, 1930). Bound by Paramount Studios in a gray linen album, (180+) (10 x 7.75 in.; 254 x 197 mm.) black & white still photographs taken during Byrd’s expedition to the South Pole. Each photograph has been linen backed to protect and secure the photographs in the album, which is imprinted in black lettering with the production number and title on the spine, “1420 With Byrd At The South Pole”. Some of the photographs exhibit mild toning; overall, in fine condition. An extraordinary assemblage of photographs of the famed explorer and his team adventuring in the harsh environment. $800 - $1,200

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Capote, Truman. Document signed (

Lot 33: Capote, Truman. Document signed ("Truman Capote"), on Paramount letterhead, 22 March 1977

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Description: 33. Capote, Truman. Document signed (“Truman Capote”), 2 pages (8.5 x 11 in.; 216 x 279 mm.), being an agreement on Paramount letterhead, 22 March 1977, relating to compensation for legendary agent Irving “Swifty” Lazar to serve as Executive Producer on a TV pilot based on Capote’s novel, Breakfast at Tiffany’s. Signed by the author on the second page in blue ballpoint, “Deal approved as above: Truman Capote.” To the right, Lazar has cosigned the agreement, “Irving Paul Lazar”. Stated pilot was never picked up by a network. Excellent association with Capote and his classic novel. Mild toning and wear, and staple holes to the upper left corners. $600 - $800

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Carter, Rubin

Lot 34: Carter, Rubin "Hurricane". Boxing license application signed ("Rubin Carter").

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Description: 34. Carter, Rubin “Hurricane”. Boxing license application signed (“Rubin Carter”), 2 pages (approx. 5 in. x 3 in.; 127 x 76 mm.), being the front and back of blue card stock, 26 October 1962, with a black and white headshot of Carter stapled to the upper right corner. Listing his address in Paterson, New Jersey, Carter has written out the necessary information in the blanks, including the name of his manager (“Carmen Tedeschi”), and the response (“No”) when asked if he had “been convicted of a crime since last license”. Signed at the lower right corner, “Rubin Carter”, in bold blue ink. Two original binder holes at the head and one vertical crease down the center; overall, in good condition. Rubin “Hurricane” Carter’s 1962 Boxing License Application.This boxing license application is dated just two months before his first notable victory, a decision against perennial contender Holley Mims on 22 December 1962. The following year he fought six times and won four, crowned by a thrilling win against past and future world champion Emile Griffith. Carter’s style and punching power (which resulted in many early-round knockouts) drew attention, establishing him as a crowd favorite and earning him the nickname “Hurricane”. However, he is probably better known for his controversial convictions (in 1967 and 1976) for three June 1966 murders in Paterson, New Jersey, and his subsequent release from prison in 1985. His life story of false incarceration and racial injustice was portrayed on the silver screen in the 1999 film starring Denzel Washington, Hurricane, based on Carter’s 1974 autobiography. Signed material dating from his early boxing career is quite rare. This boxing application, dating from the second year of his professional career (and after his first stint in prison), is especially desirable. $800 - $1,200

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Capone, Alphonse (Al or

Lot 35: Capone, Alphonse (Al or "Scarface"). Typed deposition signed four times.

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Description: 35. Capone, Alphonse (Al or “Scarface”). Typed deposition signed four times (“Alphonse Capone”), 4 pages (8.5 x 11 in.; 215 x 279 mm.), being a typed transcript of Capone’s interrogation by police in their investigation of the attempted murder of his former mentor and crime associate John Torrio. Chicago, Illinois, 24 January 1925. Capone’s deposition is part of an extensive archive of police interviews, testimony and notes in the case, each signed by the witness (two of whom include Capone’s chauffeur, Robert Barton, and his accountant, Jake Gusick), Each of Capone’s statements are signed in ink at the lower right. The remainder of the archive consists of 50 pages, (8.5 x 11 in.; 215 x 279 mm.), typescripts and carbons, plus a few handwritten statements of police and witnesses, some chipping at edges, paper yellowed. Al Capone’s deposition relating to the 1925 attempted hit on his former mentor and crime associate John Torrio – signed four times by the mafia boss.A remarkable archive of a failed investigation of an attempted murder of a Capone associate, which ironically propelled Capone to the top of the Chicago rackets. Capone’s police interrogation took place the same day as Torrio’s near fatal shooting. Torrio, described as a “retired restauranteur,” while “alighting from his automobile from the front of above address was assaulted by three men, two of the men fired several shots at him . . . The assailants then jumped into a dark Cadillac touring car, no license ...” The victim, John Torrio, was the young Capone’s mentor and sponsor in their previous criminal activities in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, where both had grown up. When Torrio moved to Chicago to manage a string of brothels for “Big Jim” Colosimo, he brought along his protege, “Scarface” Capone. The pupil soon outpaced his teacher. Capone had Colosimo killed, and Torrio took over the brothel empire. Meanwhile, Capone moved into the enormously lucrative bootleg whiskey business. Dion O’Bannion, an Irish mobster and his lieutenant, Earl “Hymie” Weiss, became their chief rivals. Conflicts between them escalated and in November 1924, O’Bannion was shot to death. On 24 January 1925 “Hymie” Weiss, with his sidekicks “Bugs” Moran, Vincent Drucci and Frank Gusenberg, seeking revenge, came upon Torrio and his wife unloading groceries in front of his home. Torrio fell in a hail of bullets, but Moran’s gun jammed as he was about to deliver the coup de grace. When Torrio recovered, he fled to Italy, leaving Capone the undisputed boss of Chicago crime, a position he enjoyed until he was convicted of tax fraud and finally jailed in 1931.Capone’s statement is captioned: “Statement of Alphonse Caponi [sic]. 7244 Prairie Avenue … relative to the shooting of John Torrio ... about 3:30 P.M. Jan 24th, 1925.” Highlights are as follows (Capone’s answers italicized): “Q. What is your business? A. Furniture business. 2224 Wabash Ave. Q. What is [the] name of store? A. Antique furniture. No name to store . . . Q. How long do you know John Torrio? A. About three years. Q. Where did you meet him.? A. In Chicago, at the Race Track, I met him at the Bennie Leonard fight in East Chicago, about three years ago ... Q. Were you ever in trouble in New York? A. No ... Q. How many times were you arrested in Chicago? A. Every time something happens I get arrested . . . Q. Did he [Torrio] tell you who did it, or did you ask him who did it? A. I did not ask him and he did not tell me because he was in no condition to talk. Q. Would [you] have any idea who did it? A. No. Q. Would you tell us if you did know who did it? A. No, I value my life too much to tell if I did know . . . Q. Can you give any reason for the shooting? A. No I cannot. Q. This statement is true and if you were called to testify this would be your statement and you will be willing to sign this statement? A. Yes sir.Information was virtually impossible to collect in regards to the shooting. The few witnesses seemed fearful; none would conclusively identify the gunmen, although “Bugs” Moran was initially fingered. Even Torrio, when Earl Weiss and Vincent Drucci were brought into his hospital room, refused to identify them as being party to his shooting. A remarkable archive providing a vivid and compelling first-hand view of the methods perfected by Capone, which rapidly propelled him to the pinnacle of the underworld. Provenance: Christies, New York, 20th May 1994, Lot 13. $30,000 - $50,000

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Carter, Howard. Exceedingly rare hand-drawn signed artwork of King Tutankhamen with cartouche.

Lot 36: Carter, Howard. Exceedingly rare hand-drawn signed artwork of King Tutankhamen with cartouche.

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Description: 36. Carter, Howard. Exceedingly rare hand-drawn signed artwork of King Tutankhamen with cartouche, 1 page (9.5 x 12.5 in.; 241 x 318 mm.). Accomplished in black fountain pen ink, Carter has drawn a detailed three-quarter-length image of Pharaoh Tutankhamen, complete with his signature headdress and staff. Below the image, Carter penned the cartouche bearing the king’s name in Egyptian hieroglyphics as well as “TutAnkhAmen”. Above the image, Carter has inscribed, “To Mrs. Williams, in kind remembrance from” and below the image continues, “Howard Carter 1924.” Exhibits toning from previous display, not affecting the image. Incredibly rare detailed signed drawing of Pharaoh Tutankhamen by the discoverer of King Tut’s tomb, Howard Carter.Arriving in the United States in April 1924 for a 24-lecture tour of the United States and Canada, Howard Carter spoke at Yale University in New Haven, Connecticut on May 6th where he first met Yale Professor and Mrs. Frederick Wells Williams. Returning to Yale in June, Carter was awarded an Honorary Degree of Doctor of Science. Williams, Yale Class of 1879 and a member of the Yale faculty for over 30 years, also received an Honorary Degree on June 18th. While Carter was in Chicago, on May 23rd, he accepted a written invitation from Prof. and Mrs. Williams for the afternoon of June 17th (included is a color copy of Carter’s two-page response to Williams, accepting his invitation, plus copies of two newspaper advertisements for Carter’s lectures in April and May). This drawing was undoubtedly drawn by Carter on that day and presented to Mrs. Williams, niece of the late Francis Wayland, first dean of the Yale Law School from 1873-1903.On 1 December 1922, The New York Times had reported, “The Cairo correspondent of The London Times in a dispatch to his paper describes how Lord Carnarvon and Howard Carter unearthed below the tomb of Rameses VI, near Luxor, two rooms containing the funeral paraphernalia of King Tutankhamen, who reigned about 1350 B.C., the discovery of which was announced yesterday [November 29th]…” Exceedingly wealthy, Lord Carnarvon, who had taken up archaeology as a hobby, was Carter’s sponsor. On 6 November 1922, Carter sent a cable to Lord Carnarvon: “At last have made wonderful discovery in Valley; a magnificent tomb with seals intact; re-covered same for your arrival; congratulations.” Autograph material by Carter is rare and this extraordinary, detailed image of his greatest discovery is the first of its kind we have ever encountered and possibly the only example extant. $30,000 - $50,000

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Carver, George Washington. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 37: Carver, George Washington. Autograph letter signed ("G.W. Carver"), Alabama, 11 August 1933.

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Description: 37. Carver, George Washington. Autograph letter signed (“G.W. Carver”), as Director of the Research and Experiment Station, Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute, 2 pages (8.5 x 11 in.; 216 x 279 mm.), front and verso. Tuskegee Institute, Alabama, 11 August 1933, to Mrs. Olivia Anderson, Chipley, Georgia. With original postmarked envelope addressed in Carver’s hand. Fine condition.George Washington Carver tells the mother of one of his students that her son has “a very unusual mind, just the kind out of which Edisons are made. I wish you could have been with us in the laboratory, and heard him name some of the sweet potato and peanut products...”Carver writes in full: Sorry you could not come down with the dear boys, I trust you are feeling quite well by this time. I wish you knew what a Joy it is to have your son come down, he is in every way a dear, sweet, wholesome boy, With a very unusual mind, Just the kind out of which Edisons are made. I wish you could have been with us in the laboratory, and heard him name some of the sweet potato and peanut products, also the Clay and minerals. The dear boy remembered them without any coaching of mine. How I wish he was nearer to me so I could have him often when I was testing out some simple things that he could understand. He tells me the pimples on his face begins to come and go sometimes they are almost gone. This is fine. Just what I had hoped to hear as they should grow less and less until they disappear altogether. With no rough, coarse skin. The thing that makes me the most happy is his right leg. I want you to examine it and see how the muscles are developing. how the veins are swelling. Please pray with me that God will bless every means employed to the healing thereof. I am so confident that he will grant our request. The dear boy has such fine powers of description, he described a moth he found so perfectly that I could tell just what kind it was.On 28 August 1934, Dr. Carver wrote Mrs. Olivia Anderson’s son, Floyd, in part, “Some time dear, I wish you write me a brief story of your case, and how the treatment has benefitted you. Dear, you are my first patient and it would be such a treasure to have it from you...” From the 26 January 1936 edition of “The Montgomery Advertiser,” in an article titled “Infantile Paralysis and the Oil Therapy.” In part, “Dr. George W. Carver, of Tuskegee Institute ... has already proved conclusively that peanut oils offer a possibility at least of adding to a man’s means of treating the after-effects of infantile paralysis...” Dr. George Washington Carver developed over 250 different peanut products, the accomplishment for which he is most remembered. In the last 35 years, only one Carver letter mentioning peanuts has sold at a major public auction. $800 - $1,200

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Chagall, Marc and Joan Miro. (2) Printed exhibition bills signed.

Lot 38: Chagall, Marc and Joan Miro. (2) Printed exhibition bills signed.

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Description: 38. Chagall, Marc and Joan Miro. (2) Printed exhibition bills signed. Including: (1) Poster printed in black and gray and signed in black grease pencil (“Marc Chagall”), on (9.75 x 11 in.; 247 x 279 mm.) paper. In French, advertising the Marc Chagall Musée Des Arts Décoratifs – Palais Du Louvre, Pavillon Marsan, 107 De Rivoli- Tous Le Jours De 10 H. A 17 H. Sauf Le Mardi. With minor edge bending. In very good condition. (2) Color printed poster signed in faint ink (“Miro”), on (8.5 x 10.75 in.; 215 x 273 mm.) paper. In French, advertising the Joan Miro Constellations, Pierre Matisse Editeur, Exposition Chez, Bergruen – 70 Rue De L’Université – Paris. Printed by Mourlot IMP. Paris. During the 1950s the renowned French printer, Mourlot Freres, printed most of the “original” posters of the most important artists of the day. In 1959 they printed the series “Affiches Originales” for collectors. They are reduced lithographic versions of the “original” posters created by the contemporary masters, Picasso, Chagall, Braque, Matisse, Miro, Leger, and Dufy. $200 - $300

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Castro, Fidel. Autograph manuscript, 2 pages, (ca. 1961).

Lot 39: Castro, Fidel. Autograph manuscript, 2 pages, (ca. 1961).

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Description: 39. Castro, Fidel. Autograph manuscript, 2 pages (6 x 8.75 in.; 152 x 222 mm.), (ca. 1961), the notes are written in blue ink by Castro, in Spanish, on a single piece of paper, with cross-outs and marginal notations. A unique Castro handwritten manuscript. Notes for a speech possibly given at the U.N., decrying U.S. actions in the wake of the Bay of Pigs.It seems like they are worried within the Justice department of the United States Government, every time the anger and desperation increases, because of our solid activity and the victorious and uncontrollable development of our revolution…Castro writes in full: Hiram of Lubrijón [?] The Revolutionary Government is very aware of the desperate efforts that is [illegible] the efforts that reflect in the last days [lined out on text] the open [lined out on text] activity that the imperialism has been realizing during the last weeks in order to promote at all cost [illegible] revolutionaries, terrorism acts, murder attempts and all type of fights that have a tendency to interfere with the revolutionary process [illegible]. That activity has been doubled after [lined out on text] reports have been expressed to the ONU to the Prime Minister of the Government. It seems like they are worried within the Justice department of the United States Government, every time the anger and desperation increases, because of our solid activity and the victorious and uncontrollable development of our revolution that translates each time in a less dissimulated support of anti-revolutionaries, the war criminals and the worse [lined out on text and partly illegible] traitors, mercenaries of all type that [illegible] of service. Disembark between Moa and Baracoa [?] group of expatriates and gringos coming from [lined out on text] They left the United States. They are 27 in total Leader dead. One hurt and another prisoner [illegible lined out on text] quickly attacked combated [lined out on text] by the army forces and militia’s farmers. [Next all lined out on text] The Ministry of the Arm Forces communicates the following: In the day of yesterday [illegible] communicates the headquarters of [illegible] Militia of the West.In March of 1960, a French freighter unloading munitions from Belgium exploded in Havana taking 75 lives and injuring 200, some of whom subsequently died. The U.S. denied Cuba’s accusation of sabotage but admitted that it had sought to prevent the shipment. And so it went, reaching a high point in April of the following year in the infamous CIA-organized invasion of Cuba at the Bay of Pigs. Over 100 exiles died in the attack. Close to 1,200 others were taken prisoner by the Cubans. It was later revealed that four American pilots flying for the CIA had lost their lives as well. The Bay of Pigs assault had relied heavily on the Cuban people rising up to join the invaders, but this was not to be the case. As it was, the leadership and ranks of the exile forces were riddled with former supporters and henchmen of Fulgencio Battista, the dictator overthrown by Castro, and would not have been welcomed back by the Cuban people under any circumstances. Despite the fact that the Kennedy administration was acutely embarrassed by the unmitigated defeat--indeed, because of it--a campaign of smaller-scale attacks upon Cuba was initiated almost immediately, under the rubric of Operation Mongoose. Throughout the 1960’s, the Caribbean island was subjected to countless sea and air commando raids by exiles, at times accompanied by their CIA supervisors, inflicting damage upon oil refineries, chemical plants and railroad bridges, cane fields, sugar mills and sugar warehouses, infiltrating spies, saboteurs, and assassins, anything to damage the Cuban economy, promote disaffection, or make the revolution look bad. Taking the lives of Cuban militia members and others in the process, pirate attacks on Cuban fishing boats and merchant ships, bombardments of Soviet vessels docked in Cuba, an assault upon a Soviet army camp with 12 Russian soldiers reported wounded, a hotel and a theater shelled from offshore because Russians and East Europeans were supposed to be present there. These actions were not always carried out on the order of the CIA or with its foreknowledge, but the Agency could hardly plead “rogue elephant”. It had created Operating Mongoose headquarters in Miami. $12,000 - $15,000

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Churchill, Winston / Dwight D. Eisenhower / Bernard L. Montgomery. Illuminated manuscript document.

Lot 40: Churchill, Winston / Dwight D. Eisenhower / Bernard L. Montgomery. Illuminated manuscript document.

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Description: 40. Churchill, Winston / Dwight D. Eisenhower / Bernard L. Montgomery. Illuminated manuscript document, entitled “The Child’s Rights” signed (“Winston S. Churchill”; “Dwight D. Eisenhower” and “B.L. Montgomery Field – Marshall.”), 1 page (12.25 x 16 in.; 311 x 406 mm.), no place, September 1945, being a handwritten calligraphic document, on vellum, listing universal
rights for children. Signed by Churchill, Eisenhower and Montgomery just
four months after the end of the war in Europe, most probably produced for a fund-raising charitable event.
Artist William Bromage has scribed in red, blue, black, green and gold inks with hand-colored, historiated borders. Signed by the artist at bottom. Slight toning along edges; otherwise, fine. One month following the end of World War II, Winston Churchill, Dwight D. Eisenhower and Bernard Montgomery sign an illuminated copy of The Declaration of the Rights of the Child.The
document states in full:

The Child’s Rights The Declaration of Geneva, drafted in 1922 by
Eglantyne Jebb, Founder of the Save the Children Fund, has been endorsed
by the leading statesmen of many countries, including successive Prime
Ministers of Great Britain, and Prime Ministers of the Overseas British
Dominions, and was adopted by the Assembly of the League of Nations in
1924 as the League&supl;s Charter of Child Welfare. By the present
declaration of the rights of the child, commonly known as the ‘Declaration
of Geneva, men & women of all nations recognizing that Mankind owes to
the Child the best that it has to give, declare and accept it as their
duty that, beyond and above all considerations of race, nationality or
creed:

I. The child must be given the means requisite for its normal development
both materially and spiritually.
 II. The child that is hungry must be fed; the child that is sick must be
nursed; the child that is backward must be helped; the delinquent child
must be reclaimed; and the orphan & the waif must be sheltered and
succored.
 III. The child must be the first to receive relief in times of distress.
 IV. The child must be put in a position to earn a livelihood & must be
protected against every form of exploitation. V. The child must be brought
up in the consciousness that its talents must be devoted to the service of
its fellow men.World War II was the first modern war in which more civilians than soldiers were killed or maimed. By August 1945, when the Japanese surrendered, some 40 million civilians had died on both sides of the conflict. After the war ended, 20 million European children were war orphans, often lingering for years in displaced persons camps that sprung up all over the continent. The Declaration of the Rights of the Child is the name given to a series of related children’s rights proclamations drafted by Save the Children founder Eglantyne Jebb in 1922. Jebb believed that the rights of the child should be especially protected and enforced. These ideas were adopted by the International Save the Children Union, in Geneva on 23 February 1923 and endorsed by the League of Nations General Assembly on 26 November 1924 as the World Child Welfare Charter. These proclamations were not enforceable by international law, but rather served as guidelines for countries to follow. $6,000 - $8,000

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Churchill, Winston. Hand-annotated typescript signed (

Lot 41: Churchill, Winston. Hand-annotated typescript signed ("Winston S. Churchill"), 10 pages, 22 May 1931

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Description: 41. Churchill, Winston. Hand-annotated typescript signed (“Winston S. Churchill”), 10 pages (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.), no place, 22 May 1931. Typed on ten separate leaves, Churchill has heavily corrected and emended his analysis for the proposed Austro-German Customs Union he wrote for an American newspaper syndicate. Punch hole present at the upper left of each page; otherwise, fine.Analyzing the proposed Austro-German Customs Union in 1931, Winston Churchill deploys the formulation he would use 15 years later in his famous “Iron Curtain” speech: From the Adriatic to the Baltic, stretches a belt of vigourous nationalities who look to France to guard their…independence… Churchill writes in part: We must recognize that the French people are not in that mood of sweet self-abnegation which is now so fashionable in Great Britain. They are resolved to hold their ancient world position, by every means in their power. They will not under any circumstances allow Germany to create a situation in which her bulk and force would expose France to a repetition of the terrible experiences of 1870 and 1914. France defends her interests with selfish but manly vigour in every quarter of the globe. Churchill continues, An elaborate system of engagements and alliances has marshalled the smaller states of Central Europe into the mutually-protective organization known as “The Little Entente.” Sandwiched between the inherent and indestructible might of Germany on the one hand and the vast mass of barbarian Russia on the other, these young States have real need to band together among themselves under the aegis of their powerful Gallic patron and champion. From the Adriatic to the Baltic stretches a belt of vigorous nationalities who look to France to guard their recently gained or re-gained independence... Foremost among those small nations was Czechoslovakia, and Churchill praises roundly the Czech foreign minister, Eduard Benes, as a resourceful, courageous, rebel, soldier, statesman. He lauds Czechoslovakia as a fresh, new, highly democratic state...She is not a naughty old-world tyrant but a liberated captive... The substantial Czech army, and the wise leadership of men like Benes, will constitute a barrier to any Austro-German compact or eventual anschluss. These words of respect contrast painfully to Neville Chamberlain’s 1938 comments on the Czech-Sudeten crisis that led to the Munich sellout, as a “quarrel in a far-away country between people of whom we know nothing.” Churchill had foreseen the emergence of a revisionist Germany as early as 1919. In March 1931 he described the Austro-German Customs Union as a danger to peace. Later he warned, German youth mounting in its broad swelling flood will never accept the conditions and implications of the Treaty of Versailles. By May 1935 he was writing in Collier’s about the deterioration of the European order; in June he drew attention to the rapid German rearmament and asked his American readers how peace might be maintained. $6,000 - $8,000

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Churchill, Winston and Franklin D. Roosevelt. World War II-date broadside document signed by both

Lot 42: Churchill, Winston and Franklin D. Roosevelt. World War II-date broadside document signed by both

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Description: 42. Churchill, Winston and Franklin D. Roosevelt. Rare World War II-date broadside document signed by both (“Winston S. Churchill” and “Franklin D. Roosevelt”), 1 page (6.75 x 8.75 in.; 171 x 222 mm.), in black with orange border and orange letter detail. “Sail on, O Ship of State!” signed by allied leaders Winston Churchill & Franklin D. Roosevelt at the Atlantic Conference, August, 1941.The broadside is a printing, commissioned by Churchill, of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s verse, “Sail on, O Ship of State!” Churchill circulated this verse at the Atlantic Conference (August, 1941), which took place aboard a warship anchored in Placentia Bay, Newfoundland. At that momentous meeting, the two leaders and their military aides agreed upon critical policies for the conduct of a joint war against Germany, even though the U.S. was still officially neutral and would remain so until December 8. The meeting culminated in the Atlantic Charter, a declaration of principles issued a few days after the conference. Often compared to Wilson’s Fourteen Points, the Charter also laid the foundation for the United Nations Declaration, signed by 26 nations in January 1942. Signed at the upper right corner in black ink, Franklin D. Roosevelt and at the lower left corner, Winston S. Churchill. Tipped to a matt. In fine condition. Documents signed by both FDR and Churchill are very uncommon; this piece, with such a great historical connection to the two greats leaders and their common cause, is especially desirable. Note: The following lot 43 is an original Henry Wadsworth Longfellow autographed manuscript poem of “Sail on, O Ship of State!”. $8,000 - $12,000

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Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. Autograph manuscript poem signed (

Lot 43: Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. Autograph manuscript poem signed ("Henry W. Longfellow").

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Description: 43. Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. Autograph manuscript poem signed (“Henry W. Longfellow”), 1 page (7 x 8.9 in.; 178 x 226 mm.), “Sail On, O Ship Of State!”, originally published in book form in 1850, The Building of the Ship. Mounting remnants on verso with areas exhibiting lighter text.Poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow writes the poem used ninety years later by FDR to rally the allies to resist the Axis Powers.Longfellow writes in full: Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O Union, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate! We know what Master laid thy keel, What Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, What anvils rang, what hammers beat, In what a forge and what a heat, Were shaped the anchors of thy hope! Fear not each sudden sound and shock, ’T is of the wave and not the rock; ’T is but the flapping of the sail, And not a rent made by the gale! In spite of rock and tempest’s roar, In spite of false lights on the shore, Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea! Our hearts, our hopes, are all with thee, Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears, Our faith triumphant o’er our fears, Are all with thee,—are all with thee! Henry W. Longfellow On 9 February 1941, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill delivered his “Give us the tools and we will finish the job” speech to his people. Churchill urged the Americans, not yet at war with Germany, to lend a hand to his country’s battle to fight against the terror then gripping the globe. Churchill intoned: ...The other day President Roosevelt gave his opponent in the late Presidential election a letter of introduction to me, and in it he wrote out a verse in his own handwriting from Longfellow, which, he said, “applies to you people as it does to us.” Here is the verse: “Sail on, O Ship of State! Sail on, O Union, strong and great! Humanity with all its fears, With all the hopes of future years, Is hanging breathless on thy fate!” What is the answer that I shall give in your name to this great man, the thrice-chosen head of a nation of 130,000,000? Here is the answer which I will give to President Roosevelt. Put your confidence in us. Give us your faith and your blessing, and under Providence all will be well. We shall not fail or falter; we shall not weaken or tire. Neither the sudden shock of battle nor the long-drawn trials of vigilance and exertion will wear us down. Give us the tools and we will finish the job.” This Longfellow poem also struck the heart of another great leader. A famous story concerning the poem is related by Sandburg in his biography of Abraham Lincoln: “Early in the war a newspaper clipping of a speech delivered in New York came to Lincoln’s hands, and at its close his eyes caught stanzas…beginning: ‘Thou, too, sail on, O Ship of State!…’ Nicolay was surprised at the way these lines hit the President. He seemed to be reading them for the first time. Nicolay had memorized the piece at school he recited it for Lincoln to the last lines: ‘Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears, Our faith triumphant o’er our fears.’ They stirred something deep in Lincoln. ‘His eyes filled with tears, and his cheeks were wet,’ said Nicolay. ‘He did not speak for some minutes, but finally said with simplicity: “It is a wonderful gift to be able to stir men like that”. After the President’s endorsement, the poem became the watchword of Union hopes. A fantastic piece of literary history that served the country in two wars spanning two centuries. This is the only handwritten copy of this poem by Longfellow that we have ever encountered. $3,000 - $5,000

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Churchill, Winston. / Franklin D. Roosevelt / Joseph Stalin. White House Card signed by all three.

Lot 44: Churchill, Winston. / Franklin D. Roosevelt / Joseph Stalin. White House Card signed by all three.

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Description: 44. Churchill, Winston. / Franklin D. Roosevelt / Joseph Stalin. White House Card signed by all three, 1 page (4 x 2 in.; 102 x 51 mm.), tipped to a (4.6 x 6.6 in.; 117 x 168 mm.) leaf, Tehran, Iran, (ca. 28 November – 1 December1943). At the top, Churchill has inscribed, “For Nicholas”, and Stalin signed in Cyrillic below the gilt embossed Presidential seal, followed by “Franklin D. Roosevelt” and “Winston S. Churchill” beneath. Exhibits slight toning.“The Big Three” at The Tehran Conference.The Tehran Conference, code-named “Eureka”, was a strategy meeting held between Joseph Stalin, Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston Churchill from 28 November to 1 December 1943. It was held in the Soviet Embassy in Tehran, Iran and was the first of the World War II conferences held between all of the ”Big Three” Allied leaders (the Soviet Union, the United States and the United Kingdom). Although all three of the leaders present arrived with differing objectives, the main outcome of the Tehran Conference was the commitment to the opening of a second front against Nazi Germany by the Western Allies.  $8,000 - $12,000

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Churchill, Winston. Incredible large photograph inscribed to Joseph Stalin.

Lot 45: Churchill, Winston. Incredible large photograph inscribed to Joseph Stalin.

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Description: 45. Churchill, Winston. Incredible large photograph inscribed to Joseph Stalin, measuring 11 x 13.75 in.; 279 x 349 mm. on photographer’s mount (image measuring 7.75 x 9.5 in.; 197 x 241 mm.), depicting Churchill seated at the Cabinet Office table. Mount slightly soiled and creased on margins.With the inevitable defeat of Germany in sight, Winston Churchill dedicates a magnificent, large photograph to Soviet leader Joseph Stalin.Inscribed on the mount in black ink by Churchill: “From his Friend Winston S. Churchill, September 1944 To Marshal & Premier Stalin who at the head of the Russian Armies & of the Soviet Government broke the main strength of the German military machine & helped us all to open paths to Peace, Justice & Freedom.” Churchill was in North America for the Second Quebec Conference (code-named “OCTAGON”) for much of September 1944, returning to London only on 26 September. Churchill likely dedicated this photograph prior to his departure for the Fourth Moscow Conference (code-named “Tolstoy”) where he would meet with Stalin and other Soviet leaders along with U.S. and Polish dignitaries from October 9-19. Provenance: Sir John “Jock” Colville (1915-1987), assistant private secretary to Churchill. Present on verso is an autograph note penned on a label by Colville, “This photograph was inscribed by the P.M. for Stalin but it was then found that the silver frame for which it was destined obscured the inscription. He therefore rewrote it on another photograph and gave me this one. J.R.C.”
 $40,000 - $60,000

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Lewis, Meriwether. Partial autograph document signed (

Lot 46: Lewis, Meriwether. Partial autograph document signed ("Capt. Meriwether Lewis"), 22 July 1801.

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Description: 46. (1) Lewis, Meriwether. (1774-1809). Partial autograph document signed (“Capt. Meriwether Lewis”) in text, 2 pages (8 x 2 in.; 203 x 50 mm.) front & verso. [Staunton, Virginia], 22 July 1801. Documents signed by famed explorers Lewis and Clark.At the time, Lewis was personal secretary to President Jefferson. The upper portions of retained copies of a receipt on one side and a letter on the other. In full: (Copy) July 22nd 1801. Recieved [sic] of Capt. Meriwether Lewis for and on account of Alexander Humphries of Staunton two hundred & fourteen dollars and thirty Cents, in the following manner,” On verso: “(Copy) Staunton July 12th 1801. Dear Sir, This will be handed you by our mutual friend Mr Monroe together with your ac[coun]t. for the maintainance [sic] of a Public Horse Mr. Simmons has” Toned at perimeter, light show-through on each side. Fine condition.William Simmons was the War Department Accountant. On 21 February 1801, Simmons had sent to Secretary of War ad interim Samuel Dexter certification of payment of $135.82 to Dr. Alexander Humphries as additional compensation for attendance on troops of the United States stationed at Staunton, Virginia. “Mr Monroe” may be James Monroe.Autograph material of Meriwether Lewis is rare (he mysteriously died of gunshot wounds in Tennessee in 1809 as he was returning to Washington). In the last 20 years, only seven signatures of Lewis in any form have appeared at major public auctions.(2) Clark, William. (1770-1838). Autograph document signed (“Wm Clark”) as Superintendent of Indian Affairs (appointed by President James Monroe), 1 page (7.75 x 7.25 in. 196 x 184 mm.) [St. Louis], 1 August 1828. In full: Received of Peter Chouteau Jr. as atty in fact for Baronet Vasquez forty Dollars the amount of public money placed in the hands of Capt. Vasquez to pay some contingency of his Agency in 1827 for which he has been held accountable to the United States.” Pinhole in blank upper right. Fine condition. Baronet Vasquez was an interpreter. Peter [Pierre] Chouteau, Jr. was nephew of fur trader Auguste Chouteau, one of the founders of the town of St. Louis.After the Louisiana Purchase, President Thomas Jefferson initiated an exploration of the newly purchased land and the territory beyond the “great rock mountains” in the West. To lead the expedition, Jefferson chose his personal secretary. Capt. Meriwether Lewis, an intelligent and literate man who also possessed skills as a frontiersman. Lewis in turn solicited the help of William Clark, one of his commanding officers in the Army, whose abilities as draftsman and frontiersman were even stronger. The expedition began on 14 May 1804, just outside St. Louis, returning there on 23 September 1806. $15,000 - $20,000

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Clark, William. Document signed (

Lot 47: Clark, William. Document signed ("Wm. Clark") as Governor of Missouri Territory, 27 April 1814.

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Description: 47. Clark, William. Document signed (“Wm. Clark”) as Governor of Missouri Territory, 1 page (7.75 x 6.25 in.; 197 x 159 mm.), St. Louis Missouri Territory, 27 April 1814. Light soiling.Famed explorer and Governor of the Missouri Territory, William Clark signs a document authorizing provisions for men in the Missouri Territory.The document reads in full: A provision Return for fourteen men ordered into the Service of the United States by Gov. William Clark for two days commensing [sic] the Twenty Sixth & Ending the Twenty Seventh of April 1814. no. Men 14, no. days 2, no. Rations p day 21 Total 42 [signed] Joseph HendersonThe Contractor will issue Forty two Compleat [sic] Rations as agreeable to the above Return St. Louis Missouri Territory the 27th April 1814 [signed] Wm. ClarkAs a reward for their contributions during their expedition to the Pacific, Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were rewarded for their trailblazing efforts with extra pay and land. Clark received an appointment as the agent for Indian Affairs in the West and became a brigadier general of the militia. In 1808 Clark married Julia Hancock and, along with his own family, cared for the children of Sacagawea after she died in 1812. The next year he served as governor of the Missouri Territory, a position he held for seven years. Once the territory became a state in 1820, Clark ran for governor but lost the election. He continued his work in Indian affairs and was known for his fair treatment of Native Americans. $2,000 - $3,000

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Clark, William. Letter signed (

Lot 48: Clark, William. Letter signed ("Wm. Clark") as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, 5 May 1836.

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Description: 48. Clark, William. Letter signed (“Wm. Clark”) as Superintendent of Indian Affairs, 1 page (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm.), St. Louis, 5 May 1836. To “Jos. M. Street, Esq., Ind. Agent, Rock Island”. On watermarked laid paper. With partial leaf addressed to “Joseph M. Street, Esq. / Indian agent / Rock Island, / Ill,” docketed, probably by Street, “Answered 17 May 1836.” In-filled in two areas at left margin with loss of a few words. Decades after the Lewis & Clark exploration of the Louisiana Purchase and only a few years after President Andrew Jackson signed the Indian Removal Act, Indian Superintendent William Clark sees “to the lines of the Reserve” based on “the assertion of Black Hawk and Wapalaw” chiefs of the Sauk and Fox tribes.Clark writes in full: I have received your letters of the 18th, 26th, and 27th ulto – In that of the 26th, you state your conviction that there are at present no intruders on the reservation on the Ioway, expressing, however, your intent personally to ascertain the fact, upon receiving orders to that effect. You are made acquainted with the assertion of Black Hawk and Wapalaw on this subject, and have been furnished with the papers requisite to guide you as to the lines of the Reserve; but the necessity of a personal examination into the matter, must be judged of by yourself. I am, respectfully Your ob. Svt. Wm. ClarkAt Fort Armstrong, now Rock Island, Illinois, 21 September 1832, Gen. Winfield Scott and Illinois Gov. John Reynolds concluded a treaty with the Sacs (Sauks) and Foxes (Meskwaki), by which, in settlement for the Black Hawk War, the Indians ceded what was called the “Black Hawk Purchase.” The treaty provided that “the United States agree to a reservation for the use of the said confederated tribes, of a tract of land containing four hundred square miles…” The tract was surveyed in October 1835. Less than a year later, on 28 September 1836, the tribes ceded this reservation, the “Reserve.” back to the United States. Chief Wapalaw (1787-1842), also spelled Wapello, signed both treaties.Wapalaw (or Wapello) was a member of the Meskwaki or Fox tribe. Black Hawk was a Sauk leader. After wars with the French in present-day Wisconsin in the first half of the 19th century, the Meskwaki and Sauk tribes were pushed southward into Illinois, Iowa, and Missouri. They moved south together. Although the tribes remained distinct, United States treaties assumed there was a “Sac and Fox Confederacy.” In 1836, Joseph M. Street (1782-1840) was named as a U.S. government liaison and representative of the Sauk and Fox. In 1837, he accompanied a Sauk and Fox delegation to Washington, D.C., where they agreed to relinquish 1,250,000 of their lands in Iowa to the United States officially signing a treaty on 21 October 1837.Street earned the respect of Chief Wapello. When Street died in 1840, he was buried on the Indian Agency. The tribes gave property to his wife so she and her family could make a living. Two years later, Wapello was buried next to General Street. It was his often expressed wish that he be laid to rest alongside his good friend General Street. The site of the government agency is now named Chief Wapello’s Memorial Park, southeast of Agency, Iowa.In 1996, an 1831 manuscript letter written by William Clark to the Agent for the Sauk and Fox tribes about tensions involving the Sauk tribes and their leader Black Hawk sold at Christie’s for $10,350. $3,000 - $5,000

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Clay, Henry. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 49: Clay, Henry. Autograph letter signed ("H. Clay"), 2 pages, 22 April 1841, to John C. Largent, Esq.

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Description: 49. Clay, Henry. Autograph letter signed (“H. Clay”), 2 pages (8 x 10 in.; 203 x 254 mm), 22 April 1841, to John C. Largent, Esq. Slight separation at folds, otherwise fine. Days after William Henry Harrison’s death, Henry Clay criticizes the new President Tyler: “His administration too is in the nature of a Regency, and Regencies are often factious, weak…”Clay writes in part: Prior to the receipt of your favor, I had seen in the newspapers that Morris was elected Mayor of N. York. I was glad that his majority was not greater. I am sorry to observe without being able to account for, the falling off in the Whig vote at Albany. A copy of the letter from Mr. Tyler to Mr. Curtis to which you allude, has been sent me from N. York. I was struck with one fact, that its date purports to be at Williamsburg in Va. two days after Mr. Curtis’ appointment. That is a very short time. Whether the letter be genuine or not, it cannot vary the question of the actual fullness and propriety of the appointment. I should not willing merely but highly gratified with your making a collection of my speeches, and preceding it by appropriate notices of the subjects of them and the speaker provided the publication would afford you a fair remuneration. I am so reluctant to being the occasion of loss... .to any friend, on my account. You are aware that some seventeen or eighteen years ago there was a publication of my speeches. Since then I have spoken a great deal - perhaps entirely too much. The latter period embraces more speeches, and probably of greater interest than those comprised in the first part of my public career. Several friends have addressed me orally & by letter, from time to time, urging... a comprehensive publication. I am not aware however that any one is actually engaged in the preparation of such a work... Our Congressional election takes place next week... From all that I know and hear of Tyler, he will not disappoint us. He wants Harrison’s popularity, and so far we shall suffer. His administration too is in the nature of a Regency, and Regencies’ are often factious, weak, and ... (?) With a lengthy initialed postscript.Henry Clay had just lost the nomination from his party (Whigs) to William Henry Harrison in 1840. $1,500 - $2,000

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 50: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed ("S.L. Clemens"),1 May 1908, on his stationary.

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Description: 50. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (“S.L. Clemens”) 1 page, (5 x 6.5 in.; 127 x 165 mm.) 1 May 1908, on his “21 Fifth Avenue” watermarked stationery. With a photocopy of the original envelope, which was addressed by Twain to: “Senator Cullom of Illinois, Senate Chamber, Washington, D.C.” Fine condition.Mark Twain declines a U.S. Senator Shelby Moore Cullom’s invitation, citing advanced age of nearly 74 and his decision to no longer travel.Clemens writes in full: You offer me a great pleasure & a distinguished compliment, & I should be glad & proud to take advantage of the offer if I could, but I have to deny myself for I shall be in my 74th year before the date you mention, & well set & solidified in my long-ago-arrived-at determination not to make another land-journey that can be avoided. With the greatest respect. Clemens celebrated his 73rd birthday, beginning his 74th year, on 30 November 1908. Republican Senator Shelby Moore Cullom had represented Illinois in the U.S. Senate since 1883. In 1904, Clemens, had leased a four-story brick and stone dwelling at 21 Fifth Avenue, at the southeast corner of Ninth Street in Manhattan. On 18 June 1908, he moved into his last home, Stormfield, in Redding, Connecticut. $1,000 - $1,500

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