WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options
Auction Description for RM Sotheby's: Arizona - Friday
Auction Description:

Kicking off the collector car auction season on a strong note, RM Sotheby’s returns to the vibrant grounds of the Arizona Biltmore in Phoenix, 19–20 January, for its 18th annual Arizona sale. Last year’s sale was highlighted by the 1937 Mercedes-Benz 540 K Special Roadster that sold for $9.9 million before a packed house. The auction’s impressive results represented a new benchmark for any automobile sold in Arizona auction week history, breaking the previous record set by RM in 2015. In total, 17 lots broke the million-dollar mark, with the event generating a total of $62.8 million with 85 percent of all lots sold.

 

RM Sotheby’s 2017 Arizona sale is set to continue the company’s strong track record in Phoenix, presenting more than 100 blue-chip automobiles from the world’s most iconic marques. Hand-selected by RM’s international team of specialists, the catalogue is set to span the spectrum of the market, from pre-war classics through to important sports and racing cars and contemporary supercars. Leading up to the sale, the grounds of the Biltmore will play host to the Arizona Concours d’Elegance, creating the ideal destination for enthusiasts looking to enjoy a week of classic car camaraderie.

BIDDERS' CONDITIONS OF BUSINESS:
Please ensure that you have read and understand these Conditions of Business prior to bidding at this or any other RM Auctions, Inc. d.b.a. RM Sotheby's ("RM") sale. Please note that the winning Bidder becomes a Buyer who is also bound by these Conditions of Business.

1. Registration Fee. In order to register to bid onsite at auction, bidders must pay a $200.00 (USD) bidder registration fee.

2. Bidder must be at least 18 years of age. To bid at an RM auction, a Bidder must be at least 18 years of age.

3. All Bids are Final at Auction. At auction, there is no "cooling off period." If you are awarded the final bid, ownership changes hands at the drop of the gavel. You own the lot ("lot" meaning any item sold at auction) and are responsible for payment in full. No Bidder may retract a bid made during the sale for any reason.

4. Payment. In the event of a successful bid, one of our Administration Representatives will e-mail you a copy of your Bill of Sale and wire transfer instructions following the sale. Payment is due in full on or before 5:00 p.m. of the next business day following the auction ("payment deadline"), and payment is to be made to RM. All payments must be in the form of cash or certified funds unless other arrangements have been approved in advance. Cash payments will be reported according to U.S. federal government requirements. The title in a purchased lot will not pass until RM has received the full purchase price in cleared funds. RM is not obligated to release a lot to the Buyer until the title to the lot has passed, and any earlier release does not affect the passing of the title or the winning Bidder's unconditional obligation to pay the full purchase price (the purchase price is comprised of the winning bid, the Buyer's Premium, and other approved costs). In the event that the winning Bidder does not pay any portion of the purchase price by the payment deadline, the Bidder agrees to and acknowledges the following: if RM elects to pay the consignor any portion of the sale proceeds, RM shall have all of the rights of the consignor to pursue the Buyer for any amounts paid to the consignor, whether at law, in equity, or under these Conditions of Business. The Bidder hereby authorizes RM to deduct the purchase price from the Bidder's cash deposit or to charge this amount to the credit card that the Bidder has provided. If the Bidder's cash deposit and/or credit card payment does not cover the purchase price, in addition to other remedies available by law, RM reserves the right to impose from the payment deadline until the full purchase price has been made by the Buyer, a late charge of ten percent (10%) interest per annum on the (1) purchase price; (2) maximum published Seller's Commission; (3) maximum published Buyer's Premium; (4) expenses; (5) any collection costs, attorney fees, and court costs incurred to enforce payment; and (6) other damages.

5. All Sales are "As Is" and "Where Is." The Bidder is responsible for inspections and verification of condition, authenticity, and completeness of any lot purchased. No warranties or representations of any type whatsoever are made by RM. Statements printed in catalogues, brochures, signs, and window cards, as well as verbal statements made by auctioneers or auction staff, are representations made by the consignor, and RM has no obligation to verify or authenticate any such claims or representations. Any announcements made at the time of sale supersede any earlier printed information. Except as herein provided, all lots are sold as is, where is, with no representations or warranties, expressed or implied. THE CONSIGNOR AND RM DISCLAIM ALL WARRANTIES, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED, AS TO CONDITION, ORIGINALITY, OR AUTHENTICITY; ORIGIN OR PROVENANCE; PREVIOUS USE OR OWNERSHIP; MANUFACTURING OR RESTORATION PROCESSES; YEAR OR AGE; SERIAL NUMBER, MAKE, OR MODEL; OPTIONS AND TOOLS; ENGINE HOURS; AND MILEAGE OF ANY LOT OR COMPONENT OF ANY LOT, AND THEY SPECIFICALLY DISCLAIM ANY WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR ANY PARTICULAR PURPOSE.

6. Bidder Responsible for All Risk of Loss or Damage. The Bidder is responsible for all risk of loss or damage immediately upon purchase of the lot.

7. Sales Tax. If a Purchaser of a vehicle resides in a state in which RM is registered to collect Sales Tax, RM is required to collect sales tax on the purchase of that vehicle. Currently, RM is registered to collect sales tax in the following states: California, Florida, Indiana, South Carolina, Arizona, New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Texas. RM reserves the right to collect sales tax from residents from other jurisdictions if RM deems the collection of tax necessary.

8. Additional Fees and Taxes. The final bid price does not include the Buyer's Premium or applicable taxes on each lot purchased. The bidder is responsible to pay all city, state, or other taxes due for which the bidder does not qualify as exempt. Proof of exemption is the Bidder's responsibility. Bidders are responsible for any duty costs noted or announced that are associated with their purchase. International bidders must pay any and all import duties that are due upon the import of the lot to its final destination.

9. Buyer's Premium. Buyer's Premiums are as follows: a ten percent (10%) commission will be added to the final bid of each motor car lot purchased, and a fifteen percent (15%) commission will be added to the final bid of any other lot purchased.

10. Reserve. Lots not marked as "no reserve" (or similar) are subject to a reserve bid set by the consignor. When a lot is sold subject to such a reserve bid, the auctioneer may bid on the consignor's behalf in an amount not to exceed the amount of the reserve bid.

11. Title Transfer. In an effort to ensure all titles are free and clear of liens or encumbrances, RM manages the process of title reassignment on behalf of the Bidder. Buyers will receive titles in the mail up to fifteen (15) business days following the auction.

12. Legal Action. In the event that either party brings action against the other, arising from or relating to this auction, the prevailing party, as determined by the court, shall be entitled to recover its reasonable attorneys' fees and costs. Jurisdiction for any action brought shall lie exclusively in a court of competent jurisdiction in the judicial district in which the auction is located.

13. Absentee and Telephone Bidding. Absentee and telephone bidding are services provided by RM for your benefit, and RM cannot be held responsible for errors or omissions with respect to the bidding process, including failure to execute any bid. By submitting these bids, you have entered into a binding contract to purchase each lot if your bid is successful. If your bid is successful, you are to pay the purchase price, including the Buyer's Premium and sales tax, if not otherwise exempt. It is your responsibility to provide proof of exemption from sales tax at the time of registering to bid. By participating in telephone bidding, you acknowledge that RM has the right to record all telephone calls.

14. Online Services are "As Is" and "As Available." Bidders may be able to bid via websites, telephone services, applications, and tools (collectively "Services").

RM tries to keep the Services safe, secure, and functioning properly, but RM cannot guarantee the continuous operation of or access to the Services. Bid update and other notification functionality may not occur in real time. Such functionality is subject to delays beyond RM's control.

Bidders agree that they are making use of the Services at their own risk and that they are being provided to Bidders on an "AS IS" and "AS AVAILABLE" basis. Accordingly, to the extent permitted by applicable law, RM excludes all expressed or implied warranties, terms, and conditions, including, but not limited to, implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement. In addition, to the extent permitted by applicable law, RM (including any parent, subsidiaries, affiliates, officers, directors, agents, and employees) is not liable, and Bidders agree not to hold RM responsible for any damages or losses (including, but not limited to, loss of money, goodwill or reputation, profits, or other intangible losses or any special, indirect, or consequential damages) resulting directly or indirectly from:

• The inability to use RM's Services
• Pricing, shipping, or other guidance provided by RM
• Delays or disruptions in RM's Services
• Viruses or other malicious software obtained by accessing or linking to the Services
• Glitches, bugs, errors, or inaccuracies of any kind in the Services
• Damage to any hardware device from the use of any RM Services
• The content, actions, or inactions of third parties, including items listed using RM's Services or the destruction of allegedly fake items
• The duration or manner in which the listings appear in search results
• The need to modify practices, content, or behavior, or the loss of or inability to do business as a result of changes to this user agreement or RM policies.

15. Posted Terms. Any and all terms of sale posted on the auction premises, printed in sale brochures or forms, described in this catalogue, publicly announced, or otherwise published are incorporated herein by reference. It is the Bidder's responsibility to familiarize themselves with these terms.

16. Responsibility of Bidder. You are responsible for all bids made with your assigned Bidder number, whether or not made by you, and whether or not authorized by you. If your Bidder card is lost or stolen, immediately report it to RM, as all bids made with your Bidder number will be your responsibility.

17. Rescission of Bid. RM may, at RM's sole discretion and without any obligation to do so, rescind a bid on or sale of a lot if RM believes the bid or sale could subject RM to liability. RM is not responsible for any damages or losses that are claimed to have resulted from the rescission of the bid or sale.

18. Currency Display. RM may use a currency display in the saleroom for informational purposes only. The currencies listed on the currency converter are not real-time conversions pegged to market rates and are not to be relied on by anyone. Errors and inaccuracies may occur in the operation of the currency converter. To be clear, the bid price stated by the auctioneer is the prevailing and binding bid price.

19. Bank Letter. Please note that in order to register to bid at an RM sale, RM requires that all bidders provide a Bank Letter. All Bank Letters must be written on bank letterhead.

20. Credit Card Hold and Pre-authorization. Please note that in order to register to bid at an RM sale, RM requires a $5,000.00 (USD) hold and pre-authorization to be placed on your credit card. If you fail to pay for a lot purchased on or before 5:00 p.m. of the next business day following the auction, you acknowledge that your credit card will be charged $5,000.00 (USD) for the missed payment; please note that you are still bound to pay your remaining balance. The $5,000.00 (USD) hold will not be charged to your credit card if you make full payment on or before 5:00 p.m. of the next business day following the auction. If you do not purchase a lot, your credit card will not be charged. If your credit card is not to be charged, the $5,000.00 (USD) hold will fall off your credit card within three to four business days depending on your credit card company.

21. Removal of Purchased Lots. All purchased lots must be removed from the auction site by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, January 23rd, 2017 ("Removal Period"). If lots are not removed by the Removal Period, they will be removed by a third party and the Buyer will be charged a removal fee of $250.00 and a daily storage fee of $25.00 by the third party until the lot is removed. Please note that the Buyer is required to insure their lot while it is being stored on their behalf.
Buyer's Premium:
A buyer's premium of 12% is applicable on the hammer price of all motor car lots and 17% for all other lots (including memorabilia, boats, and motorbikes).
Sales Tax:
If a Purchaser of a vehicle resides in a state in which RM is registered to collect Sales Tax, RM is required to collect sales tax on the purchase of that vehicle. Currently, RM is registered to collect sales tax in the following states: California, Florida, Indiana, South Carolina, Arizona, New York, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Texas. RM reserves the right to collect sales tax from residents from other jurisdictions if RM deems the collection of tax necessary.
Shipping Terms:
All purchased lots must be removed from the auction site by 5:00 p.m. on Monday, January 23rd, 2017 ("Removal Period"). If lots are not removed by the Removal Period, they will be removed by a third party and the Buyer will be charged a removal fee of $250.00 and a daily storage fee of $25.00 by the third party until the lot is removed. Please note that the Buyer is required to insure their lot while it is being stored on their behalf.

Arizona - Friday (82 Lots)

by RM Sotheby's

January 20, 2017, 5:00 PM MST

Live Auction

Phoenix, AZ, USA

Refine by:
Category: All
All Categories
Automobiles, Boats & Airplanes (82)
  Classic & Antique Cars & Trucks (7)
  Aston Martins (3)
  Bentleys (2)
  Cadillacs (4)
  Chevrolets (4)
  Chryslers (2)
  Dodges (5)
  Fords (6)
  Automobiles - General (1)
  Jeeps (1)
  Lamborghinis (4)
  Mercedes (10)
  Packards (1)
  Porsches (5)
  Sports Cars (26)
  Motorcycles (1)
Search
Jump to:
Go
Sort by:  
Lots with images first
Per page:  
Connetti Ferrari Monza, 1959

Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: Dimensions: 24 × 75 × 35 in.Weight: 150 lbs.This Connetti Ferrari Monza is a very rare competition junior sports car. Built in 1959, there were very few of these diminutive sports cars ever produced. The little racer was originally priced at $595, which got you a real, if rather small, race car. It was fully prepared and equipped with a two-horsepower Red Seal Continental AU series engine. Furthermore, they were fitted with a factory recoil starter, competition-style automatic clutch drive, and internal expanding brakes made from special linings that are controlled from inside the cockpit by a hand lever. The Ferrari-inspired racing chassis is equipped with direct positive steering for exceptional handling. It even has fully adjustable aircraft ball joints and steering components. It has true front coil springs and twin swing axles mounted to tube-type chassis. Each wheel is a true two-piece, ten-stud, race-designed unit.The Connetti Ferrari Monza was featured in the September 1959 issue of Car Craft as well as in Motor Trend’s Sportscar Graphic June 1959 issue. The quality of this particular car and its professional restoration is stellar, down to the original body, chassis, motor, and even tires. It has never been modified and is presented with a collection of vintage magazines, photos, and period advertising.

View additional info

Starting bid: $10,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1946 Indian Chief

Estimate: $25,000 - $30,000

Description: Model 346. Est. 40 hp, 74 cu. in. air-cooled side-valve V-twin engine, three-speed manual transmission, girder front forks, plunger-type rear suspension, and two-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 60.5 in.An excellent example of an iconic American V-twinAntique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Junior, Senior, and Grand National First Prize winnerOffered from private ownership since 1984The 1940 model year was significant in the history of Indian motorcycles, with the addition of skirted front and rear fenders on all of its models, a feature that remains emblematic of the Indian line today. Mechanically, the Chief and Four models also received a new frame with an innovative dual plunger-type rear suspension as opposed to the decidedly low-tech unsprung rear wheels and large, low-pressure tires relied upon by Harley-Davidson. Based upon a remarkably solid large-tube frame, the updated Indian models continued to build on the marque’s well-deserved reputation for smoothness and excellent handling. Following the end of World War II hostilities, the Indian model line consisted solely of the V-twin Chief, in order to meet the pent-up demand for new motorcycles, as well as to conserve funds for the development of a new model line. In 1945, under a change of ownership led by Ralph Rogers, Indian was purchased from DuPont and they began development on a new line of motorcycles patterned after the popular British singles. Unfortunately, in 1948, the historic Springfield, Massachusetts, factory—affectionately known as the “Wigwam”—was closed in favor of a new facility.The 1946 Indian Chief presented here is finished in a beautiful deep maroon color and accented by tasteful chrome trim along the front and rear fenders. The Chief was acquired by the current owner in 1984 who then completed a comprehensive restoration. The motorcycle was finished in 1986 and then presented at several AACA meets, where it won its First Junior, Senior, and Grand National awards. Remaining in his private ownership for over 30 years, this exceptional American motorcycle continues to present well with only 170 miles showing on its odometer. The Chief includes a pair of chrome plated driving lights, a distinctive fringed saddle, as well as an abundance of bright trim and a pair of period-style whitewall tires.Reported by the current owner to ride as well as it looks, this Indian Chief Roadmaster continues to exemplify the classic American V-twin motorcycle.

View additional info

Current bid: $10,000 (1 bid)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1954 Kleinschnittger F125

Estimate: $20,000 - $30,000

Description: 6 hp, 123 cc two-stroke air-cooled single-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, independent rubber band suspension, and four-wheel cable brakes. Wheelbase: 66.9 in.Formerly owned by noted microcar collector Bruce WeinerRecent repaint and restorationOnly 71,428 kilometers, believed to be originalMeet the mighty Kleinschnittger F125 and all six horsepower of unbridled fury.Produced in Arnsberg, Germany, between April 1950 and August 1957, this microcar oddity weighs in at a featherweight 150 kilograms (330 pounds). Hand-hammered aluminum panels and a steel tubular Wachtendord & Schmidt chassis make up the eight-foot, eight-inch long by three-foot, nine-inch wide diminutive F125. Employing leftovers from the Second World War, ex-army cooking pots cut into quarters formed the basis for the molds of the front fender curve. Each of the four wheels features fully independent rubber band suspension. The 123-cubic centimeter ILO two-stroke, air-cooled engine sends power through a three-speed gearbox to the front wheels. Given the correct conditions, an adventurous individual can theoretically attain a maximum speed of 70 km/h. Although, factory figures provide a more conservative 50–55 cruising speed. Perhaps the most impressive feature of the F125, a fuel consumption rating of 1 gallon per 113 miles, allows a range of almost 170 miles using every drop in the 1.5 gallon fuel tank. This 1954 model was the subject of a very high-standard restoration in 1996. All-new body panels were manufactured and installed where necessary, in addition to a fresh coat of attention-grabbing red paint and a re-trimming in black vinyl using the original thatch straw filling in the seat squab. The vehicle also received a brand new hood and a set of new old-stock Continental tires. The vehicle has since been on a display within a private residence for almost 20 years after being purchased from the Bruce Weiner Microcar Collection in 1997. More recently in the past year, the Kleinschnittger was disassembled and re-painted. The engine received an overhaul and was removed, re-sealed, and tuned. The carburetor was rebuilt, and a new air filter was sourced. Most importantly, the rubber suspension and steering link were replaced. Kleinschnittger expert Martin Kricke in Germany provided all of the parts and schematics utilized in this most recent restoration. Finally, a new hood latch and straps were sourced, as were new whitewall tires. A well-cared-for example for its entire life, this F125 once belonged to a friend of the late Paul Kleinschnittger’s wife and comes with German registration documents in his name. An intriguing microcar to say the least, this Kleinschnittger is sure to delight for years to come.

View additional info

Starting bid: $10,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1966 Cadillac Fleetwood Sixty Special Brougham

Estimate: $40,000 - $60,000

Description: 340 bhp, 429 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, three-speed Hydra-Matic automatic transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms and coil springs, live rear axle with four-link suspension and coil springs, and hydraulic front disc and rear drum brakes. Wheelbase: 133 in.Exquisite restoration to better-than-new conditionAntique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Senior award-winnerAccompanied by a copy of its build sheet and original manualsAlmost certainly the finest example in the worldFor the last six decades of the 20th century, Cadillac’s Sixty Special line stood for the company’s most expensive non-limousine offerings—a sedan ever so slightly larger, more opulent, and more expensive than others in the company’s roster. The Sixty Special became even more special for 1966 with the introduction of a second model in the series, the Fleetwood Brougham. Previously an option package, the Brougham incorporated a distinctive vinyl roof covering and interior appointments worthy of a Rolls-Royce, including genuine walnut trim and, in the rear compartment, folding writing desks, foot rests, and reading lamps.Combined with the muscular styling introduced this year, the new Fleetwood Sixty Special Brougham was a Cadillac to be proud of, representing one of the most comfortable and expensive of all American automobiles in 1966. It was the kind of car seen outside the Four Seasons or Lutèce, or cruising between Greenwich and New York City. Today it has retained its regal aura and impressive stature.The Fleetwood Brougham offered here is almost certainly the finest example in existence, and one of the best in the world. Recipient of an excellent restoration to modern concours standards, it is virtually impeccable in its fit and finishes, including a fresh interior upholstered in proper embroidered fabric and laser-straight panels, and it can aptly be described as being “better than new.” Even the chrome is impeccable both inside and out. The Antique Automobile Club of America has recognized the car’s excellence by bestowing it a Senior First Prize in its division. It is accompanied by a copy of its Cadillac build sheet, as well as owner’s specifications and shop and service manuals.A posh luxury sedan from the last great era of American comfort, this Fleetwood Brougham continues to represent the best of Cadillac attitude and luxury, at its superbly crafted finest.

View additional info

Starting bid: $20,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1937 Chrysler Airflow Eight Sedan

Estimate: $50,000 - $75,000

Description: 130 bhp, 323.5 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission with overdrive, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 128 in.Last of the AirflowsDocumented no-expense-spared restorationClassic Car Club of America (CCCA) Full ClassicChrysler’s Airflow represented the best of times, yet also the worst of times. A brilliant design, it had the promise of technology yet suffered the heartbreak of the Depression. Credit for the design is rightly given to engineer Carl Breer, who with Owen Skelton and Fred Zeder was one of Walter Chrysler’s “Three Musketeers.” The trio, who worked at Studebaker during World War I, were recruited by Chrysler in 1920 to design a new car for Willys, then under Chrysler’s direction. Through a series of complex events, that car eventually became Billy Durant’s Flint, but the Musketeers stayed with Chrysler for the rest of their working lives and were responsible for all of Chrysler Corporation’s much-vaunted engineering until the 1950s.The Airflow was Breer’s implementation of “form follows function,” a wind tunnel-tuned shape built on a semi-unitary “truss bridge” chassis based on aircraft principles. The engine was pushed forward, over the front axle, which allowed both seats to be situated within the wheelbase. The Airflow was roomy inside and extremely comfortable.It was launched to great fanfare in 1934. Chrysler had four series on different wheelbases, all eights and three of them Imperials. DeSoto had a single line of six-cylinder Airflows. Although the press was generally positive in its reaction, enamored of the technology, the public was not. Barely 11,000 Chrysler Airflows were sold, against 25,000 conventional six-cylinder models that had fortunately been continued. With only an Airflow model, production shrank by nearly half.For 1935, stylist Raymond Dietrich was called in to give both Chrysler and DeSoto Airflows a more attractive front end. As a hedge, he also came up with more conventional “Airstream” models to help weather Depression-hampered sales. DeSoto abandoned Airflows after 1936, but Chrysler soldiered on for one more season with an abbreviated line. The Imperial name had been reclaimed by three series of high-end conventional eight-cylinder cars. The Airflow Eight line consisted of a coupe and a six-passenger sedan. Production was limited to just 230 coupes and 4,370 sedans. Last of the Airflows, this car is a solid Texas example and the recipient of a frame-off restoration. It was acquired by Lowell Stapf of Amarillo, Texas, from Jack Edmonds of Fort Worth, in 1966. In the early 2000s, Stapf commissioned the no-expense-spared restoration. At his passing, the car was inherited by a long-time employee, who sold it to the current owner. Striking in deep maroon with black fenders, it exhibits superb fit and finish. The interior is expertly upholstered in grey cloth, and the instrument panel is correctly detailed. Mileage showing is slightly in excess of 80,000. The quality of the restoration extends to the luggage compartment and likewise the engine, which is immaculately detailed. Factory features include an overdrive transmission and full fender skirts at the rear. The car is equipped with wide whitewall tires. Included are a dossier of pre-restoration photos and comprehensive documentation of the restoration itself. The C-17 Airflows are recognized by the Classic Car Club of America as Full Classics, so this car is eligible for all CCCA events. Certainly one of the best of the last of the Airflows, it will be a delight to own.

View additional info

Starting bid: $30,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1918 Oakland Model 34-B Touring

Estimate: $10,000 - $15,000

Description: 44 hp, 177 cu. in. Northway L-head inline six-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle, full floating rear axle, and rear-wheel drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in.Offered from the Jules Barsotti CollectionOlder restoration in very presentable conditionIdeal for Nickel Era tours or to begin a Pontiac collection“The Oakland from Oakland”Oakland Motor Car Company is largely remembered today as one of the founding names of General Motors, and it is also the company that created the car from which the Pontiac was born. It is easily forgotten that the company was around for 24 successful years, that, in its day, it was a household name, and that it made its mark on the American automobile scene with its stylish yet powerful cars.Edward Murphy and Alanson Brush had run the Pontiac Buggy Company in the Michigan town of the same name. They desired to enter the automotive age, and they used Brush’s small two-cylinder car, the design for which Cadillac had rejected, as a platform in which to enter this growing fast-paced world. Slow sales of the early models in 1908 must have convinced Murphy that Cadillac had the right idea, as the company soon switched to four- and, later, six-cylinder models that became highly regarded for their performance and durability.The acquisition of this very American automobile by Jules Barsotti, a man who made his life around Mercedes-Benz, may seem unusual. However, it was actually a natural acquisition, as, a country away from Oakland County, Michigan, Mr. Barsotti established his second European Motors dealership in Oakland, California—and acquired the 1918 Model 34-B touring thereafter as a result. It has remained near Oakland for many years and wears an older cosmetic restoration, still very presentable, in bright royal blue and black, with a black interior. Polished wooden wheels with bright blue brake drums behind act as an attractive accent. The dashboard gauges appear original, with the odometer noting 2,981, likely mileage since completion of the restoration work.A charming addition to any GM or Pontiac collection, this is a cheerful little car that will bring much happiness to its new owners—regardless of which Oakland they live near!

View additional info

Current bid: $5,000 (1 bid)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1940 Ford V-8 DeLuxe Convertible

Estimate: $40,000 - $50,000

Description: Model 01A. 85 bhp, 221 cu. in. flathead V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with transverse semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in.Offered from the Jules Barsotti CollectionAttractive older restoration of a desirable body style from a great yearA beloved family parade car for two generationsThe 1940 Ford models introduced several new features, as well as one of the most distinctive pre-war automotive designs. Technically, one of the most significant changes was the movement of the gearshift lever from the floor to the steering column, a modern feature that was not only more convenient for the driver, but also increased front seat legroom for passengers. Ford also introduced sealed beam headlights in 1940, finally eliminating the persistent problem of moisture degrading the reflectivity of headlights, which relied on separate bulbs. The sealed beams sat at the front of the fenders in oval chrome housings that also incorporated the parking lights, merging earlier Fords’ covered headlight treatment with the improved efficiency and durability of the sealed beam bulbs.The single element vee-shaped grille design of 1939 was broadened for better cooling, with separate grille elements located on each side of the center grille, a sharp and distinctive visual identification feature. Inside, the 1940 Fords featured a modern dashboard in maroon and beige plastic, which employed rectangular forms for the instrument panel, the radio, and the large speaker, replacing the wood-grained dashboards that Ford had used for many years. Bob Gregorie’s two-spoke steering wheel, which had earned high praise and acceptance in the 1939 Mercury, now found its way into the Ford line.The desirable V-8 DeLuxe Convertible offered here was acquired by Jules Barsotti in 1990 from an owner in Pennsylvania; an earlier caretaker is noted as Jerome Zich of Richmond, Virginia, to whom a title was issued in 1976. Restored some years ago, it is a correct restoration, in the proper factory color of Folkstone Grey with a brown leather interior and black canvas top piped in red. Accessories are abundant, including dual driving lights, rear fender skirts, front and rear bumper guards, and side-view mirrors. Overall the car is clean and very nice, both inside and out, and still looks terrific.The Barsotti Family loved this car, which was regularly put into use in local events, including parades for such events as the centennial of Belvedere, California, Jules Barsotti’s longtime hometown. Stored in San Francisco for some years, it will require mechanical service prior to use but will undoubtedly soon be purring down the roads of a new owner’s hometown, filled with happy kids and grandkids.

View additional info

Starting bid: $20,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1938 Mercedes-Benz 200 V Sport Roadster

Estimate: $50,000 - $70,000

Description: 64 hp, 2,007 cc L-head inline four-cylinder engine with two Solex 35 I FP carburetors, four-speed manual transmission with reverse, transverse leaf-spring front suspension, swing axle rear suspension with coil springs, and four-wheel hydraulically assisted drum brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in.Offered from the Jules Barsotti CollectionSpecial Roadster-like styling on the small 200 V chassisBelieved to be the only known survivor of 31 builtCommissioned by Daimler-Benz for company useOwned by a prominent Mercedes-Benz dealer for four decadesMost of Mercedes-Benz’s special coachbuilding expertise in the late 1930s was put to use on the largest and most expensive models of the range, the supercharged 540 K and the vast 770. The company, however, was also capable of producing some special bodies on its smaller “family car” platforms, as evidenced by the existence of this charming Sport Roadster, a dashing two-passenger convertible with a rumble seat, built on the 200 V chassis.The 200 V unto itself was not a particularly common car in any form, but in letters to a former owner of this car, Louis Robbins of El Paso, Texas, Mercedes-Benz of North America indicated that it was something very unique indeed. Writing to Mr. Robbins, Count Marcus Clary noted that 27 Sport Roadsters were produced in 1938, and only four the following year. Further, this particular Sport Roadster “was commissioned early in 1938 and apparently originally used as a company car because it was only sold to a customer in late 1939.”After longtime Northern California Mercedes-Benz dealer Jules Barsotti acquired the Robbins car in 1979, he was able to satisfy himself that no other examples survived, noting “only one left” in paperwork in the car’s file. Restoration of the rare Sport Roadster commenced thereafter, with the goal of competition at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Finished in two shades of silver with red striping and a red leather interior, the charming little car made a big impression in its display at Pebble Beach in 1984, winning 3rd in Class.The car retains its original serial number and body number tags, with certain bespoke panels, such as the hood hinge, still bearing stamped factory body numbers. While the thorough restoration is now 40 years old, it still holds up well, with the paint and interior still being attractive enough for driving enjoyment and local display. However, the car has been in storage for several years, and therefore mechanical rejuvenation will be necessary before taking it on the road. The odometer recorded 80,749 kilometers at the time of cataloguing.If the ultimate Mercedes-Benz of this era was the Special Roadster, then this, indeed, must be a very special little roadster.

View additional info

Starting bid: $30,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 S Coupe

Estimate: $250,000 - $300,000

Description: 150 hp (DIN), 2,996 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, four-wheel coil-spring independent suspension with control arms in the front and swing axles in the rear, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 116 in.Offered from the Jules Barsotti CollectionAn exceptional “numbers-matching” 300 S coupe, ideal for restorationOwnership by a famous name in Mercedes-Benz for nearly four decadesExtremely solid and complete throughoutOne of the great grand touring cars of the post-war era, the remarkable Mercedes-Benz 300 S combined elements of the existing luxury 300 series with the upcoming 300 SL sports car. Its most notable enhancement was under the hood, where the engine’s horsepower was increased to 150, while the bodywork, all two-door styles, was hand-built to individual customer order, in the great tradition of Classic Era craftsmanship. Spectacularly appointed interiors featured acres of beautiful, thick walnut; cushy leather armchairs; and jewelry-like gauges, providing an incredibly comfortable space in which to reach the remarkable top speed of 110 mph.With a price tag of $12,680, a new 300 S cost as much as 10 average automobiles. Perhaps unsurprisingly, only about 560 were built, for a roster of clients that included the Aga Khan, Gary Cooper, and Cary Grant. Just 216 of that number were coupes.According to its Mercedes-Benz data card, the 300 S coupe offered here was originally delivered to a Fa. Santos of Lisbon, Portugal, finished in Dark Grey (DB 164) with a grey (955) leather interior and grey cloth headliner. Its subsequent ownership history has not been traced, but in 1979 it was purchased by longtime Northern California Mercedes-Benz dealer Jules Barsotti, through his European Motors, Ltd., of Oakland. Over the next seven years the car was conscientiously repaired and restored, in time to be exhibited in the European Motors showroom during the Mercedes-Benz centennial year of 1986.While kept off the road in recent years, the 300 S, now showing 59,933 miles, remains very presentable. Furthermore, the car retains many of the rare and hard to find accessories and trim pieces, including the original headlamp rings, while the star mascot on the radiator, and the front turn signal lenses are OEM replacements. Its older Strawberry Metallic paint has a good shine, and the tan leather is still in excellent condition and would be suitable for driving and local shows. Given the attractiveness of its original color scheme, and the inherent desirability and beauty of the body style, it would also be an ideal basis for a complete restoration. Some mechanical work will likely be required, as the car has been in storage for several years.The 300 S is among the most significant and sought-after of modern Mercedes-Benzes. Offered here is one of the most publically visible examples on the West Coast, familiar to anyone who visited European Motors and bought a new 450 SL or 500 SE from the late Jules Barsotti.

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1931 Mercedes-Benz 370 S Mannheim Sport Cabriolet

Estimate: $350,000 - $450,000

Description: 75 bhp, 3,689 cc inline six-cylinder engine with dual carburetors, three-speed manual transmission with overdrive, semi-elliptical leaf-spring suspension in the front and rear, a solid rear axle, and four-wheel mechanical brakes. Wheelbase: 112 in.Offered from the Jules Barsotti CollectionThe centerpiece of the Collection since 1966Only five owners from new; original bodywork, chassis, and engineDocumented with a copy of the original commission sheetWidely shown all over the West Coast for 50 yearsPerhaps the best-known 370 S in North AmericaIn 1986, Mercedes-Benz honored its 100th anniversary with exhibits and celebrations worldwide. Among these was a six-month Centennial Exhibition at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, utilizing models from throughout the company’s rich history, gathered together from numerous West Coast collectors. Special classes saluted the Star and the Laurel at the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. A book was even published, The First Century, with artwork by Ken Dallison, to commemorate the occasion.Everywhere you looked, Jules Barsotti’s 370 S Mannheim Sport Cabriolet was there. It may well have been invited on its own merits, which were abundant, but in a way that special cars and special people often combine, its ownership made it poignant. Not only was this an excellent example of the first touring model built by a combined Daimler and Benz, but it was owned by the man who built the small European Motors into today’s Mercedes-Benz of San Francisco. In a bustling Northern California market that is today filled with SLs and E-Classes, Jules Barsotti was first, and for the rest of his life he remained a landmark of the area’s motoring culture. His 370 S was a part of that life, and thus a part of that culture.“BENZ 28”The provenance of the Barsotti 370 S is documented by a copy of its factory commission sheet, noting its delivery with engine and chassis both numbered 87058 and “Sport Cabr./2” coachwork, thus confirming its delivery in the desirable configuration in which it is presented today. It was ordered by the Mercedes-Benz agent in Vienna, Austria, for Count Ferdinand, of the noble Austrian Arco-Zinneberg family, for delivery to his home in St. Martin im Innkreis. A subsequent owner, noted in the original Austrian registration book, was likewise of noble birth, a “Freiherr” by the name of Rudolf von Hudolin, in Salzburg. Von Hudolin sold the car on 25 February 1960, to Koos Blakestein.Mr. Blakestein subsequently relocated with the car to the Netherlands, and advertised it to American buyers, using the same photo as in its Austrian registration booklet, in the September 1960 issue of Sports Cars Illustrated. The car was then purchased by longtime Mercedes-Benz Club of North America member Allen Bishop of Deerfield, Illinois, in suburban Chicago, and thus arrived in the United States.In an article he wrote for The First Century, Mr. Barsotti noted that he acquired the car in Chicago, presumably from Mr. Bishop, in 1966, paying $6,000 for it, with noted San Francisco enthusiast Martin Swig (then the European Motors sales manager) arranging the transaction. With the assistance of his father, himself a skilled inventor and fabricator who had built the world’s first amphibious automobile in 1914, Mr. Barsotti completed a brief cosmetic and mechanical restoration, and put the car in his showroom. It left the dealership to attend the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance in 1972 and 1973, winning 3rd in Class the latter year.Longtime Concours co-chair Jules Heumann, appreciating the car with his connoisseur’s eye, suggested to Mr. Barsotti that he do a proper restoration, as the 370 S “was really worth it.” The owner listened, and after a rather adventurous four-year restoration effort—including the purloining of the car by a former employee, and its subsequent retrieval—the Sport Cabriolet did, indeed, win Best in Class at Pebble Beach in 1977.Many more exhibits followed, including more years on display in the San Francisco showroom of European Motors, and appearances at Pebble Beach and in the Natural History Museum in 1986, for which the car received a new California blue license plate, “100 YEARS,” replacing its longstanding “BENZ 28” (honoring what was thought, at the time, to be its model year). Eventually, as its owner aged, it was put into storage in the City by the Bay, alongside other significant cars that Mr. Barsotti had acquired over the years, and until recently, there it has remained.While the restoration has aged somewhat, the car remains very solid, complete, and highly presentable, having not been driven in some years; it would require thorough mechanical service, having been in storage for several years. It would also be the best possible basis for authentic restoration of a rare and beautiful 370 S Sport Cabriolet—today offered to the enthusiast community, and its sixth owner from new, by the family of Jules Barsotti, a man who loved and celebrated Mercedes-Benzes, none more so than this particular car.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1964 Fiat 2300 S Coupe

Estimate: $50,000 - $75,000

Description: 128 hp, 139 cu. in. OHV inline six-cylinder engine with dual Weber twin-choke carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, double wishbone front suspension with torsion bars, hydraulic dampers, and anti-roll bar; solid rear axle with leaf spring suspension, hydraulic dampers, and anti-roll bar; and four-wheel servo-assisted disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.3 in.The elegant coachbuilt coupe version of Fiat’s “executive car”Beautiful styling reminiscent of the Ferrari 250, with potent touring powerOne of very few examples known in the United StatesSubject of a two-year restorationMore famous in North America for small cars, Fiat has always produced a wide range of automobiles encompassing virtually every need. Its large “executive cars” were popular with Italian politicians during the 1960s, particularly the 2300, which featured a potent overhead-valve six-cylinder engine and, later, an automatic transmission. It was advanced, stylish, had fine handling and ride qualities, and was quite comfortable – everything that an Italian banker or senator required.For the banker or senator who wanted to drive himself, in a style that Gianni Agnelli himself could appreciate, there was the svelte 2300 coupe. This limited-production coachbuilt model was styled by Sergio Sartorelli of Ghia and bore a striking resemblance to the ASA and Ferrari 250 GT of the same time period, with round headlights, a long hood, and an airy greenhouse. Power-operated windows, densely padded leather seats, and other cosseting comforts could be found within. The truly sporting 2300 S version boasted a more powerful engine, with two twin-choke Weber carburetors, and a standard four-speed transmission with 3.9:1 final drive, and was a true “driver’s car” with excellent performance.The 2300 S offered here is one of very few of this model to have come to the United States, where they were not officially sold when new. Acquired in 2014 by a prominent collector and classic automotive museum owner, it underwent a two-year restoration that included stripping the body to bare metal, repairing it properly, and finishing it in a lustrous Blu Notte. The interior was restored as necessary, involving many new pieces; all of the chrome pieces were removed and re-plated, and new rubber seals for the door glass were installed. The brakes were disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled to work well, and the carburetors were rebuilt and properly tuned.Fun to drive and likely a car its new owner will never see coming – even on the way to the local Italian car show – this Fiat 2300 S would be a delightful, charming, and powerful addition to any quality collection.

View additional info

Starting bid: $30,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1989 Porsche 911 Turbo 'Flat Nose' Cabriolet

Estimate: $225,000 - $275,000

Description: Type 930. 282 bhp, 3,299 cc SOHC horizontally opposed air-cooled six-cylinder engine with a single turbocharger and Bosch electronic fuel injection, G50 five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated and cross-drilled power disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in.Rare “Flat Nose” Cabriolet, option M505Highly desirable “triple black” combinationThe most sought-after model with a G50 gearboxFinal year of the K-series 911 TurbosPorsche began to experiment with turbocharging its 911 six-cylinder engine in 1972, but in order to race its new Type 934 in Group 4, it was required to build at least 400 examples within a two-year period that could be sold through dealers and legally registered for street use. Thus the Type 930 was born, the first of which appeared in 1976. The new 930 Turbo soon established itself as the world’s fastest production car, and with its huge flared fenders and whale-tail rear deck spoiler, it became the dream car of countless enthusiasts.For the discriminating enthusiast for whom a mere Porsche Turbo was not adequate in the late 1980s, option M505 beckoned on the dealer order sheet. This option brought the customer a Turbo coupe, Targa, or cabriolet with a steel “flat nose” (or slant-nose) conversion, providing a sleek new “935-like” look with lowered and louvered front fenders, flush headlamps, boxed rocker panels, and straked side cooling vents on the radically widened rear quarter panels. Altogether, it was an extreme and very muscular look. Porsche would build 600 Turbo cabriolets for the North American market for model year 1989, the K-series being the final iteration of that chassis and body before the arrival of the new 964-based Carrera 2 and 4. A small number of these were equipped with the M505 package due to its considerable extra cost.The Turbo package itself included dramatically widened fenders, enclosing 16-inch-diameter Fuchs alloy wheels, 8 inches wide in front and 9 inches wide in the rear, shod with 225/50 and 245/45 tires, respectively. Luxuriously appointed with standard air conditioning, tinted glass, electric windows, and an entertainment system, its 282-horsepower engine could launch the Turbo to 60 miles an hour in less than five seconds and achieve more than 160 miles an hour. Turbos had impressive stopping power as well, with large power-assisted ventilated and cross-drilled disc brakes all around.We are pleased to offer one of the most attractive 1989 “Flachbau” Turbo Cabriolets available. This beautiful example, benefiting from long-term ownership, was factory-equipped with a smooth-shifting G50 five-speed transaxle, 40-percent limited-slip differential, and a sports steering wheel atop a raised hub. Options documented on the original invoice, included with the sale, include a shorter shift lever, tonneau cover, power sport seats for both the driver and passenger, a pair of rear shelf speakers, and of course, option M505, the Flat Nose package.The car was originally delivered to Ken MacDowell of Ohio on 21 January 1989 through the Crestmont Porsche dealership of North Olmsted, Ohio. Mr. MacDowell retained the car until his passing in 2010, and the car was acquired by the consignor. Included with the car are invoices from new throughout Mr. MacDowell’s ownership, documenting every service performed by an authorized Porsche dealer. Additionally, the original order form, deposit, and delivery invoices are included with the car, along with the original window sticker. According to CARFAX, “This vehicle was listed as vehicle 2 out of 2 and the vehicle is listed by year, make, model” as being involved in an accident. No further information about the accident was reported, and CARFAX is unable to provide any further details other than the provided. A Pre-Purchase Inspection (PPI) has recently been performed by an authorized Porsche dealer and is on file for review. The numerous invoices on file do not make any mention of accident repair, and a RM Sotheby’s specialist inspection could not find anything out of place. With just over 9,300 miles on the odometer, extensive documentation and long-term ownership, and finished in Code 700 black with black leather trim, black carpets, and a black convertible top, this Turbo Cabriolet is an elegant yet menacing road machine.

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1957 Chevrolet Bel Air 'Fuel-Injected' Convertible

Estimate: $110,000 - $140,000

Description: 250 bhp, 283 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, three-speed manual transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and power hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 115 in.America’s favorite collector car250-brake horsepower fuel injection engineShow-quality restorationIn the 1950s, American car designs typically ran in three-year cycles. Usually, by the third year of a design, the car was in need of freshening. The 1957 Chevy, however, has been the exception that disproved the rule. Changes from 1956 lowered the whole car through a combination of smaller wheels and body modifications, and the nose and tail were updated with Cadillac cues, resulting in what some call a “baby Eldorado.” The V-8 was bored an eighth of an inch to 283 cubic inches, available in six stages of tune. At the top of the chart was the Corvette V-8 with 10.5:1 compression, whose Rochester fuel injection developed the magic one horsepower per cubic inch. Four-speed transmissions had yet to reach Chevrolet’s passenger car option list, so the sole transmission choice for this engine was a column-shifted heavy-duty three-speed.Although Ford marginally outsold Chevrolet for the 1957 model year, it’s the “five-seven” that has stolen the hearts of the collector community. There’s a broad consensus that despite its status as an “old design,” the ’57 Chevy is just right in that it looks as fresh today as it did 55 years ago. This 1957 “fuelie” convertible was the subject of a correct, frame-off restoration to show-quality standards by well-respected experts Legendary Motorcars of Milton, Ontario, Canada. The option list is short: a pushbutton AM radio, whitewall tires with spinner hubcaps, E-Z-Eye tinted glass, heater-defroster, and a dashboard clock. The odometer shows fewer than 600 miles since restoration. Beautiful in black, with a red and white interior, the car has a superbly straight body and exhibits extraordinary panel fit. The black convertible top fits well. A clean and highly detailed engine compartment and equally impressive undercarriage complement the outstanding exterior. The car comes with reproduction copies of the owner’s handbook and manual for the top. An excellent example of one of America's favorite collector cars, it is ready to delight a new owner on the concours field or on the open road with the top down.

View additional info

Starting bid: $60,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1990 Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.5-16 Evolution II

Estimate: $225,000 - $275,000

Description: 235 bhp, 2,463 cc Cosworth DOHC inline four-cylinder engine, five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with lower control arms, independent five-link rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 104.9 in.The first Evo II offered publicly in North AmericaOne of 502 Cosworth-powered homologation specialsOne of the most successful DTM race cars, winning the title three years running5,000 original kilometers; collector owned in Japan for two decades, never racedDTM upgrades, including Motec ECU and OZ DTM-specification wheelsOf the cars homologated for the German Touring Car Championship (DTM) in the late 1980s, BMW’s M3 is credited for some of the Motorsports Division’s finest work. However, BMW’s fiercest competitor also produced its own incredible homologation special. That car is the Mercedes-Benz 190 E 2.3-16 Cosworth.The partnership between famed engineering firm Cosworth and Mercedes-Benz began as a project to compete in Group B with the 190 E. However, the domination of the all-wheel-drive Audi Quattro quickly put the project on hold. Mercedes-Benz shifted focus toward touring car racing. The W201 chassis was beefed up with larger anti-roll bars, harder bushings, limited-slip differential, quicker dampers, and a faster steering ratio. Additionally, Getrag provided the five-speed dogleg gearbox to ensure fast and easy gear selection. Cosworth took the standard M104 2.3-liter 8-valve engine and fitted a light alloy cylinder head along with dual-overhead cams and four valves per cylinder. Continued development on the car resulted in an increase in engine displacement to 2.5 liters in 1988 and the Evolution variants of the 190 Cosworth. The initial Evo model overhauled the platform into a thoroughbred racer by installing a tuned version of the 2.5-liter motor. A higher rev limiter, 3.27:1 axle ratio, larger brakes, and better tires meant that the Evolution accelerated and stopped better than any 190 E. Further enhancements included wider front and rear tracks, stiffer adjustable suspension, and revised bodywork. For the Evo II model, Mercedes-Benz refined the developments of the Evo I. Again, the engineers managed to squeeze out more power to an impressive 235 horsepower. Brembo four-piston calipers were in charge of bringing the car to a rest. The true highlight of the Evo II is the aero kit that features a towering rear spoiler, imposing fender flairs, and an even more aggressive front splitter.The W201 chassis had finally reached the peak of success in 1992 when the Evo II took the overall victory in the 1992 DTM championship.While the phrase “race car for the road” rarely finds itself attached to cars befitting of the expression, this Evo II is a rare exception. The previous owner, finding the car not quite hardcore enough, upgraded a number of components from the DTM racers in order to increase the car’s overall performance. Racing exhaust manifold, full exhaust, intake manifold, custom header tank, individual throttle bodies, larger injectors, lightweight aluminum pulley, fuel cell system, and a Motec engine management system encompass the drivetrain upgrades. Additionally, chassis bracing, Brembo Monobloc brakes, larger suspension links, and DTM-specification OZ wheels keep the car planted through the turns. With only 5,000 kilometers, this exceptional 190 E 2.5-16 stands as a unique and well cared for example of an already rare machine. As the first Evo II offered publically in North America, it is a must-have for any serious Mercedes-Benz and modern sports car collector.

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1997 Porsche 911 Turbo S

Estimate: $425,000 - $500,000

Description: Type 993. 424 bhp, 3,605 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin turbochargers and electronic fuel injection, six-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in.One of only 183 Turbo S models produced for the United States12,500 original miles; original Speed Yellow over black Incredibly powerful, twin-turbo, all-wheel-driveThe ultimate air-cooled Turbo 911 modelPorsche Certificate of AuthenticityIntroduced in 1997 and built for only two years, the Turbo S was a huge step up in performance, looks, exclusivity, and price from the standard 911 Turbo. Of the acclaimed Type 993 produced from 1994 to 1998, the Turbo S was among the last of the air-cooled 911s and was capable of performance that is still impressive today. The 0–100 time, of only 8.9 seconds, was half a second faster than that of the standard Turbo and if the driver was brave enough, the car would reach a top speed of 184 mph.The heart of the Turbo S is a flat six-cylinder engine fitted with a pair of K-24 turbochargers that makes 430 horsepower in U.S. specification. Power is put to the ground through a six-speed manual transaxle and all-wheel-drive system that was developed for the earlier 964 Carrera 4. Porsche altered the Bosch Motronic engine-management system to produce more power than the standard Turbo and added an additional oil cooler to handle the increased heat load. Large, 12.68-inch power-assisted ventilated and cross-drilled multi-piston disc brakes with yellow calipers delivered impressive stopping power from any speed.Porsche’s Exclusive Department built only 345 examples of the Turbo S, and this incredibly rare car is easily identifiable by its numerous unique features throughout. The front fog lights were removed and replaced with air ducts to aid front brake cooling, the exhaust system was replaced with a modified unit that has quadruple rear tips, the flared rear fenders sprouted large air inlets, and the rear deck featured an impressive “Aerokit II” biplane spoiler to increase downforce.Unlike some other special edition models, Porsche did not sacrifice creature comforts and usability for track performance with the Turbo S. Inside was a luxurious full leather interior with generous amounts of carbon fiber trim on the lower portion of the dashboard, around the gauges, along the doorsills, and on the center console, door panels, and door pulls. It even has an electric sunroof.The Turbo S delivered stunning performance in a package as luxurious and exclusive as Porsche’s discerning customers had come to expect. It really was the ultimate supercar that could be used as a daily commuter if the owner wished. Collectors today value the Turbo S for its rarity, performance, timeless styling, and that it is the last iteration of the air-cooled Turbo.The Turbo S offered was completed at the factory on 12 March 1997 and had its delivery inspection at Porsche of Fairfield, Connecticut, on 17 April 1997. With just over 12,500 original miles, it still wears its original Speed Yellow paint and black leather interior. The car’s Certificate of Authenticity lists the optional equipment as racing-style sport seats, deletion of rear window wiper, black Porsche floor mats, self-dimming mirrors and rain sensor, open black console tray, and Pirelli tires. Notably, the MSRP of a standard 1997 Turbo was a little over $100,000; this Turbo S was priced at an astonishing $152,027.An enthusiast in New Canaan, Connecticut, originally owned the Turbo S before it was sold to an owner in Canada, where it stayed until the current owner purchased the vehicle and brought it back to the United States in 2012. Stamps indicating services by Gulf Performance Center, Pfaff Porsche, and Weissach Servicing in Vancouver are in the Maintenance Manual. Included in the sale is the radio manual with radio code, owner’s manual, warranty and customer information booklet, maintenance manual, a leather pouch for the books, as well as a tool kit.This is a very attractive, low-mileage Turbo S that has not been repainted or modified in any way. It is true to its factory specifications and is ready for many more years of enjoyment.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1988½ Ferrari Testarossa

Estimate: $170,000 - $200,000

Description: 380 bhp, 4,943 cc DOHC horizontally opposed 12-cylinder engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension by double wishbones, coil springs, and telescopic dampers; and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 100.4 in.Rare and very striking Oro Chiaro MetallizzatoExceptionally well-preserved, only 4,300 original milesCavallino Classic Platinum Award winnerFerrari Classiche certifiedFerrari’s brand-new Testarossa, the star of the 1984 Paris Motor Show, shocked the world at its premiere. It was a dramatic departure from the 512 BBi that preceded it, as its styling was angular and aggressive, yet its design was just as functional as it was attractive. The new Testarossa not only offered a step forward in terms of styling, but Ferrari’s new supercar also improved on all aspects of the outgoing Berlinetta Boxer models. The engine produced 40 more horsepower than that of the 512 BBi, helping the Testarossa accelerate from 0–60 mph in under 5.8 seconds and reach a top speed of 180 mph. Its dramatic side strakes that ran along the side of the car helped to channel air into the dual rear-mounted radiators, which kept both the engine and cabin from overheating. By 1988, the single “Flying Mirror” was replaced with more conventional dual mirrors, and the center lock wheels were changed for similar looking wheels with five bolts. This Testarossa is finished in the rare and striking color combination of Oro Chiaro Metallizzato over black leather interior. With just under 4,300 original miles, it is in wonderfully preserved original condition, and even has the original chalk markings from the factory on the engine, suspension, and other components. When the current owner purchased the car, the original Cosmolene preservative applied by the factory was still covering many components in the engine bay. The owner spent days carefully removing the Cosmolene with a gentle cleaner, revealing the virtually new suspension, subframe, and cadmium plating underneath. The factory hashmarks are even still on the A-arms. In 2015, this Testarossa was Ferrari Classiche certified and in January 2016, the current owner showed the car at Cavallino Classic, where it won the coveted Platinum Award. Before the show, a full engine-out service was completed, all four brake calipers were rebuilt, and the car was thoroughly detailed. Included in the sale are the factory books, tools in their pouch, service records, and its Ferrari Classiche red book.This Ferrari is the ideal example for a discerning collector looking for an immaculately preserved Testarossa that is guaranteed to stand out from the rest.

View additional info

Starting bid: $90,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1934 Packard Super Eight Coupe Roadster

Estimate: $225,000 - $275,000

Description: Series 1104. 145 bhp, 384 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed synchromesh manual transmission, front and rear semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension with variable-pressure shock absorbers, and vacuum servo-assisted four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 142 in.Offered from the collection of a knowledgeable enthusiastThe most desirable body style from the greatest Packard yearHigh-quality older restoration by marque specialistsFor many, the 1934 model Packards, which the factory dubbed the Eleventh Series, represent the height of the company’s pre-war efforts. They were the final models with traditional open fenders, albeit gently skirted, and the upright radiator shell for which the company had become well known. In addition, the chassis’ adjustable Ride Control suspension and Bijur automatic lubrication produced a car that was a dream to drive. Books have been written solely about this model year Packard, and it is widely considered among the most beautiful and purely enjoyable of all Classic Era production automobiles.The most desirable body style on this chassis is the sumptuous two-passenger coupe roadster, which had styling inspired by a “semi-custom” design provided by LeBaron in 1931, including the distinctive convertible top that folds flush with the body.The car offered here was delivered to the renowned marque specialists LaVine Restorations of Nappanee, Indiana, in the mid-1990s as a solid and complete original car, owned by Michael Wendt. In a recent conversation with RM Sotheby’s, Eric LaVine recalled the Packard as being a “pretty straightforward project, of a solid car without wood rot and with very little rust.” The car was restored to the shop’s usual superb standards, including gorgeous Packard Green paint, stripped in cream, on the beautiful original sheet metal. The engine had been rebuilt previously by Art Brummer and ran very well, as it still does today. With chrome wire wheels shod in blackwall tires, dual side-mounted spares, dual driving lights, and a proper trunk rack, the car was stunning. Its enduring appeal captured a class award in its highly competitive category at the Meadow Brook Hall Concours d’Elegance in 1999.Ever since completion, the Packard has been very well maintained and reportedly shows today as nicely as when it was restored; the paint is still spectacular and the interior has only minor creasing from minimal use. The long-term owner notes that in the 12 years that he has been the car’s custodian, it has been well looked after but has never been shown, thus allowing a new owner to display it at the concours d’elegance of his or her choice.A gorgeous Packard in the sportiest body style from the most desirable model year, this car has benefitted from excellent care and the finest craftsmen’s work. It would be a superb addition to any collection of American Full Classics.

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1996 Porsche 911 GT2

Estimate: $1,100,000 - $1,500,000

Description: Type 993. 430 bhp, 3,600 cc SOHC air-cooled horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin turbochargers and Bosch Motronic M 5.2 management, six-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with McPherson struts, Bilstein coil-over dampers, and an adjustable anti-roll bar; independent rear suspension with semi-trailing arms, Bilstein coil-over dampers, and an adjustable anti-roll bar; and four-wheel cross-drilled ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 105 in.One of just 57 homologated 993 GT2sOnly 33,000 kilometers from newStunning Speed Yellow over blackThe 911 GT2 took the top-of-the-line 993 Turbo to new heights, while reverting from the 959-derived all-wheel-drive to a traditional rear-wheel-drive configuration. Eliminating the front- wheel-drive system, rear seats, power-adjustable front seats, and various other items trimmed some 500 pounds from the GT2’s curb weight, while, in racing form, the M64/60R engine with its twin intercooled KKK turbochargers developed 480 horsepower; the street version dialed that back a bit, to 430, along with 457 foot-pounds of torque at 13 psi. This still equated to only 6.6 pounds per horsepower, a figure that surpassed the fabled 959. All this energy was fed to the rear wheels through a new six-speed transaxle and an asymmetrical 40/60 limited-slip differential (ABD).The GT2’s bodywork included aluminum doors and front trunk lid, and very aggressive aero package, with a front air splitter with up-turned canards and a huge bi-plane rear-deck-mounted wing incorporating air ducts that fed the intercoolers. Special 18-inch diameter multi-piece Speedline alloy wheels with aluminum outer rims and magnesium centers filled the bolt-on fiberglass wheel arches.The result was utterly stunning performance, including a 0–60 mph sprint in less than four seconds, and a top speed of nearly 190 mph. The new GT2’s power-assisted four-wheel carbon-fiber/ceramic disc brakes were fully up to the task of hauling the car to a halt without fade.To meet homologation rules, Porsche had to construct and sell at least 200 examples, of which 57 were road-legal. This special group of cars was specially hand-prepared by Roland Kussmaul’s Race-Sports Department and were assigned the name 911 GT, while the track versions were labeled GT2. After 1997, both versions carried the GT2 name.The GT2 immediately proved itself to be extremely competitive on the racetrack. One early example enjoyed high podium finishes at the Sebring 12 Hours in both 1995 and 1996, as well as at Watkins Glen and Daytona. In the hands of expert drivers, the GT2 was indeed a very sharp and reliable scalpel. The street versions were also brilliant performers, but many owners specified various comfort options, and as a result, the GT2 was the most expensive model within the 911 lineup that year.Offered here is one of 57 homologated 911 GT coupes, a well-optioned example that was delivered in March of 1996 to a private collector in Japan. Factory records indicate that this ultra–high-performance street-legal Porsche GT version was delivered with Japanese market specifications around the first of March 1996, wearing Speed Yellow paint with a black partial leather interior with hard-shell sport seats, whose back rests can be adjusted for rake. It was fitted with a 40 percent limited-slip differential with ABD, 235/40 and 285/35 Michelin tires on 18-inch Speedline three-piece alloy wheels, a 92-liter fuel tank, power steering, electric windows, air conditioning, a tinted windshield, a suede-wrapped sports steering wheel and white-faced instrumentation, fog lights, external hood and engine lid locks, RS-style lightweight door cards, and numerous other items. Its previous owner exercised the car periodically over the years and “wanted something different.” As a result, modifications were undertook to re-trim the interior to Clubsport specifications, including the fitting of a roll cage and lightweight MOMO Porsche steering wheel, removal of carpeting, and installation of new racing seats. Recently imported to the United States, at the time of purchase it was discovered that none of the modifications were detrimental and that they were easily undone. Jim Newton of Automobile Associates in Canton, Connecticut, was then entrusted to remove the Clubsport modifications and re-trim the interior. Following federalization by the respected JK Technologies, the odometer now reads 33,000 kilometers, or about 20,500 miles. Recently imported to the United States, this two-owner, now-Federalized, rare and desirable GT2 offers its next fortunate owner a combination of brilliant engineering and thrilling over-the-road performance.

View additional info

Starting bid: $600,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1990 Ferrari F40

Estimate: $1,250,000 - $1,500,000

Description: 478 bhp, 2,936 cc DOHC V-8 engine with twin turbochargers and Weber-Marelli fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.Cat/non-adjust, U.S.-specification exampleCalifornia smog-compliant and road-registered7,614 actual miles; complete with books, tools, and luggage2016 Ferrari Club of America Platinum Award winnerOver three years of service receipts; a well-maintained, well-prepared F40FORTY YEARS OF FERRARIIn 1987, not only was Ferrari approaching its 40th anniversary, but it was also engaged in a supercar war with rivals Lamborghini and Porsche. Lamborghini’s Countach took the world by storm with its radical styling and incredible performance, making it the poster child of a generation. Adding fuel to the fire, Porsche introduced the 959 in 1986. The car was laden with many technological firsts for the automotive industry, and it was also capable of a blistering 197 mph, making it the world’s fastest road car. Of course, Ferrari would not let this stand; it needed something to silence the naysayers and put itself back atop of the record books.Ferrari’s F40, developed from the 288 GTO Evoluzione, punched through an automotive barrier that had remained untouched, as it not only bested the 959’s top speed, but it also broke 200 mph in the process, achieving a top speed of 201.4 mph.Unlike the 959, the F40 went about achieving 200 mph in a completely different fashion. Instead of using cutting-edge technology and loading the car down with modern-day conveniences, Ferrari, as per usual, turned to its Formula 1 team for inspiration and stuck with the tried-and-true formula of “less is more” in order to make the F40 as lightweight as possible. In terms of the chassis, the track dimension of the 288 GTO’s chassis was widened and a fresh steel-tube frame was reinforced with an extensive use of carbon fiber, making the platform significantly lighter than its predecessor. When stripped out for racing, Ferrari was able to save a few further precious grams. The F40 had no carpet, utilized door pulls instead of traditional handles, and could be ordered with roll-up or fixed windows (installing power-operated windows was simply out of the question). As a result of these fanatical weight-saving measures, the F40 tipped the scales at a feather-weight 2,400 pounds, paving the way for a powerful engine to rocket it into the annals of automotive history.The engine was based on the 288 GTO’s twin-turbocharged V-8, but it was bored to displace nearly three liters. Following some additional tuning, the engine could produce 478 brake horsepower, making it the most powerful road-going Ferrari to date. Combined with its lightweight nature, this made the F40’s performance figures just as incredible as its top speed. A sprint from 0–60 could take just 3.8 seconds, and the car could be powered onwards to a quarter-mile time in 11.8 seconds. Braking was equally impressive, and the F40 could bring itself to a stop from 60 mph in just 119 feet.Production of the F40 was originally planned for just 400 units, and even with a list price of roughly $400,000, which was an astronomical price for a car at that time, many traded hands for much more than that when new. As a result of the car’s desirability, massive demand pushed total production numbers to 1,311, all of which would be in left-hand drive and liveried in classic Rossa Corsa paint. Of those examples, only 213 were delivered new to the United States, making Ferrari’s ultimate road-going machine even rarer in its largest market.Adding to its overall historical importance, the F40 was the last car to receive the blessing of Enzo “Il Commendatore” Ferrari before his passing. Enzo had envisioned the car as an ideal way for the company to celebrate its 40th anniversary, as it would both promote all it had accomplished in its short history as well as highlight its plans for making the next 40 years just as exciting as its last. As such, the F40 signaled the end of an era for one of the most iconic marques in automotive history.CHASSIS NUMBER 86678According to the records of Ferrari historian Jarrett Rothmeier, the F40 offered here was built to U.S. specifications, in Rosso Corsa with Rosso cloth interior, and equipped, as it is today, with wind-up windows. It was sold new in 1990 to the original owner in California, for whom it was road-registered as 2ULR999, and shown the following year at the Ferrari Owners Club Concours d’Elegance at Carmel Valley, and at another FOC meet at Laguna Seca.In 1995 the car was offered for sale in the Ferrari Market Letter by Lake Forest Sportscars as “one owner, low miles.” It was sold thereafter to Mark H. Balan of Yorba Linda, California, who retained ownership until at least 2005. Subsequently it was offered for sale by Ferrari-Maserati of Fort Lauderdale, prior to its acquisition by the current owner, a devoted Southern California enthusiast. In his ownership the car was awarded its FCA Silver award at the International Meet in Monterey, California, in 2015, followed by its Platinum award in Pasadena this year.The car recorded 7,614 miles at the time of cataloguing, which is the actual mileage from new, and has never been raced or tracked. In fact, its maintenance history is rather impressive, with service records for the last three years, from the respected Rex Nguyen Restorations and Beverly Hills Ferrari, accompanying it, along with a clean CARFAX report, fitted luggage, and the correct books and tools. Importantly, it is also California smog compliant, and in fact is presently road-registered and street-legal.Reported by its owner as being “currently fully serviced and ready to go,” this supercar is ready for a new owner to experience on the open road or the show field—in either case, a truly special experience, with a wonderful F40.

View additional info

Starting bid: $600,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1967 Ferrari 330 GTS

Estimate: $2,200,000 - $2,500,000

Description: 300 bhp, 3,967 cc SOHC V-12 engine with triple Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.5 in.One of the finest 330 GTS available anywhereOne of only 99 examples produced; retains its original engineExquisite restoration; four-time Platinum award winnerAccompanied by a set of books and toolsFerrari Classiche certifiedThe replacement to the 275 GTS, the 330 GTS, was designed to be an elegant, open-top, V-12 grand tourer for Ferrari’s best customers looking for the finest automotive experience money could buy. In addition to plenty of room for two plus their luggage, the 330 GTS also boasted an incredible set of performance figures. It boasted a top speed of 150 mph, and the 330 GTS could easily outpace just about any other car on the road when it was new.Unveiled at the Paris Motor Show in October of 1966, its styling was instantly recognizable as a Pininfarina design. The 330 GTS epitomized mid-’60s Italian GT styling with its uncluttered and elegant design, from its classic nose characterized by its shallow egg-crate oval grille to its triple-louvered vents on the rear flanks of the front fenders and on to the seductive tapered tail. The impeccable style carried on to the car’s interior, which was luxuriously appointed with twin leather bucket seats and a wood-rimmed, aluminum steering wheel. With remarkably spacious proportions inside, this was the perfect place to be for a 1,000-mile road trip across the country or for a quick trip across town. Aside from the obvious addition of its convertible top, the 330 GTS was identical to the 330 GTC coupe that had been unveiled a few months earlier at the Geneva Salon. However, the convertible was built in much more limited numbers than its closed sibling. While 598 of the 330 GTC were built in total, only 99 of the 330 GTS would leave the factory gates by the time GTS production concluded in 1968, making the convertible much more desirable than the coupe. Today, these 99 cars are highly sought after by collectors for their fine driving characteristics as well as their gorgeous looks. CHASSIS NUMBER 10689 The 63rd of the 99 330 GTS built, chassis number 10689 was completed by the factory in November 1967, finished in Verde Medio over a Beige Connolly leather interior, and equipped with Borletti air conditioning. It was delivered early in 1968 to Montreal dealer George Wooley, who subsequently sold it through Chinetti Motors to the first owner, H. Lifshutz of Fort Lauderdale, Florida.Records indicate that the car was advertised in the Miami Herald in 1978, with 34,000 miles. In 1983 it was sold to Edgar Birner of Connecticut, who had François Sicard restore the car in black with a red leather interior. The 330 GTS remained with Mr. Birner until 2004, when it was sold to Steward Coleman of Asheville, North Carolina, who displayed it extensively, including at the 2006 Amelia Island Concours d’Elegance, 2006 Euro Festival in South Carolina, and at the 2007 Cavallino Classic, where it won a Silver class award. The current owner acquired chassis 10689 in 2007, and had it certified by Ferrari Classiche later that year. He has since driven and shown the car extensively, in both the United States and Italy. In 2008, it was awarded at the Ferrari Club of America Annual Meet in Toronto, Canada, and at Cavallino Classic. It was then driven on the Tour di Palm Beach and was shown at the Geneva Concours d’Elegance in Geneva, Illinois. The 330 GTS was again shown at the Cavallino Classic and at the Ferrari Club America Annual meet in 2009, but these times won the coveted Platinum award. In 2010, the car was flown to Italy to participate in the Ferrari Tribute to the Mille Miglia, with a route from Brescia to Imola, to Rome and then back to Brescia. It was also shown at the 50th Annual Ferrari Club of America National Field and Driving Concours in 2013, where it won the Trofeo Gran Turismo Award, for an outstanding regularly driven pre-1975 Ferrari, and yet another Platinum award. Despite it already being a Platinum award winner, the owner decided to have the car painstakingly restored in 2013. Finished in the period factory color of Grigio Notte over black leather interior, the car’s current configuration is nothing short of spectacular. Importantly, the car does retain the engine it was delivered with new, and all of the stamped numbers were documented during the Classiche certification process. Every component was inspected and addressed during the restoration, resulting in one of the best examples in existence. Post-restoration, the exquisite 330 GTS was shown at the 2014 Cavallino Classic where it won another Platinum award, confirming the quality and authenticity of the work. Included with the sale are its books in their original leather pouch, the tool roll, the jack in its leather bag, and the Classiche Red Book documenting its certification process. Simply put, this 330 GTS is one of the finest examples to be offered for sale and is ready for its next owner to drive or show in concours events the world over.

View additional info

Starting bid: $1,000,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
2001 Ferrari 456M GT

Estimate: $150,000 - $225,000

Description: 442 bhp, 5,473 cc 65-degree V-12 engine, six-speed manual transaxle gearbox, independent front and rear suspension with coil springs over gas-filled telescopic shock absorbers with self-levelling rear suspension, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.3 in.Recent timing belt service by a Ferrari specialistJust under 4,450 miles from newRare and desirable six-speed manual exampleAt the 40th anniversary celebrations of Garage Francorchamps in Brussels, Belgium, in 1992, Ferrari chose to introduce its newest four-seater grand touring car, the 456. Featuring an all-new 65-degree V-12, this was a dramatic departure from the outgoing 412, boasting elegant Pininfarina styling that was sure to propel Ferrari into the 21st century whilst harkening back to the elegant GT cars of the 1950s and 1960s. Of course, as a four-seater Ferrari grand-tourer, its performance was exceptional. The 456’s V-12 was capable of producing 442 horsepower at 6,200 rpm, and it could reach speeds of over 186 mph and accelerate from 0–60 mph in 5.2 seconds, which were quite impressive performance figures for its day. Gorgeously appointed throughout, it boasted a full leather interior with electronically adjustable front seats and was outfitted with all the requisite luxuries, including electric windows and doors, an eight-speaker stereo system with a CD player, and air conditioning. For those riding in the rear, there was more than enough space for two adults for a short journey.For 1998, Ferrari introduced an updated version of the 456, dubbed the 456M. This introduced a number of subtle changes throughout to improve the overall driving experience but kept the overall feel and personality of the car. New seats were fitted and the dashboard was revised, the hood scoops were removed, and a slightly larger grille was fitted; further, the 456M received a fixed undercarriage spoiler in place of the original motorized spoiler. Horsepower and performance remained unchanged. As was the case with the original 456, an all-synchromesh six-speed transaxle manual gearbox was standard, but buyers could also opt for an automatic transmission. Finished in a seldom seen and attractive color combination of Blu Pozzi over a light blue leather interior with contrasting dark blue piping, this particular 456 remains in wonderful condition throughout. According to its original window sticker, it was outfitted with brake calipers in aluminum and Scuderia Ferrari shields, as well as color-matched stitching and a color-matched steering wheel. Currently, the car shows less than 4,450 miles from new on its odometer and remains ready for further road use following a recent belt service by a Ferrari specialist. Importantly, it retains all of its original books, keys with remotes, and its original toolkit. While the car is currently fitted with a Tubi exhaust, the original exhaust will be included in the sale. For the enthusiast looking for a subtle automobile with exceptional performance and true grand-touring credentials, a 456M GT would be a perfect choice. With space for four plus luggage and powered by a front-engined V-12 with nearly 450 horsepower on tap, this would be the perfect choice for cross-country trips at speed whilst remaining under the radar.

View additional info

Starting bid: $80,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1958 Facel Vega FVS Series 4 Sport Coupe

Estimate: $200,000 - $275,000

Description: 325 bhp, 354 cu. in. OHV Hemi V-8 with two Carter four-barrel carburetors, PowerFlite pushbutton automatic transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs, and telescopic dampers; live rear axle with longitudinal semi-elliptical springs and telescopic dampers; and four-wheel Lockheed-Bendix hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 104.8 in.Four owners from newHigh-quality, well-maintained recent restorationThe supreme European grand tourer of its eraWith the domestic manufacture of large engines quashed, Facel Vega followed a pattern established by the likes of Delaunay-Belleville before the war, sourcing an American eight-cylinder engine, which had the great advantages of quality and larger production numbers. Starting in 1954, their engine of choice was from Chrysler.As with so many small manufacturers, Facel Vega built its cars in short series, with 10 different models over 10 years. The same decade corresponded with a rapidly developing horsepower race in America, and Facel Vega’s Chrysler V-8s increased from a 172-horsepower, 276-cubic inch DeSoto Firedome to a 354-horsepower, 392-cubic inch Hemi V-8 from the Chrysler 300. Of the approximately 357 Series 2 through Series 4 FVS that Facel Vega built, only 36 are thought to have been equipped with this car’s 325-horsepower, dual-quad Typhoon Hemi engine.Facel Vega’s drivetrain was powerful and largely conventional, but the results were not. Under the beautiful skin of an FVS lurks a fascinating combination of muscle car and grand tourer. It is unhappy when asked to ease off the line, instead requesting the driver to put their foot to the floor and enjoy a sub-10-second 0–60 time. Thanks go to the Hemi’s 430 foot-pounds of torque for moving a 4,100-pound car up to speed so fast. At the same time, handling is surprisingly confident and sporty. With a top speed in the neighborhood of 130 mph, it is supremely exciting when driven with confidence, yet it is also relaxed and comfortable at highway speeds.According to former owner and noted collector Wayne Davis, the car offered here was sold new in the Dallas, Texas, area, and was street-driven until 1968, when it was disassembled for restoration by a forward-thinking enthusiast. It was still apart when Mr. Davis acquired the car and was completed to a show-quality standard for his collection in 2012.The Facel Vega includes a fitted five-piece set of factory luggage, correct wire wheels (shod in Michelin radial tires), maroon Connolly leather, and Wilton wool carpets, as well as a Motorola AM/FM radio. The original windshield, which was once referred to as “maddeningly” irreplaceable, does not display the common Facel Vega cracks, and the exposed exhaust tips at the other end are not damaged. The interior is very well done, with only slight signs of use, and the wood-grain dashboard, with its crystal-clear gauges, is like new.As a dual-quad Series 4, it is a rare jewel in its own right, as it is unlikely that there are any others that have enjoyed only four owners in 57 years or have been restored to so high a standard. It is as close as one can come to buying a new Facel Vega.

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1979 Ferrari 308 GTB

Estimate: $125,000 - $150,000

Description: 240 bhp, 2,926 cc DOHC V-8 engine with four twin-choke Weber carburetors, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs, anti-roll bar, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 92.1 in.Beautifully presented original example with just 23,000 miles from newU.S. delivery; includes books, tools, and jackRecent 30,000-mile belt serviceFinal year of the carbureted 308 GTBThe Ferrari 308 GTB, introduced at the 1975 Paris Motor Show, marked a significant change for the company from Maranello. Powered by a mid-mounted transverse V-8, the 308 opened up a market segment unexplored by Ferrari, which had aimed its products solely at an elite clientele. As a successor to the V-6 Dino, the 308 was powered by a 240 horsepower 3.0-liter four-cam 90-degree V-8 transversely mounted ahead of the rear axle. The four cams were driven by toothed belts and the engine was fitted with a quartet of Weber twin-choke carburetors. A five-speed all-synchromesh rear transaxle was included, and the chassis, with fully independent front and rear suspension, was much like the Dino’s, including the 92.1-inch wheelbase.A GTS variant was unveiled at the 1977 Frankfurt Motor Show, featuring an open targa roof. Bosch fuel injection arrived at the end of 1980, and the adoption of four-valve per cylinder technology came two years later. Thanks to the popularity of the Magnum, P.I. television series, this is to many, the quintessential Ferrari. This largely original example from the final year of the carbureted V-8 has traveled just 23,000 miles from new. It incorporates all the desirable updates made during the production run, including aero outside mirrors and a gas strut-operated tail section for ease of servicing. Most importantly, it benefits from a 30,000-mile service, including cam belt change, new belt tensioners, and a valve adjustment in May 2015. Its original jack, tools, and manuals are included, along with the proper U.S.-specification emissions equipment: air pump, injectors, and catalytic converter—even the original smog certification sticker on the windshield. Presented in Rosso Chiaro over Nero leather, rarely does one find such a fine example of a 1970s supercar in the condition as newly delivered some 37 years later. A perfect candidate for any concours preservation class or Ferrari Classiche certification, this is an opportunity not to be missed for all enthusiasts and collectors.

View additional info

Starting bid: $60,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1966 Aston Martin DB6 Vantage

Estimate: $400,000 - $500,000

Description: 325 bhp, 4,200 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with triple Weber carburetors, ZF five-speed manual transmission, front suspension with upper and lower A-arms, coil springs, and an anti-roll bar, rear suspension with a live axle, Watts linkage, radius rods, and coil springs, and four-wheel Girling disc brakes. Wheelbase: 101.7 in.A factory left-hand-drive example equipped from new with air conditioningCorrect 325-horsepower Vantage engine and ZF five-speed transmission; all of the best featuresAccompanied by a copy of its factory build sheet, documenting extensive post-delivery service historyBeautiful and ideal for rallying and driving eventsIn 1958, Aston Martin introduced its revolutionary grand touring sports saloon, the DB4, while its close successor came roaring onto the world stage in 1963 as the famous DB5. By 1965, the series had reached its ultimate development with the DB6, which was produced in first series form until 1969. In the uprated Vantage state of tune, the Tadek Marek-designed and race-proven inline six-cylinder was perfected to produce 325 horsepower, while Touring of Milan’s celebrated coachwork design was by now stretched to accommodate a wheelbase 3.75 inches longer than its predecessor, offering a more refined ride with room in the back for actual adult passengers! The addition of its advanced and pleasing Kamm-style tail crowned the DB6’s ravishing presence.Many enthusiasts consider this final series of Touring-designed Aston Martins to be the best of all, as they offered the most sublime combination of gentlemanly luxury, sophisticated street manners, and superior straight-line performance. As ever, starting with the DB4, the world standard design features remained first-rate with its overbuilt and understressed aluminum engine block and head, triple Weber carburetors in Vantage form and four corner disc brakes, with interior appointments of Connolly leather trim, Wilton wool carpets belying its handbuilt nature. Now more fully refined in the DB6, it is clothed in aluminum alloy panelwork, as every post-war Aston Martin until the introduction of the DB7 some 20 years later. Eye-wateringly expensive then, the DB6 offers superb value today in comparison to its predecessor models.According to its factory build sheet, a copy of which is on file, the DB6 offered here is a factory left-hand-drive model, delivered new to Captain E.D. Smith of St. Neots, Cambridgeshire. The build sheet notes the 3.54:1 limited-slip rear differential, heated rear window, Fiamm horns, Britax safety belts, Marchal fog lamps, chrome wheels, and, notably, the desirable Normalair air conditioning, a typical high-specification configuration for the Continental market, despite its original English delivery location; it is believed to have been used in France.Further attachments to the build sheet note regular and conscientious service at the factory during its first five years and 24,719 miles of the car’s life. It was thereafter upgraded, as suggested by the factory service records, with the installation of a correct factory Vantage-specification engine. In combination with a ZF five-speed transmission, replacing the sluggish original Borg-Warner automatic unit. This, along with its original A/C unit, is considered the most desirable specification for a DB6. Thereafter, in the 2000s, the car was restored to its present appearance, in a beautiful, lustrous black, with a rich red leather interior. The restoration has been exceedingly well-preserved and shows only minor signs of wear, suggesting driving enjoyment throughout, in particular in the care of its current owner, a longtime and well-known enthusiast.An ideal DB6 in the most desirable specification and superb presentation, complete with an owner’s handbook, this car is perfectly suited for the tours and rallies of its new owner’s choosing, even show-worthy at AMOC or regional concours. It is passionate British performance with elegance to match.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1967 Shelby GT500 Fastback

Estimate: $110,000 - $130,000

Description: 355 hp, 428 cu. in. V-8 engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with unequal-length control arms, coil springs, and anti-roll bar; live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs; and front disc and rear drum hydraulic brakes. Wheelbase: 108 in.Well-restored and thoroughly optionedEquipped with its original 428 engine and four-speed transmissionAccompanied by a Marti ReportCarroll Shelby, the renegade Texan who built and sold the legendary 289 Cobra, had the idea to apply the Shelby magic to Ford’s hot, new Mustang. It was a match made in heaven. The year 1967 brought a mildly re-contoured Mustang body. Shelby took out the grille and put a pair of high-beam lights in the cavity. Taillights were replaced by rectangular units, and the air scoops were punched into the side coves, ahead of the rear wheels.Since the new 1967 Mustang body shell was designed to accept Ford’s 390-cubic inch big block engine, Shelby dropped the Interceptor 428 into the pony car’s engine bay and added a dual-carb intake, creating the top-of-the-line GT500. Although conservatively rated at 355 horsepower, its actual output was closer to 400 horsepower, with 420 foot-pounds of pavement-melting torque!The GT500 looked the part too, as it had a special front end with a unique bonnet scoop and grille-mounted driving lights, which gave the Shelby Mustang an unforgettable face. In the back, rear-quarter scoops, a rear spoiler, and sequential turn signals lifted from the 1966 Thunderbird gave the car an even more powerful presence. A roll bar with inertia-reel shoulder harnesses completed the competition flavor of the car.According to its accompanying Marti Report, the Wimbledon White over black GT500 offered here was completed at San Jose, California, on 9 February 1967 and was originally delivered to the Romy Hammes Corporation of South Bend, Indiana. It was optioned new with a four-speed manual transmission, black Décor interior, additional cooling package, courtesy light group, fold-down rear seat, power steering and power front disc brakes, and a heavy-duty battery. Today it retains the original engine, which remains correct, including the factory-specification carburetors and intake manifold.After acquiring it in 2005, the current owner decided to completely restore the car and had Kreations Auto Body of Eureka, California, perform all the work. Today it presents absolutely beautifully and remains a fine example of a classic Shelby.

View additional info

Starting bid: $60,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1987 Porsche 959 'Komfort'

Estimate: $900,000 - $1,200,000

Description: 450 bhp, 2,849 cc rear-mounted, air- and liquid-cooled, horizontally opposed six-cylinder engine with twin two-stage turbochargers and Bosch electronic fuel injection, six-speed manual transmission, all-wheel drive, front and rear independent double-wishbone suspension with electronically adjustable ride height and shock-absorber control, and four-wheel hydraulic ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 89.4 in.Porsche’s first supercar; one of only 337 Cutting-edge Group B technologyTenacious road-holding and brutal accelerationPorsche stunned the automotive world when it unveiled its new “Gruppe B” at the 1983 Frankfurt Auto Show. Identified internally as the Type 961, this twin-turbocharged, all-wheel-drive design, with its innovative composite-over-steel body and chassis platform, powerful rear-mounted 2.8-liter turbocharged engine, and multitude of electronic engine and suspension management systems was quickly judged to be one of the most advanced ultra–high-performance automobiles ever created. Yet it was unmistakably a member of the 911 family. This new machine was to be the German automaker’s entry into the cutting-edge FIA Group B international rally championship arena, where the only rule was that there were no rules—practically any technology was permissible.Group B’s no-limits policy encouraged a long list of automakers to create incredibly powerful and extremely fast vehicles, all of which required production of at least 200 street-legal examples on which these rally specials could be based. As surely as night follows day, a rash of serious accidents forced a re-examination of the series. The FIA abruptly cancelled Group B, leaving manufacturers like Porsche on the hook. With production of the homologated road cars already underway, Porsche found itself in a dire financial situation. To recover its huge investment in tooling and research, the company’s board of directors had no choice but to press ahead in hopes it could convince a fairly limited number of wealthy customers that a 200 mph road car was a sound investment. Company management need not have worried; eager buyers lined up to place deposits on the Type 959.The 959’s chassis, on the same 89.4-inch wheelbase as the 911 Carrera, was based on the 911’s stamped steel floorpan. In fact, the cabin’s center section, including its interior, was nearly identical to the 911. The front trunk lid and doors were aluminum; the extended nose section with its almost flush headlamps was molded of polyurethane, and the remainder of the shell from fiberglass-reinforced Kevlar. Aerodynamic stability was a primary consideration in the 959’s design, and after extensive wind tunnel studies, Porsche’s designers achieved a package with near-zero body lift and an amazingly low drag coefficient of 0.31, still an impressive figure today. There was extensive ducting and venting in the nose to cool the front brakes and oil radiator. The body’s rear section was greatly extended and widened, and it too was generously ventilated and topped with a full-width rear wing.The true brilliance of the 959 lay beneath its svelte body shell. Its tremendously powerful engine, rear-mounted, was Porsche’s race-proven “boxer” six, with air-cooled cylinders and four-valve, water-cooled cylinder heads. This engine, displacing 2.85 liters, was similar to those used in the brilliant “Moby Dick” IMSA GT coupe and Porsche’s Indy open-wheel project. Featuring a pair of asymmetrical turbochargers, each of them intercooled, this engine delivered power in an almost seamless fashion, with a small turbocharger spinning up almost from idle to establish low-end boost, while the second exhaust-driven turbine came into play at 4,500 rpm. At full throttle and maximum boost, this relatively small engine produced a very impressive 450 horsepower at 6,500 rpm. Power was fed through a specially designed Borg-Warner six-speed transmission, which included an extremely low first gear for use in the off-road situations the Type 961 rally car might encounter. Otherwise, it could be ignored. Porsche’s Porsche-Steur-Kupplung (PSK) system allowed the driver to vary the 370 foot-pounds of torque between the rear and front axles, allowing up to 80 percent to the rear under hard acceleration, all managed electronically. The 959’s highly advanced suspension was also race-derived, with double-wishbones at each corner, coil springs, and double shocks that could be adjusted by the turn of a knob from the driver’s seat. Both the ride height and shock damping were electronically adjustable, and a full array of instruments kept the driver in touch with everything going on behind and beneath. Special 17-inch lightweight magnesium alloy wheels and model-specific run-flat tires were created for the 959, and the wheels included one of the first automatic pressure-monitoring systems. Large power-assisted, ventilated disc brakes with ABS handled stopping chores.Most 959s were delivered as “Komfort” models, with a broad array of cockpit amenities, including full leather trim and air conditioning. With its ability to put power to the pavement so effectively, the 959 was an amazing performer. It could see 60 miles an hour in less than four seconds from a standstill, cover the standing quarter mile in about 12 seconds, and touch 200 mph on a clear road. Without question, the Porsche 959 set the standard for high-performance road cars that was unchallenged until Ferrari unveiled its slightly faster but much less sophisticated F40 a few years later.This attractive Guard’s Red 959 “Komfort” has been consigned from a collection in New England. It is fitted with heated sport seats for the driver and passenger. Although its earliest history is largely unavailable at the time of this writing, there are extensive service records on file from the current ownership period beginning in 2012. No expenses have been spared on annual servicing, and one would be hard pressed to find a better-maintained car. Following the consignor’s purchase in 2012, Proto Tech Inc. of Oakland Park, Florida, performed a full engine-out service, with invoices totaling $77,039.67. All aspects of the car were addressed, including the brakes, fuel system, differentials, and steering rack. Following Proto Tech’s servicing, the car has since been maintained by Callas Rennsport of Torrance, California, beginning in 2013. Invoices document significant servicing annually during their caretaking. In 2013, invoices totaled $29,120.62 for various servicing and clutch work. In 2014, new engine mounts were installed and the complete clutch assembly was replaced to a total of $10,878.20. In 2015, the rear shock system was reassembled and a major service on the engine was performed, totaling over $30,000. In April of this year, the suspension was further serviced along with additional servicing totaling approximately $25,000.959s represent the pinnacle of technological advancement and the peak of Group-B development. With just under 13,000 kilometers on the odometer and a tool kit and books included, along with a grand total of $175,900.35 of servicing invoices, this 959 represents a unique opportunity to acquire a fully serviced low-mileage 959.

View additional info

Starting bid: $500,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1995 Ferrari F50

Estimate: $3,000,000 - $3,500,000

Description: 520 bhp, 4,698 cc V-12 engine with Bosch Motronic 2.7 engine management, six-speed manual transmission, four-wheel independent suspension with coil springs and unequal-length wishbones, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 101.6 in.The 62nd of 349 F50s produced; one of only 55 U.S.-production examplesOne of four examples finished in Nero; one of just two U.S.-production examples in NeroJust under 2,090 miles from newUndoubtedly one of the most desirable F50s in existenceBuilt to celebrate 50 years of success in motorsport, the Ferrari F50 aimed to offer customers an experience as close to a Formula 1 car as possible, but while retaining the familiarity of a road-legal platform. Following four years of production and development, the F50 was finally unveiled at the 63rd annual Geneva Motor Show in 1995. Luca di Montezemolo, Piero Lardi Ferrari, Sergio Pininfarina, and Niki Lauda were all on hand at the unveiling, illustrating the monumental importance of this new model to the history of Ferrari.Carbon fiber was utilized throughout, particularly in the body tub and shell, helping to keep the F50 as featherlight as the chassis itself, which was made entirely of Cytec aerospace carbon fiber and tipped the scales at just 225 pounds. The six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which the oil tank was mounted for the dry-sump engine lubrication system. This layout was reminiscent of the one used in Ferrari’s contemporary Formula 1 cars. Ferrari’s weight-saving measures and no-nonsense approach to the car’s design were also evident throughout the interior. Wind-up windows instead of electrically operated windows were utilized and even the throttle, brake, and clutch pedals (all fully adjustable) were drilled to further maximize weight reduction. At its heart was a 4.7-liter naturally aspirated V-12 engine with five valves per cylinder and twin overhead camshafts per bank, derived directly from the engine used in the 1990 Formula 1 season. As fitted to the F50, it was capable of producing 520 horsepower at 8,000 rpm but was capable of reaching an eardrum-shattering 10,000 rpm. The six-speed longitudinal gearbox, complete with a limited-slip differential, was fitted behind the engine, between which the oil tank was mounted for the dry-sump engine lubrication system. To help rein in the power, massive drilled and ventilated disc brakes were fitted with Brembo-supplied four-piston brake calipers. This fanatical attention to detail in adding performance and reducing weight paid massive dividends in terms of performance. Capable of rocketing to 60 mph from a standstill in just 3.6 seconds, the F50 could accelerate onwards toward a top speed of 202 mph if the driver was brave enough to keep accelerating. Even more incredible was the car’s time for a standing mile – just 30.3 seconds. The F50 might have looked drastically different from Ferrari’s F1 cars of the time, but it undoubtedly had the heart and soul of a racer. Production would be limited to just 349 examples worldwide, far less than the over 1,300 F40s produced. Of course, while the 288 GTO and F40 before it were only finished in the traditional Ferrari shade of Rosso Corsa, this would change for the F50. The vast majority of F50s produced were indeed finished in red, but a handful received more unique paintwork. Some were finished in yellow and silver, while only four were finished in black.Of the four black F50s produced, there were only two examples that went to the United States. One such example was unfortunately crashed about three years ago, leaving the example presented here, chassis number 104092, the only pristine and unmolested black, U.S.-specification F50 in existence.Fitted with a contrasting black and red leather and Alcantara interior, the F50 truly has a menacing look and presents just as beautifully as when it came out of the factory. Throughout its whole life, it has remained in the hands of careful collectors, individuals who recognized the car’s significance and inherent value. As a result, it has been carefully cossetted and maintained accordingly from new and remains in splendid condition throughout.Importantly, it retains a number of its original accessories, including the following: its original hardtop still wrapped in its roof box, three pieces of unopened factory luggage, its original and unused canvas top, two sets of keys, tool kit, car cover, and wheel nut tool. Furthermore, in December of 2016 the car received a service by a Ferrari specialist, which included changing all the fluids and replacing the car’s fuel bladder. Thus, it remains ready for road use should its next custodian so desire. Without a doubt the most special F50 that RM Sotheby’s has ever offered, it is highly unlikely that such a remarkable example will become available in the near future. With only four examples ever finished in black, a Nero F50 ranks amongst the rarest of modern Ferraris ever produced. It would stand tall in any of the finest Ferrari collections on the planet as an exceptional example of one of Ferrari’s most incredible road-going automobiles.

View additional info

Starting bid: $2,000,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
2013 Bugatti Veyron 16.4 Super Sport 300

Estimate: $2,100,000 - $2,300,000

Description: 1,200 bhp, 7,993 cc DOHC 64-valve intercooled W-16 engine with four turbochargers, seven-speed, dual-clutch, semi-automatic sequential transmission, front and rear double-wishbone suspension, and four-wheel carbon-ceramic disc brakes with rear airbrake. Wheelbase: 106.7 in.Chassis number 300 of only 300 Veyron coupes builtOne of just eight U.S.-specification Super SportsDisplayed by Bugatti at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show One private owner; showing less than 400 miles from newAnnual service performed in May 2016The purest iteration of an engineering masterpieceTHE ULTIMATE VEYRON COUPEA supercar in the making. Many would argue that when the first production Veyron rolled off the line at Bugatti’s purpose-built factory in Molsheim, France, it was the most widely anticipated automobile the 21st century has ever seen. The Veyron was the first new car to wear the Bugatti name following the brand’s acquisition by the Volkswagen Group, and it was widely acclaimed as the most incredible car the world had ever seen. Not only was it capable of reaching a top speed of over 248 mph and 0–60 in less than three seconds, it could carry both its driver and passenger in uncompromising luxury.The Veyron was the brainchild of Ferdinand Piëch, the chairman of the Volkswagen Group and a former engineer who worked on many automotive greats, such as the Porsche 917 and the Audi Quattro, and it was to be designed with utterly no concessions. Under Piëch’s leadership, Volkswagen purchased the rights to Bugatti in 1998 and then instructed its engineers to design a car capable of reaching a top speed of over 400 km/h and an output of over 1,000 horsepower. Many believed that such a request was impossible to fulfill, but such requests were typical of Piëch, who, in 2002, had pressured engineers to produce the Volkswagen Phaeton, a car that he insisted must be capable of being driven all day at 300 km/h in 50 degrees Celsius, while also maintaining an interior temperature of 22.2 degrees Celsius. Nevertheless, the engineers ventured into uncharted territory when designing and engineering a road car capable of such speeds, but the resulting automobile proved to be nothing short of extraordinary.Many believed that since the Veyron was simply such an incredibly well engineered and designed car, its performance simply could not be topped. However, five years after the original Veyron went into production, Bugatti introduced the Super Sport, which replaced the Veyron as the fastest car ever made. The Super Sport, which now boasted 1,200 horsepower and 1,500 Newton meters of torque, was capable of accelerating from 0–62 mph in 2.5 seconds, arriving at 186 mph in 16.6 seconds, and achieving an electronically limited top speed of 257 mph. In order to add an additional 199 horsepower to the standard Veyron’s already incredible power output of 1,001, two additional fuel pumps, as well as four larger turbochargers and air coolers, were fitted, and engineers were able to reduce its exhaust back pressure, resulting in a car that could both inhale and exhale more easily. At the same time, reducing the exhaust back pressure also helped to improve the fuel economy over the standard Veyron. Additionally, the car benefitted from improved aerodynamics, which helped to increase its stability at high speeds and increase airflow to the engine and brakes.SUPER SPORT 300This Veyron was purchased new by its first owner and delivered in August 2012 as one of 48 Super Sports constructed and only eight examples built to U.S. specifications. As a “Super Sport,” it has 200 more horsepower, larger turbos, and two additional fuel pumps, and it is 100 pounds lighter and slightly re-styled, with larger, re-shaped intakes. The Super Sport also boasts distinctive NACA ducts on the roof, replacing the more traditional air intakes fitted to its roof. It retains chassis number 300 and would thus be the last of the coupes, which were limited to 300 units. It was born as one of forty-eight 1,200-horsepower Veyron 16.4 Super Sports and was one of eight delivered new to the United States, perhaps being the only example in this color combination. As evidenced by documentation accompanying the car, 269 of the current miles driven were accumulated by Bugatti at Molsheim during Bugatti’s standard and extensive pre-delivery testing. As a result, it is presented in virtually as-new condition. Since its delivery, it has been very well preserved and regularly maintained. Braman Bugatti in Miami carried out its annual service in November 2013, and it received another annual service by them in May 2015. The Veyron was acquired by the current vendor in August 2015 and was serviced by Bentley Beverly Hills in May of this year.Of note, just last year, this Super Sport traveled to Geneva at the request of Bugatti, where it was displayed at the 2015 Geneva Motor Show, alongside the very first Veyron, chassis number 001 (formerly this Super Sport’s stablemate), in a celebration of the Veyron’s 10-year production run.To call the Veyron the most important sports car of this generation or any other is, quite simply, an understatement. With utter disregard to cost, it was built to be superlative in all respects and prove the brand’s relentless pursuit of supremacy. No other car could ever carry this mantle because no other car will ever logically benefit from the same production budget that the Veyron had. Bugatti went to great lengths to ensure that even the most minute detail, which will never be seen by even the most astute buyer, was made of the finest materials on earth and finessed to the most razor-sharp tolerances, regardless of cost. The Veyron is, therefore, the benchmark against which all other 200-mph, ultra-high horsepower supercars will be measured. This car represents a moment in time that today’s enthusiasts will look back upon for years to come.

View additional info

Starting bid: $1,000,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1957 Porsche 356 A 1600 Speedster

Estimate: $340,000 - $380,000

Description: 60 hp, 1,582 cc OHV air-cooled horizontally opposed four-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with laminated torsion bars, parallel trailing arms, and tubular shock absorbers; independent rear swing axles with torsion bars and tubular shock absorbers; and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 82.7 in.Excellent, well-cared-for older restorationFinished in very attractive black over blackFitted with optional coupe seats for comfortable touringUnquestionably one of the coolest classics on the roadOn a recent episode of his car show, Jay Leno asked the question, “What is cool?” As rhetorical as the question may be, it remains a contentious topic among gear heads. However, all it takes to end that argument is the arrival of a black Porsche Speedster like the one offered here. The Speedster was the inspiration of New York dealer Max Hoffman, the godfather of the 300 SL Gullwing, who wanted an affordable stripped-down version of the Porsche 356 to put in the hands of amateur club racers in 1957. In order to save weight, the Speedster had no side windows and featured a short raked windscreen, which replaced the heavier street version. These stripped-down Speedsters were considerably cheaper than the other 356 models, selling for less than $3,000. Today, because of their rarity—Porsche produced only 1,171 units for 1957—and their coolness factor, they are by far the most valuable of any 356 model. The only concern with the design was that the minimal soft top and removable side curtains not only did not provide much weatherproofing, but also forced the driver to tuck down in the car just to see out, so the top was rarely used.The car, originally finished in Meissen Blue, changed for the owner, who had Stoddard Imported Cars in Willoughby, Ohio, restore the car in 1989. Since that time, the stunning black paint has been carefully maintained, with no evidence of clouding or swirl marks. The car has accrued fewer than 100,000 miles on the odometer. When the car was restored, the door and dash trim and the delivery-optional coupe seats—original Speedster seats are just vinyl covering over bucket shells suitable for racing but hardly comfortable enough for daily driving on bumpy city streets—were reupholstered in black leather. The car is also presented with U.S.-specification bumpers and sealed-beam headlights, documentation of the restoration, original tool kit, original and newly restored Speedster side curtains, and a replacement tonneau cover.Though this 1600 Speedster is fitted with the Normal engine producing 70 horsepower rather than the more tightly wound S engine, the combination of the four-speed manual transmission (rebuilt by 356 Enterprises) and the incredible lightness makes this car incredibly responsive and satisfying to drive. To the fortunate bidder on this Speedster, pull on your worn leather flying jacket, white tee-shirt, and cuffed Levis and enjoy the drive over the Laureles Grade on the way to Laguna Seca for the 2018 Porsche Rennsport Werks Reunion. There you will be simply . . . cool.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1930 Cadillac V-16 Roadster

Estimate: $1,000,000 - $1,250,000

Description: Model 452. Body Style 4302. 175 bhp, 452 cu. in. OHV V-16 engine, three-speed selective synchromesh manual transmission, solid front axle with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension and hydraulic dampers, three-quarter floating rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf spring suspension, and four-wheel vacuum-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 148 in.One of the most desirable American ClassicsA genuine example with decades of well-known ownership historyPebble Beach Concours d’Elegance Best in Class winner100 points in Classic Car Club of America (CCCA) judgingA superlative, award-winning V-16 with few peersTHE CADILLAC SIXTEENOn 4 January 1930, Cadillac stunned the fine car market at the New York Auto Show with the introduction of its breathtaking new V-16. With it, Cadillac instantly catapulted itself to the head of the luxury class in one brilliant stroke. Until then, only Bugatti had produced a 16-cylinder engine, and it was accomplished by bolting two 8-cylinder inline engines together, which was an innovation that was originally intended for aircraft use.Cadillac’s V-16 was the first true 16-cylinder engine to be built from scratch, and it was a project that was led by Owen Milton Nacker under conditions of the utmost secrecy. In order to avoid knowledge of the project leaking from lower-level GM engineering departments and parts suppliers, a well-coordinated disinformation campaign was created, which included cover stories and notes on various blueprints that indicated that the project was actually Cadillac’s contribution to a new GM bus project. The 45-degree cylinder bank angle and overhead-valve design kept the V-16 narrow, while its external manifolds allowed easy access to the engine compartment.Furthermore, Cadillac’s V-16 was the first automotive engine ever to be “styled,” as all of the wiring was hidden and the engine compartment was dressed up with plenty of gleaming, polished aluminum, porcelain, and a pair of beautiful valve covers with brushed aluminum ridged surfaces that featured the Cadillac emblem.Cadillac managed to survive the rapidly declining luxury-car market of the early 1930s thanks to the financial resources of GM, its massive parent company. Without this support, Cadillac could never have produced such a limited-production, luxurious automobile. Although the V-16 was brilliantly designed, its shrinking Depression-era market meant that the V-16 was, of course, produced in tiny numbers for those few who were capable of paying more than 10 times the cost of a contemporary Chevrolet convertible. Without doubt, the few examples remaining today offer a rare glimpse into one of the most exciting automotive eras of all time.V-16 NUMBER 702604According to V-16 historian William Meffert, the roadster offered here is a very good and authentic survivor of the merely 100 produced in this fleet and sporting style, number 4302, on the 1930 and 1931 V-16 chassis. Body number 97, the car is further documented as an original roadster by a copy of its build sheet, which is on file, noting its delivery new through New York State dealer Fred Tremble. Interestingly, the car was originally all-over black, with the body moldings and undercarriage finished in Tokio [sic] Ivory – something that must have been truly a sight to behold!The roadster’s subsequent history is not known prior to 1961 or 1962, when it was acquired by Neil Austin, a longtime V-16 enthusiast from Florida. Mr. Austin seldom restored, drove, or sold any of the numerous treasures packed into his garage, and while he began work on the roadster, it largely sat, out of sight, until 1988.That year, the aging Mr. Austin finally elected to sell the car to well-known St. Louis collector Fred Weber, who had pursued it for many years. Mr. Weber commissioned Mark Ohm to perform a restoration of the roadster, after which it was traded to Steve Nannini. Mr. Nannini, in turn, sold the Cadillac to the present owner, a renowned American collector of the finest Full Classics, in whose care it has been maintained ever since.What began as mechanical work on the car in 1997 turned into a full restoration, completed in time for the 1999 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance. Finished in a beautiful, subtle two-tone of soft grey and blue, it was a crowd favorite that day on the Monterey Peninsula and was awarded Best in Class. The owner notes that it was taken to the CCCA Grand Classic in 2001, winning a first prize and scoring 100 points. It was returned to Pebble Beach in 2008, meaning that it will soon be eligible for its next appearance.The car’s restoration has aged only gently, with minor stretching and cracking to the leather of the front seat; its paintwork and chrome trim are still beautiful and show-quality. Numerous accessories, including a radiator stone guard, Goddess mascot, dual driving lights and cowl lamps, and a driver’s side spotlight, add to the period-correct flair. Authenticity gurus will find peering under the hood especially satisfying, as the engine’s unit number, 7-2804, matches the build sheet, as does the engine number 702604, stamped on the crankcase.The Cadillac V-16 roadster is one of the most visually and technologically impressive automobiles of its generation and has recently attracted new attention from collectors worldwide as one of the most desirable Full Classics on the market today. The opportunity to acquire such a beautifully restored and correct example as this is rare, indeed.

View additional info

Starting bid: $500,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1961 Ferrari 400 Superamerica SWB Coupe Aerodinamico

Estimate: $3,250,000 - $3,850,000

Description: 340 bhp, 3,967 cc single overhead-camshaft V-12 engine with triple Solex carburetors, four-speed manual gearbox, coil-spring independent front suspension with live rear axle, four-wheel telescopic Koni shock absorbers, and four-wheel disc brakes. Wheelbase: 95 in.Platinum Awards at Cavallino Classic and FCA meets; 99 points at Pebble BeachOne of only 17 SWB Pininfarina 400SA Coupe Aerodinamicos ever builtFormerly of the Greg Garrison and Skeets Dunn collectionsComplete with books, tools, luggage, build sheet copies, and extensive documentationFerrari Classiche Red Book certifiedVery likely the finest restored example in existenceCREATING THE SUPERAMERICAThe high-performance luxury gran turismo was a new automotive idiom in the prosperous years following World War II. The genre had its roots with great pre-war touring cars like Rolls-Royce’s Phantom II Continental and Mercedes-Benz’s supercharged 500 K and 540 K sports coupes. Post-war luxury gran turismos included the Bentley Continental R-Type and, later, the Mercedes-Benz 300 SCs. Moving into the 1960s, these fast, luxurious cars continued to be the car of choice for the rich and famous. Most combined powerful engines with a highly competent chassis and were clothed in unique or limited-production coachwork from inspired designers, equipped to the highest standards, and trimmed in the finest materials.Ferrari had offered such cars to its very best clients for years. Crafted in tiny quantities, they were superbly fitted and offered sparkling performance. One of the best known of these was the Superamerica and Superfast series—superb cars with price tags that exceeded even Rolls-Royce. The Aurelio Lampredi-designed V-12 engine, which was originally developed for the four-liter GP cars, supplied power for the first-series examples. The 410 Superamerica appeared at the Brussels Motor Show in January 1956 with a 4,962-cubic centimeter “long block” engine that delivered 340 horsepower. Pininfarina’s coachwork was masterful, minimizing the car’s apparent size and conveying the car’s performance potential.The second-series 400 Superamerica was introduced at the Brussels Motor Show in 1960, when chassis number 1611SA, a two-place cabriolet, was first exhibited. Later, at the Turin Show in November, the Superfast II debuted, providing the inspiration for the Coupe Aerodinamico.Introduced in 1962 as the Superfast III, the new car would be built between September 1962 and January 1964. A total of 17 examples were built. Unlike the earlier 410 Superamericas, these cars were fitted with the latest version of Ferrari’s legendary Colombo-designed V-12. The lovely design, penned by Pininfarina, featured a tapered nose and tail, creating an elegant, streamlined look. It was this design that earned the model its name: Superamerica Coupe Aerodinamico. It is considered to be one of Pininfarina’s great designs—an artful expression of Ferrari performance with stylistic elegance. Once again, their dizzying price tags ensured that the client base would be restricted to heads of state and captains of industry. These cars represented the pinnacle of Ferrari production to be sure: fantastic 1960s styling, extremely low production numbers, and world-class performance. One must also consider that, given the era, these cars were even rarer than other concurrent Ferrari models, the 250 GTO, the 275 GTB later on, and the 250 GT SWB included.CHASSIS NUMBER 2841 SA: A WONDERFUL RARITYChassis 2841 SA was one of these seventeen 400 SA Aerodinamico SWB Coupes produced. It was completed in September 1961 and finished in Grigio Fumo, or Smoke Grey, with the interior finished in Pelle Rosso, or red Connolly, leather.In November of 1961, the car was delivered to its first owner, Count Fritz Herbert Somsky, of Geneva, Switzerland. It remained with him for some time, but by the 1970s, the car had been imported into the United States, where it was owned by Barry Le Fave, of Santa Ana, California, who sold it to W.B. LeFace. Fellow California resident Walter Harris then purchased the car; it was advertised by him in 1980, stating that the car was “all original, numbers matching, had a highly tuned engine, and had rebuilt brakes and rear end.” Presumably, as a result of that advertisement, Harris sold the car to the late Greg Garrison, a renowned Ferrari collector and the producer of the Dean Martin Show in Hollywood.In May of 1999, after almost 20 years of ownership, 2841 SA was sold by Garrison to C.A. “Skeets” Dunn of Rancho Santa Fé, California. In May 2001, the car was shown at the Palos Verdes Concours d’Elegance by Mr. Dunn, and it placed First in Class and won the Meguiar’s Award for best paint. Despite its obviously lovely condition, Dunn eventually elected to undertake a complete restoration of the car, beginning in August 2003. The mechanicals were performed by specialist Bill Pound, with the body and paint done by Symbolic Restoration in Sorrento Valley, California.The car went through an exhaustive and comprehensive Ferrari restoration, where it was disassembled down to every nut and bolt. The body was stripped to bare metal, and every panel and piece of chrome was carefully fitted before re-painting or re-plating. Finally, the body was meticulously refinished in Blu Sera, while the interior was carefully re-trimmed in natural saddle leather. The entire restoration, costing in excess of $400,000, is documented by an accompanying file of restoration receipts and several dozen photographs. Most importantly, the car is also accompanied by copies of its original Ferrari build sheets.Upon completion of the restoration in mid-2006, Skeets Dunn elected to show 2841 SA at the 2006 Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where it scored 99 points in the class for Ferrari GT cars, a remarkable result for a first-time showing, particularly when one considers that the judges included none other than Paul Russell, David Seilstad, and Parker Hall. Later, in January 2007, the car was shown once again at the XVI Palm Beach Cavallino Classic Concours d’Elegance at The Breakers in Palm Beach, Florida, where it won a coveted Platinum Award. It has since been shown many times, accumulating a string of Platinum and First in Class awards. As a testament to the preservation of this extraordinary car, 2841 SA was awarded a Platinum Award, scoring 99.5 points at the 2013 Ferrari Club of America Concours in Pasadena.The car was shown at the 2014 Pebble Beach Concours, where it won Third in Class. Prior to its showing at Pebble Beach, the car was fully prepared and brought back to as-new condition by Brian Hoyt at Perfect Reflections. It was also shown at the 2015 Hillsborough Concours, where it won First in Class and the Best Post-war Closed Car award. Today, the car looks amazing. The quality of the paint is pristine. All the body panels fit precisely and effortlessly. The chrome does not have any signs of wear and tear. The undercarriage is spotless, and it shows the care and the lengthy work that made this car one of the best Superamericas ever restored. No corners were cut on the restoration, which can be admired by looking at the undercarriage. The interior still remains in excellent condition, and it gives the car the extra touch of originality and elegance that makes it so amazing all the way around. However, one can only appreciate the full extent of this restoration’s execution when one closes the door and turns the ignition key. The even sound of the engine, the effortless clutch, the responsive throttle, and the precise gearing make the driving experience beyond divine.Adding to the car’s extraordinary presentation, it comes complete with books, tools, a jack, and an extensive history file, including the coveted Ferrari Classiche certification book, as well as the aforementioned restoration records and copies of the factory build sheets.With just 17 built, it is certainly true that any 400 SA Superamerica SWB Coupe Aerodinamico is extremely rare. This example is all the more unique for its well-known ownership history and its high-point, professional restoration, making it arguably one of the best available examples of the 400 Superamerica and, very likely, the finest restored example on the planet. Furthermore, when one considers its supreme rarity, particularly in relation to its brethren in the Ferrari stable, be it a 275 GTB, 250 GT SWB, or perhaps even a GTO, it becomes readily apparent that the opportunity to acquire such a car will not come again soon, and perhaps never again. It is a motor car of supreme scarcity, exclusivity, power, and elegance, the likes of which the motoring community may never see again.

View additional info

Starting bid: $2,000,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1924 Isotta Fraschini Tipo 8A Landaulet

Estimate: $675,000 - $775,000

Description: 110 bhp, 7,370 cc OHV inline eight-cylinder engine, three-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel power-assisted mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 146 in.An exceptional original and unrestored Isotta FraschiniRetained by Isotta Fraschini for over 90 years and never officially “sold”Incredibly preserved and largely untouchedThe earliest known Tipo 8A; likely the first example builtPerhaps the only opportunity to become the first owner of a Full ClassicAccording to the Societa Isotta Fraschini, the car offered here, chassis number 655, is the earliest known example of the company’s most famous and prestigious model, the Tipo 8A, and may well have been the first built. It was bodied by Cesare Sala of Milan, one of Italy’s premiere coachbuilders and one with a very close relationship to Isotta Fraschini, as Oreste Fraschini, a member of the founding family, occupied a seat on Sala’s board. Subsequently, around 1926, solid side-mount covers and special interior woodwork were fitted by Carrozzeria Riva, whose secondary coach tag is found directly under Sala’s on the body. This is believed to have been the only Isotta Fraschini that had two different Classic Era coachbuilders involved in its construction.According to Isotta historian Angelo Tito Anselmi, in his famous book on the marque, the car was recorded as being sold to Filippo Bolzari of Milan, but there is no evidence that the vehicle was ever actually delivered to him, as no viable records survive noting the delivery. The current owner was informed that the car had been produced in 1924 as a demonstration chassis for the factory. As these cars were frequently driven by chauffeurs, Isotta Fraschini held training sessions for future drivers and used this particular chassis as the sample and training vehicle. Isotta Fraschini afterward put the nearly new automobile into storage at a warehouse, offsite of the factory, thus saving it from destruction when the Works was obliterated during World War II.In 1993, the Isotta Fraschini name was revived by a partnership between Audi and coachbuilders Fissore. They eventually sold the name to Finmeccanica, an Italian defense, aerospace, and security company, and in the course of that deal, chassis 655 was discovered, still in the warehouse, which had remained in company ownership and largely forgotten. The current owner purchased the car directly from Finmeccanica and had it imported to the United States, for the first time in its life, in July 2016, 92 years after it was built.The car has been cleaned and mechanically serviced, but it remains otherwise almost entirely original. Its finishes—inside, outside, and underneath—are all remarkably preserved, and scarcely even patinaed! Remarkable as it seems, the paint is original from 1924, as is, it is believed, the interior; there is, for instance, original Italian writing on the back of the carpeting. There is some evidence that the wiring was repaired in its Finmeccanica ownership, in addition to other cosmetic and mechanical maintenance, such as taillights modified to meet modern Italian laws. Nonetheless, the car is still, for all intents and purposes, “new”—the only Isotta Fraschini that has remained that way since the Classic Era.This treasure is accompanied by a large collection of documentation, including that from the Societa Isotta Fraschini, and, most importantly, both the Bill of Sale between Isotta Fraschini and Finmeccanica, and the Bill of Sale to the current owner. The latter documents are the only sales receipts from this car’s entire history; thus, the buyer at this sale will become the last person to become the first official owner of a “new” Isotta Fraschini—one that the factory liked well enough to never sell it.Addendum:Please note that the original tires were replaced for road worthiness, though two of the original tires were retained and are mounted on the spare sidemount wheels.

View additional info

Starting bid: $300,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1933 Chrysler CL Imperial Dual-Windshield Phaeton

Estimate: $350,000 - $400,000

Description: 135 hp, 385 cu. in. L-head inline eight-cylinder engine with nine main bearings, three-speed manual transmission with vacuum-assisted clutch, leaf-spring and beam axle front suspension, leaf-spring and live axle rear suspension, and vacuum-assisted four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 146 in.One of fewer than 20 authentic survivorsOriginally delivered to powerboat racer Lou FageolFormerly owned by Turhan Bey, Jack Passey, and Laurence “Baron” DorcyWell-known history from newLou Fageol was one of the most colorful and legendary figures in motorsport, on land, and on the water. He built and piloted some of the fastest speedboats around, collecting many prestigious trophies, and he built race cars as well (including Indy 500 contenders). He was known as a hard-driving competitor and he won many important powerboat races. His boat racing career ended in 1955 when the craft he was piloting at speeds well in excess of 100 mph became airborne and performed a perfect backwards aerial somersault, a “loop-the-loop” before returning to the water and coasting to a stop . . . . He survived the serious injuries he sustained in that accident, and retired from racing. Until his death in 1961, he was, in the words of American Boat Racing Association historian Fred Farley, a “respected elder statesman of the sport he loved.”– Christopher Cummings, Cadillac V-16s: Lost and FoundThroughout the history of modern American athletics, the men and women of daring-do have always had one thing in common: the pursuit of power. Those who flew fast planes, loved fast cars; those who raced fast cars, owned fast boats. Lou Fageol was no exception to this rule, and when not on the water, his road car was a new 1933 Chrysler CL Imperial dual-windshield phaeton, that offered here. It was one of the best-engineered automobiles of its era, a car so wonderful to drive that many of the fewer than 20 known survivors are still on the road being enjoyed.After about a year, Fageol had his shop fit the car with a 1930 Cadillac V-16 engine, number 700132, along with associated adjustments to the chassis and suspension. The combination of the more potent 175 horsepower V-16 with the Imperial chassis and body (1,000 pounds lighter than the Cadillac) made for what Fageol termed “an excellent high-performance highway automobile,” which suited its thrill-seeking owner and driver quite nicely.With its V-16 fitted, the Fageol Imperial next passed to Hollywood film actor Turhan Bey, and subsequently to a student at Stanford University, who sold it in the early 1950s to the late, legendary Northern California collector and enthusiast, Jack Passey. Passey, in turn, traded the car to Earl Hill and Dick Wells, who sold it to Laurence Dorcy.Better known to one and all by his favored nickname, Baron, Mr. Dorcy was the grandson of Great Northern Railroad magnate James J. Hill and lived the fabulous life of a millionaire eccentric. A passionate enthusiast of automobiles, sailing yachts, and aircraft, he collected and piloted all three with vigor well into his dotage, living a carefree life in Maui. Such was Baron Dorcy’s passion for the Fageol Imperial that, over the next 50 years, he would come to own the car two further times, always buying it back after he sold it. The current owner, a longtime friend and neighbor, was actually the last to sell the car to Dorcy, in trade for a Duesenberg in 2001, and re-acquired it from Dorcy’s estate 10 years later.The Imperial was restored between 1985 and 1987 by Harold Orchard, a well-known craftsman in Southern California, famous for his award-winning restorations during this period. More recently, during Baron Dorcy’s final ownership, the car had the engine hood correctly replaced, and the body was refinished in its present brilliant scarlet, matching the hue it wore when Dorcy first acquired it in the 1950s. Most recently, it has undergone further cosmetic restoration and, somewhat poignantly, the installation of a period-correct CH Imperial engine, very similar to the original CL unit that first powered the car in 1933.The car has been well-known to the Chrysler Imperial community for decades. It is described in Christopher Cummings’ aforementioned book, Cadillac V-16s: Lost and Found, and is pictured in the book on Jack Passey’s automobiles, For the Love of Old Cars by Ken Albert. Furthermore, it is listed in the compendium of original CL Imperial phaetons published by George Tissen in 1980, documenting its provenance as a genuine example. The numbers of the two V-16 engines it carried in-period are known, and it is possible one may still exist, should a new owner choose to return the car to its “Fageol” configuration.Surviving CL Imperial dual-windshield phaetons are widely held as among the most beautiful and desirable American Classics. Few, however, have the rather spectacular, unlikely, and wonderful history of the example offered here, which has been owned and driven since new by utterly fascinating individuals, and has accrued a lifetime of amazing stories.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1979 Aston Martin V8 Vantage 'Oscar India'

Estimate: $350,000 - $400,000

Description: 425 bhp, 5,340 cc DOHC alloy four-cam V-8 engine with four Weber downdraft carburetors, ZF five-speed manual transmission, independent front suspension with upper and lower control arms, de Dion rear axle with Watt linkage, trailing arms, and coil springs; and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.8 in.Desirable second-generation U.K.-specification “true Vantage” ‘Oscar India’Original Raven Black car with fresh red interior; rare factory sunroofProfessional, high-quality conversion to LHD; original five-speed gearboxRecent service and mechanical restoration work by marque specialists Steel WingsLong-term ownership by well-known AMOC members both in Europe and the United StatesThe true Vantage “supercar” version of Aston Martin’s standard-bearer V8 was never sold new in the United States due to emissions regulations; the fire-breathing “4 × 2” Weber carburetors and low-restriction exhaust were simply not compliant. So this first-generation V8 Vantage was rare then, and this now federal emissions exempt example is one of only a few existing today in the United States.The proper, full-specification V8 Vantage was noted in the April 1978 issue of Motor Sport Magazine as being the fastest accelerating production automobile in the world, capable of rocketing from 0–60 mph in 5.4 seconds. Motor Magazine, not to be outdone, took a Series II out on 25 April 1981 and bested that time with the run in only 5.2 seconds. These figures are still impressive today, especially considering the weight of its stature as a luxurious GT, though clothed in aluminum alloy coachwork. Beginning in October 1978, these cars gained improvements to their body styling, including the trademark Vantage aerodynamic package, a leather headliner, and a burled walnut dashboard as part of the so-called Series II or “Oscar India” generation (“OI” was internal code for the new model referring to “October Introduction”).One of the 172 genuine 425-horsepower V8 Vantage models produced between 1978 and 1985, the car offered here was one of the first dozen built in 1979 and was originally delivered to a doctor in Halesowen, England. According to the current owner, it was subsequently sold in 1987 to Viscont de Farcy of France and was professionally converted from right-hand drive to left-hand drive by a well-known Aston Martin specialist there. Later it was sold to Count Audion de Dampierre, a noted Champagne manufacturer, and previous president of the French Aston Martin Owners Club, who drove it some 30,000 miles before selling it to the next French custodian in 1998. A Swiss Aston Martin enthusiast acquired the car in 2001 and added another 12,000 kilometers over the next dozen years.More recently, the V8 Vantage underwent a complete chassis renovation, bare-metal repaint, and complete servicing by Steel Wings of Pennsylvania, including an installation of their own upgraded suspension with shock absorbers and anti-roll bar, plus the addition of updated Ronal-type factory wheels. The body was stripped to bare metal and given a concours-quality repaint to better-than-new condition, all brightwork was reconditioned, and, more recently, the interior reupholstered in red leather, including a factory optional leather headliner and correct trunk liner, as-new. The engine was resealed and fitted with new water pump, oil lines, and oil coolers, and the engine bay detailed, all in spring of 2015.Accompanied by a copy of its factory build sheet, a comprehensive history file, a factory owner’s manual, and two sets of keys, this is a splendid “true Vantage,” worthy of a new home in any Aston Martin collection, where its performance will continue to astonish.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1970 Jaguar E-Type Series 2 4.2-Litre Fixed Head Coupe

Estimate: $40,000 - $60,000

Description: 246 bhp, 4,235 cc DOHC inline six-cylinder engine with two Stromberg carburetors, four-speed manual transmission, torsion bar independent front suspension, coil-spring independent rear suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96 in.Offered from a private collectionHighly original; showing just 57,000 milesFeatures optional air conditioningJaguar’s iconic E-Type coupeJaguar’s E-Type debuted to universal applause at the March 1961 Geneva Motor Show. But despite its popularity, the car had a number of shortcomings. The transmission, while sturdy, had an unsynchronized first gear, and the seat backs were non-adjustable, fine for short trips but tiring on a long journey, especially for taller drivers. The cooling system, too, was marginal in some of the warmer American climes. For 1965, these drawbacks were addressed, the gearbox given full synchros, and the seat backs made adjustable. Brushed aluminum trim in the cockpit gave way to molded plastic and leather, and a new brake booster was adopted. The engine was enlarged to 4.2 liters, resulting in greater torque, which made for better tractability in traffic. As United States motor vehicle safety and emissions regulations tightened, further changes were made to the E-Type. For the United States market, the covered headlamps were replaced by open versions, and other lighting was relocated and made more prominent. Switchgear was replaced with rocker-type units, a collapsible steering column was fitted, and the bumpers were strengthened. These changes were phased in during 1967 and 1968, and codified in a new Series 2 for all markets in August 1968, accompanied by some changes to the body.A highly original car, this Series 2 fixed head coupe is finished in the maroon hue that Jaguar called Claret. The interior is finished in black leather, and features include air conditioning and a cassette stereo radio. Mileage shown is less than 57,000, which is believed to be original.The steady evolution of the E-Type meant that buyers of the Series 2 got a much better, more comfortable and reliable Jaguar—attributes that complemented its already well-established reputation for superior performance, handling, and appearance. Correct and ready to go, this Series 2 fixed head coupe is sure to provide a wonderful motoring experience for its new owner.

View additional info

Starting bid: $20,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1954 Chevrolet Corvette

Estimate: $80,000 - $100,000

Description: 150 bhp, 235.5 cu. in. OHV inline six-cylinder engine, two-speed Powerglide automatic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 102 in.Offered from a private collectionSecond year of “America’s Sportscar”Formerly of the Jim Rogers collectionOnly 37,000 miles, believed originalRare Sportsman RedChevrolet’s Corvette was the hit of the 1953 Motorama, General Motors’ traveling exposition of new models. Rushed to production by 30 June, it was based on a passenger car chassis, complete with Blue Flame six-cylinder engine and a two-speed Powerglide transmission. The white show car had three side-draft carburetors, a hot cam, high compression head, and dual exhausts. A true roadster, there were no side windows, the only weather protection being rigid, metal-framed plastic side curtains and a manual canvas top. Its formal debut was held in September at the General Motors Proving Grounds, and 50 Corvettes were delivered by the end of the month. The first cars were allocated to high-volume dealerships, for sale to prominent citizens in their communities. Among the latter was John Wayne, who received Corvette number 51.Because tooling for a steel body would have been time-consuming and expensive, fiberglass was chosen instead. Still, production was slow and by the end of the year just 300 had been built, all of them white with a red interior. First-year cars were built at Flint, Michigan; Corvette production in St. Louis began with the 1954 model year. The Corvette’s price of $3,498 was $1,200 more than a Bel Air convertible and $500 more than the Ford Thunderbird introduced a year later. The 1954 models differed mostly in availability of additional colors. Although Pennant Blue, Sportsman Red, and Black were added to the palette, Polo White remained the most popular, with four-fifths produced in that color. Other changes included a new type bag for window storage, rerouting of fuel and brake lines, and a new air cleaner and starter. At the end of the model year, all production moved to St. Louis. Furthermore, deliveries had increased tenfold, reaching 3,640.Formerly in the Sun Belt collection of the late Las Vegas media magnate and philanthropist Jim Rogers, this second-year Corvette is one of 100 delivered in the new Sportsman Red color. It has been repainted in its original color, but otherwise has responded well to careful detailing. The interior has matching seats and carpet, and a dashboard finished in contrasting white. The latter contains a center-mounted tachometer, full engine instrumentation, and a push-button radio. Other features include windshield washers and a tan convertible top. The odometer shows barely 37,000 miles, which are believed to be original. The Blue Flame 150 six-cylinder engine is nicely detailed and runs well. A superb example of an early Corvette in a rare color, this car is ready to be enjoyed to the fullest.

View additional info

Starting bid: $40,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1955 Cadillac Series 62 Convertible

Estimate: $180,000 - $220,000

Description: Model 6267X. 250 bhp, 331 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, four-speed Hydra-Matic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel power hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 129 in.Offered from a private collectionOlder, superbly preserved nut-and-bolt restorationAntique Automobile Club of America (AACA) Grand National winnerAir conditioning for personal comfortGeneral Motors issued a new series of “C” bodies, used by Cadillac, Buick, and Oldsmobile, in 1954. Presaging the future, they introduced the panoramic “wrap-around” windshield that would become almost obligatory in 1955. With the major changes already made public, Cadillac had quite a job making the ’55s look new. In end, though, the subtle refinement resulted in a more sophisticated Cadillac, and the public agreed, boosting sales by nearly 25 percent and setting a record—although the improving economy certainly played a role.Although the cars were mechanically similar to 1954, horsepower increased to 250 for the standard engine, largely due to higher compression. Manifolds were redesigned, and despite the higher power, fuel economy also improved. Although already favored by the vast majority of Cadillac customers, Hydra-Matic transmission was finally made standard. Recipient of a full nut-and-bolt restoration in the late 1990s, this Series 62 convertible has been rebuilt to exacting standards, with no expense spared, while owned by Carroll and Priscilla Trentham of Seymour, Tennessee. Originally finished in Ivory White with a black top, the Cadillac was painted in Cadillac’s Mandan Red, with a white vinyl top and a color-matching red-and-white leather interior by Jenkins Interiors, the well-known Cadillac specialists in North Wilkesboro, North Carolina. The quality of the restoration is exceptional, and the result is nicely complimented by Firestone wide whitewalls mounted on Truespoke chrome wire wheels. Upon completion in 2000, the car took an AACA Junior First Prize in its first show season. In 2001 it earned Senior status and was designated an AACA Grand National Champion in 2002. Air conditioning was added for personal comfort following this award-winning streak. The convertible is also equipped with power steering, power brakes, and power windows. Other features include a power seat, windshield washers, Autronic Eye automatic headlight dimmer, and a push-button radio. The odometer shows barely 1,000 miles since restoration.The dramatic Eldorado convertible may have been the 1955 Cadillac most people lusted after, but the basic Series 62 was the convertible that more of them bought. At nearly 8,150 units, though, it was still rare compared to the sedans and Coupe de Ville hardtops. This car is an excellent example.

View additional info

Starting bid: $90,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1969 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL 'Pagoda'

Estimate: $80,000 - $100,000

Description: 180 bhp, 2,778 cc SOHC inline six-cylinder engine with Bosch mechanical fuel injection, four-speed automatic transmission, independent front coil-spring suspension, independent rear single-point swing-axle coil-spring suspension, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 94.4 in.Offered from a private collectionUltimate version of the W113 SLAutomatic transmission and air conditioningShowing just over 70,000 milesAlthough it filled a niche at its 1955 introduction, the Mercedes-Benz 190 SL had become outmoded and underwhelming by the early 1960s. Development was begun on a six-cylinder successor, which became the W113 sports line, spun off the S-Class W112 300-series sedans, coupes, and convertibles. Under the auspices of Technical Director Fritz Nallinger, Chief Engineer Rudolf Uhlenhaut, and Head of Styling Friedrich Geiger, lead designers Paul Bracq and Béla Barényi created a compact sportster with a distinctive, patented, slightly concave hardtop that inspired the “Pagoda” nickname. The engine was a 2,308-cubic centimeter inline overhead-cam six with multi-port fuel injection, and both four-speed manual and automatic transmissions were available. Designated 230 SL, for its displacement, production began in June 1963.The 1967 Geneva Motor Show heralded the 230 SL’s successor, the 2,496-cubic centimeter 250 SL. Production had begun in December of 1966, and while the new model retained the strong points of its predecessor, it made new strides in drivability with the larger engine and rear disc brakes. A larger fuel tank gave greater cruising range. The final iteration of the W-113 arrived in December 1967. The 280 SL had an engine enlarged to 2,778 cubic centimeters. Over the years the model had evolved from a sports car to a grand tourer, frequently equipped with the optional automatic transmission and air conditioning, especially in the United States market. Because the larger bore of the engine resulted in pair-cast cylinders without an intermediate water jacket, an oil cooler was added, mounted vertically beside the radiator. Each engine was bench-tested for two hours, ensuring that the full 180 horsepower was available. This 1969 Mercedes-Benz 280 SL is nicely finished in Fire Red, with a tan leather interior. Original, but for one repaint, it shows slightly more than 70,000 miles and is equipped with automatic transmission, radio, air conditioning, and narrow whitewall tires. The paint and brightwork present well, and the leather interior and carpets show no appreciable wear. The engine compartment shows some use but is otherwise serviceable and functional. The final iteration of the W113 Mercedes, the 280 SL remained in production through 1971, by which time nearly 49,000, of all types, had been produced. This car is a nice example of the ultimate “Pagoda,” the sports car that had become a grand tourer.

View additional info

Starting bid: $40,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1965 Plymouth Belvedere I Super Stock Lightweight

Estimate: $160,000 - $200,000

Description: 425 bhp, 426 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, four-speed manual transmission, torsion bar independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 116 in.Offered from a private collectionSecond-generation Super Stock Lightweight car with a Race HemiReportedly one of only eleven builtFormerly exhibited at the Walter P. Chrysler MuseumWell-kept professional restoration to original conditionChrysler Corporation first introduced its lightweight “Aluminum Package,” comprising a number of aluminum components and a lightened interior, for Plymouths and Dodges in 1963. For 1964, a number of lightweight parts increased, including the radiator shield and hood lock brace. Undercoating was now omitted, as were dashboard liners and the silencer pads in the front kick panels. These were joined in 1965 by lightweight engine components, including a magnesium cross-ram intake manifold, aluminum cylinder heads, aluminum water pump and thermostat housings, and alternator brackets, all part of the upgraded A990 Hemi engine introduced that year. Now the front fenders, hood, and radiator and grille supports were all lightweight stamped steel, rather than aluminum. Previously available on hardtop coupes, the lightweight package was now restricted to two-door “post” sedans. It was an important ingredient in the Super Stock package, named, as its title suggested, at the drag-racing community.Reported by the owner as being a genuine lightweight Super Stock car and believed to be one of only eleven built, this 1965 Plymouth Belvedere was scheduled for production at the Lynch Road factory on 14 December 1964, fitted with the 425-horsepower, 426-cubic inch Race Hemi, Super Stock rear axle, and front bucket seats but no rear seat, and steel wheels with blackwall tires. The color scheme of single-tone White with tan cloth and vinyl interior is correct.The car was restored in 2002 by Muscle Car Restorations of Wisconsin, for MoPar collector Jack Brundage, and was formerly exhibited in the Walter P. Chrysler Museum in Auburn Hills, Michigan. It is finished to factory build standards in single-tone White, with tan cloth vinyl interior. It has bucket front seats, and the rear seat was deleted. Scheduled for production at the Lynch Road plant on 14 December 1964, it was fitted with the 425 -brake horsepower dual-quad 426-cubic inch Hemi engine and Super Stock rear axle. The paint and brightwork are of the highest quality, and the engine compartment is expertly detailed without being overdone. The odometer shows only 520 miles, a figure that the owner believes to be original. Further, the car is accompanied by a dossier of documentation.A great hot Hemi Belvedere, this Super Stock beauty is ready to roar into a new home.

View additional info

Starting bid: $80,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1982 Ferrari 512 BBi

Estimate: $250,000 - $300,000

Description: 340 bhp, 4,942 cc DOHC horizontally opposed 12-cylinder engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transaxle, front and rear independent suspension with unequal-length A-arms, twin rear coil springs, an anti-roll bar, and hydraulic dampers; and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in.Offered from a private collectionIconic Berlinetta BoxerJust 7,750 original milesThe 1971 Turin Auto Show heralded a new era. Taking pride of place was a new Ferrari, the 365 GT4 BB, or “Berlinetta Boxer.” Boxer, of course, referred to its horizontally opposed engine, which was located amidships. The targeted competition was Lamborghini’s Miura and the upcoming Countach, which it countered admirably. Design was by Leonardo Fioravanti at Carrozzeria Pininfarina.In 1976, the 365 GT4 BB was updated and up-rated as the 512 BB, with a five-liter flat-12, for the first time deviating from the company tradition of naming cars for the displacement of a single cylinder. In the manner of the 512 S race cars, 512 meant five liters, 12 cylinders; the actual displacement was 4,943-cubic centimeters, and 929 were built from 1976 to 1981.Ferrari never qualified the Berlinetta Boxer for U.S. sale, but a number of privateers undertook to make conversions on their own, enabling a moderate number of “grey market” imports. For 1982, Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection was substituted for the four Weber carburetors of earlier cars. This made U.S. compliance much easier, and eventually Ferrari capitulated and sanctioned the assistance of Ferrari dealerships in arranging overseas delivery and the U.S. conversion process. Production of 512 BBi cars totaled 1,007 in four years.A New York car in its past, this 512 BBi has been in the current owner’s West Coast collection for approximately a decade. Finished in traditional Rosso Corsa, it has a striking black-and-white interior. While the dashboard and carpets are the usual black hue, the seats, console, and door panels are set out in eggshell-white leather. It has U.S.-style instruments in English units, the odometer showing barely 7,750 miles. There is a Pioneer tri-band stereo radio with cassette and dashboard-fitted graphic equalizer. Passengers ride in air-conditioned comfort.The car is detailed throughout, including the engine compartment. Road & Track was ecstatic about the 512 BB, calling it “ . . . the best all-around sports & GT car we have ever tested.” The last word, perhaps, comes from Sergio Scaglietti, designer of Ferrari’s racing cars, about the end of Boxer production in 1984: “It was something special . . . . It was the last car where we made everything by hand.”

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1987 Lamborghini Countach 5000 QV

Estimate: $275,000 - $350,000

Description: 420 bhp, 5,167 cc DOHC V-12 engine with Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with coil springs and telescopic shock absorbers, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 96.5 in.Offered from a private collectionEuropean-specification Italian supercarCurrently showing just 6,200 kilometersFerruccio Lamborghini was an atypical automaker in the world of supercars. The son of grape farmers in the Emilia-Romagna region of Italy, he began his industrial career with tractors. He later manufactured oil heaters and air conditioning equipment. It was not until 1963 that he formed Automobili Ferruccio Lamborghini SpA to build high-end sports cars. He had owned several Ferraris but felt that he could build a better high-performance car. Though building cars of power, comfort, and refinement, his business suffered uneven fortunes under a number of owners. Only since purchase by Audi AG in 1998 has it seen stability and increased sales.The world met Lamborghini’s Countach at the 1971 Geneva Motor Show. Styled by Marcello Gandini of Carrozzeria G. Bertone, who had created the earlier Miura, it struck out in new dimensions. Constructed almost entirely of trapezoidal aluminum panels over a space frame, it was but 42 inches high and 163 inches long. The most outrageous feature was what are now called “Lambo doors,” hinged at the front with horizontal hinges, so that they swing upward in scissor fashion. Not simply for art, the doors are useful, in that they allow opening them in tight spaces. Power comes from a mid-mounted V-12, four liters in the early versions, 5,167 cubic centimeters in the Quattrovalvole model offered here. Six Weber carburetors were used on European models, but when the Countach was certified for U.S. sale in 1985, Bosch K-Jetronic fuel injection was used instead. Bumpers were also conformed to U.S. safety standards. This car is a European-specification model with metric instrumentation and the monumental optional rear spoiler. Equipped with air conditioning and power steering and brakes, it is white, with a matching leather interior accented in black. The odometer shows but 6,209 kilometers. An Alpine tri-band stereo audio system is the main cockpit amenity.Car and Driver summed up the Countach quickly: “This is a bad boy’s car, and everybody knows it . . . . Just being seen at the wheel of such a thing is prima facie evidence that you’re a regular traveler beyond the borders of good judgment, good sense, and good taste . . . . You flash your Countach and everybody gets the message. You’ve got the speed of a telegram at a zillion times the price.” And we haven’t even mentioned performance . . . .

View additional info

Starting bid: $100,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1963 Dodge 330 Max Wedge Lightweight

Estimate: $180,000 - $260,000

Description: 425 bhp, 426 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, three-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission, torsion bar independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 119 in.Offered from a private collectionThe third of nine factory 330 Lightweights builtBuilt with the Aluminum Package option and 426 Max Wedge V-8Beautifully presented full restorationIn February of 1963, Chrysler introduced the Aluminum Package as an option for Dodge and Plymouth cars. This subtle name referred to aluminum front fenders, hood with air scoop, and front bumper dust shield, as well as a lightened front bumper and its supports, omitting the jute backing from the floor carpets, and relocating the battery from under the hood to the trunk, for better weight distribution. Yes, this “Aluminum Package” was actually ordering up a stripped factory drag-racer – and, indeed, the early “Lightweights” used a 426-cubic inch Max Wedge V-8, a 425 horsepower short-ram version of the RB block first used in 1963, and the most potent MoPar muscle mill outside of the vaunted Hemi.MoPar historian and registrar Galen Govier indicates that the car offered here was the third of nine such genuine 330 Lightweights built at Hamtramck, with production scheduled for 28 March 1963, and shipment on 2 April to the Iverson Motor Company of Santa Maria, California. It was subsequently owned by Ronald Mezich of San Diego, California, and by the noted MoPar muscle car collector, Jack Brundage. In 2006, it received a restoration by the specialists at Muscle Car Restorations of Wisconsin.In keeping with the “no-nonsense” character of a 330 Lightweight, the car has the 426/425 Max Wedge with dual four-barrel carburetors, TorqueFlite A727 automatic transmission, 3.9:1 rear axle, “low grade” red cloth and vinyl interior, and no other options – no power assists, no radio, no heater, and no other accessories. Blackwall Goodyear tires are mounted on steel rims, with the so-called “poverty” hubcaps.The car has been carefully finished to its exact original specification. The workmanship is superb, with all aspects being of top quality. The aluminum components are intrinsically straight, and the bumpers notably unblemished. The engine compartment is correctly detailed, and the engine itself has been given a preservation treatment after being rebuilt during restoration, so a new owner will be able to make a clean start with a virtually new engine, if desired. The 2,094 miles shown on the odometer are believed accurate from new. A dossier of information is included with the car.This beautiful finished, lightweight Dodge muscle car, boasting power to spare, is now ready to be enjoyed in any way its new owner desires – on the quarter mile or the show field.

View additional info

Starting bid: $90,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1966 Dodge Coronet 500 Hemi Convertible

Estimate: $175,000 - $225,000

Description: 425 bhp, 426 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, four-speed manual transmission, torsion bar independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 117 in.Offered from a private collectionOne of 12 Hemi/four-speed Coronet convertibles built in 1966Documented by MoPar historian Galen GovierWell-maintained complete restoration by marque specialistsIn order to overcome the NASCAR ban on Race Hemi engines after 1964, Chrysler developed a somewhat milder Street Hemi, which could be sold to the public in the numbers required for homologation. An option for B-body Dodges and Plymouths, beginning in the 1965 model year, the Street Hemi had lower compression, less aggressive valve timing, and cast iron cylinder heads. The full-throated Race Hemi, meanwhile, remained quietly, slyly available, for the committed competitors and unmuzzled enthusiasts who wanted it.Most of the latter engines went into barebones two-door sedans or hardtop coupes, in keeping with the engine’s racing nature. However, it was entirely possible, simply by checking the right boxes at the local Chrysler-Plymouth-Dodge dealer, to order a Race Hemi in a model with more panache and creature comforts. That is how 21 Dodge Coronet convertibles received a Race Hemi in 1966 – and a dozen of them also had a four-speed transmission, making for the hottest available driveline and a ragtop that really rocked.The car shown here is documented by MoPar registrar and historian Galen Govier as being one of the 12 Hemi/four-speed Coronet convertibles produced, and as having been originally finished, as it is today, in Bright Red with a Premium Grade white vinyl interior, top, and top boot. Its additional options included the pushbutton AM radio with front speaker and a console-mounted tachometer. Govier notes that production of the car was scheduled for 15 April 1966, at the St. Louis plant. Later owners included the well-known custom show promoter, Larry Tarantolo of Illinois, and muscle car collector Jack Brundage, for whom the Coronet was restored by Muscle Car Restorations of Wisconsin, between 1997 and 2003, invoices for which are on file.As with other cars from this collection, the workmanship throughout the Coronet is exceptional, with flawless paint and exterior brightwork, a stunning white vinyl interior, and American five-spoke sport wheels shod in BF Goodrich Radial T/A tires. The car shows fewer than 300 miles, and while it has not been run since its restoration, the engine has been internally treated with oil, keeping it virtually new. A new owner may make a clean start and enjoy the car, or keep it under preservation. Either is tempting, with one of the rarest MoPar muscle cars of its era.

View additional info

Starting bid: $90,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1965 Bentley S3 Continental Drophead Coupe

Estimate: $180,000 - $240,000

Description: Est. 230 bhp, 6,230 cc OHV V-8 engine, four-speed automatic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel servo-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 127 in.Offered from a private collectionOne of only 76 examples builtThe most modern styling on the S3 Continental chassisOlder restoration by Charles AgapiouDescribed by The Autocar as “[a] new stage in the evolution of the post-war Bentley,” the magnificent Continental sports saloon became synonymous with effortless high-speed cruising in the grand manner after its introduction on the R-Type chassis in 1952. With the arrival of the final (S-Type) generation of six-cylinder cars in 1955, the Continental lost a little of its individuality but none of its exclusivity, and this trend continued after the arrival of the V-8-engined S2 in 1959. Although the S2 appeared externally unchanged, its performance was considerably enhanced by the new 6,230-cubic centimeter aluminum-alloy V-8 engine. Power-assisted steering was now standard and there was no longer the option of a manual gearbox, Rolls-Royce’s own four-speed automatic transmission being the sole offering. The striking Continental also gained a drophead coupe model, 15 of which were constructed by coachbuilder H.J. Mulliner.The S3, introduced in 1962, brought subtly updated styling on the standard sedans, quad headlamps, and less prominent bumper guards. The sidelamps and directionals moved from their classic perch atop the fenders to the leading edge. The Continental’s changes were less pronounced, in many respects. The Bentley Continental was, of course, exclusively a coachbuilt automobile. The firms of H.J. Mulliner, Park Ward, and James Young all offered bodies on the Continental S2 chassis, which differed from the standard version by virtue of its four-leading-shoe front brakes, shorter radiator, and, up to chassis number BC99BY, higher gearing. By far the most striking of the S2 Continentals were those bodied by Rolls-Royce’s in-house coachbuilder Park Ward, and this design by Norwegian Vilhelm Koren, with its influential continuous front-to-rear fender line, would continue on the Continental S3. Quad headlamps were the S3’s major styling innovation, and on the Mulliner Park Ward-bodied Continental they were contained in slanting nacelles, which generated some controversy. Bentley S3 Continental chassis number BC176XC is one of just 76 drophead coupes bodied by H.J. Mulliner, Park Ward Ltd. after the two firms merged. A right-hand-drive example, it was previously owned by Gregory Gill, president of Los Angeles realty giant Matlow-Kennedy. Mr. Kennedy sold it to John I. Lichfield in 1990. The car was then restored by Rolls-Royce and Bentley specialists Charles Agapiou, Ltd., of West Hollywood in 1995. It was repainted and the interior was reupholstered in beige Connolly leather with deep red piping matching the Regal Red exterior. The engine, transmission, and brakes were overhauled at this time as well. Although now older, the restoration has held up well and the paint and brightwork show only minor flaws; the seats, while exhibiting use, show no significant wear and tear. The odometer shows fewer than 20,000 miles. Cockpit equipment includes a Kenwood cassette stereo radio.A wonderful grand tourer, this S3 Continental has many luxurious road miles ahead for its next proud caretaker.

View additional info

Starting bid: $90,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1955 Cadillac Series 62 Eldorado

Estimate: $180,000 - $220,000

Description: Model 6267SX. 270 bhp, 331 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, four-speed Hydra-Matic transmission, coil spring independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel power-assisted hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 129 in.Offered from a private collectionOriginally delivered to silent film legend Norma TalmadgeCadillac’s most luxurious, top-of-the-line modelA high-quality sympathetic restoration of an excellent original carA prestige Cadillac with genuine star power!General Motors scored a hat trick with its 1953 Motorama traveling show. All three of the upscale divisions, Oldsmobile, Buick, and Cadillac, had prestige convertible “idea cars,” dramatic in design but close enough to the production models that they were ready to manufacture. Named Fiesta, Skylark, and Eldorado, respectively, they entered limited production during the year. Based on the Series 62 convertible, the Eldorado differed in having a wrap-around windshield, a portent of GM’s future, as well as a distinctive dipped cockpit contour and a hard “parade boot” to cover the top when lowered.For 1954, all Cadillacs had wrap-around windshields, and the Eldorado adopted the standard 62 body contours. Distinctive side trim now distinguished the car, and at just $1,300 more than the 62 convertible, it was much more affordable. For 1955, the Eldorado previewed the “rocket ship” tail fins that would eventually be adopted across the board, and Sabre Spoke cast wheels replaced the wire wheels of earlier Eldorados. A higher-performance engine with dual four-barrel carburetors was now standard and exclusive. Dr. Carvel James, a Beverly Hills physician, took delivery of this car on 8 March 1955, for his wife Norma. Born Norma Talmadge on 2 May 1894, she was pushed by her mother into acting, and by 1912 she had played bit parts in more than 100 films. Her big break came in 1915, with Vitagraph’s The Battle Cry of Peace, an anti-German propagandist drama. After 250 more films, she returned to her East Coast birthplace and met Broadway and film producer Joseph M. Shenck. They were soon married, and in 1917 they established the Norma Talmadge Film Corporation, for which she was the brightest star. Transitioning to talking pictures in the late 1920s, she saw her acting career ebb, and Norma retired in 1932. After divorcing from Schenck in 1934, she married comedian George Jessel; the couple parted in 1939 and in 1946 she married Dr. James.Alas, Talmadge did not enjoy her Cadillac Eldorado for long. In ill health for most of her later life, she passed away on Christmas Eve, 1957. Her widower, however, kept the car for many years. He died in 1980 and the car passed though one more long-term ownership before acquisition by the consignor more recently.As offered, it is a well-cared-for original car, repainted in the original Alpine White. It has its original black-and-white leather interior, showing use but no significant wear. Features include power steering, power brakes, power windows, power seat, windshield washers, and a Wonder Bar signal-seeking radio. A Clardy air conditioning system has been added for passenger comfort. The engine compartment is clean, but has not been detailed, and shows use commensurate with the displayed mileage, now just slightly more than 32,000.This beautiful Eldorado boasts a wonderful Hollywood history and sympathetic restoration. What could be better?

View additional info

Starting bid: $90,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1968 Mercedes-Benz 600 Four-Door Pullman

Estimate: $90,000 - $120,000

Description: 300 bhp, 6,332 cc OHC V-8 engine, four-speed automatic transmission, double-wishbone air spring independent front suspension, swing axle rear suspension with air springs, and four-wheel power-assisted hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 153.5 in.Offered from a private collectionOne of only 304 four-door Pullman limousinesHighly original car with one repaintDivision partition with television and stereoIntroduced in 1963, the Mercedes-Benz 600 was the company’s third-generation post-war luxury car. Internally designated W100, it was the logical successor to the W186/189 Adenauer models and had few peers apart from the Rolls-Royce Phantom V.At 146 inches in length and 7,350 pounds loaded, the new 600 was more than a match for its predecessor’s six-cylinder engine, so a new powerplant, a 6,332-cubic centimeter overhead-cam V-8, was developed. It was a dry-sump design with Bosch mechanical fuel injection and developed 245 horsepower. Air suspension gave the car a boulevard ride, and a high-pressure hydraulic system provided every power assist imaginable. There were two wheelbases, 126 and 153.5 inches. The short-wheelbase versions were both sedans, one with a division window and one without. Long-wheelbase cars were called “Pullman” and included a four-door division limousine, a six-door version with additional jump seats, and a Landaulette. Most 600s, 2,190 of them, were on the short wheelbase. Long-wheelbase Pullmans numbered just 487. The 600 line remained in production until 1981, although only a few were built after 1972. The four-door Pullman offered here has been a Seattle car for most of its life. Repainted in the original black, it is otherwise highly original. The interior is done in beige leather, and although it shows some age, it does not exhibit wear. The long wheelbase gives ample room to seat four in the passenger compartment, and a cherry wood console on the division partition hosts a Sony television and Panasonic stereo system. Of course, air conditioning is provided. The odometer shows slightly more than 71,000 miles, which is believed to be original. The engine compartment shows use commensurate with the mileage. A throwback to an earlier era of long-wheelbase limousines, this Mercedes-Benz Pullman displays an elegance not seen in today’s Cadillac and Lincoln executive transportation. As one of 304 four-door Limousines, its occupants are unlikely ever to see another outside the opera house or film premiere.

View additional info

Starting bid: $50,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1965 Dodge Coronet Super Stock Hemi Lightweight

Estimate: $140,000 - $180,000

Description: 425 bhp, 426 cu. in. OHV V-8 engine, three-speed TorqueFlite transmission, torsion bar independent front suspension, live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel hydraulic drum brakes. Wheelbase: 117 in.Offered from a private collectionDesirable lightweight Super Stock Dodge“Gold Standard,” formerly owned by Hemi guru Steve AtwellHigh-quality restoration by marque specialistsSuper Stock MoPars of the mid-’60s were generally drag cars; aimed at that community, they combined the lightweight architecture of the early 1960s with the newly available Race Hemi engine. Unlike the original 1963 lightweights, however, the aluminum nose and bumpers were replaced with lightened steel; the glass was thinner, and the sound deadener was omitted. Automatic transmissions, if ordered, were a beefed-up TorqueFlite, reconfigured “backwards” with Drive at the bottom, allowing for straightforward manual shifts on the drag strip.The data tag of the car offered here shows a production schedule date of 3 February 1965. Known as “Gold Standard,” it represents the Holy Grail of Race Hemis, as the former drag-racer of Steve Atwell, the renowned Hemi race car guru and collector. Later part of the renowned Jack Brundage collection of muscular MoPars, for which it was restored by the Wisconsin facility of Muscle Car Restorations, it has twice been exhibited at the Walter P. Chrysler Museum, a testament to its quality and excellence.Unusual specifications include an interior done in tan, almost gold, vinyl and carpeting, with lightweight bucket seats in front, and the rear seat deleted. Extreme lightening touches include the single windshield wiper, a seatbelt on the driver’s side only, and two headlights versus the usual four, while the body is finished in the Dodge color of Bright Red. Throughout, workmanship is exceptional, including the finish of the paint and brightwork, and museum-quality detailing. In particular, the engine compartment is correctly finished, without being overdone. The steel wheels, less hubcaps, are mounted with Firestone blackwall tires.Showing just over 1,000 miles, a figure that the consignor believes is original, this is an excellent drag-racing Coronet from great names in MoPar collecting.

View additional info

Starting bid: $70,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1934 Bentley 3½-Litre Tourer

Estimate: $140,000 - $180,000

Description: 105 bhp, 3,669 cc OHC inline six-cylinder engine, four-speed manual transmission, solid front axle and live rear axle with semi-elliptical leaf springs, and four-wheel mechanical drum brakes. Wheelbase: 126 in.Offered from a private collectionAn early Derby Bentley with its original registrationClassic British four-seat tourer coachworkRecently servicedWalter Owen Bentley learned engineering at Clifton College, leaving at 16 to apprentice at the Great Northern Railway. It was during the Great War, however, that he began designing engines, working at Gwynne’s of Hammersmith. After the War, Bentley opened his own drawing office and rented a workshop. The first Bentley car was displayed at Olympia in October 1919, and deliveries began in 1921 from a new factory at Cricklewood.Six-cylinder cars joined the range in 1926, with a 6½-Litre “Big Six.” This became the “Speed Six” in 1928, and a massive eight-litre six was shown at the London Motor Show in 1930. Unfortunately, financial troubles had emerged in the mid-1920s, and the company had been propped up by money from millionaire Woolf Barnato. In 1931, however, Barnato pulled his support and left Bentley foundering. Ultimately Rolls-Royce, Ltd., stepped in, and Bentley Motors became a wholly owned subsidiary. Operations were moved from Cricklewood, London, to Rolls’ Derby works. Thus, the 1933–1939 cars are known as “Derby Bentleys.” Built first as 3½-Litre cars, with a pushrod overhead valve six of 3,669 cubic centimeters, they rode a 126-inch wheelbase and left the factory as bare chassis to be bodied by outside coachbuilders. Many of them were bodied by Park Ward, others by collegial coachbuilders like H.J. Mulliner, Hooper, or Gurney Nutting. However, a number of small coachbuilding firms also took their turns at clothing Bentley chassis. This 3½-Litrr, chassis number B90CR, was sent to F.W. Plaxton Ltd. of Scarborough, Yorkshire. Established in 1919, Plaxton began building charabanc (motor coach) bodies, but by 1925 had ventured into passenger cars. Work on Rolls-Royce and Bentley chassis was occasional at most, making this car, in its original sedan style, very rare. Plaxton continued to build bus and coach bodies, which it continues today as part of Alexander Dennis Limited, the United Kingdom’s largest coachbuilder.Chassis number B90CR was first registered in Middlesbrough, Yorkshire, in 1934 as XG2929, a plate it still carries. The Plaxton body, however, has been consumed by time and replaced by a four-seat tourer configuration, somewhat reminiscent of the Vanden Plas-bodied cars that won at Le Mans in the 1920s. The craftsmanship is traditional, in aluminum panels over an ash frame, and finished off in British Racing Green. The clutch and wiring were replaced in the late 1990s, at which time turn signals were added for enhanced driving safety. Recently serviced, it is ready to enjoy.Representing a fine opportunity to re-live open-air British-style motoring, this handsome Bentley comes with a tool kit and an owner’s handbook. It would undoubtedly be a superb tourer for a new owner’s collection.

View additional info

Starting bid: $70,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1989 Aston Martin V8 Vantage Volante

Estimate: $375,000 - $425,000

Description: Est. 485 hp, 6,347 cc DOHC V-8 engine, ZF five-speed manual transmission, front and rear telescopic shock absorbers with a de Dion axle with Watts linkage, and four-wheel ventilated disc brakes. Wheelbase: 102.8 in.One of 58 U.S.-specification examples; factory triple black, desirable final-year modelAttractive original-style Euro-specification bumpers and bodyworkMatching-numbers original engine uprated to 6.3-litre factory specification by marque specialists OselliAn exceptional Vantage Volante with massive powerAston Martin introduced its new V8 Volante on 21 June 1978 in order to satisfy the demand for a convertible version, primarily for the American market. Outfitted with a fully lined and power-operated top, the new model introduced the thrill of open-air motoring to the already exciting V8 platform and remained in production for 11 years while undergoing near-constant engineering and stylistic evolution. By the time production ended in October 1989, the model had gained improved aerodynamics, particularly on the new Vantage version of the V8 Volante, with flared wheel arches, a rear deck spoiler, an extended front spoiler, and fiberglass extensions that replaced the former bright metal door sill covers. This final evolution of Vantage style was only available during the last three years of production. European-specification Vantages offered the hotter engine, for which the model was legendary as a true supercar, while the standard U.S.-specification cars, for emissions reasons, retained a standard V8 drivetrain.The car shown here, one of 58 U.S.-specification V8 Vantage Volantes built, was originally delivered, as it presents today, finished in Cannock Black with a Black interior and black soft top, to Bruce P. McNall, via Los Angeles dealer Gregg Motors. Its matching-numbers original engine has been upgraded to a 6.3-litre “big bore” V-8 by English marque specialists Oselli, and it has what the owner describes as “massive unfussy performance,” with 485 horsepower – more powerful and torquey than even the 6.3-litre Zagato models which offered top-of-the-range performance. Also equipped from new with the ZF five-speed transmission and other desirable final-year modifications, including cruise control, and the much appreciated European-specification bumpers, it is accompanied by books, tools, and ownership history, and it remains remarkable in every regard, with about 31,000 actual miles.Perhaps the finest V8 Vantage Volante available on American shores today, this car boasts a wonderful history and excellent condition, as well as its drivetrain updated to the powerful yet mannered 6.3-litre specification for even more performance than the standard factory V8 Vantage in European trim. It would be a worthy addition to any Aston Martin fleet and thrilling to drive along winding corniches or mountain roadways.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
1974 Ferrari 365 GT4 BB

Estimate: $350,000 - $400,000

Description: 380 bhp, 4,390 cc DOHC horizontally opposed 12-cylinder engine with four Weber triple-choke carburetors, five-speed manual transmission, front and rear independent suspension with unequal-length A-arms, coil springs, and anti-roll bars, twin coil springs at the rear, and four-wheel hydraulic disc brakes. Wheelbase: 98.4 in.The lightest, purest, and rarest Berlinetta BoxerOne of just 387 first-series examplesDocumented by Ferrari historian Marcel MassiniMajor service, including cam belt, in December 2015Ferrari’s stunning 365 GT4 Berlinetta Boxer debuted at Turin in 1971. It was the company’s first road-going model with a mid-mounted, flat 12-cylinder engine, which was subsequently nicknamed the “Boxer.” The exotic design was derived from the company’s 3.0-liter Formula One car, while the 365 GT4 BB also took some inspiration from the unique P6 Berlinetta Speciale, a one-off shown on Pininfarina’s stand at the 1968 Turin Salon.In all, it took two years to bring the 365 GT4 BB into production, and the spectacular new model was finally launched in late 1973, as a 1974 model. Only 387 were built in the following three years. Road & Track hit 175 mph during a road test in 1975, dubbing the original Boxer “the fastest road car we’ve ever tested.”This 365 GT4 BB, chassis number 18001, was clothed in body number 162 and is recorded as having assembly number 172. Originally finished in Giallo Fly with black leather upholstery, the car was completed at the factory on 14 June 1974. It is documented by Ferrari historian Marcel Massini as an original left-hand-drive car, supplied new by Ferrari dealer Charles Pozzi S.A. in Levallois-Perret, Paris, just one month after its completion. Owned early in its life by Alain De Boisboissel of Belgium, the car was exported in August 1981 to the United States, where it arrived at Bob Norwood Autocraft of Dallas, Texas, to be federalized. Richard Rider, a resident of Mill Valley, California, purchased this car in 1984 and subsequently painted it black. He would go on to retain 18001 for nearly 30 years, only using it on rare occasions. It is fitted with a period-correct triple-pipe exhaust and has recently been subject to an exterior cosmetic update, with period-correct matte-black around all bumpers and below the door line. Major service work in December 2015 included replacement of the cam belt along with rectifying several minor issues, which are laid out in the accompanying service invoice on file.The most astute collectors often focus on the earliest examples of a given model, ensuring they retain the purity of the original vision. The 365 GT4 BB is considerably rarer than the 512 BB models that followed and represents the earliest iteration of the boxer-engined Ferrari. They have always been—and are likely to remain—highly sought after, both for their incredible looks and impressive driving characteristics.

View additional info

Starting bid: $200,000 (0 bids)

Leave Bid
  Register to bid
Sign in to continue
Email
Please enter your email.
Password
Please enter your password.
Forgot Your Password?
Enter Your Email
Please enter a valid email.
No user is registered with that email address.
Request Sent
Check to find your temporary password and password reset instructions.
Use your new password to Sign In.
 
Per page:
1
2