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Auction Description for Dreweatts: The Military Sale: Medals, Orders, Decorations & Militaria
Viewing Notes:
Viewing at 24 Maddox Street, London W1S 1PP: Monday 3rd June 9.30am to 5.30pm. 4th June 9.30am to 7.30pm. Day of sale from 9.30am. Viewing at all other times by appointment only. Viewing at 11 Adelphi Terrace, London WC2N 6BJ. (Lots 1-149 - Medals only) Tuesday 28th - Friday 31st May by appointment only. Please telephone +44 (0) 20 7930 9808

The Military Sale: Medals, Orders, Decorations & Militaria

(217 Lots)

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury


217 lots | 207 with images

June 5, 2013

Live Auction

Baldwin’s & Dreweatts London

24 Maddox Street

London, W1S 1PP United Kingdom

Phone: +44 (0)20 3291 2832

Fax: +44 (0)1635 553599

Email: fineart@dnfa.com

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AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

Lot 1: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: The Boer War CBE and DSO Group of 5 awarded to Colonel Hugh Fortescue Coleridge, 1st Loyal North Lancashire Regiment, who undertook duties as Provost-Marshal and Intelligence Officer during the Second Boer War, and played a gallant role during the Battle of Modder River, comprising: The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, Commander's (CBE) Neck Badge, 1st Type, Distinguished Service Order, VR, in silver-gilt and enamels, Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 2nd type reverse with ghost dates, 4 clasps, Belmont, Modder River, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Major H. F. Coleridge, 1st L. N. Lanc: Regt), King's South Africa Medal, 1901-1902, 2 clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (Major. H. F. Coleridge. D.S.O. L. N. Lanc. Rgt.), Jubilee Medal, 1887; the second officially impressed, the third officially engraved, the latter unnamed as issued, group loose. Group lightly toned, CBE with a little loss of enamel in parts, group otherwise good very fine or better. (5). CBE London Gazette 03.06.1919 'For valuable services rendered in connection with the War'. DSO London Gazette 27.09.1901 - 'In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa'. MID London Gazette 10.09.1901. Hugh Fortescue Coleridge was born on the 11th of January 1858 in Cadbury, Thorverton, and was the son of Reverend Canon F J Coleridge. Having been passed as a Cadet at the Royal Military College in 1879, he was commissioned into the 47th Foot 22 January 1879 and served for a period of 2 years in Gibraltar before spending some 8 years in the East Indies. He was promoted to Captain on the 1st of July 1887 and was Adjutant with the 1st Volunteer Battalion Loyal North Lancs from the 1st of May 1893 to the 1st of November 1898. After a period of home service, Major Coleridge served in the Second Boer War between 1899 and 1902 as Provost-Marshal and also performed the duties of Intelligence Officer to a column. He took part in the advance on Kimberley with the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancs, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River. During this battle, he led his men across the river (as mentioned in Conan-Doyle's 'The Great Boer War') shouting "Now, boys, who's up for otter hunting?" as he jumped first into the water. During the climax of the battle, his qualities came to the fore, as outlined by Maurice's 'History of the War in South Africa 1899-1902': "...They were so closely pressed by the enemy's musketry that, in order to cover the retreat, two officers, Major H F Coleridge, North Lancashire, and Captain T Irvine, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, each with ten or eleven men of different battalions, threw themselves into farmhouses, which they stubbornly defended until, many hours later, after their detachments had suffered severe loss, they were ordered to evacuate their posts.". Following this action he was present at Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, April to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Lindley and Renoster River; operations in Cape Colony, north and south of Orange River, 1899 to 1900; operations in the Transvaal, 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches and then awarded the DSO in September 1901, being invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on the 1st of June, 1906; and commanded the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. He was given the Brevet of Colonel on the 1st of June, 1909, and retired a year later on the 1st of June, 1910, with the rank of Colonel. Colonel Coleridge served in the Great War, 1914-18, and was created a CBE in 1919. He married, in 1906, Kathleen, eldest daughter of Rear Admiral J H Bainbridge and of Mrs Bainbridge, of Elfordleigh, Plympton, and they had five sons. He died at Langstone, Tavistock, on the 17th of April 1928. Sold with copy service papers, roll & London Gazette mentions, as well as some further research.

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Lot 2: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Rare WWII POW ARRC Group of 5 awarded to Sister Kathleen Mary Jenkins, Queen Alexandra's Imperial Military Nursing Service Reserve, survivor of the sinking of SS Kuala during the evacuation of Singapore, taken POW by the Japanese and subsequently awarded the ARRC for services at the Bankinang POW Camp, comprising: Royal Red Cross, GVIR, 1st Issue, Associate's 2nd Class Badge (ARRC), reverse engraved (1946), 1939-1945 Star, The Pacific Star, Defence and War Medals, 1939-1945, medals unnamed as issued, group court mounted for display, the first with bow above. The first toned, if a little unevenly, good extremely fine. (5). RRC London Gazette 13.06.1946. (208541) Miss Kathleen Mary Jenkins received an emergency commission as Sister into the QAIMNS(R) on the 30th of May, 1941, and presumably having worked at Alexandra Hospital, she is recorded as being present at the evacuation of Singapore aboard the SS Kuala - this vessel subsequently was bombed and machine gunned by the Japanese on the 14th of February 1942, being sunk with many other QAIMNS nurses who had been ordered to evacuate. She survived the sinking of this vessel, where some 300 of an original complement of roughly 500 were killed. According to the account of a similar survivor, that of Mrs Brenda McDuff, she reached Sinkep Island, and then managed to reach Sumatra where she appears to have continued nursing along the 'escape trail', where she was eventually taken POW at Padang by Japanese forces in 1943. She was interned at Bankinang camp and survived the war, being listed as serving in the camp hospital team in the Fraterhuis. Following the war she was awarded the ARRC on the 13th of June, 1946, presumably for her valuable services rendered in the POW camp at Bankinang. Sold with original RRC box of issue by Garrard & Co, with named King's Letter to Miss K M Jenkins, ARRC, copy London Gazette mentions, and a quantity of research mentioning her name as aboard the SS Kuala and the evacuation of Singapore.

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Lot 3: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Rare Boer War DCM Group of 3 awarded to Bombardier George Day, Pom Pom Section, Royal Artillery, comprising: Distinguished Conduct Medal, EVIIR (30466 Gnr: G. Day. 3rd Depot. R.G.A.), Queen's South Africa Medal, 3rd type reverse, 3 clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (30466 Actg: Bomb: G. Day. R.G.A.), King's South Africa Medal, 1901-1902, 2 clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (30466 Bomb: G. Day. Pom Poms Sec: R.A.); all medals officially impressed, group loose. Lightly toned, group with a few contact marks and tiny edge nicks, pleasing very fine. (3) DCM London Gazette 27.09.1901. MID London Gazette 10.09.1901. Bombardier George Day was born c.1878 in St Leonards, Exeter, Devon, and attested for service with the Royal Artillery on the 4th of October, 1898, at Fort Rowner, Gosport, having previously worked as a Butcher. He served with the Royal Artillery in the Boer War, and was posted to the 1-Pounder Maxim Battery on the 10th of February, 1900. At the end of the Boer War, he continued to serve with the Royal Artillery, later serving with the 3rd Depot, RGA, as of the 1st of December 1903. He reached the rank of Corporal before he was convicted of Felony and discharged in 1909, having served for nearly 11 years with the colours. Sold with copy service papers, copy roll mentions, and worthy of further research.

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Lot 4: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Rare Boer War 'Defence of Ladysmith' DCM Pair awarded to Battery Sergeant-Major W J Bell, 67th Battery, Royal Field Artillery, died of disease at Dundee, Natal, on the 27th of June, 1901, comprising: Distinguished Conduct Medal, VR, 1st type obverse (57274 B. Serjt: - Maj: W. J. Bell. R.F.A), Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 2nd type reverse with ghost dates, 6 clasps, Talana, Defence of Ladysmith, Orange Free State, Transvaal, Laing's Nek, South Africa 1901 (57274 B.S. Major W. J. Bell, 67th Battery, R.F.A.); group officially impressed, medals court mounted for display. Very fine. (2). DCM London Gazette 27.09.1901. MID London Gazette 10.09.1901. BSM W J Bell served with the 67th Battery, RFA during the Boer War. This Battery served with distinction at Talana and during the Defence of Ladysmith, where its guns played a key role in silencing the Boer artillery pieces which had been causing much damage. BSM Bell is confirmed as having died of disease at Dundee on the 27th of June 1901. Sold with copy roll mention confirming these awards.

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Lot 5: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Scarce Great War 'Defence of Kut' DCM Group of 4 awarded to Private Arthur Edward Catchpole, 2nd Battalion, Norfolk Regiment, MID, killed in action and awarded a posthumous DCM for distinguished service during the Defence of Kut-al-Amarah, comprising: Distinguished Conduct Medal, GVR (7697 Pte. A. E. Catchpole. 2/ Norf: R.), 1914-15 Star (Pte.), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-19 (Pte.); medals officially impressed, group loose. Lightly toned, the first lightly polished, group generally very fine. (4). DCM London Gazette 12.12.1917 - 'For gallantry and distinguished service in the field'. MID London Gazette 19.10.1916 - 'For distinguished service during the defence of Kut-al-Amarah' (killed). Private Arthur E Catchpole was born in 1891 at Rockland St Marys, near Norwich, Norfolk, and attested for militia service with the 3rd Battalion Norfolk Regiment in October 1907, at the age of 17, having previously worked as a Labourer. He attested for full service with the 1st Battalion on the 1st of June 1908. Initially serving at home for a period of nearly 3 years, he was sent to India on the 8th of February 1911, where he would serve for nearly 4 years until the outbreak of hostilities in WWI. During this period he appears to have run into a little trouble, but his papers rather sympathetically note: 'His crimes mostly due to a hot temper'. The 2nd Battalion Norfolk Regiment were sent to serve in Mesopotamia, arriving on the 6th of November 1914, and fought as part of the 18th (Belgaum) Infantry Brigade, 6th (Poona) Division under General Charles Townshend. The Division fought its way up the Tigris River to Ctesiphon, but in the face of heavy resistance beat a hasty retreat to Kut-al-Amarah, where it was invested by Ottoman Forces under General Nur-ud-Din (with expert assistance given by the German Army's Baron von der Goltz). Private Catchpole was killed in action on the 12th of January 1916, at the age of 25, having served in Mesopotamia for just over a year, and was buried in Kut War Cemetery, Baghdad. According to 'In Kut and Captivity' by Major E W C Sandes, the 2nd Norfolks (as part of Hamilton's 18th Brigade) were largely stationed within Kut and nearby Yakasum (Woolpress Village), and had been supplying the outlying piquets downstream along the Tigris river. He recorded the following on the day of Private Catchpole's death, which may explain how it came about: "At 7.30pm on January 12th the Turks brought very heavy rifle fire to bear on our first line trenches and the redoubts for half an hour, and thereafter kept up a fairly heavy fire till 11.30pm. Our guns engaged the enemy's troops, who emerged from their trenches in small parties opposite Redoubts A and C, but did not attempt an attack in force.". Suffering was terrible amongst the British and Indian Troops, particularly amongst the latter, who specifically were unable for religious and cultural reasons to partake in the more readily available supplies of fresh horsemeat, causing a greater susceptibility to scurvy and other diseases . Despite the attempts of a British relief force under General Aylmer, Townshend's remaining 3000 British and 6000 Indian troops finally surrendered on the 29th of April 1916, after 147 days and having exhausted all food supplies, and were sent into captivity for the remainder of the war. Private Catchpole's medals and scroll were originally received by Susan 'Maria' Blake, his mother, at The Common, Rockland St Marys. Sold with original memorial scroll, copy MIC, copy 'burnt records' service papers, and some research.

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Lot 6: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Superb and Extremely Rare WWII Pathfinder's CGM & DFM Group of 5 awarded to Warrant Officer Solomon Joseph Harold Andrew, No.35 Squadron, No.8 (Pathfinder Force) Group, Royal Air Force Volunteer Reserve; a veteran of a staggering 89 operational sorties and 315 hours of operational flying over France and Germany between November 1943 and April 1945, he was awarded the CGM and DFM for his role as an Air Gunner 'of outstanding ability' and considered to have skill 'second to none' in the Halifax and Lancaster bombers of No.8 Group - one of only 11 such gallantry combinations awarded, comprising: Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (Flying), GVIR (1715306 F/Sgt. S. J. H. Andrew. R.A.F.), Distinguished Flying Medal, GVIR. (1715306. F/Sgt. S. J. H. Andrew. R.A.F.), 1939-1945 Star, Air Crew Europe Star with copy 'France and Germany' clasp, War Medal 1939-45; the first two officially engraved, the remainder unnamed as issued, group court-mounted on board by Spink & Son Ltd, with reverse pin for wear. Group lightly toned with a few light hairlines and tiny contact marks in places, otherwise good extremely fine, and an extremely rare and desirable combination of awards. (5). ex Spink, 11th of May, 2001, lot 777 (cover group), sold for £8,050 hammer. CGM London Gazette 26.10.1945 DFM London Gazette 8.12.1944 Warrant Officer Solomon Joseph Harold Andrew was born in early 1924, in Lanner, near Redruth, Cornwall. Having previously worked as an agricultural labourer, he enlisted into the RAFVR in June 1942 at the age of 18. His remarkable operational career began in late 1943, being drafted into the elite Pathfinder Force of No.8 Group, No.35 Squadron, RAF - based at Gravely near Huntingdon, Cambridgeshire. Initially equipped with Halifax Bombers (the squadron converted to Lancasters in March, 1944) the Pathfinder Force was comprised of picked, specialist crews of high skill and navigational ability, intended to precede the large-scale RAF bombing assaults by laying down target indicators to assist the following Bomber formations in finding their targets, all the while enduring the gruelling anti-aircraft 'flak' fire, harassment by enemy fighter aircraft and the general navigational difficulties of night-time raids. Flight Sergeant Andrew made his first sortie on the night of the 22nd of November, 1943, and was very much 'thrown in at the deep end', taking part in a bombing raid on Berlin itself. From this point onwards he was almost continuously involved in bombardment of strategic targets over France and Germany. After less than a year, in September 1944, he was recommended for the Distinguished Flying Medal, having already completed an impressive 54 sorties and 221 operation hours as Air Gunner, his recommendation for the DFM states: 'Flight Sergeant Andrew is a most efficient and capable Air Gunner who has shown the greatest determination when flying on operations. Many of the 54 bombing attacks against the enemy in which he has taken part have been against targets strongly defended by night fighters and Anti-Aircraft guns. It is considered that the high standard of efficiency attained by this N.C.O., together with his record of many operations successfully completed, fully merits the non-immediate award of the Distinguished Flying Medal'. Continuing in his role as Air Gunner, he continued to take part in further important bombing raids, and was regularly used as part of the crew of the Master Bomber aircraft - the lead bomber aircraft which used high-frequency radio to co-ordinate all other bombers towards an accurate target. In total, he would go on to complete a remarkable 89 sorties and some 315 hours of operational flying against numerous German and French targets. Completing 3 operational tours, he took part in raids on Frankfurt (thrice), Stuttgart (four times), Essen (four times), Bremen (twice), Duisburg (twice), Dortmund (thrice), Kiel (twice) and Dresden (once) - this the night of 13th and 14th of February 1945, when the resultant 'Firestorm' devastated an area of 1600 acres and killed tens of thousands. Andrew appears to have flown his last operational sortie on 24th of April 1945, against Neubrandenburg, and also appears to have assisted in the repatriation of POWs from Juvincourt on the 26th of May 1945. Warrant Officer Andrew's recommendation for the CGM in May 1945 states: 'Since being awarded the Distinguished Flying Medal, Flight Sergeant Andrew has completed a further 35 bombing attacks against enemy targets as an Air Gunner in heavy bombers, with Path Finder Force. Many of his sorties have been carried out in the Master Bomber aircraft. He has always shown an extremely strong spirit of offence, plus skill at his job second to none. Flight Sergeant Andrew has earned for himself an excellent reputation as a Gunner in the Squadron and by his devotion to duty, has set an extremely fine example to all Aircrew. This N.C.O's fine record of service is considered worthy of the non-immediate award of a Bar to the Conspicuous Gallantry Medal (sic - this in error)'. By the end of WWII some 109 CGMs had been awarded to operational aircrew, of which 89 were issued to Bomber Command, with 59 awarded to aircrew aboard Lancaster Bombers. However, only 11 recipients were awarded the CGM and DFM in combination. This rare group sold with copy sortie summary, copy recommendations for awards and London Gazette mentions, original Central Chancery Investiture letter (dated 23.11.1945), 3 excellent original photographs, including photos of the recipient receiving of his awards at Buckingham Palace, and a photograph of the recipient and his crew with Lancaster bomber behind, and large photocopy 'Operation Record Book' for 35 Squadron P.F.F. from February 1944 to May 1945 giving detailed assessments of the aforementioned bombing raids, and printed copy extract from 'The Western Morning News' October 27th, 1945, mentioning the award of his CGM, and providing newly discovered information regarding his place of birth and date of enlistment. Genealogical records suggest he took a wife of the surname Holman, being married in Lewisham in late 1967

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Lot 7: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Rare WWI Submariner's DSM & LSGC Group of 5 awarded to Chief Petty Officer Henry Joseph Ling, Royal Navy, awarded the DSM for distinguished service aboard Submarine E19 between October 1916 and January 1918 in the Baltic, comprising: Distinguished Service Medal, GVR (228181 H J Ling, P.O. H.M. Submarines. Baltic Sea. 1917.), 1914-15 Star (L.S.), British War & Victory Medals (Act. C.P.O.), Royal Navy Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, GVR (P.O. H.M.S. Ganges.); medals officially impressed, group swing mounted on bar as worn with reverse pin for wear. Attractively toned, a little polished, pleasing very fine. (5). DSM London Gazette 26.04.1918 - "In recognition of distinguished services performed in difficult circumstances and during a long period in British submarines operating in the Baltic Sea.". CPO Henry Joseph Ling was born in Deptford, Kent, on the 29th of February 1888, and entered the Royal Navy as a Boy 2nd Class aboard HMS Impregnable on the 3rd of September 1903, at the age of 15. Moving steadily through the ranks, he reached Ordinary Seaman on the 1st of March 1906, and Able Seaman on the 14th of December that year. At the outbreak of hostilities in WWI he was rated as Leading Seaman, and served aboard HMS Bonaventure (submarine depot ship) between the 5th of March 1914 and 6th of September 1916. He was promoted to Petty Officer on the 20th of January 1916, and served with HMS Thames (submarine depot ship), and is believed to have been Coxswain aboard submarine C27, serving in the Baltic, until September that year. After a month at the submarine base HMS Dolphin, he was sent aboard the submarine E19 as Petty Officer on the 10th of October 1916. The Baltic Sea was an important theatre of war, as important shipments of iron ore from Sweden to Germany were of strategic importance to the German war effort. British submarines regularly operated in the area to disrupt these shipments, and the submarine E19 gained some repute in this area during WWI, when under the command of Lieutenant-Commander Francis Cromie it successfully sank 4 vessels in one day on the 10th-11th October 1915, all without the use of functioning torpedoes, and without a single casualty. Petty Officer Ling served aboard this vessel for a period of 15 months, and returning to HMS Dolphin on the 15th of January 1918, he narrowly avoided having been present when this submarine (and six others) were intentionally scuttled at Helsinki to avoid them falling into enemy hands. He was later awarded the DSM on the 26th of April, 1918, for his services during this period. Having returned to HMS Dolphin, he remained there until being sent aboard HMS Ambrose with Submarine L5 on the 1th of May 1918, serving aboard this vessel until the 12th of June 1919 and his being demobilised. He signed up the next day for a further 5 years' service, and appears to have continued serving aboard submarines, including two six-month periods with HMS Cyclops and the submarine M2. He later joined the Royal Fleet Reserve. He was called up to serve in WWII, again as a CPO and presumably in a training capacity, but after 12 months he was finally discharged as unfit for further service on the 22nd of February 1941, at the age of 53. Sold with a quantity of original documentation on vellum and waxed paper, two ribbon bars reflecting his entitlement in WWI and later in WWII, the latter showing additional entitlement to the 1939-45 Star, Atlantic Star, Defence Medal & War Medal (the latter sold with group, in original box), and contemporary silver Bosun's Call - this lot still worthy of further research.

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Lot 8: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A WWII Dunkirk and D-Day Operations 'Minesweeping' DSM Group of 6 awarded to Leading Seaman Robert Louis Rousseau, Merchant Navy, awarded the DSM for 'devotion to duty' aboard Motor Minesweeper HMS MMS-17, comprising: Distinguished Service Medal, GVIR (L.S. R. L. Rousseau, LT/JX 203783.), 1939-45 Star, Atlantic Star, Africa Star, War Medal 1939-45, Dunkirk Veteran's Medal; the first officially impressed, with box of issue, the remainder unnamed as issued, group loose, the latter framed with original named certificate. The first toned, lightly polished, group extremely fine overall. (6). DSM London Gazette 01.01.1945. Leading Seaman Robert Louis Rousseau was born in Bristol on the 9th of January 1922, but was raised in Brighton, the son of John and Phillis Rousseau. Having been raised on the Channel Coast and given that his father had been born in St Helens, Jersey , and had served as an Armourer with the Royal Navy, it appears to have been something of a forgone conclusion for Robert Rousseau to serve at sea, choosing the Merchant Navy. LS Robert Rousseau took part in the evacuation of British Forces from Dunkirk as part of 'Operation Dynamo' between the 27th of May and the early hours of the 4th of June 1940,whilst serving with the Merchant Navy (as shown by his certificate), and is believed to have served aboard one of the 'little ships of Dunkirk' - a flotilla of nearly 700 smaller merchant and fishing vessels, as well as a number of Dutch coasters, that assisted the larger British Fleet in removing as many soldiers as possible in that short window of opportunity. Later in the war, he was awarded the DSM for service with HM Motor Minesweeper 17, a Thornycroft Motor Minesweeper (these vessels known generally as MMS or 'Mickey Mouse'), which served as part of the 101st Minesweeping Flotilla, initially based at Gravesend. The 101st Minesweeping Flotilla played an important part in the intensive and largely unsung minesweeping operations prior to 'Operation Neptune' and the D-Day landings, later working from Lowestoft. In an attempt to clear the channel 'lanes' intended for the enormous 7000 or so vessels necessary for the landings, minesweeping flotillas worked tirelessly in June and July 1944 to ensure their safety from German acoustic and magnetic mines. In particular, on the 5th and 6th of June, right up to the point of the landings, the MMS Flotillas in fact led the way, undertaking the final and particularly risky minesweeping of the inshore areas as close to the shoreline as possible, to remove mines deployed to destroy smaller troop carrying landing craft bringing the soldiers to the beach. As described by the Naval Commander of the Western Task Force, Read Admiral Alan Kirk, US Navy: "It can be said without fear of contradiction that minesweeping was the keystone in the arch of this operation. All of the waters were suitable for mining, and plans of unprecedented complexity were required. The performance of the minesweepers can only be described as magnificent." Sold with original photograph of recipient in uniform, believed to be with his brothers, original letter of notification of the award of the DSM for 'gallantry in the face of the Enemy' as part of the New Year Honours, original certificate of identity slip pertaining to the award of a Naval Gratuity of £20 for the DSM, signed by the recipient, dated 4th of September 1947, and some useful genealogical research, showing that LS R L Rousse died in May 1985 at Brighton, and historical research, particularly relating to "Operation Neptune: the Minesweeping Operation 5-6June 1944", by David Verghese

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Lot 9: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Very Rare WWI MM Group of 3 awarded to Private James Joseph Gregory Povey, Machine Gun Corps (Cavalry), comprising: Military Medal, GVR (52202 Pte J. J. G. Povey. 12/Cav: Sq: M.G.C.), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-1919 (52202 Pte. J. J. G. Povey. M.G.C. Cav.); medals officially impressed, and swing mounted on board for display. Toned, the first lightly polished, good very fine overall. (3). MM London Gazette 16.07.1918. James Joseph Gregory Povey was born on the 18th of April, 1892, in Birmingham. He was adopted by the Bennett Family of 20 Brougham Street, Aston, Birmingham, and appears to be a relation (and probably son) of the similarly named James Joseph Gregory Povey, of Handsworth, Staffordshire, who was an Innkeeper and Butcher, who is recorded in the London Gazette as having filed for bankruptcy on the 30th of May, 1862. Private J J G Povey served with the 12th Squadron, Machine Gun Corps Cavalry in WWI, which was formed on the 29th of February 1916 and served with the 8th (Lucknow) Cavalry Brigade, of the 1st Indian Cavalry Division. These troops were dismounted for service in the trenches of the Western Front, and were subsequently broken up on the 14th of April, 1918. Private Povey was awarded the MM for Gallantry on the 16th of July, 1918, presumably related to service during the German Spring Offensives of 1918. James Povey died in Bodmin, Cornwall, on the 23rd of October, 1969. Sold with attractive silver and enamel ID bracelet, copy MIC, copy MM card, and a quantity of research.

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Lot 10: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Scarce WWII Dunkirk 'Light Cars' MM Group of 3 awarded to Sergeant John Alexander Cross, Guards Armoured Divisional Signals, Royal Corps of Signals - whilst serving with the 11th Light Car Section attached to the 1st Head Quarters Battalion, he was awarded the MM for courage and devotion to duty in surviving an encounter with a German tank on the 26th of May, 1940, where he was wounded and his driver killed, but nevertheless made his escape and successfully delivered his despatches, comprising: Military Medal, GVIR (783320 Sgln. J. A. Cross. R. Signals.), 1939-45 Star, War Medal 1939-45; the first officially impressed, the remainder unnamed as issued, group loose. Old cabinet tone, the first with two edge bruises and light obverse scratch, very fine. (3). MM London Gazette 22.10.1940. Sergeant John Alexander Cross was born in 1908, the son of Alexander and Mary Cross of Govan, Scotland and was awarded the MM during the Battle of Cassel: "For courage and devotion to duty. On 26 May 1940 he was in a light car with despatches near Cassel. He met an enemy tank on the road which opened fire killing the driver and wounding Cross. He took the despatches from the car, crawled some distance along a ditch, being machine gunned at intervals from the tank. When he got clear he met a column of French transport, warned them of the presence of the tank, and diverted them to another road. He obtained a lift on a passing vehicle, delivered his despatches and returned to the unit with other messages before he had his wound dressed. He refused to be evacuated and carried on until embarkation on 28 May." We can only speculate as to the specific nature of the despatches in question, but given that the 26th of June was the day before the announcement of the retreat and evacuation from Dunkirk, it may have been very sensitive information. He married one Margaret Cross, of Auldern, Nairn, Scotland, and died between the 26th and 28th of May 1942 at Cucklington Camp, Somerset, at the age of 34, under currently unknown circumstances. He is buried in Glasgow (Cardonald) Cemetery.

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Lot 11: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Scarce and Interesting 'London' BEM Group of 3 awarded to Bombardier Albert Henry Charles Simpson, 64th Searchlight Regiment, Royal Artillery, awarded the BEM for 'exceptional powers of quick thinking and leadership' whilst serving as Detachment Commander during a V2 Rocket attack, believed to have taken place near Waltham Abbey on the 25th of September, 1944, comprising: British Empire Medal, Military Division, GVR (1762806 Bmbdr Albert H. C. Simpson. R.A.), Defence & War Medals, 1939-1945; the first officially engraved, remainder unnamed as issued, group swing mounted on board for display. Toned, very fine. (3). BEM London Gazette 10.04.1945 - 'In recognition of Meritorious Service'. During the course of WWII, a total of 1,358 German V-2 rockets were fired in the direction of London, destroying swathes of buildings and causing an estimated 2,754 civilians killed and another 6,523 injured - largely in East and South East London. The most notorious of these strikes devastated Selfridges, Speaker's Corner and Holborn, and particularly high casualties were caused by rocket hits at Woolworths in New Cross (168 killed) on the 25th of November, 1944, and at a market in Farringdon (110 killed) on the 8th of March 1945. Given their supersonic speed and high-altitude (known as Divers or Flying Bombs), V-2 rockets were virtually impossible to defend against, however British espionage tactics and misinformation, as well as the Allied advance, eventually combined to steer the rockets to less populated areas, or latterly place them beyond range. The recommendation for Bombardier Simpson's BEM reads: "Throughout his war service, Bombardier Simpson has always shown great keenness and competence in any tasks or duties that he has had to perform. During a recent Flying Bomb attack on the London area he exhibited exceptional powers of quick thinking and leadership when a Flying Bomb exploded 20 yards from the site at which he was Detachment Commander. The fine example which this NCO set has undoubtedly been an inspiration to all ranks of his Regiment." Sold with copy London Gazette mentions, useful research, and copy Unit Diaries detailing the services of the 64th Regiment RA during this period.

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Lot 12: AWARDS FOR GALLANTRY AND DISTINGUISHED SERVICE

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Description: A Rare 'Freetown Riots' BEM awarded to Gate Porter Joseph Philip Jusu, Connaught Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone, for 'Courage, Loyalty and Devotion to Duty' during the riots of February 1955, one of only 5 BEMs awarded for this incident, and the only example awarded to a local civilian recipient, comprising: British Empire Medal, Civil Division, EIIR (Joseph Phillip Jusu); officially impressed. Attractive light tone, good extremely fine. BEM London Gazette 10.06.1955 - 'For courage, loyalty and devotion to duty during the riots in Freetown, Sierra Leone, in February, 1955. The Freetown Riots of February 1955 were led by striking workers and unemployed local civilians who rose in opposition to increased food prices caused by the 'Diamond Rush' of that time, as well as by disenchantment with the ruling administration, their locally installed tribal chiefs, and widespread general corruption. In response to the riots, a strong army presence was deployed in the city, and as mentioned in 'A Dirty War in West Africa: The RUF and the Destruction of Sierra Leone' by L. Gberie: "...riots broke out in February 1955 in which workers and looters broke into shops and attacked the homes of politicians. The army was called in to quell the riots and according to the Shaw Commission set up to investigate the riots, acted with extraordinary brutality: 'There was wild indiscriminate shooting...including the promiscuous use of automatic weapons, a callous disregard for the lives of unarmed and innocent civilians and indifference to the sufferings of the wounded.' In total eighteen people were killed and 121 wounded." The Connaught Hospital in Freetown was the first hospital built in West Africa modelled on modern 'western' medical practice, and was built on the site of the colonial 'King's Yard'. It faces the historically politically significant 'King's Gate' - a site worthy of its current placement on the UNESCO tentative list. Following the abolition of slavery, a huge number of slaves liberated by the Royal Navy were repatriated to Africa through Sierra Leone. After being received, processed and given medical treatment at the King's Yard and hospital, former slaves were considered officially liberated upon passing through its stone gate, dated 1819, which is inscribed 'any slave who passes through this gate is declared a free man'. Sold with London Gazette mention for this award, and some research, whilst still worthy of more research.

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Lot 13: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: CARIB WAR MEDAL, 1773, George III, Treaty of St Vincent, cast silver medal by G M Moser, 55mm, fitted with original fixed silver loop for suspension (Betts 529; BHM 183; Eimer 750). Extremely fine, a particularly attractive example.

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Lot 14: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: EARL ST VINCENT'S TESTIMONY OF APPROBATION MEDAL, 1800, original striking in silver, 48mm, typically pierced at 12 o'clock and fitted with contemporary silver loop for suspension (BHM 489; EIMER 919). Light and attractive tone, one or two tiny marks to reverse high points, otherwise a bold extremely fine, and rare thus.

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Lot 15: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: HONOURABLE EAST INDIA COMPANY MEDAL FOR EGYPT, 1801, original striking in silver, 49mm, fitted with contemporary silver loop for suspension. Attractively toned, a few light surface marks in fields, nearly extremely fine and lustrous.

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Lot 16: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: HONOURABLE EAST INDIA COMPANY MEDAL FOR THE CAPTURE OF RODRIGUEZ, ISLE OF BOURBON AND ISLE OF FRANCE, 1810, original striking in silver, 49mm, fitted with contemporary silver loop for suspension, with lanyard. Lightly toned, a few tiny marks, otherwise nearly extremely fine with some lustre in parts, and rare.

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Lot 17: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: SPANISH MEDAL FOR THE CAPTURE OF BAGUR AND PALAMOS, 1810, original striking in silver, 46mm, fitted with contemporary silver loop for suspension, with lanyard. Old cabinet tone, a few light surface marks, otherwise a pleasing good very fine, and very rare in such good condition.

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Lot 18: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: HONOURABLE EAST INDIA COMPANY MEDAL FOR JAVA, 1811, original striking in silver, 49mm, fitted with contemporary silver loop for suspension, with lanyard. Toned, a few light surface marks, otherwise good very fine.

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Lot 19: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: HONOURABLE EAST INDIA COMPANY MEDAL FOR BURMA, 1824-26, original striking in silver, 38mm, fitted with crude but contemporary clip and loop for suspension. Toned, one or two minor edge bruises and a few light marks, about very fine.

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Lot 20: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: HONOURABLE EAST INDIA COMPANY MEDAL FOR THE COORG REBELLION, 1837, original striking in silver, 50mm, fitted with small and tasteful contemporary silver loop for suspension. Attractively toned, a few tiny hairlines and tiny marks, otherwise a pleasing extremely fine with lustre, and rare in this condition.

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Lot 21: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: NAVAL GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL, 1793-1840, single clasp, 23rd June, 1795, with attractive contemporary silver replacement suspension and bar, with additional silver and glass encasement, this engraved in upright capitals (W. Symonds Midshipman); medal rim itself proud and of correct diameter, believed officially impressed naming beneath, with reverse pin for wear, reverse lunette now missing, with fitted leather and velvet box. Once roughly polished prior to encasement with associated hairlines, otherwise good extremely fine with lustre, silver encasement at reverse with a little damage at 12 o'clock, and a rare and interesting award to a Rear-Admiral. Rear Admiral Sir William Symonds CB FRS, was born in Taunton, Somerset, on the 24th of September, 1782 to an important naval family - being the second son of Captain Thomas Symonds, RN, and family friend of Admiral Sir William Cornwallis. After the death of his father in 1793, he began his career at the age of 12, entering the Royal Navy at Torbay on the 27th of September 1794 as a Midshipman in HMS London (98) under Vice-Admiral John Colpoys. He took part in Lord Bridport's action with the French fleet off the Ile de Groix on the 23rd of June 1795, which after a lengthy pursuit and action resulted in the capture of 3 enemy ships of the line (Alexandre, Tigre, Formidable) prior to their arrival at Lorient. In this action, HMS London played a major role in the final capture of the damaged French vessel Tigre, but suffered only three wounded from her crew. In addition, William Symonds was present aboard the same vessel when the French corvette Jean Bart was captured, along with the French frigates Gloire and Gentille, and during the events of the Mutiny at Spithead. William Symonds led a successful and varied career throughout the Napoleonic Wars, and whilst missing out on the famous action at Trafalgar, he took part in numerous lesser actions against privateers and enemy vessels which went without the reward and recognition of further clasps to his medal. He was promoted to Lieutenant on the 10th of October 1801, and was made Magistrate of the Ports of Malta and Captain of Valetta in 1819; during which time he suggested a plan for the transport of Cleopatra's Needle to London, and he remained in this post until his promotion to Commander on the 4th of October 1825. It was also during this period, however, that he built at his own expense the experimental yacht Nancy Dawson, which was copied and promoted by yachtsman George Vernon, this beginning his career in ship design. Having been introduced by Vernon to the Duke of Portland, he was promoted as a designer to Lord High Admiral the Duke of Clarence in April 1827 (later William IV). He was appointed to the Royal Yacht HMS Royal George, and appears to have befriended the Duke of Clarence himself, being made Captain soon after in December that year. Following on from his earlier work with Nancy Dawson and the subsequent design of the sloop Columbine and 50 gun brig HMS Vernon, he was appointed and served as Surveyor of the Navy between 1832 and 1847, when he became involved in the building of most of the new ships of the Royal Navy. During this period of his career, he came into conflict with many who did not share in his enthusiasm for new ideas, and who had also suggested somewhat unfairly that he had gained his position by political means rather than by merit. Despite his new ideas, this period marked the gradual decline of large heavy-rigged ships and the abandonment of sail in favour of steam power. He was elected FRS in 1835 and was knighted in 1836. In deference to his opponents in the Admiralty he resigned from his position as Surveyor of the Navy in October 1847 regardless receiving his CB (Civil) on the 1st of May 1848. This last award is believed to have displeased him greatly, feeling that he should have received CB (Military). Sir William was for short time Queen Victoria's naval ADC, and promoted to Rear-Admiral on the 28th of October, 1854, before retiring for health reasons to Malta as Retired Admiral. He died in 1856 whilst at sea aboard the steamer Nile en route from Malta to Marseilles and was buried at the latter. In his will, he requested the publication of a biography, which continued to argue for the vindication of his designs - Memoirs of the life and services of Admiral Sir William Symonds (1858), by J A Sharp. This medal sold by order of an indirect family relation, with a quantity of useful research, including extract taken from O'Byrne's Naval Biographical Dictionary, detailing his career in full. The medals belonging to the recipient's son are to be found in lot 32.

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Lot 22: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: NAVAL GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL, 1793-1840, single clasp, St Vincent (William Larke, Midshipman.); officially impressed. Dark and slightly uneven tone, a few light obverse marks and hairline scratches in places, good very fine. Commander William Larke, believed to be of Yarmouth, Norfolk, joined the Royal Navy as an Able Seaman on the 10th of January, 1796, on board HMS Hebe. Through determined effort and spirited conduct he rose through the ranks to achieve the Rank of Commander upon retirement in 1834. As reported in significant depth, presumably by his late wife, the details of his career, many of which are newly discovered and not mentioned in O'Byrne, were printed in the Norfolk News, Saturday 15th June, 1850: "Death of Captain Larke, R.N. - In our obituary this week will be found the death of our worthy and excellent fellow-townsman Captain William Larke, RN, who though of humble origin received the benefit of a useful education, which he turned to good account up to the latest period of his life. The spirit which prevailed in this country during the French revolutionary war, led Captain Larke at an early age to enter the navy, and it was not long before he joined the British Fleet under the command of Sir John Jarvis (afterwards Earl St Vincent), at that time blockading Cadiz. At the great battle of Cape St Vincent, the subject of our notice was present, and has since received a medal for it. In that action he was one of the party which carried, by boarding, the Salvador del Mondo (sic), a Spanish ship of the line of 112 guns. In taking possession of the vessel his duty led him into the chapel (a usual appendage to all large Spanish vessels of those days) where he found a huge waxen candle burning before the altar, and this he bore away as his trophy of the day, and for many years after, on every anniversary of the engagement, the gallant Captain was in the habit of lighting this candle, and pledging a toast to 'Lord St Vincent, and the wooden walls of old England.' This relic is now in the possession of the deceased gentleman's friend Francis Worship esq. The good conduct and steadiness of Captain Larke were not long before they attracted the favourable notice of his Admiral, and, indeed, so unremitting were his services, that they soon secured for him the friendship of Lord St Vincent, and this friendship was maintained by constant correspondence which terminated only with his Lordship's life. Captain Larke particularly distinguished himself in boat actions, which always full of danger, required the greatest coolness and courage; and his comrades in those trying scenes presented him with a costly sword, as an acknowledgement of his services which always led them to success. He became Lieutenant in 1802, and Lord St Vincent (then First Lord of the Admiralty) appointed him Governor of the Naval Hospital at Yarmouth, at that time a post of much responsibility, considering the state of the continent, especially that part nearest to our shore. He became Retired Commander under the order of Council of 1816. He was one of the first Aldermen and Magistrates appointed under the Municipal Act, but he resigned the former office in 1839. He was twice married, first to Miss Hawes, and secondly to Elizabeth, widow of John Worship esq.; and he survived his second wife only a short period. His strong good sense, gentle manners, and stern integrity, endeared him to a large circle of friends, by whom his death will long be lamented." (© The British Library Board). Sold with copy Last Will and Testament, copy printed account as mentioned above in the Norfolk News, and confirmation on the NGS roll.

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Lot 23: ?CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: NAVAL GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL, 1793-1840, single clasp, Capture of the Desiree 8th July 1800, with attractive contemporary silver replacement suspension, bar and clasp (Richard Bluett, Lieut. R.N.); officially impressed, with reverse pin for wear. Toned, scratch to cheek of portrait and in obverse field behind nape of neck, otherwise very fine, and rare. Commander Richard Bluett was born in Barr, near Falmouth, Cornwall, on the 18th of January, 1781. His father (and his father before) were shipbuilders, of close relation to the old and influential Bluett family, based at Halcombe Court, whom they regularly visited. Richard Bluett joined the Royal Navy as an Able Seaman in April 1793, at the age of 12, going aboard HMS Druid (32) under Captain Joseph Ellison. He joined Captain Ellison, now as Midshipman, into HMS Standard (64), with whom he took part in the ill-fated expedition to Quiberon Bay in 1795. He was also unlucky enough to have been afterwards employed aboard HMS Artois (38) which was wrecked off La Rochelle on the 31st of July 1799, however after this his luck improved. He served aboard HMS Unicorn (32) and Ethalion (38) both commanded by Captain James Young, under whom on the 17th of October 1799 he served during the capture of the Spanish Frigate El Thetis, carrying a huge amount of bullion from the New World. From this capture, then Midshipman Richard Bluett gained a share of nearly £800. He was also present as Lieutenant aboard HMS Babet; a converted French 20-gun corvette under the command of Captain James Mainwaring, during the cutting out action at Dunkirk Roads on the 7th of July 1800. As part of a British Squadron under Captain Henry Inman, British blockading forces attempted to 'cut out' and capture numerous vessels of a French frigate squadron confined within this well-defended port. On that evening, HMS Dart, and the gunboats Biter and Boxer (as well as several fire ships) succeeded in passing within range of some of the innermost vessels, and Dart discharged its double-shotted 32 pounders into Desiree and soon after came alongside and sent a boarding party to capture the vessel. Despite initial success, a second party was required to subdue the rallying French sailors, the vessel was successfully steered away from the action, taken as a prize and entered in naval service. The remaining ships of the British squadron attacked the van, however they avoided the fire-ships, and despite some exchange of fire the three French frigates cut anchor and escaped the harbour, navigating the sandbars in a broadly successful manner (one was temporarily grounded), with the British unable to follow in dark and unfamiliar waters. His varied career continued, and as First Lieutenant, Richard Bluett served aboard HMS Raisonnable (64) under Captain Josias Rowley, was subsequently present at the Battle of Cape Finisterre in July 1805, and also at the reduction of the Cape of Good Hope in January 1806 and the capture of the French frigate Volontaire (46). He was also noted for his 'steadiness and good conduct' at the taking of St Paul's, Ile de Bourbon in September 1809, where he was placed in charge of the captured La Caroline frigate. Richard Bluett was promoted to Commander on the 6th of December 1816, and retired to half-pay in 1837. He married Maria Fisher in County Cork, Ireland, on the 24th of June, 1812, and had 7 children. He died on the 15th of April in Dublin, at the age of 73, and was buried in Mount Jerome Cemetery in Dublin. His headstone reads: Sacred to the Memory of RICHARD BLUETT, Commander Royal Navy, who departed this life, April 15th in the year of our Lord 1854, aged 73. Also MARIA his wife who slept in Jesus, 28th Feby. 1862, aged 69 years. Also WILLIAM ROWLY his son, Vicar of Clonlea, Co. Clare, who slept in Jesus 20th Dec. 1884, aged 68 years. Also ANNA MARIA his daughter, died 4th June 1885, aged 67 years. "Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord" Rev. XIV 13. Only 24 medals were issued for this action. Sold by order of a direct descendant. This medal relates to Lot 140.

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Lot 24: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: NAVAL GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL, 1793-1840, single clasp, Copenhagen 1801 (John Lester.); officially impressed. Lightly toned, once cleaned and lightly polished with some associated hairline marks in fields, otherwise good very fine. ex Sotheby, 28th March 1966, lot 281, bought by Spink. J B Hayward & Son, March 1973, lot 5, £95. Sotheby, Thursday 1st March, 1984, lot 149. Private John Lester, Royal Marines, first appears on the Muster roll for HMS Leydon in January 1801, and was sent aboard HMS Ardent (64) on the 2nd of February of that year, at 'the Great Nore' at Yarmouth, where she was being prepared to join the fleet for the expedition to Copenhagen. This expedition became necessary as a result of the signing of the League of Armed Neutrality between Denmark-Norway, Russia under Tsar Paul I, and Sweden in supporting free trade with France. This was viewed as a direct threat not only to the British blockade of France, but also to the supply of key materials to the British Navy. The expedition to Copenhagen was led by Admiral Sir Hyde Parker, a solid but cautious figure at the age of 61, with the dynamic Vice-Admiral Horatio Nelson second in command (owing to his recent public scandal with Lady Hamilton). The aim was to dissolve the league by armed ultimatum, and failing that, of secondary importance was to nullify the Danish Fleet before it could combine with the Russian Fleet based in Kronstadt and Reval (Talinn) after the melt of Baltic sea-ice. The fleet made way on the 12th of March with some delay, allowing the Danes time to prepare for the British arrival, where stores and munitions could be made ready and the significant 'Tre kroner' shore batteries prepared. This, in addition to the moored Danish Fleet and the unknown waters off Copenhagen caused the British ships to consider their attack carefully. Attacking from the southern approach as directed by Nelson, at 8.00am on the morning of the 2nd of April 1801 the British vessels attempted a difficult route between various narrow channels and made the attack, however three ships ran aground in the approach. The Danish fought bravely and with impressive tenacity, causing heavy damage to the attacking ships, in particular Isis and Monarch. It was here at Copenhagen that Nelson; aboard HMS Elephant, famously 'turned a blind eye' to Parker's signal to withdraw if required (arguably intended to spare Nelson potential embarrassment), however he continued to press on to victory and surrender of the Danish forces, which he himself considered his hardest-fought battle. The British suffered roughly 1,000 men killed or wounded, and the Danish figure estimated at twice that figure, as well as the destruction of the entire Danish Fleet save two Frigates taken as prizes. Furthermore, this intervention caused the Danish withdrawal from the League, and the subsequent opening of negotiations with Sweden. Russia, following the death of Paul I soon after, also returned to peaceful terms with Britain. HMS Ardent, under the command of Captain Thomas Bertie, was part of Nelson's Division in the attack, and was located towards the centre-rear of the British line. In the battle she found herself facing the Danish ships Kronborg (22), Svvardfisken (22) and Jylland (48), as well as several coastal guns, however despite suffering heavily she expended 2464 cartridges and 2693 shot, causing four Danish ships and floating batteries to surrender. The ship's log noted her 'masts, yards and rigging are much wounded' and that they had '30 men killed, 3 officers and 65 men wounded' this figure including Private John Lester. HMS Ardent's notable actions at Copenhagen brought Nelson aboard the Ardent the day following the battle, to deliver his personal commendations to his old friend Captain Bertie, as well as his officers and crew. Following the surrender of the Danish Forces, John Lester was transferred to the Danish prize vessel Holstein with many other wounded men of the British fleet, and returned to Yarmouth Hospital on the 25th of April 1801. The severity of his injury required an amputation at the thigh, and he was subsequently discharged from further service on the 19th of October, 1801. This scarce casualty medal sold with a quantity of research relating to HMS Ardent, and mentions of Private Lester's wound and discharge to Yarmouth Hospital. His name confirmed on the NGS roll.

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Lot 25: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: NAVAL GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL, 1793-1840, single clasp, Navarino (W. C. Coffin, Midshipman.); officially impressed. Old cabinet tone, small reverse edge bruise at 10 o'clock and one or two tiny nicks, otherwise nearly extremely fine. William Chappell Coffin was born in January 1811 in Devonport, Devon. He entered the Navy on the 15th of April, 1824 coming aboard HMS Prince Regent as a Volunteer 1st Class, aged 13, and was promoted to the rank of Midshipman on the 1st of August that year. He moved to HMS Cambrian (40) on the 7th of September 1824, and served aboard that vessel for a total of nearly four years on the Mediterranean station. Midshipman Coffin was present at the Battle of Navarino on the 20th of October, 1827, as part of the combined British, Russian and French fleet under Vice-Admiral Sir Edward Codrington - sent to engage the Ottoman fleet lying in Navarino Bay. During this battle (the last to be fought entirely under sail) the British and Allied fleet's superior firepower and training led to the destruction of the opposing fleet - three quarters of the 78 Ottoman vessels were sunk, and only 8 remained worthy of repair. The British suffered 181 killed and 480 wounded, and whilst several British and Russian battle ships required serious repair, none were sunk. Contrastingly, Ottoman casualties were considered to be as high as 3,000 killed, 1,109 wounded, as stated by Letellier in his report to Codrington. HMS Cambrian, located towards the left of the British line, attacked its opposing vessels and also helped silence the shore batteries nearby, but only suffered fairly light casualties of one killed and one wounded. Soon after, Midshipman Coffin was present aboard HMS Cambrian during the attack made upon a pirate stronghold at Gramvousa (or Grabusa), an island stronghold off the northwest coast of Crete. During the Greek Wars of Independence, a population of some 400 Cretan rebels had taken control of the old Venetian fort (previously garrisoned by Ottoman troops) located on the crest of a mountain, and due to the lack of resources present on the island, were engaging in piracy in the strategic straits between Gramvousa and Antikythyra. A taskforce of six British and two French ships under Commodore Sir Thomas Staines was duly sent by the Governor Ionnnis Capodistrias to pacify the pirates, and all 14 Greek pirate vessels were destroyed in the sheltered harbour, and two merchantmen (Ionian & Austrian) were secured, the booty returned to Malta for claims. Unfortunately, having secured the stronghold, HMS Isis struck Cambrian, causing her to broadside the rocks in the narrow channel. The ship settled in shallow water and the entire crew was safely removed before strong swell then subsequently broke her up. William Coffin served aboard numerous other ships and packets, being promoted to the rank of Mate aboard HMS Kent on the 7th of October 1830, and he appears to have received a severe wound to his right eye in an unrecorded incident which took place aboard HMS Scorpion c.1836. He was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant on the 23rd of November 1841, and began to receive a pension for wounds of £27/7s/6d as of the 14th of March 1842. Genealogical research suggests he was married in early 1842, just prior to serving for three years as First Lieutenant aboard HMS Scylla (18) on the North American and West Indies station under Captain Robert Sharpe, which proved his last serious post before retirement. He is shown in the 1851 Census as living in Plymouth, as Lieut. RN on half-pay, at the age of 40, and is not long afterwards recorded as having died in Calcutta, India, as noted in the London Standard, Monday 8th August, 1853: "Lieutenant William Chappel Coffin (1841) died on the 14th of June at Calcutta. He was admiralty agent in a contract mail-packet, and was in receipt of a pension for wounds." (© The British Library Board). Sold with copy O'Byrne entry, detailed service papers and other useful research.

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Lot 26: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Scarce Waterloo 'Long Service & Good Conduct' Pair awarded to Corporal John Taylor, 1st Battalion, 71st (Highland Light Infantry) Foot, comprising: Waterloo Medal, 1815, with replacement steel clip and ring suspension (Corp. John Taylor 1st Batt. 71st Reg. Foot.), 71st Foot Regimental Medal, in silver, 48mm, with silver suspension and ribbon bar, obverse engraved 'For Courage, Loyalty & Good Conduct' with crowned '71' at centre, and '10 Years Service' below, reverse with combined emblems at centre, engraved 'Tria Juncta In Uno' above, without hallmarks, with old section of tartan ribbon [cf. Balmer R446a]; the first officially impressed, the latter unnamed as issued, pair loose. Toned, the first with minor obverse edge bruise at 3 o'clock, light surface marks and tiny scratches to both, otherwise nearly good very fine, and a scarce pair. (2). ex Needes Collection, 1908. Corporal John Taylor fought at the Battle of Waterloo in Captain James Henderson's Company, 71st Foot, the regiment placed in the 3rd (Light) Brigade of Lieutenant General Sir Henry Clinton's 2nd Division. The 71st Foot, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Thomas Reynell, were initially held in a reserve position on the right flank to the rear of Hougoumont (given their recent arrival after 2-day's march) but were later brought forward into line to support the British regiments between Hougoumont and La Haye Sainte. As recorded in the anonymous 'The Journal of a Highland Soldier, of the 71st or Glasgow Regiment, Highland L.I.'': "The artillery had been tearing away, since day-break, in different parts of the line. About twelve o'clock we received orders to fall in, for attack...General Barnes gave the word, 'Form Square'. In a moment the whole brigade were on their feet to receive the enemy. The General said ' Seventy-first, I have often heard of your bravery, I hope it will not be worse, than it has been, to-day.' Down they came upon our square. We soon put them to right...The noise and smoke were dreadful...all around the wounded and slain lay very thick. We then moved on, in column, for a considerable way, and formed line; gave three cheers, fired a few volleys, charged the enemy, and drove them back." Napoleon subjected this area to heavy artillery fire and repeated cavalry attacks led by Marshall Ney, but the line held. The 71st played their part in the repulse of the Imperial Guard, and reputedly fired the last shot of battle with an artillery piece they had just captured, turning it to fire onto the fleeing French forces. In total, the 1st/71st suffered the loss of 16 officers and 171 men killed and wounded at Waterloo. Sold with copy original roll mention (possibly showing name as Tyler), contemporary accounts and extracts, and other research.

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Lot 27: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: WATERLOO MEDAL, 1815, with replacement steel clip and ring suspension (Lieut. A. E. Glynne, 1st Batt. 40th Reg. Foot.); officially impressed. Once cleaned but lightly toned, a few light obverse marks, scratch to neck of portrait and two minor edge bruises, otherwise a bold very fine. ex Gaskell Collection, 1908. Lieutenant Andrew Eugene Glynne was born c. 1789 and is believed to have been born in Killarney, County Kerry, Ireland. He attested for service as an Ensign in the 40th (2nd Somersetshire Regiment) Foot April 1809 at the age of 20, and served in the Peninsular Wars in Spain and southern France. He was promoted to a Lieutenancy in September 1811, and joined the regiment at Ciudad Rodrigo. He served with the 40th Foot throughout the remainder of the Peninsular War, and the Challis Roll suggests he was slightly wounded whilst in action at the Pyrenees, although in his records it states 'near Pampeluna' which might be more accurate. In June 1815, The 'Fighting Fortieth' arrived at Waterloo later than most Regiments after a long forced march from Ghent, but arrived the night preceding on the 17th (missing out on the action at Quatre Bras) and owing to their long march were initially placed towards the centre rear amongst the reserve with Lambert's Division. After a wet night, on the morning of the 18th the battle was underway, during which the reserve position was nevertheless subjected to constant cannonade. At about 3 o'clock in the afternoon Lambert's Division was brought forward to defend the vital crossroads behind La Haye Sainte, which had been under constant French attack. Napoleon; mistaking the nature of these troop movements and believing a retreat was imminent, ordered a huge attach of cavalry at this critical point led by Marshall Ney, with the aim of smashing the British and Allied centre and taking the farm building there. The British regiments of the centre formed squares in response and with concentrated musket fire they bitterly resisted the cavalry and subsequent attacks of columns of infantry which followed in support. At 6.30pm the position of the 40th became particularly desperate as the French temporarily captured La Haye Sainte, but the 40th held their square. Following the repulse of the elite Old Guard, Wellington called out to Lambert's Brigade: 'No cheering, my lads, but go on and complete your victory.' And so, the 'Fighting Fortieth' fixed bayonets and went on to rout the French columns to their front and recapture La Haye Sainte, continuing with general advance until exhausted and called to halt. During the battle, Lieutenant Glynne served in Captain C Ellis's Company, and was himself severely wounded in the action. During the battle all five officers of his company were wounded. Sold with a quantity of research, confirming his entitlement to this medal, and the Military General Service Medal with 9 clasps.

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Lot 28: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: WATERLOO MEDAL, 1815, with replacement steel clip and ring suspension (Tr. Serj. Maj. F. Kinkee, 10th Royal Reg. Hussars.), officially impressed. Toned, good very fine. ex Sotheby, February 1892. H Gaskell Collection, 1908. DNW, 6th of July, 2004, lot 26. Cornet Frederick Kinkee was born c.1787 in St. James, Piccadilly, London, and attested for service with the 10th Hussars in July 1803. He was promoted to Corporal in December 1805, to Sergeant in December 1810, and to Troop Sergeant Major in June 1812. He served in the Peninsular War with the 10th Royal Hussars, where his regiment performed admirably, being present at the action at Morales de Toro (where under Major Robarts they confronted and routed the French 16th Dragoons, taking two officers and two hundred soldiers captive), and also at the Battles of Vittoria, Pyrenees, and Orthes. Whilst serving in Spain, he showed courage and experience on the 23rd of May, 1813, as mentioned in the 'Memoirs of the Tenth Royal Hussars' by Colonel R S Lidell: "In passing the Douro, a feat accomplished by Graham's force in six hours, three horses of the Tenth fell out of the boats, but were brought safely to the shore by Troop Sergeant-Major Kirkee, who jumped into the water after them." Frederick Kinkee was present with the 10th Hussars at the Battle of Waterloo, serving as Troop Sergeant-Major in Captain Charles Wood's Troop (No. 5). The 10th Hussars, under the command of Colonel Quentin, formed part of Major General Sir Hussey Vivian's Hussars Brigade. Initially placed far to the British left near Ter-la-Haye and Frischermont, whereby they still received steady cannonade. Later in the day, the Hussars were moved along the main road to support the British and Allied centre, which was under increasing pressure from cavalry attacks as Napoleon sought to break the British squares. Having helped to repulse the cavalry, the 10th Hussars faced galling fire as the Hussar Brigade (with the 18th Hussars and the hussars of the King's German Legion) formed lines, with the 10th in front. At this point they were ordered to charge the French Imperial Guard. As recorded in the account written by Private John Marshall: "After advancing one hundred yards we struck into a charge, as fast as our horses could go, keeping up a loud and continual cheering, and soon we were among the Imperial Guards of France... we got into their columns and like birds they fell to the ground. We took sixteen guns and many prisoners." Additionally, It has been noted that in comparison to the bold enthusiasm of the Union Brigade (including the Scots Greys and Inniskilling Dragoons, neither of which had served on the Peninsula), the Hussars Brigade performed with cold discipline, maintaining their order and helping to turn the tide of the battle at a key juncture. This achievement was not only due to the experience of their rank and file, but must also have been the result of the bravery of the Senior NCOs, such as Kinkee. After Waterloo, Troop Sergeant Major Kinkee was promoted to Regimental Quartermaster, 19th Light Dragoons, on the 1st July 1824, retired to half pay on the 18th of August 1825. He was soon after promoted to the commissioned rank of Cornet & Acting Adjutant (without purchase) on the 19th of October 1827, where he latterly served with the Cavalry Riding Establishment in St Johns Wood, but finally retired in 1832. He married one Mary Kinkee (nee Johnston) in the Church of St Andrew by the Wardrobe (near Blackfriars) on the 3rd of January 1815, and died on the 17th of November, 1863, at 14 Victoria Road, Kentish Town, at the age of 77. Sold with copy death certificate, copy Waterloo Roll mention, and copy MGS roll mention, showing his entitlement to an MGS with two clasps (although his papers record him as being present at Vittoria), copy mention in the Waterloo Roll Call, showing him as an NCO (later commissioned), and some useful research

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Lot 29: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: WATERLOO MEDAL, 1815, disc only (Francis Moran, Hospital Asst. Royal Staff Corps.); officially impressed. Lightly toned, light surface marks and several edge knocks and scrapes, a bold fine thus, and rare. Assistant Surgeon Francis Moran MD was born in Ireland, and having studied Medicine at Edinburgh University he attested for service as a Hospital Assistant with the Royal Staff Corps on the 22nd of April 1813, and subsequently served in the Peninsular Wars from June 1813 until April 1814. Whilst his name is not recorded on the Waterloo Medal Roll, he is believed to have been present at the Battle of Waterloo on the 18th of June 1815 and to have submitted a successful late claim. In his role as Hospital Assistant on that day we can assume he was faced with the treatment of a seemingly endless number of casualties in the days that followed, many of whom suffered horrific cannon, gunshot and small arms wounds on that day.The 'Army List' of 1821 shows that he was promoted to the rank of Assistant Surgeon soon after this famous battle on the 17th of August, 1815, and was later placed on half pay on the 25th of December 1818. He went on to take a position as Assistant Surgeon on the Colonial Medical Establishment of New South Wales, Australia, arriving there on the 15th of August, 1822 and remained in this position for a number of years, largely based at Port Macquarie and Newcastle - having become land owner at Hunter's River, in particular the Duck River Farm. During his time there he appears to have played a prominent role in treating an outbreak of whooping cough, amongst other numerous examples of medical practice. He retired from the position and moved to Sydney for a time, where he was involved in saving the lives of a father and daughter from drowning, before travelling to India. He was mentioned in the London Gazette on the 18th of November 1831 as transferring at Madras into the 54th Foot as Assistant Surgeon with that regiment, however after several years he returned to Australia, residing at Pitt Street, Sydney. At this point he appears to have run into trouble with the authorities, and was imprisoned for 'an impropriety of conduct in the Police Office.' He was soon released, but immediately was struck down with illness and delirium, and was found dead on the 30th of March, 1839 - with the cause of death considered 'disease due to ill-temperance', which given his symptoms and life in the tropics seems somewhat harsh. Sold with a quantity of research, London Gazette and Army List mentions, and copious material sourced from the website 'Free Settler or Felon' as regards his later life in Australia.

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Lot 30: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: An interesting Victorian Group of 3 awarded to Sergeant Saddler E Bliss, Royal Artillery, comprising: India General Service Medal, 1854-1895, single clasp, Hazara 1891 (2391 Cpl. Sad: E. Bliss. Attd. R.A.), India General Service 1895-1902, 2 clasps, Tirah 1897-98, Relief of Chitral 1895 (2391 Sergt. Sad: E. Bliss. Attd. R.A.), King's South Africa Medal, 2 clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (2391. Sergt. Sadlr. E.Bliss. Att. R. A.); all three medals renamed and engraved in a contemporary style, the first two mounted on bar with reverse pin for wear, the latter mounted with loose QSA ribbon (this medal absent) with reverse pin for wear. Toned, well-polished, a little pitted and suspensions a touch loose, pleasing fine thus. (3). For the awards to other family members, see lots 41 and 105.

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Lot 31: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: INDIA GENERAL SERVICE MEDAL, 1854-95, 2 clasps, Burma 1885-7, Burma 1887-89 (218 Private W. Kennedy 2nd Bn R. Muns. Fus.); officially engraved in a running script, latter clasp loose on ribbon as often encountered. Unevenly toned, suspension a touch loose, otherwise a bold very fine.

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Lot 32: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Fine Crimean Campaign Group of 3 awarded to Admiral of the Fleet Sir Thomas Matthew Charles Symonds, GCB, Captain of HMS Arethusa during the Bombardment of Fort Constantine at Sebastopol, comprising: Crimea Medal, 1854-56, single clasp, Sebastopol (Capn T. M. C. Symonds. H. M. S. Arethusa), Turkish Crimea Medal, 1855, British Issue (Capt: T. M. C. Symons. R. N. H. M. S. Arethusa), Order of Medjidie, 3rd class, in silver, with gold and enamels; the first two privately engraved in upright capitals, and with silver claw suspension and reverse pin for wear, latter unnamed as issued, group loose. The first well-toned, group extremely fine overall and a rare group to an Admiral of the Fleet. (3). Sir Thomas Matthew Symonds GCB, was born on the 31st of October 1811, the second son of Rear Admiral Sir William Symonds. He entered the Royal Navy on the 25th of April 1825, at the age of 13, and obtained his first commission as Lieutenant on the 5th of November 1832. His service in the Mediterranean, East Indies and North America stations saw him promoted to Commander on the 21st of August 1837, and to Captain on the 22nd of February 1841. The key event of his career took place in 1852, when he was placed in charge of the new 50-gun frigate HMS Arethusa. He was ordered to the Black Sea in 1854 as part of the Crimean War, and after having served for a short time under Flag Captain to Sir Edmund Lyons, in HMS Agamemnon (being mentioned in despatches), he was Captain of HMS Arethusa (50) during the bombardment of Fort Constantine, one of two forts guarding the harbour at Sebastopol, on the 7th of October 1854. At the siege of Fort Constantine, the Arethusa was brought into action by the steamer Triton, and upon arrival near the heavy stone fort she fired broadside after broadside, in return being 'hulled in all directions' and heavily damaged by shot from the Wasp and Telegraph shore batteries, later requiring assistance reaching Constantinople for repair to avoid being sunk. Such was the bombardment, that the Russian forces sank a number of their own ships to prevent entrance by the British and Allied ships. In this bombardment she suffered eighteen killed and wounded, and five wounded belonging to the Triton, whose crew were assisting the gun-teams. He received the CB on the 5th of July 1855, KCB on the 13th of March 1867, and GCB on the 23rd of April 1880. He retired after 56 years' service on the 31st of October 1881, and died at Torquay on the 14th of November 1894. This medal sold by order of an indirect family relation, with a quantity of useful research including extract taken from O'Byrne's Naval Biographical Dictionary. The medal belonging to the recipient's father are to be found in lot 21.

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Lot 33: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: CRIMEA MEDAL, 1854-58, 4 clasps, ([G]unr. & Dr. D. Bonner. R.A.); officially engraved in upright capitals. Old cabinet tone, first letter of rank very weak, contact marks throughout and slight edge bruises, good fine.

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Lot 34: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: CRIMEA MEDAL, 1854-58, single clasp, Sebastopol (4002. William. Brown. 1st.. Battn.. 1st.. Royals); regimentally impressed in elegant upright capitals. Lightly toned, a little polished with a few light marks in places, about very fine. Sold with copy roll mentions confirming this entitlement.

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Lot 35: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: An Indian Mutiny LSGC Pair awarded to Private Francis James Bode, 3rd Battalion, 60th Foot (Rifle Brigade), comprising: Indian Mutiny Medal, 1857-58, single clasp, Lucknow (Fras. Bode, 2nd Bn. Rifle Bde.), Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, VR (2717. Pte. F. J. Bode, 3-60th Rifles); medals officially impressed, pair court mounted on board for display. Once cleaned, very fine. (2). Private Francis James Bode was born in 1836 in the parish of St Margarets, London, and attested for service with the Rifle Brigade at Westminster on the 22nd of October, 1855, at the age of 19. He served for over 21 years with the colours, including 13 years spent in the East Indies, and was discharged at the age of 40 on the 20th of October, 1876.

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Lot 36: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: ABYSSINIA MEDAL, 1867 (907 J. Kennedy. 26th Foot); reverse officially named as struck, usual minor repair to suspension. Toned, ribbon suspension a touch loose, otherwise good very fine. Sold with copy roll mention confirming this award to Private John Kennedy.

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Lot 37: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Rare and Emotive South Africa 1879 Casualty Medal awarded to Trooper Francis 'Louis' Secretan, Natal Mounted Police, killed in action at the Battle of Isandhlwana during the final retreat along the Fugitives' Trail towards the Buffalo River, the location of his death confirmed as reported by his brother Archer Jeston Secretan in The Standard, March 25th, 1879, comprising: South Africa Medal, 1877-79, single clasp, 1879 (Tr F. Secretan. Natal Md Police.); officially engraved in large upright capitals, court mounted for display. Light and attractive tone, small lower reverse edge bruise and tiny nick, otherwise good very fine, and extremely rare when found with such detailed biographical and historical information. Francis Louis Secretan was born in 1856 in Croydon, Surrey. His father Francis Herbert Secretan was a Stockbroker at the Stock Exchange in London, who had married Ellen Elizabeth Levin at Hackney, Middlesex, in 1853. Francis Louis Secretan was raised with his three brothers and two sisters, with whom he soon relocated to Camden Town by the time of the 1861 Census, later moving towards his father's place of birth in Leyton, Essex by the time of the 1871 Census. Francis Louis Secretan and his brother Archer Jeston Secretan both appear to have taken the decision for an adventurous move to South Africa c.1877-8, at the age of 21 and 20 respectively. The two brothers appear to be new arrivals at the time of the Anglo-Zulu War, when both joined the Natal Mounted Police at Pietermaritzburg, Natal, on the 23rd of April 1878 (their recent arrival indicated by the lack of a local contact address used upon enlistment by A J Secretan, deferring instead to the address of their father in Essex as noted in the NMP enlistment register). The two brothers soon found themselves in the thick of it, as the NMP was sent as part of the invasion force into Zululand under General Lord Chelmsford. Having moved towards the frontier the British, Colonial and Native forces arrived at Isandhlwana, and against the advice of Inspector Phillips - the NMP Second in Command, the camp was made with their backs set towards the foot of the monumental rock formation there, and critically without making the recommended defensive 'laager' of wagons on the perimeter. Archer Secretan was subsequently sent with his NMP Commanding Officer Major John G Dartnell as part of a small reconnoitring force to track Zulu movements roughly 10 miles to the South East, leaving his brother Francis and a remaining 33 men of the NMP to remain at the camp with the majority of the British Forces, set against the eastern side of the foot of the hill at Isandhlwana. Lord Chelmsford also personally led a larger force of approximately 1200 British and Native soldiers (further dividing his troops) to reconnoitre, leaving the camp under the command of Lieutenant Colonel Henry Pulleine of the 1st/24th Foot, taking seniority over Lieutenant Colonel Durnford of the colonial Natal Native Contingent. It was here on the 22nd of January, 1879, that Francis Louis Secretan was killed in action. At roughly 11.00am the 'head and horns' of the Zulu warrior force swept around and directly into the British camp, and despite desperate resistance for as much as three hours, the British and Colonial and Native forces were vastly outnumbered and routed by the attacking Zulu forces, estimated at between 12,000 and as many as 20,000. To summarise, according to contemporary reports, the British and Colonial forces near the camp stood in lines two deep with their rifles, initially taking a heavy toll on their attackers. However these tactics left them very exposed, and through a combination of weight of enemy numbers and a possible lack of readily available ammunition, the Zulus closed extremely quickly to get within stabbing range of their assegais, and despite attempts to form squares of resistance and mount desperate fighting retreats and 'last stands', the British and Colonial force in the camp was killed virtually to a man, suffering approximately 1,300 dead including Pulleine and Durnford, with Zulu casualties considered to be in the region of 2,000 to as much as 6,000. Only a reputed 55 British and Colonial men successfully escaped (those mostly with horses) along the so-called 'Fugitives' Trail', but many more died en route. Amongst these men, Lieutenants Melvill and Coghill managed to escape as far as the Buffalo River in an attempt to save their regimental colours, only to tragically lose them into the river (where they were subsequently recovered downstream) and be killed after crossing. These two soldiers were awarded the VC. As recorded by A J Secretan in his letter home as printed in The Standard on the 25th of March, 1879, the reconnoitring forces returned to the camp too late after getting word of the slaughter, and after shelling the remaining Zulus from the area, they remained in the camp itself until dawn. As a section of his full and harrowing account records: "Morning at length came to our weary bodies, and we saw the scene of the battle. All the white men, with their entrails, noses, ears, and other parts of their body cut off and thrust in their poor dead mouths; sides slit up and arms thrust in; horses and oxen all lying about, stabbed and ripped up. We saw the British soldiers all lying formed up in a square, where they had held their ground till all were slain where they stood. The gunners were stabbed to a man where they stood by their two guns, the captain himself being shot whilst in the act of spiking the last one. Our horses were almost dead beat, as this was the beginning of the third day they had not had their saddles off or their bits out of their mouths, day or night; they were just like bags of bones. Well, after the officers had gone round the sad scene we left about five a.m., twenty-five of the Natal Mounted Police forming a rear guard, of which I was one. On the road to Rorke's Drift we found all the way along torn clothes, dead bodies, &c., showing that the fiends had not spared a being so long as they could get near enough to assegai them. We found a few wounded Zulus and stragglers who were promptly despatched by us without mercy; our men were mad with revenge, and can you expect one to have the slightest piece of feeling for these wretches? Further along the road we came across four mounted police lying side by side, three stabbed and one shot, the last named being poor Louis. He had all his clothes on, even to his spurs, but everything about him - arms, money, &c. - was gone; he was not in the least way mutilated. I think these four must have got so far on foot, and that they were followed up before they could get as far as the river, as there were no horses near. He was shot through the back of the head, and death must have ensued directly. I have the following from one of our fellows who escaped, and who when leaving saw Louis mounting his horse. Colonel Durnford called out to him 'What are you mounting for?' He replied 'I have no more ammunition, sir.' The officer then told him to stand his ground with his knife only, and Louis replied, 'Yes, sir, I will.' So you see while others were riding away and cutting their way through, Louis obeyed orders and stood with the soldiers until all the officers were killed and there were no orders to be heard, and then it was every man for himself, (© The British Library Board). The location of his death is believed to be on the Fugitives' Trail, towards the Manzimyama Stream, where the final survivors on foot were killed, unable to escape more swiftly owing to his lack of a mount. The Natal Military Police are believed to have been camped and located on the southernmost point of the camp, and nearest to the 'Saddle' of Isandhlwana and the escape route towards the Fugitives' Trail, so it does make sense that he might have managed to escape relatively far by foot, rather than assuming any instance of cowardice. However it is reported that one of these 'last stands' was made by many of his NMP and Colonial troops around their leader Durnford, set somewhat back from the camp - many of whom 'could' have escaped, as their horses were found slaughtered close by, still on their picket rope. The truth is we may never know exactly how Francis Secretan and his three other NMP cohort managed to escape on foot (perhaps they had been separated somewhat earlier, were part of a vedette located to one side, had been attempting to retrieve ammunition (whilst the other remaining Colonials had been surrounded etc.) but perhaps in the fullness of time their specific cairn will be identified. Francis Louis Secretan's official death notice records his final age as 22, leaving behind personal effects of 'about £10'. A letter from his father addressed to the NMP on the 30th of July 1879 names Archer Jeston Secretan to settle his brother's accounts and to receive all funds and other bank savings, totalling around £40. His name is recorded on the memorial by the City Hall at Pietermaritzburg, with the rather inexcusable spelling error of 'F Secreton'. The name of his brother 'A Secretan' appears in Tavender's 'Casualty Roll for the Zulu and Basuto Wars, South Africa 1877-79' - apparently confusing the two names, and this is then repeated erroneously in Roy Dutton's 'Forgotten Heroes: Zulu & Basuto Wars' (Secretan A [F] KIA 1879) although there appears to be little doubt who was the true casualty. Whilst portions of the above extract are often misquoted as written by an 'Arthur J Secretan' - there is no doubt that it is written (as seen in print) by Archer Jeston Secretan. It appears that the link between the two serving brothers in the NMP and the above article has not been made prior to this sale, particularly the fact that the author names his brother as 'Louis' - according to his middle name, owing to the fact that their father went by the name Francis and would have been the only one called such in their household - and no such details are to be found in the suggested references for this campaign. Sold with a file of documentation, including copy roll mentions as detailed above, a full typed copy of the letter written to his father by A.J. Secretan, detailed genealogical research, copied pages from the NMP enlistment book, and a quantity of other useful research. and all did the best they could..."

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Lot 38: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: AFGHANISTAN MEDAL, 1878-80, 3 clasps, Peiwar Kotal, Charasia, Kabul (6862 Dr D. Jackson. G/3rd R.A.); officially engraved in upright capitals. Lighty toned, obverse edge bump at 8 o'clock and suspension a touch loose, otherwise a pleasing and proudly polished fine. ex Spink, 10th of December, 2001, lot 133. Sold with copy roll mention confirming this 3 clasp award to one Daniel Jackson.

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Lot 39: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: KABUL TO KANDAHAR STAR, 1880 (Sepoy Kalloo Goorung / 4th Goorka Regt.); reverse officially engraved. Toned, nearly extremely fine.

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Lot 40: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: An Extremely (© The British Library Board). Miss C H Lloyd went on to marry Commander C K Kennedy-Purvis, RN, whom she had met in Egypt, who himself had been seriously wounded at Kassassin, and died in uncertain circumstances at Ramsgate Coastguard Station on January 26th, 1886, at the age of only 39. A rare award, with approximately 30 such awards being made to nurses - sold with some useful research and Egypt Roll mention Rare Egypt Campaign Pair awarded to Nursing Sister Cecilia Lloyd, Army Nursing Service, comprising: Egypt Medal, 1882-89, reverse date 1882, no clasp (Nursg. Sister. C. Lloyd.), Khedive's Star, 1882; the first officially engraved, the latter unnamed as issued, pair court mounted for display. Toned, pair practically as struck, the first lustrous, and extremely rare. (2). ex Sotheby, 3rd of July, 1986. A A Upfill-Brown Collection, DNW, 4th of December, 1991, lot 277. Nursing Sister Cecilia Harriet Lloyd was born c.1847, and was specially engaged on a 6-month contract to serve with the Army Nursing Service, at the instigation of Lady Superintendent Mrs J C Deeble on the 1st of August, 1882. She embarked for Egypt on the 23rd of August, and served for a short time in the hospital at Ismailia, along with 5 other nurses under the direction of Miss A E Caulfield. Returning to England later that year to see out her contract at the Royal Victoria Hospital at Netley, she was commended in a subsequent telegram in 1883 from the PMO Egypt for 'good service', being awarded a gratuity. Latterly, she also took part in the 1883 Board of Enquiry into the state of medical care for troops in Egypt during 1882, who along with Matron Deeble and Superintendant of Nurses A E Caulfield, would recommend a whole-sale expansion of the Army Nursing Service. As reported in an anonymous letter as published in The Standard on Friday October 20th, 1882: "Among the various notices that have appeared in the daily papers...I have not seen a word commenting on the good work done by the Lady Nurse-tenders sent out by our Government to assist in the Hospitals at Alexandria, Ismailia and Cyprus...The assistance given to the medical officers at Ismailia by the staff of Lady Nurses after the action at Tel-el-Kebir was simply invaluable, and the services were greatly appreciated by the wounded themselves. Their cheerful and willing labour and their skilful, tender handling of the wounded are worthy of all praise."

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Lot 41: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: Egypt Campaign Pair awarded to Trooper E Bliss, 19th Hussars, comprising: Egypt and Sudan Medal, 1882-1889, undated reverse, single clasp, Suakin 1885 (1073 Tpr: E. Bliss. 19th Hussars.), Khedive's Star 1884-6, the first renamed and engraved, the latter unnamed as issued, pair swing mounted on bar with reverse pin for wear. Pair toned, a little pitted from contact, very fine. (2). For the awards to other family members, see lots 30 and 105.

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Lot 42: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: An Egypt Campaign and Boer War LSGC Group of 5 awarded to Company Quarter Master Sergeant W T Leverett, Royal Engineers, comprising: Egypt Medal, 1882-89, undated reverse, 2 clasps, Suakin 1885, Tofrek (18278. Driv: W. Leverett. 2(5)th Co. R.E.), Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 2nd type reverse with ghost dates, 2 clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State (18278 C.Q.M.S. W. T. Leverett, R.E.), King's South Africa Medal, 1901-02, 2 clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (18278 C. Qr: - Mr: - Serjt: W. Leverett. R.E.), Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, VR (18278 C.Q.M. Serjt: W. T. Leverett. R.E.), sold with Corps of Commissionaires Order of Merit, 1st Class, in silver and enamels, with hallmarks for Birmingham, 1917, reverse engraved (W. Leverett). Group toned, the first with some pitting from contact and good fine thus, remainder generally pleasing very fine. (5). ex Spink, 28th April 2005, lot 470.

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Lot 43: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: An East and West Africa 'Benin 1897' LSGC Pair awarded to Chief Stoker John Maytom, Royal Navy, comprising: East and West Africa Medal, 1887-1900, single clasp, Benin 1897 (J. Maytum, Lg. Sto. 1 Cl., H.M.S. Forte.), Royal Naval Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, EVIIR (John Maytom, Ch. Sto., H.M.S. Grafton.); pair officially impressed, the first with tiny unofficial correction to 'u' of 'Maytum' to 'o', group swing mounted on fabric for wear. Dark cabinet tone, a few small contact marks, very fine. (2). Chief Stoker John Maytom, of Herne Bay, Kent, was born on the 4th of October 1869, and attested for service with the Royal Navy on the 24th of June, 1889. He served with the Royal Navy a total of 22 years, including 2 years spent aboard HMS Forte for which he was awarded the East & West Africa Medal. Sold with copy service papers. For awards to his relations, please see lots 103, 117 and 139.

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Lot 44: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Fine Mashonaland Campaign, Boer War and Great War LSGC Group of 9 awarded to Trooper C Mott, Royal Horse Guards & Royal Parks Police, late 7th Hussars, who during his service with the 7th Hussars and Royal Horse Guards was servant to HSH Prince Alexander of Teck, at that time a junior officer in the 7th Hussars, comprising: British South Africa Company Medal, 1890-97, Rhodesia 1896 reverse, single clasp, Mashonaland 1897 (4211 Pte C. Mott, 7th Huss.), Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 3rd type reverse, 5 clasps, Relief of Mafeking, Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Belfast (Pte C. Mott, 7/ Hussars.), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-19 (2064 Tpr. C. Mott. R. H. Gds), Royal Victorian Medal, EVIIR, Coronation Medal 1902, Coronation Medal 1911, Royal Parks reverse (C. Mott), Army Long Service & Good Conduct Medal, EVIIR (1140 Tpr: C. Mott. Rl. Horse Guards), with Germany, Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, Ernestine House Order, Silver Medal of Merit; the first two medals officially engraved, third, fourth, seventh and eighth medals officially impressed, remainder unnamed as issued, group court mounted for display, the latter Order mounted beside separately. Group proudly polished as worn, bold fine thus, and a rare and interesting combination of awards. (9). Trooper Charles Mott was born c.1868 in Maidstone, Kent, and worked for a short time as a Postman prior to his enlistment on the 17th of January, 1887 - initially joining the 17th Lancers. He served with this regiment in India, Egypt and on home service until the 1st of January 1895, when after a short period with the 19th Hussars, he was transferred to the 7th Hussars on the 5th of September 1895. He served in Matabeleland and Rhodesia between 1896 and 1898, returning home for less than a year before joining British forces fighting in South Africa. It was during these years that he was servant to HSH Prince Alexander of Teck, who was mentioned in despatches in both of the above campaigns. Returning again to Britain, he served with the Royal Horse Guards between October 1904 and his discharge after 'exemplary' service 'without offense' after some 21 years with the colours on the 30th of April, 1908. Additionally, it was during this time that he was awarded the Royal Victorian Medal upon the occasion of the marriage of HSH Prince Alexander of Teck to HRH Princess Alice of Albany in February 1905. Upon the outbreak of hostilities in WWI, he rejoined the Royal Horse Guards for service throughout the Great War, during which time he appears to have served with the Royal Parks Police, being awarded the 1911 Coronation Medal. Ultimately, he was finally discharged on the 31st of March, 1920, after a total of approximately 27 years of service. He was married to one Alice Eliza Mott, residing at 64 Portland Road, Holland Park Avenue, London, and after retirement, he died on the 20th of August 1954, at the Royal Military Hospital Chelsea, at the age of 86. Sold with a quantity of useful research, including attestation and discharge papers, confirming all but the final award, and still worthy of further investigation, particularly as regards his connection to HSH Prince Alexander of Teck.

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Lot 45: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Scarce 'Defence of Kimberley' & Great War Group of 5 awarded to Private William J. Rigg, 10th Field Ambulance, SAMC, late Kimberley Town Guard, comprising: Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 3rd type reverse, single clasp, Defence of Kimberley (Pte W. J. Rigg. Kimberley Town Gd:), 1914-15 Star (Pte. W. J. Rigg, 10th F. Amb. - S.A.M.C.), British War & Bi-Lingual Victory Medals, 1914-1919 (J. W. Rigg [sic]), Kimberley Star, 1899-1900, hallmarked Birmingham with date letter 'a'; medals officially impressed, the latter unnamed as issued, medals mounted on board for display. Medals toned extremely fine, and a scarce group. (5). Private William J Rigg, of 18 Sydney Street, Kimberley, served with the Kimberley Town Guard during the Boer War, and later with the South Africa Medical Corps in the Great War. Whilst never worn by the recipient, his Great War BWM & Victory Medal Pair were issued very late, being finally received upon the request of his family in 1988. Sold with copy clasp confirmation, copy SA service report / MIC, and copy letter of request as written by his son.

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Lot 46: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: Boer War and Great War 1914 Group of 5 awarded to Private William Smith, 12th Lancers, comprising: Queen's South Africa Medal, 2nd type reverse, 3 clasps, Relief of Kimberley, Orange Free State, Transvaal (4357. Pte W. Smith. 12/R. Lrs:), King's South Africa Medal, 2 clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (4357 Pte W. Smith. 12th Lancers.), 1914 Star with clasp and rosette (4357 Pte. W. Smith, 12/Lrs), British War & Victory Medals (12-L- 4357 Pte. W. Smith. 12-Lrs.); the first officially engraved in sloping capitals, the remainder officially impressed, group loose mounted on board for display, sold with Silver War Badge no.146495. Lightly toned, the first two with a few tiny nicks and contact marks, group otherwise good very fine. (6). Having played a significant role in the Boer War, during WWI the 12th Lancers took part in one of the last true cavalry charges of the modern age, charging with lances against the Prussian Dragoon Guards near the village of Moy de l'Aisne, near St Quentin, on the 28th of August 1914. It would appear that Private William Smith, by this time an experienced soldier and present with his regiment, took part in this charge. Sold with copy MIC, and SWB List mention. His MIC mentions that he was discharged on the 30th of November, 1916 as 'unfit for further service', presumably from a wound or possibly simply from age.

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Lot 47: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Boer War & WWI Group of 5 awarded to Acting Colour-Sergeant R Brodley, Cameron Highlanders, late RAMC, comprising: Queen's South Africa Medal 1899-1902, 3rd type reverse, 3 clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (13396 Pte R. Brodley, R.A.M.C.), King's South Africa Medal, 1901-02, 2 clasps, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (Pte), 1914-15 Star (7942, L-Sjt. R. Brodley, Cam'n Highrs), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-1919 (A.C.Sjt); group officially impressed, medals court mounted on board for display. Group toned, QSA & KSA very fine with one or two edge knocks, latter trio extremely fine. (5).

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Lot 48: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Boer War and Great War Group of 4 awarded to Captain Walter William Sharpe, MID, Army Service Corps, late 62nd (Middlesex) Company, 11th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry, comprising: Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 3rd type reverse, 2 clasps, Cape Colony, Orange Free State (4284 Pte. W. W. Sharpe,. 62nd Coy Imp: Yeo.), 1914-15 Star (Lieut. W. W. Sharpe A.S.C.), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-1919, the latter with bronze MiD spray of oak leaves (Capt. W. W. Sharpe); medals officially impressed, group court mounted on board for display. Medals lightly polished and cleaned, a few light marks, otherwise nearly extremely fine. (4). MID LG 10.07.1919. Captain Walter William Sharpe was born in King William's Town, near Cape Town, South Africa, on the 4th of May, 1877, and enlisted for service with the 62nd (Middlesex) Company, 11th Imperial Yeomanry at London on the 16th of February 1900, having previously worked as an Engineer. He fought during the Second Boer War, during which time he was accidentally wounded during service and later appears to have been discharged in September 1900. Having subsequently moved to Britain, he was working as Manager of Argyle Motor Works at the outbreak of WWI, and given this trade he was called up to serve with the Army Service Corps, initially as Second Lieutenant, and later being promoted to Captain on the 18th of July 1916. He was discharged in April 1919, and married one Olive Sharpe, and listed her as his next of kin with a permanent address at 18 Frederick Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham. Sold with copy attestation papers for the Second Boer War and WWI, and copy MIC

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Lot 49: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Boer War and Great War Group of 4 awarded to Driver H Kane, 232nd Brigade Royal Field Artillery, late Scots Guards, comprising: Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 2nd type reverse with ghost dates, 3 clasps, Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (6946 Pte: H. Kane. Scots Gds.), 1914-15 Star (93323, Dvr. H. Kane. R.F.A.), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-1919 (93323 Dvr. H. Kane, R.A.); the first officially engraved, the remainder officially impressed, group court mounted on board for display. Toned, good very fine. (4). Driver Hugh Kane was born in the Paisley, Renfrewshire, Scotland, and he attended for service with the Scots Guards on the 19th of September, 1885, having previously worked as a Fishcurer. He served with this regiment during the Second Boer War, and having completed nearly 17 years with the colours in July 1902 he was discharged from further service. He was called up again during WWI, and served with the Royal Artillery in Egypt, and was awarded a Silver War Badge for 'Sickness' being discharged on the 21st of March, 1919. Sold with copy attestation papers, QSA roll mention, and copy MIC.

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Lot 50: CAMPAIGN MEDALS AND GROUPS

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Description: A Second Boer War & WWI Group of 4 awarded to Private Joseph Charles Brady, West York Regiment, comprising: Queen's South Africa Medal, 1899-1902, 3rd type reverse, 2 clasps, Transvaal, South Africa 1902 (3773 Pte. J. C. Brady. W. York: Regt), 1914-15 Star (15913 Pte. J. C. Brady. W. York. R.), British War & Victory Medals, 1914-1919 (Pte.); medals officially impressed, and court mounted on board for display. Toned, good very fine. (4). Private Joseph Charles Brady was born c. 1874 in St James, London, and had previously worked as a Porter, with some experience in the Militia with the 5th Battalion Royal Fusiliers. He attested for service with the West Yorkshire Regiment on the 24th of November 1893, and served with this regiment in Gibraltar, Hong Kong, Singapore and the East Indies, prior to service in the Boer War. Following this, he continued to serve in the Army Reserve before being called up again to serve in the Great War. He received a gunshot wound to the foot whist serving in France on the 14th of September, 1916. Sold with copy original and later WWI attestation papers, as well as numerous pages related to two other minor injuries that occurred during his service.

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