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Buy Now (125 Items)

by RJM Autographs and Antiques

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Cabaret Singer Hildegarde Called Most Famous Who Ever Lived by Liberace -- Archive

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: HILDEGARDE (1906-2005) was an American cabaret singer and dubbed “the most famous supper-club performer who ever lived” by no less than Liberace. Hildegarde headlined nightclubs across the globe for close to seven decades, along the way igniting the now common vogue for single-named celebrity. She was once referred to as a “luscious, hazel-eyed Milwaukee blonde who sings the way Garbo looks.” Her admirers ranged from soldiers during World War II to the Duke of Windsor. She was the lesbian partner of her early manager Anna Sosenko. Three item archive: One page, TLS, two page, ALS, and an original complete edition of the April 17, 1939 edition of “Life 1982” signed and inscribed in green ink on the cover, “Bless you, Judi Bar. Love, Hildegarde. Nov. 20, 1982.” In very good condition with minor wear, date smudged. Great content one page, TLS, 8 ½” x 11” to biographer Chaw Mank. Some foxing, fold splits repaired with archival tape. Else very good. In part: "I was so sorry that you were unable to get me on the radio. There was a mistake. I was on WMAQ instead of WGN. I was furious when I heard this but it was too late to get in touch with you. "However, I did mention the book to the man who interviewed me and I autographed one for him too and he promised that he would mention it too. As a matter of fact, you might drop him a note. "Tell him that you are the one who published and complied this book of favorite prayers, and perhaps he might be able to mention it every once in a while. I realize that you have invested a great deal of money in this book and I do wish I could help you, but God knows I have tried. Marshall Field & Company have promised to carry it. It is strange that you said in one of your letters that you sent the Book Buyer at Marshall Field & Company your book and yet Mr. Hoffman, the Manager of the Book Section, didn't seem to recognize it when I gave it to him. I had a picture taken holding the book in my hand with Jim Mills. As soon as I get a copy, I will send one to you. "Thank you for wanting me to write a FORWARD for your second book on Prayer. This will take time and thought. Forgive me if I don't take care of it right away because I have piles of letters to answer and many other obligations first…” 2 pp, 5” x 7”, ALS, January 3, 1983, on Palmer House Chicago stationary dated September 2, 1957. Excellent condition. “Judi Barr: Thank you so much for the lovely hankie & scarf. You are just too kind & thoughtful, but what a good soul you are! I made a list of gifts I received before I left NYC & Dammit, I forgot to take it with me & I’m furious with myself. I have wracked my brain trying to remember all the gifts and from whom!! One package didn’t have a name or card – 25 cards & a hankie or small scarf in green wrapping paper. Is that from you Bar? Oh, I’m so embarrassed, I could die! Please be honest. I am wondering about you and your Florida adventure. I hope what ever it is, you’re happy above all. I love being in this show & Praise the Lord, it is a hit & so am I!! I thought you’d like seeing the program. God bless you with lots of goodies in 1983. Love Hildegarde.” In very good condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [NAS#131]

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Price: $225

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America's First Transgendered Woman Left the Army, Told Her Story

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: CHRISTINE JORGENSEN (May 30, 1926-May 3, 1989) was the first widely known person to have sex reassignment surgery -- from male to female. Born George William Jorgensen, Jr., Jorgensen grew up in the Bronx and later described himself as having been a "frail, tow-headed, introverted little boy who ran from fistfights and rough-and-tumble games." After being discharged from the Army, Jorgensen attended Mohawk College in Utica, NY, the Progressive School of Photography in New Haven, CT, and Manhattan Medical and Dental Assistant School in New York City. Jorgensen had the surgery in Copenhagen. When she returned, reporters were waiting for her. She made a living telling her story. Autograph card with sentiment "Very best wishes to Causey Christine Jorgensen" Two small cello tape stains on verso. Else very good. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem with anything you purchase from us, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of the Universal Autograph Collectors Club, The Manuscript Society and The Ephemera Society. [NAS#130]

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Price: $85

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Abolitionist Phillips Admits Connection to John Brown Soldier; Evades Discussion

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: WENDELL PHILLIPS (November 29, 1811-February 2, 1884) was one of the most important voices in the abolitionist movement and probably one of the least celebrated. When on Oct. 21, 1835, the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society announced that George Thompson would be speaking, pro-slavery forces posted nearly 500 notices of a $100 reward for anyone who would cause violence to Thompson. Thompson canceled and William Lloyd Garrison decided to speak. A lynch mob formed, forcing Garrison to flee. The mob found him hiding in a carpenter shop, put a noose around his neck to drag him away. Phillips, who was converted to abolitionism by Garrison, witnessed this and stopped practicing law to devote himself to the cause. His oratorical abilities were extraordinary. He believed that racial injustice was the source of all of society’s ills. He denounced the Constitution for tolerating slavery. In 1854, Phillips was indicted for participating in the attempt to rescue Anthony Burns, a captured fugitive slave, from a Boston jail. His partnership with Garrison forged an important relationship that helped to shape the abolitionist movement of the 1840s. RICHARD REALF (June 14, 1832-October 28, 1878) was born in East Sussex, England. During his life, he was a poet, abolitionist and a journalist. After arriving in the United States, he explored the slums of New York City and became a Five Points Missionary. He assisted in establishing cheap lectures and a self-improvement association. He became acquainted with radical abolitionist John Brown, accompanied him to Canada, and was to be secretary of state in the provisional government that Brown projected. When Brown made his attempt at Harpers Ferry in October 1859, Realf was in Texas, where he was arrested and sent to Washington, DC, being in imminent danger of being hanged along the way. He was later released and enlisted in the 88th Illinois Volunteer Infantry Regiment. Some of his best lyrics were written in the field and were widely circulated. After the war, he was commissioned in a colored regiment and in 1866 was mustered out with the rank of Captain and Brevet Lieutenant-Colonel. Realf committed suicide in 1878 due to a bad marriage. Offered is a 2 pp, 5” x 8” ALS in which Phillips acknowledges having known Realf. Oct. 10, 1882, “Dear Sir, I knew Realf but so little & met him only once or twice – that I could not have helped you years ago. With that distance of time, I have literally nothing to tell you & you must excuse me. Yours, Wendell Phillips” Letter is tipped to a larger, blue-lined sheet. Toning, light scuffing in right corner, not affecting writing, minor glue residue. Very fine piece of abolitionist history. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [B102]

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Price: $195

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America's Eighth President Martin Van Buren -- His Free Frank, Image, Framed

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: MARTIN VAN BUREN (1782-1862) served a single term as the eighth president of the United States (1837-1841). His inability to deal with the deep economic depression following the Panic of 1837 and with the surging Whig Party led to his defeat in 1840 to Whig candidate William Henry Harrison. He was blamed for the depression and hostile newspapers called him ?Martin Van Ruin.? Van Buren was a major supporter of Andrew Jackson and ran for and was elected Governor of New York, hoping to boost Jackson?s campaign. He resigned after two months to become Jackson?s Secretary of State. His anti-slavery views resulted in his supporting the Union during the Civil War and Abraham Lincoln?s policies. Nicely gold framed Free Frank with Van Buren?s image and gold lettered description, ready for hanging on the wall. The cover is addressed to Mr. J.H. Giddings of Great Barrington, Massachusetts, with the word Schenectady crossed out below the address, apparently to correct a mistake and to reuse the cover. Two postmarks. Overall frame size approximately 11 x 16. Toning and some ink blotching to one of the postmarks. Still a very nice piece of history. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem with anything you purchase from us, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of the Universal Autograph Collectors Club, The Manuscript Society and The Ephemera Society. [P164]

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Price: $465

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Grant Appointees: Anti-Slavery Whig; Prosecuted Ku Klux Klan -- 5 Letters

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Offering a nice assemblage of five ALSs by two controversial attorney general appointees in President Ulysses S. Grant?s administration: three by Anti-Slavery Whig EBENEZER ROCKWOOD HOAR and two by GEORGE HENRY WILLIAMS, who supported women?s suffrage, prosecuted the Ku Klux Klan and was himself indicted for failing to enforce gambling statues. HOAR (February 21, 1816-January 31, 1895) was appointed U.S. Attorney General in 1869 by President Ulysses S. Grant. Hoar was the first U.S. Attorney General to head the newly created Justice Department. Hoar was earlier elected to the Massachusetts State Senate as an anti-slavery Whig and was a member of the Massachusetts Supreme Court when Grant appointed him. As Grant?s attorney general, he worked with the president and Secretary of State Hamilton Fish over contentious issues, such as settling the Alabama Claims with England and in keeping the United States from recognizing Cuban belligerency during the Ten Years? War. Hoar also assisted Grant in appointing two Supreme Court justices that helped overturn a decision outlawing paper money as legal tender. His refusal to distribute federal patronage jobs resulted in senators? refusal to confirm his nomination by Grant to the Supreme Court. Offering three ALSs by Hoar, the first relating to court affairs in Massachusetts, possibly when he was on the state Supreme Court and the remaining two to autograph collectors, proving that Hoar carried a degree of notoriety. One-page, 8? x 10?, n.p., n.d, but very possibly written when Hoar was on the Massachusetts Supreme Court. ?My dear Chief Justice, ?The enclosed tells its own sad story. What can we do for this poor fellow? ?I would very cheerfully go to Dedham [MA] for him next week ? if he could go to Lawrence any better. ?Or could not you adjourn the Municipal Court on Monday night to Wednesday morning ? go out to Dedham on Tuesday & call the docket, impanel the jurors & adjourn the court there to the next Monday? ?I?ll do anything I can if you will suggest anything more? ?E.R. Hoar? 1 ? pp, 5? x 8?, Concord [MA], May 10, 1875, to Phineas Bates, Jr. ?I have to apologize for not sooner answering your letter of the 17th which I have not seen until today. It came in the hurry of our Centennial Celebration and was laid aside by some of my family and with some other things? ?I have not been in the habit of preserving letters except such as I wish to keep for reasons of business or friendship and cannot therefore undertake to supply you with any for your collection. I have had many similar applications. ?Very truly yours, ?E.R. Hoar. ?Mr. Phineas Bates Jr. ?I return your postage stamps.? One-page, 6 ?? x 4?, Concord, Feb. 19, 1892, to Charles E. Ruthe. ?I do not think that autographs made for the purpose are of any great account, but will not refuse your civil request. ?Ebenezer R. Hoar? Each letter contains folds, but overall in excellent condition. Nice collection of letters from a prominent, although controversial, member of Grant?s cabinet. WILLIAMS (March 26, 1823-April 4, 1910) was appointed by President Ulysses S. Grant to be the 32nd Attorney General of the United States. He also served one term as U.S. Senator, authored and supported legislation that allowed the U.S. Military to be deployed in Reconstruction. As attorney general, Williams continued prosecutions of the Ku Klux Klan. Grant also nominated Williams to serve on the Supreme Court, but the Senate refused to confirm him. Williams resigned in 1875 under the controversy that his wife allegedly took a bribe from the custom house firm Pratt & Boyd to drop litigation by the Justice Department. Williams later returned to Oregon and served two terms as Portland?s mayor. He was a supporter of women?s suffrage and advocated that marriage and divorce proceedings should be handled by the civil courts rather than the church. At 83, he was indicted but acquitted for failing to enforce gambling statutes. He continued to serve the rest of his term. We?re offering two ALSs, one as Senator and the other in response to an inquiry about the date of his appointment by Grant. An original news clipping bearing Williams? image is included. The first ? 2 pp, 5? x 8?, Washington, DC, December 22, 1869, on United States Senate Chamber letterhead, to author, journalist George Alfred Townsend. TOWNSEND columns appeared in many city newspapers. His coverage of President Lincoln?s assassination brought him tremendous recognition and was used, in part, in the Life, Crime and Capture of John Wilkes Booth. In part, ??Allow me to make my acknowledgement of the too flattering notice of what upon the announcement of Mr. Fessenden?s [of Maine] death in the Senate.? Grateful for the fine article, Williams says it ?betrays the hand of a friend than a critic. ?Yours very truly, ?Geo H. Williams? Second letter is one page, 5? x 8?, Washington, DC, Jan. 18th, 1879, to George Johnson of New York answering a question. ?I have to say in answer to your letter of the 7th that I was appointed Attorney General in December AD 1871. ?Yours very truly, ?Geo H. Williams? Both letters have residue on verso from having once been attached to another sheet, toning and some light foxing. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem with anything you purchase from us, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of the Universal Autograph Collectors Club, The Manuscript Society and The Ephemera Society. [P109]

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Price: $125

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Andrew Johnson, Matted and Framed, Impeachment Ticket with Autograph, Image

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: ANDREW JOHNSON (December 29, 1808-July 31, 1875) was the 17th President of the United States from 1865 to 1869. He was the first vice president to ascend to the presidency due to a president?s assassination ? Lincoln. He was also the first president to be impeached, though acquitted by one Senate vote. Johnson?s plans didn?t protect former slaves and he came into conflict with the Republican-dominated Congress, which resulted in his impeachment. Johnson was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives in 1843, where he served five two-year terms. He became Governor of Tennessee for four years and was elected by the legislature to the U.S. Senate in 1857. As Southern states seceded from the Union, he remained firmly in support of the union. He was the only sitting senator from a Confederate state who did not resign when the Civil War began. left his Senate seat in 1862. By 1864, be became the logical choice to be Lincoln?s running mate. Six weeks after Lincoln?s re-election, Johnson ascended to the presidency after the President was assassinated. Fine assemblage of a U.S. Senate Impeachment of the President Ticket, May 18, 1868, along with a very fine Johnson autograph and image, matted and placed in a gold frame. Frame size 11 ? x 12 ? . Light toning to the signature. Some toning to the mat. Back sheet to the frame has been torn. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P153]

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Price: $450

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Artist Dean Young Celebrates Al Jolson on First Day Cover, Image of Dagwood, Autograph

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: DEAN YOUNG (b.1938) is the head writer of the popular comic strip Blondie, which he inherited from his father Chic Young, who died in 1973. Since that time he has produced the comic with a team including credited artists Jim Raymond from 1973 until 1981, Mike Gersher from 1981 until about 1984, Stan Drake from 1984 until 1997 and Denis Lebrun from 1997 until 2005. The current Blondie head artist is John Marshall. Very nice signed & inscribed 1977 FDC honoring Al Jolson and 50th Anniversary of Talking Pictures with a hand drawing in ink of Dagwood Bumstead on this cover. Very good condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [NAS#120]

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Price: $85

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American Realist Painter James Browning Wyeth: Postal FDC, Christmas Card

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: JAMES BROWNING WYETH (born July 6, 1946) is a contemporary American realist painter. He is the youngest member of the Brandywine School, which includes his grandfather N. C. Wyeth and father Andrew Wyeth. He opened his first one-man show in New York City at the age of twenty. Very fine FDC on the inside of a Christmas card autographed. Two beautiful Christmas 8-Cent Christmas Stamps, very clean Washington, DC, postmark, November 10, 1971, inscribed and autographed. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [NAS#118]

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Price: $95

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Federalist, Presidential Elector, Supreme Court Justice Sells Church Pew in 1815

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: CALEB ELLIS (1767-1816) was born in Walpole, MA, and graduated from Harvard University in 1793, studied law and was admitted to the bar. He later moved to Newport, NH, and then to Claremont, NH. Ellis was elected as a Federalist to the 9th Congress (1805-1807). He was later elected to the New Hampshire Senate (1811) and was appointed a judge of that state's Supreme Court (1813), an office he held until his death. He was a presidential elector on the Clinton ? Ingersoll ticket in 1812. One-page, 6 1/2" x 7 3/4" Autograph Document Signed by Ellis selling his church pew to Abel Wheeler. "Know all men by these presents that I, Caleb Ellis of Claremont, Esq., in consideration of $39 paid to me by Abel Wheeler...the receipt whereof is hereby acknowledged, have sold...to the said Wheeler that certain pew on the West Side of the broad aisle in the new part of the old meeting house in said Claremont, of which I am the original proprietor... "In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal the 21st day of Nov. Anno Domini 1815." The document is signed twice by Ellis, once internally and at the conclusion. Two witnesses have signed. Small wafer seal is intact. Nice docketing on verso, including what appears to be docketing placed much later in pencil. Folds, toning and light soiling mostly on the verso. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM135]

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Price: $135

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Renowned Watergate Hero Cox Questions Nation's Lack of Ethics

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: The Watergate scandal involving countless illegal activities conducted by the Nixon administration caused the largest constitutional crisis in American history. The scandal began to unravel and continued to grow in the early morning of June 17, 1972, when police arrested five men led by James McCord Jr., who had broken into the Democratic Party's national headquarters at the Watergate office and apartment complex in Washington, D.C. The men had cameras and electronic bugging devices. A connection was discovered to the Republican Committee to Re-elect the President (CREEP). The burglars were found with documents that implicated White House consultant E. Howard Hunt and CREEP aide G. Gordon Liddy. Presidential Counsel John Dean, who testified at the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Presidential Campaign Activities, headed by North Carolina's Democratic Senator Sam J. Ervin, Jr., named names including Richard Nixon as having approved the burglary. Alexander P. Butterfield, a secret service agent, revealed in testimony that presidential conversations at the White House had been tape recorded since 1971. Special Prosecutor ARCHIBALD COX (1912-2004) sought the tapes as evidence and Nixon "stonewalled." Nixon also refused to comply with Judge John Sirica's order to release them. Cox sued to get the tapes and Nixon fired him on Oct. 20, 1973, in what became known as the "Saturday Night Massacre." The firing of Cox sparked fury throughout the country and is often credited as being the precipitating factor that led the House Judiciary Committee to vote articles of impeachment, which led to Nixon's resignation. Offering a typed quote signed by Cox, no date or place: "I confess that I cannot understand how we can plot, lie, cheat and commit murder abroad and remain humane, honorable, trustworthy and trusted at home." Excellent condition and an incredible piece of history signed by one of the 20th centuries most important players in the struggle to uphold the strongest ethics of government and elected officials. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P#167]

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Price: $75

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Wool Tariff, America's First Protectionist Legislation; Chester Arthur's Lobbyist Reports

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: When the Civil War closed, the U.S. was faced with having to pay down its indebtedness. Some favored continuing taxation at the war time level. A conservative view prevailed as it was realized that continuing war time taxation would hamper economic development. The demand for woolen goods had diminished after the disbandment of the army. Further price depression occurred when the government sold great quantities of garments accumulated during the war but were no longer needed. In January 1866, wool trade associations struck a bargain. The manufacturers wrote a tariff schedule that increased duties on imported wool and gave compensatory duties to manufacturers to offset the extra cost on imported wool. Chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee Justin Morrill of Vermont included the associations verbatim in the general tariff bill of 1866. Although the bill died in the Senate, its wool and woolens schedule survived as a separate bill, passed both chambers, was signed into law by a reluctant President Andrew Johnson, becoming the first protectionist legislation to reach the statute books after the Civil War. JOHN L. HAYES was secretary of The National Association of Wool Manufacturers and highly instrumental in helping to forge the schedule. He spent a good deal of time monitoring the tariff and lobbying congress for this important legislation. Hayes was a prolific writer whose published works include "The Knit-Goods Industry and The Tariff," published in 1881, in which he discusses at length the wool and woolen goods tariff and his involvement as the chief negotiator in this success story. Hayes was extremely well known and respected and was appointed by President Chester Arthur to study the tariff issue. Research is included. Offered is a ALS by Hayes, reporting on his progress of his lobbying congressional lobbying efforts six months before the law was passed when the situation seemed dismal. 7 x 10, 2 pp, June 17th, 1866, Hayes reports to Walter Hastings, Esq. of Boston. Hayes writes from The Ebbitt House, a boarding house, where many of Who's Who in America stayed or frequented and where he was staying while working on the tariff. "I have no definitive progress on our cause to report. The Committee of Ways & Means are still engaged upon iron and our matter has not been regularly taken up. Mr. Rumsbury & myself have occupied ourselves in working with individual members of the Committee. We have as yet received no definite assurance from Mr. Morrill [Congressman Justin Morrill, head of the Ways and Means Committee, who was instrumental in the passage of tariff legislation.] and we fear him more than any other person as we suspect that he is desirous of showing to wool farmers that he has reduced the demands of the manufacturers. We shall have more definite information tomorrow. Mr. Colwell is of the opinion that we shall secure our bill mainly as proposed. The utmost reduction that I fear is five or ten cents on our specific duty as Mr. Morrill admits that the duties on manufacturers must be measured with the duties on wool, although at present he objects to the two items 2 cents for drys & drystuffs and the charges $4.85 cents. If these should be struck off, the specific duty would be reduced to 46 cents. We have insisted and shall insist upon the bill as matured by the Executive Committee. I shall send to you by Mr. Rose a draft upon you for one hundred dollars which my wife requires. I trust that you will find it convenient to pay it. I should be glad to hear from you. Yours truly John L. Hayes" Folds and light toning, but overall excellent. Very fine post-Civil War tariff Americana. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P#166]

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Price: $55

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Ulysses S. Grant Led the Union Army to Victory -- His Bold Autograph, Image

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: ULYSSES S. GRANT (April 27, 1822-July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States. Grant worked closely with President Abraham Lincoln to lead the Union Army to victory during the Civil War. Grant was elected twice to the presidency and was noted for implementing Reconstruction, following the Civil War, often at odds with Lincoln?s successor, Andrew Johnson. His presidency was often criticized for tolerating corruption and leading the nation into a severe economic depression during his second term. Offering a very nice bold clip autograph with a color tinted large image. Ready for framing. Light toning, minor foxing specs. Overall excellent. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P#131]

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Price: $595

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America's First Catholic Presidential Candidate, Alfred Smith, Letters, Photograph

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: ALFRED EMANUEL SMITH (December 30, 1873-October 4, 1944) was elected Governor of New York four times and was the Democratic U.S. Presidential Candidate in 1928, the first Catholic ever to run for the highest office in the land. His candidacy brought out women to vote, who had only recently received the right to vote, and the anti-Catholic vote. Smith was anti-prohibition. Many protestants feared his candidacy believing that the Catholic Church and the Pope would dictate his policies. Smith lost in a landslide to Republican Herbert Hoover. He sought the nomination four years later but was defeated by Franklin D. Roosevelt. Smith then entered business in New York City and became a vocal opponent of Roosevelt?s New Deal. Offering a three-piece lot ? two TLSs by Smith to Henry F. Wilson, Jr., of New York City, one regarding the distribution of an estate and the other thanking Wilson for sharing the reprint of an article. The third item is a photograph of Smith, Calvin Coolidge and Wilson, signed by Wilson and Smith. Three Smith autographs. Letters have folds, toning, but are in overall excellent condition. Signatures on the photograph are in black ink but have been overwritten with white ink. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P#165]

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Price: $245

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Anti-Slavery Proviso Threat Led Roosevelt Lawyer to Take Defensive Action to Protect's Family Resources

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Franklin Delano Roosevelt?s great-grandfather, JAMES ROOSEVELT, founded the Bank of New York in 1784 and was its president from 1786 to 1791. He also built the first American sugar refinery in New York City in the 1740s. James Roosevelt had just died when David V.N. Radcliff of Albany, NY, wrote this 1 ? pp, 7 ?? x 9 ??, ALS to John M. Knox, Counsellor at Law, Aug. 25, 1847, regarding stock held by Roosevelt and Radcliff?s desire to have it sold. The letter was written during the Mexican-American War, which resulted from the1845 U.S. annexation of Texas. Mexico considered Texas part of its territory. The proposed Wilmot Proviso would have banned slavery in any state that the U.S. had acquired from Mexico. The Proviso, supported by anti-slavery congressmen, failed to pass. But the threat of it and the political discord around banking at the time took a toll on banking stocks. Radcliff?s desire appears to be to protect Mrs. Roosevelt from a potential financial loss. He writes, in part, ?I recd yours yesterday & impressed to learn you had not received the interest or what is equivalent the regular dividend upon the Bank stock pledged as security declared & payable on the first instant ? The stock stands in the name of Mr. James Roosevelt and the acting Executor or probably yourself have only to draw your check for the amount of the dividend $120 as Mr. Roosevelt did in his life time. ??I directed a friend of mine to sell the stock the first opportunity at par & interest from the time of dividend?having been on a long journey to the west with Mrs. R?I prefer to sell the stock instead of making a loan or calling in other investments?I cannot but think Mrs. Roosevelt and some of the legatees would prefer such an investment for its safety, convenience and profit to any other particularly in preference to U.S. stock which pays less [but] with the threatening trouble of Mexican annexation and Wilmot proviso and other causes may prove worthless?? Integral address leaf with nice New York Postmark, hand stamp paid and postage. Folds and small seal tear affecting nothing. In very fine condition. Superb period example of action being taken to protect the wealth and resources of one of America?s premiere families. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P#147]

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Price: $165

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Ringling Bros., Barnum & Bailey's Director Provides Superb Details of Circus Performance

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Ringling Bros, Barnum & Bailey?s Director Provides Superb Details of Performance 3pp, 8" x 11", Dec. 18, 1940, on The Zepher's letterhead, Lexington, KY, vaudeville performer W. SHELBY JAXON writes a wonderfully detailed letter to his friend Bill Warner, who was the technical director of Ringling Bros and Barnum & Bailey Combined Shows, Inc. Stationary contains detailed listings of acts, including triple horizontal bar act, trampoline table acrobatic act, fairs, vaudeville, clubs, much more. Some grammar and punctuation corrected. "I just received your letter. Sorry you are having a tough time getting the Boys up to practice. I also am having trouble finding some way to practice the Bars. The colleges are Basket Ball Crazy now and I can't practice nights and I have no one to practice in the daytime with me. "I just worked a one nighter. I used Big Blakeman as my partner. We were a little slow and stalled a bit but we went over 100% and got encores. So we didn't feel so bad. "The warehouses have closed until Jan. 2nd and the Barrel Hog Factory has moved out of town. So, I won't get any work around here. If I had a Bar Act in shape ready to go, I could go to work tomorrow night for 4 straight weeks in clubs and then get a unit show. Blakeman wants to quit his job and go with me. But he needs two months straight practice before he would be presentable. He doesn't realize that I had a top and speedy act when I worked these spots before and that is what they expect me to give them now and I can't do it with him the shape he is in. So I am just letting it go. I have the triple ground bars all set and painted up and ready to go. They really look fine on a stage. I painted the bar tiles gold and shined the uprights and they are the cleanest, neat appear stage bars I have ever seen when set on a stage with lights on them. "I got a letter from a fellow in Chicago who just finished building a rigging that folds and has two bars. He wants me to work with him and furnish the car and split fifty-fifty. But he says he rigging folds down instead of together. I am not taking any chances as I have no way he has a practical rigging. He wants me to come to Chicago and practice a week and go to work but that costs money when you consider you have to buy a wardrobe and get photos made. So, I turned it down not knowing him either. Jake Crumley told him about me. "I have a job coming up in four or five weeks which will last about 5 to 7 weeks at pretty fair money. I have got to go out of town to see about it next week. It is for Voise on serial bars. [This is likely Harold Voise, an aerialists and a member of the Flying Harolds. Voise and his wife Eileen traveled with Sells-Floto, Ringling-Barnum, Cole Bros., Polack Bros. and Shrine Circuses.] Did you ever hear from Walter Guice." [Guice had his own circus troupe.] "I am rebuilding my car?s generator and fooling around with my car in general as I just had a fellow pay me $25.00 he has owned me for over two years, that wasn't hard to take. "Bill, I think I had better stick around and try to pick up something around here until February and then I can go to work for Voise for a few weeks and from there it will be easy going. Let me hear from you and don?t worry too much about the bar practice or the folding rigging, take it easy. I'll probably be able to send you some money to start on the folding rigging when I go to work for Voise. As Ever, W. Shelby Jaxon." Folds, toning but overall in excellent condition and a great piece of Americana. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM 159]

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Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada -- Valentine Troop's 1841-1846 General Store Account Book

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Annapolis County, Nova Scotia, Canada, Valentine Troop?s 1841-1846 General Store Account Book Folio format register, laid paper watermarked W. Warren, 1839, ruled throughout, hundreds of pages all filled, recording purchases of eggs, fruit, cheese, socks, brandy, tobacco, potatoes, sugar, salt, tallow and other general store items, together with names, dates and amounts. Bound in contemporary half leather with some damage to the binding and staining to contents. Internal evidence that his book belonged to Valentine Troop (1822-1881) of Annapolis County, Nova Scotia. The people listed seem to belong to the same county. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [B 102]

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Price: $495

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Revolutionary War-Date Pay Order Signed by Samuel Wyllys for James Hillhouse, Who Alongside Aaron Burr

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Revolutionary War-Date Pay Order Signed by Wyllys for James Hillhouse, Fought with Aaron Burr SAMUEL WYLLYS was a politician and served in the Revolutionary War. In 1775, he was appointed Lieutenant-Colonel in the 2nd CT, and on July 1 was promoted to Colonel. Wyllys served in the Siege of Boston until the British evacuated and then marched with George Washington to New York. He saw action in the Battle of Long Island and served in the New York. From 1777-1781, Col. Wyllys commanded the 3rd CT Regiment. He was later appointed Major General of the Connecticut Militia. After his war service, he served as a representative in the Connecticut General Assembly and as Secretary of State in Connecticut. SAMUEL LYMAN, born in Goshen, CT in 1749, served in the Massachusetts House of Representatives, the State Senate and the United States Congress. ELEAZER WALES, a Yale graduate and Presbyterian Minister, was a Justice of the Peace in Hartford, CT. JAMES HILLHOUSE was an American lawyer, real estate developer and a politician from New Haven, CT. He represented Connecticut in both the U.S. House and Senate. During the Revolutionary War, he served as captain of the Second Company of the Governor?s Foot Guard. He commanded troops alongside Aaron Burr during the successful British invasion of New Haven on July 5, 1779. Offering a beautifully executed manuscript pay order instructing John Lawrence, Treasurer to ?Pay James Hillhouse, Esq. Eighteen Pounds Connecticut Currency and charge the State. Pay Table Office, Jan. 22, 1781.? Signed by Lyman, Wales and Lawrence. Folds, toning, but in excellent condition with nice docketing on verso. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [RW 104]

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Price: $185

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Brilliant Physicist, John Tyndall, Discovered Greenhouse Gas, Importance of Ozone

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: JOHN TYNDALL (August 20, 1820-December 4, 1893) was a prominent 19th century physicist. His initial scientific fame arose from the study of diamagnetism and later in the realms of infrared radiation and the physical properties of air. He published more than a dozen science books, bringing 19th century experimental physics to a wide audience. From 1853 to 1887, he was professor of physics at the Royal Institution of Great Britain in London. In May 1859, six months before the publication of On the Origin of Species, Tyndall proved that some gases have a remarkable capacity to hang onto heat, demonstrating the physical basis of the ?Greenhouse Effect.? Tyndall is also the founder of the science of light scattering or nephelometry. His instruments are the basis of many instruments such as fluorimeters, turbimeters and ultra-violent spectrometers. His major research work was in the transmission and absorption of gases and liquids. He is also credited with the first ever atmospheric pollution measurements using infrared and scattering measurement instruments to monitor the London atmosphere. He showed that ozone, the upper layer of atmosphere so vital to life on Earth was an oxygen cluster rather than a hydrogen compound. Tyndall was the inventor of the fireman?s respirator and made other less well known inventions including better foghorns. One of the most important inventions to which he contributed, the light pipe, has led to the development of fiberoptics which are playing an increasing role in telecommunications, electronics and medicine. In his highly intellectual article, ?Miracles & Special Providences,? published in 1867 and the subject of this offering, Tyndall went to great lengths to denounce miracles. One page, 4 ?? x 6 ?? to an unknown correspondent, 31st May (no year, but circa 1867), with embossed seal of Royal Institution. ?Sir, ?Please send me twelve copies of the Review containing my article ?Miracles & Special Providences.? ?John Tyndall? Folds, light toning. Recipient has placed a checkmark above the word ?Sir,? and there is some ink offset from another document at the bottom left, affecting nothing. Comes with a fine steel engraving. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [NAS 109]

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Price: $195

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Victorian Sheffield Cake Basket, Extraordinary Design

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Spectacularly designed antique Sheffield cake basket with ornate handle, 13 ?? diameter, heavy border with birds inside oval cut outs, 8 birds and 8 floral sprays. Modest, expected wear. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [ANT 102]

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Price: $995

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Matthew Boulton 3-Light Sheffield Silver Plate Candelabra, C. 1790-1810

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Pair of Matthew Boulton 3-light Sheffield plate candelabra, c. 1790-1810, 17? high, 14? center, 17? wide. Small cadroon edge on base and bobeche. Exceptionally elegant design by this master silversmith. [ANT 101]

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Price: $4,200

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Elegant, Simplistic Colorless Glass Decanter

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Elegant colorless glass decanter, approximately 11? tall, measuring about 5 ?? from side to side. Simplistic in design, the glass has a zipper like design at the bottom. [ANT 100]

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Price: $175

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Civil War Col. Broadwell Transports Seized Cattle; Confederacy Short of Food

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: COLONEL W.A. BROADWELL is listed as a major and a brigadier quartermaster in the Provisional Confederate Army. He was also their Adjutant. There is another listing for him as Lieutenant Colonel of the Cotton Bureau of the Trans-Mississippi Department, Confederate Field and Staff. The Confederacy found that cotton was as good as gold in securing loans from foreign countries for the war. Broadwell is also listed as being on the staff of General E. Kirby Smith. In an August 1865 memo from Maj. Gen. P.H. Sheridan to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, William A. Broadwell is listed as one of many Confederates who fled to Mexico through Texas. (Research on the memo is included.) One page, 8? x 10,? Jackson, Miss., 25th Sept. 1862, Broadwell writes to General Ruggles, interesting letter about moving cattle at a high cost, possibly indicating that the Confederacy was already short of food. ?Gen?l ?In conformity with your instructions, I am sending to Virginia the beeves?seized by the Provost Marshall of Natchez under the control of Mr. Crothers, the person appointed by Mr. A.K. Farnum to bring them here. He will require some $25,000 to pay expenses, which, with your approval, I would like to have disbursed through the agency of Mr. Harrison, if in accordance with your views & convenience to detail him for this purpose. Mr. Harrison I know to be honest & reliable. Mr. Crothers, I doubt not, is perfectly so, but he is a stranger to me. ?For the sake of such authority as it may be necessary to exercise, I beg leave to suggest the propriety of confirming upon Harrison the rank of Lieutenant. ?Respectfully, ?W.A. Broadwell ?Major ?To Genl. Ruggles ?Comdg.? Folds and small mounting traces on verso along with docketing, but overall in excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society.[CW135]

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Price: $165

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Preserved Fish, William Bayard Jr. -- Friend of Alexander Hamilton -- Enter Shipping Agreement

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: PRESERVED FISH (1766-1846), a prominent New York City shipping merchant in the early 1800s, served as president of the Bank of America. Born in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, he shipped on a whaler, becoming its captain at 21. He founded and controlled the potent shipping firm of Fish & Grinnell and was also one of 28 brokers of the New York Stock Exchange Board, which later became the New York Stock Exchange. Fish was involved in Tammany Hall. His faction controlled the Democratic Party in New York City. When the shipping blockade was lifted after the War of 1812, Fish & Grinnell became the foremost shipping firm of New York. WILLIAM BAYARD JR. (1761-1826) was a prominent New York City banker and a member of the Society of the New York Hospital. He was also a close friend of Alexander Hamilton, who was taken to his Greenwich Village home after his duel with Aaron Burr. He died there. Bayard founded LeRoy, Bayard & McEvers with Herman LeRoy and James McEvers. Bayard was director of the Bank of America, president of the Bank for Savings and governor of the New York Hospital. He was also trustee of the Sailors? Snug Harbor. In 1824, he was chairman of the committee that received General Lafayette. Offering an August 3rd, 1815, entirely manuscript shipping agreement between Fish & Grinnell and the ship Cumberland of 335 tons and Leroy Bayard and McEvers, dated August 3rd, 1815, to proceed to Turks Island and return with a full load of salt for which they will be paid thirty cents a bushel. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM156]

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Price: $125

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Renowned New England Painter Norman Rockwell Sends Photograph Postcard with Inscription

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: NORMAN ROCKWELL (February 3, 1894 ? November 8, 1978) was a 20th-century American painter and illustrator. Rockwell is most famous for the cover illustrations of everyday life scenarios he created for The Saturday Evening Post magazine for more than four decades. His drawings of homespun America sum up decades of small town life ? the Old Swimming Hole, Thanksgiving Dinner, Boy Scouts doing good deeds, and Freedom of Worship. Very fine autographed postcard photo signed, circa 1975: a black and white photo of Rockwell drawing in his studio. Inscribed in blue ink: ?My best wishes to Terry Tobin, Sincerely, Norman Rockwell.? Excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [NAS110]

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Price: $165

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Inscribed Photograph of Segregationist GA Gov. George Wallace, ALS by Racial Theorist

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Two-piece lot includes a very fine inscribed photograph of segregationist Governor George Wallace and an ALS by W.Z. Ripley, whose work was taken up by white supremacists. GEORGE CORLEY WALLACE (August 25, 1919--September 13, 1998) was an American politician and the 45th governor of Alabama, having served four nonconsecutive terms: 1963-1967, 1971-1979 and 1983-1987. He had four failed runs for the U.S. Presidency. A 1972 assassination attempt left Wallace paralyzed, and he used a wheelchair for the remainder of his life. He is remembered for his Southern populist and segregationist attitudes during the desegregation period, convictions that he renounced later in life. Wallace said that he did not wish to meet his Maker with unforgiven sin. He will always be remembered for his 1963 inaugural speech in which he proclaimed "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever." In a vain attempt to halt desegregation by the enrollment of black students Vivian Malone and James Hood, he stood in front of Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963. This became known as the "Stand in the Schoolhouse Door". After being confronted by federal marshals, Deputy Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach, and the Alabama Army National Guard, he stepped aside. Very fine 8" x 10" head-and-shoulders portrait inscribed "To Terry Tobin Best Wishes George C. Wallace." In excellent condition. WILLIAM ZEBINA RIPLEY (October 13, 1867 ? August 16, 1941) was born in Medford, MA. He was an American economist and racial theorist who is today mostly famous for his tripartite racial theory of Europe. His work was later taken up by white supremacists and eugenicists. In his time, he was also quite famous for his criticisms of American railroad economics and American business practices in the 1920s and 1930s. He received his undergraduate degree in engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1890 and his master's and doctorate from Columbia University in 1892 and 1893. He was married to Ida S. Davis. In addition to lecturing at Columbia on sociology, he was a professor of economics at MIT and later became a professor of political economics at Harvard University. In 1899, he wrote The Races of Europe: A Sociological Study. Ripley believed that race was the central engine to understanding human history. He wrote: "Race, properly speaking, is responsible only for those peculiarities, mental or bodily, which are transmitted with constancy along the lines of direct physical descent from father to son. Many mental traits, aptitudes, or proclivities, on the other hand, which reappear persistently in successive populations may be derived from an entirely different source. They may have descended collaterally, along the lines of purely mental suggestion by virtue of mere social contact with preceding generations." His book became very well respected, renowned for its careful writing and criticism of data of many other anthropologists in Europe and the United States. His economic criticisms in 1926 received wide attention, including a full-page spread in the New York Times. He became just as famous for his work on railroad economics. He worked under Theodore Roosevelt on the United States Industrial Commission in 1900, helping to negotiate relations between railway companies and anthracite coal companies. From 1917 to 1918, he served as Administrator of Labor Standards for the U.S. Department of War, and helped to settle railway strikes. Ripley became a major critic of American corporate practices, beginning with a series of articles in the Atlantic Monthly in 1925. He received a full-page profile in the New York Times with the headline, "When Ripley Speaks, Wall Street Heeds". He suffered a nervous breakdown in 1927 following an automobile accident. One article implied that the accident was part of a conspiracy. He returned to teaching in 1929. In the early 1930s, he continued to issue criticisms of the railroad industry labor practices. In 1932, he appeared at the Senate Banking and Currency Committee, demanding a public inquiry into the financial affairs of corporations. ALS, 2 pp, on Harvard Club (New York) 27 West 44th Street stationary, "Tuesday." Excellent condition, approximately 4 ? x 7?, he writes about construction repairs to his home. "Dear Fred When it comes to finishing off the wood work, take on Hedbund of West Newton (Massachusetts), if you can, will you? He did well before and needs work, so should do it as cheaply as anyone. Will you (as extra) set a storm door on the conservatory to left off hinges easily and to shut toward the house? The frame is built for it. It should match the inside outside door of course. "Will the face of the window seat, which is satinwood, stand? The top of seat won't show. Better rebuild the face of pine to match, I think. The hot water pipes on right of chimney should be set closer if possible to make room for wood box. Walworth English Flett Co. do all such work for me." Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [BL107]

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Price: $95

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MA Legislator to Zachary Taylor Appointee: Strawbridge v Curtiss Supreme Court Case

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: WILLIAM SULLIVAN (1774-1839), American statesman, Massachusetts legislator and Brigadier General of the State Militia, was the author of "Familiar Letters on Public Characters and Public Events," in 1834 which was reprinted in 1847 as "The Public Men of the Revolution." WILLIAM MORRIS MEREDITH (June 8, 1799 -- August 17, 1873) was a lawyer, politician and the 19th Secretary of the Treasury, appointed by President Zachary Taylor in 1849 who wanted a Pennsylvania Whig for his cabinet. Meredith strongly opposed free trade legislation, passed the year before under his predecessor. He felt there was no need to protect the American workman who was subject to competition from poorly paid European labor. 3 pp, 8" x 9 3/4", Boston, Oct. 4, 1820, ALS, Sullivan writes to Meredith, regarding a legal matter and addressing a case he brought before the U.S. Supreme Court (Strawbridge v Curtiss), which resulted in the court holding that if there are two or more joint plaintiffs or defendants in case, each plaintiff must be capable of suing each plaintiff in the courts to sustain jurisdiction of the case. In part, "I sent two affidavits referring it to your discretion to determine which to use -- also exemplification of will -- and Strawbridge?s power of attorney. I cannot tell when I was in Phild' but I am sure and declare that I was not in Pennsylvania at any time in the year 1798 nor in 1799 -- nor before the first day of June 1800. I think I went to Phild' sometime in the summer of 1800 and was there three days. I went on a very pressing errand, in no manner connected with anything relating to Wm Williamson or his estate or affairs. I remember it was very hot and I well remember (excuse me) that I remarked that night brought with it, no refreshing coolness...I was not on that occasion absent from Boston 14 days in the while & travelling was not performed as expeditiously...I have not been in Philadelphia at any time since Williamson died...I think I saw Strawbridge in the summer of 1800 in Phild. one evening if I ever saw him in my life of which I am by no means certain. But sure I am he never spoke to me of his suit and how strange it is, that I should appear on the docket as Defendant when Strawbridge will know that Williamson's will was not proved here that he alone provide it in Phild. that I had no property of Williamson & never had any property of his...I am entirely ignorant why my name was used in the action...He was not a very clear headed man...but a very honest man... The power of attorney was principally designed to enable me to sue one Zebina Curtis in Strawbridge's name. I did so and the case went to the Supreme Court in Washington and is reported as Strawbridge v Curtiss..." More Expected toning and soiling, folds, vertical split between pages, affecting nothing. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM155]

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Price: $95

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Civil War 6th Regt., CT Infantry, Deserter Requests Soldier's Order Given to Wife

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: The 6th Regiment, Connecticut Infantry, was organized at New Haven on September 12, 1861. Its service included Sherman?s Expedition to Port Royal, SC, including the capture of Forts Walker and Beauregard, reconnaissance on Hilton Head Island, bombardment and capture of Fort Pulaski, Battle of Secessionville, evacuation of James Island, occupation of Folly Island, SC, attack on Morris Island, assault on Fort Wagner, operations against Fort Darling, Battle of Drewry?s Bluff, Battle of Strawberry Plains, assault and capture of Fort Fisher, capture of Wilmington. CHARLES C. NORRIS enlisted on September 12, 1863, as a Private. Research shows that he deserted on November 9, 1864. Offered is a note, in another hand, but signed by him on October 17th 1863 instructing the selectmen of Norwalk [CT] to ?draw my soldier?s order and deliver it to my wife and her receipt shall be good for me.? Research included. Folds, some brushing to his signature. Else fine. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [CW160]

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Price: $45

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Early Indiana Settler, Man Charged by Minister for Choking Wife, Woman Writes of 1892 Parade -- Red, White, Blue

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Eclectic mix of nine documents and letters, including a manuscript 1831 marriage certificate signed by WILLIAM CRENSHAW, one of the earliest settlers of Browstown Township, Jackson County, Indiana, affirming the marriage of Emanuel Mahes and Sarah Parker, an 1806 Baptismal prayer signed by Edge Williams, an 1846 charge, written by Pastor A.P. Sanborn, charging parishioner Samuel Lock of Hollis for spousal abuse for the ?unchristian conduct? of choking his wife and pulling her hair and a nice grouping of documents that include a letter encouraging a female Congregational missionary in her work and an 1892 letter describing a parade that may have been in celebration of the presidential election. Our writer, Helen, writes to her brother Paul, on Oct. 1, 1892, ??Jennie is going over to a friend to see a parade, one of the largest during this campaign. Columbus Day, I saw the great parade from our roof?There were 40 bands, 12 drums corps and three floats. 1st represented the landing of Columbus, 2nd Queen and King of Spain with their royal attendance?There was a load of children all dressed in red, white & blue? Congregational Minister A. Hall of Connecticut writes a 2 pp letter on March 29, 1887, in part ??I see no reason why you could not be useful as a missionary?I don?t see why the door of usefulness is not open to you as widely & as properly as to any other person. As to age?you ought to have 30 or 40 years of vigor before you now. The proper thing is to apply & the committees at Boston ought to be abundantly able to decide wisely?We have a good church & plenty of heathen all around it & no excuse for idleness?? Also included are a couple of letterheads one of which was used on the verso, on May 16, 1860 for an inventory of church statues. The grouping has expected wear, occasional small paper loss, folds and toning but overall very good and readable. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM 154]

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Price: $95

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Wiscasset, Maine Garrison Orders Tools in 1815; Six New EnglandLetters, Documents

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: THE WAR OF 1812 is regarded as the one that made Mainea state. Boston provided littleresistance to the British, which incensed Mainers, who declared theirindependence from Massachusetts. Theyfelt that Massachusetts did not have Maine’s interests at heart and ultimatelybecame a state, splitting from Massachusetts. Offering an assemblage of six unrelatedbut interesting New England documents, the most significant of which is arequisition for blacksmith tools for the Wiscassett Garrison in Maine, datedSeptember 22, 1815. One-page, 7 ¼ x 8 ½, requisition forblacksmith tools for the Wiscassett Garrison, dated September, 22nd,1815, just seven months after the War of 1812 ended. List includes hammers, anvil, files, tongs,requested by Lieut. Thomas V. Earle. Expected toning. This document, marked“duplicates,” appears to have been trimmed at the bottom from a largerdocument, though it appears to be complete. Second item is an ALS by Geo. W.Livermore of Millbury, MA, September 24, 1827, to John Rich of Sutton, who,some research lists as a town selectman. In this very short letter, Livermore requests that Rich pay a fine for“a delinquency in equipment.” Toning, staining, seal tear. Two pre-Civil Warautograph documents signed and in excellent condition: "That the grandjury respectfully call the attention of the court to the insufficiency of theroom now occupied by them suitably to accommodate the grand jury for the wantof proper furniture, means of ventilation, shades to the windows and otherconveniences." Signed by Josiah B. Wiggin, foreman, dated February Term1853. The fourth document fromthe Justices of the Court of Common Pleas responds to the need and is signed byJames Butler. "Having been informed that the citizens of Exetercontemplate erecting a new county courthouse and Town Hall, and being wellacquainted with the great inconveniences and insufficiency of the present building,we recommend to the Rockingham County Convention to appropriate a sum notexceeding to hundred dollars to aid the object above mentioned. Folds, light toning. Fifth is an ALS 1 1/3 pp, Stockbridge,MA, Feb. 2nd ,1854, Stephen Edgerly writes to Daniel B. Fenn, withdetails about gathering wood. In smallpart, “…I could get no help about the wood. It has been a good time in theswamp and notwithstanding they all disappointed us, we have got out to the roadtwelve & half cords. It is good chopping now…no snow to drain out…I havebeen trying to work a little on the mountain today and feel pretty well worn…” Folds, light toning. Finally, a military appointment fromGovernor John Fairfield for Maj. Gen. Joseph Barry on March 14, 1839. This document is in poor condition,with puckering. Fairfield’s signature is readable but faded. The strongest partof the document is the signature of A.B. Thompson, Adj. Gen. on the verso. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to theoriginal buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problemwith anything you purchase from us, please contact us immediately(617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to bemembers of the Universal Autograph Collectors Club, The Manuscript Society andThe Ephemera Society

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19 Postcards -- Garfield's Tomb, 1904 World's Fair

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: 19 Postcards ? Garfield?s Tomb, 1904 World?s Fair Interesting selection of postcards, including one from Garfield's Tomb in Cleveland, Ohio, with a handwritten note from the sender: "Lest we forget." Three are from the 1904 World's Fair in St. Louis and one is of the White House. Nearly all contain messages written by various members of the Comfort family. Expected light soiling on some. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society.

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Eary PA Taverns: Pioneers, Civil War Captain, POW at Libby

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: TITUS YERKES was born in the Manor of Moreland on Nov. 15th, 1762, and died there on June 15th, 1846. In 1789, he formed a co-partnership with his brother Jonathan and joined with him in the purchase of an estate in Germantown, PA, where they engaged in the milling business. Some years later, he erected a mill for the manufacture of cotton yarns on land that had belonged to his father at what was Yerkesville and is now Terwood. For several years, he was the proprietor of the Red Lion Inn, afterwards the States Union Hotel, on Market Street in Philadelphia. One page, 4" x 6", Philadelphia, March 1st, 1825, Tavern Bill from Perry to Titus Yerkes for Brandy, Gin, Beer, Crackers & Sugar $3.50. Recd Payment Titus Yerkes." Nice docketing on verso. Folds, toning, light soiling and irregular margins. Comes with a copy of an early photograph of The Red Lion Inn. JOHN S. EICHELBERGER enlisted as a Captain on June 11, 1861, into F Co., which he helped to organize, PA 37th Infantry, and was drafted into B Co., PA 99th Infantry. He was taken POW and held at Libby Prison for 42 days and later exchanged. He was wounded at Fredericksburg on April 30, 1863, and discharged as a result. He purchased the Hopewell House Hotel after the war and became a hotel keeper. A fire began in the hotel on Thanksgiving morning 1931, destroying most of the town?s businesses and homes. (His bio is included.) 3 pp, 8" x 14" Eichelberger's January 1900, part-printed, part-manuscript, petition and bond for operating a tavern at the Hopewell House in Bedford County, PA. The document includes four tax stamps and the names of 40 men who are supporting the petition and some who have witnessed the document. They include: FRANKLIN CARTWRIGHT, possibly Franklin James Cartwright, a Civil War Veteran of the 205th PA Infantry, Co. C. RUFUS E. SMITH, an influential school board member. His father, John Smith, was the son of a pioneer of Bedford County. Smith was a member of C Co, 205th PA Volunteer Infantry. He was at the front of the Battle of Fort Steadman and later at the Siege of Petersburg. He also fought at Weldon Railroad and Hatcher's Run. During President Grant's second term and part of President Chester Arthur?s, he held the storekeeper position of the Sixteenth Internal Revenue District. For several years, he was auditor of Hopewell Township. Document has expected folds. Some staining and ink brushing on second and fourth pages. Overall in excellent condition and very readable and a wonderful piece of Bedford County, PA history. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM104]

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Traveler Details Dangerous New England Ship Journey to Wife and Children:

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: The Boston Almshouse was established in the 1600s as a place to house the poor who were considered a drag on society. In 1795, a new almshouse was built by Charles Bulfinch at Barton?s Point, near the present day Causeway Street. By this time, foreign born residents began to swell the rolls of the Boston Almshouse, which also provided work for the poor. On October 31, 1854, our writer, who signs his name as ?Harry Sr.? in a 3 pp, ALS, to his wife and children, finds himself at the Boston Almshouse as he provides profound details of his perilous voyage through New England. In part, ??After a storm and dangerous passage, owing to thick fog which prevailed for almost the whole passage, especially after leaving Rockland [MA]. ?The boat?s whistle was sounded every half minute and she was navigated entirely by compass until the Captain supposed her near Portland. They then made ready to anchor and wait for the fog to lift but as darkness came on Cape Elizabeth light was discovered within a half mile. Then the boats head was pointed rite [into] the harbor and the whistle sounded again & again which was soon answered by numerous horns from countless vessels at anchor. Then followed a piece of very delicate navigation as the streamer threaded her way through the mist, now grazing the jibbook of one and?running plumb onto the broadside of another and backing out?is again put forward with slow and cautious motion until finally arrived at her wharf. We rush headlong haste to our seats in the cars. My first voyage in the fog. I hope it may be my last. Not that such a voyage is not somewhat exciting but for a man anxious to return to his wife & three children and has first to get to Boston and stay four whole days, it requires some patience? ?Don?t ?get most discouraged? not a bit of it ? because you have no cause for being so. ?Affect yours, ?Harry S.? Folds, even toning. In excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM107]

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Pioneer Aviator Orville Wright Signs Check on His Birthday--Exceptionally Framed

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Aviation Pioneer ORVILLE WRIGHT conquered man?s desire to fly a plane with his historic, successful flight on December 17, 1903. It was the first powered, sustained and controlled airplane flight in history. Orville, along with his brother, Wilbur, tested their gliders at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. The two of them studied weather bureau statistics and plotted the day and time to test the 605-pound Flyer with a 12-HP engine. In the first successful flight, Orville was at the controls of the Flyer, keeping it aloft for 12 seconds and covering 120 feet at an altitude of 10 feet. Wilbur successfully flew that day also, remaining airborne for 59 seconds and traveling 852 feet. Offering a beautifully framed lot of Orville?s photograph and a check signed by him to The Dayton Power & Light Co. on August 19, 1942, his birthday. The framing and matting are extraordinarily beautiful. Overall approximate size 17? x 24?; overall approximate check size is 2 ?? x 8 ??. Modest corner chip to top left corner of frame. Else excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [NAS129]

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[Uncle Tom's Cabin] Abolitionist Harriet Beecher Stowe's Son, Injured at Gettysburg, Receives Bill for Civil War Uniform

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: FREDERICK W. STOWE was the son of famous abolitionist and author of Uncle Tom?s Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and her husband, Lyman. He was troubled by alcoholism since age 16 and at 21, he left Harvard Medical School to enlist as a Sergeant in Co. A, 1st MA Infantry on May 23, 1861. Stowe received several commissions. He was badly wounded on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, and resigned because of his wounds. His mother often intervened in his life as she was concerned over his weaknesses. She acquiesced when he decided to rejoin the army as a private on October 14, 1864, in the 1st CT Artillery. He made 2nd Lieutenant on June 12, 1865. After the war, Stowe moved to San Francisco, still struggling with his addiction. He later disappeared and his mother was not able to discover his fate. Was it suicide? Did he fall upon some corruption in the rough San Francisco dock culture? But Capt. Stowe would not let his physical condition keep him from defending his country. He enlisted as a private on October 14, 1864, in the 1st CT Artillery and made 2nd Lieut on June 12, 1865. Seems rather unjust, but his personal struggles and his heroism were not enough to prevent the Army and Navy Taylor from sending him a bill for his uniform, offered here. One page, 5 1/2" x 7", bill for Stowe's uniform sent by Army tailor G.W. Locker: To 1 Jackett -- 12.00 To 1 Pair of Lt. Blue Pants -- 10.00 To 1 Pair of Russian Knott -- 6.00(total) 28.00 Please Send the amount By Adams Express if you have the amount for me. G.W. Locker" Nice docketing on verso. Comes with an 1862 pocket calendar advertising Mr. Locker, the "Army and Navy Taylor" Locker did not waste paper. A name before Fred Stowe's has been scratched out. One ink spot, minor foxing, toning. Soiling to calendar and one small tear. Verso of calendar contains a list of items in pencil, including a chair, stove, table. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [CW120]

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John Hancock's Land Committee Member Sells Salt Marsh Tract to Ferry, Stage Coach Owner -- 1810

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: NATHANIEL WELLS was born in Bedford, Maine and is listed as a Councilor under Massachusetts (Maine was once a district of MA) from 1782-92. Councilors advised the governor. He is also listed as a Muster Master for York County during the Revolutionary War. In 1783, Massachusetts owned 17 million acres in Maine. Steeped in debt and holding a treasury that was essentially empty, Gov. John Hancock looked to these lands in the District of Maine for revenue through sales. Wells was one of the members of the Lincoln Committee, which was charged with clarifying rightful land claims in Maine, identifying trespassers and allowing them to purchase land. (Research included) ALEXANDER RICE operated the Kittery-to-Portsmouth Rice's Ferry in the late 1700s, and later the Eastern Stagecoach between Portland and Portsmouth. He was a selectman from 1798-1813 and again from 1823-24; a representative to the General Court from 1807-09; senator from 1809-12 and a member of the Governor?s Council and a senator from 1812-13. 1 ? pp, 13 ?? x 8 ??, May 15, 1810, deed in which Wells sells a ten-acre tract of salt marsh land he owns in York County to Rice for $250, ??which I purchased from Captain Job Wheelwright late of Boston in the County of Suffolk deceased bounded northerly by salt marsh of John Rankin, Esq, Southeasterly and northeasterly by Nanny?s Creek so called excepting and reserving the use, profits and improvement of the said ten acres of marsh for and during the term of my natural life?? Much more. Docketing on verso. Research included. Toning, foxing. Some reinforcement to folds. Nice Americana. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM123]

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War of 1812, Capt. Heiner, Berks County Militia, Details Service, Claims

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: CAPTAIN JOHN HEINER, grandson of Revolutionary War General Brodhead, moved to western Pennsylvania in 1812 and took possession of all the lands left him by his grandfather. At the breakout of the War of 1812, he returned East with his family to Charlestown, VA, (now West Virginia), the home of his wife?s family. There, he left his wife and children and entered the army as Captain of Volunteers, 1st Co., 4th Battalion, Berks County Militia, serving with distinction throughout the war. At its conclusion, he returned with his family to western Pennsylvania, living at Kittanning, in which vicinity were many of the Brodhead lands. In this 1 ? pp, approximately 6? x 8? May 22, 1813, ALS addressed to Samuel Johnson, Esq., of Newton, New Jersey, Heiner writes in part: ?I take the liberty to inform you that I arrived here safe and found all my family in the same situation. ?A few days after I left this place, the Militia was called and was ordered to Norfolk. I am the only one that is left. What they will do with me, I do not know, neither do I care?for I will go when I please. ?Concerning the Germany claims?it appears the old man of all or the father of Kerafft Heiner did reside in Trembertheim, and was born in the year 1722 in the month of June 17th. The wife?s name was Anna Maria Heiner and his name was Philip Heiner. The District or County they resided was called Pauls. You will be kind enough to write to me as soon as you receive this. I have nothing to communicate to you at present?only Federals gained the Elections. ?We are all well here and wish to be remembered by all our acquaintances. I remain your most obedient, etc. ?Jno. Heiner? Postscript reads: ?I set the Devil going in Reading concerning what is to come to us from Henry Reaser?He brought suit against the Rutes and I further answered for you and Brodhead for you. Equal shares for cost if we should be cast in the suit.? Integral address leaf with round postmark. Expected folds, toning and a seal hole. Minor chipping at edges. One horizontal and seal tear reinforced with archival tape. Very interesting letter. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society.

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12-Letters, Salem, MA: Copperheads to get Booted Out; Lee Met His Match; Merritt Killed at New Bern; Civil War Home Front

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Like many communities throughout the United States, Salem, MA, played an important role during the Civil War, providing hundreds of soldiers, many of whom were wounded or killed, including Lieutenant Colonel Henry Merritt, who was killed in the Battle of New Bern. Salem clearly recognizes his heroism with the statue it erected of him. In this 12-letter archive, mostly written by one J.L. Lougee, who could be the Salem cabinet maker whose store existed well into the 20th century, the writer takes us on a highly descriptive narrative of Salem?s ?offerings? in the war, the stresses that he is going through, hoping to avoid the draft, the dozens of residents who have enlisted, the sad day when Lt. Col. Merritt was buried, how neighboring Lynn could be displaced as a shoe making capital if the war moves to the western part of the country and the grand parade and ceremony, celebrating the Civil War veterans. The letters range from 1862-1865, just before the war ended, and comprise of more than 40 pp are mostly written from Salem, MA, to his brother. One is in pencil and the others in ink. In very small part: July (year missing)??I suppose you have heard about the Zouaves from Chicago, the great military company. Well they visited Salem & I never saw the beat. It would do you good to see them drill?? May 29 [no year]: ?The birds warbling forth their songs of praise leads one for a moment to almost forget that all is not peace and tranquility in this fair land but as we turn from this bright picture to contemplate the struggle?going on between men and men, tens of thousands of souls being swept into eternity and tens of thousands being crippled and mangled up and all for what? Our hearts sicken and we turn our thoughts from the scene, thanking God, that we have not got to answer for the crimes of others. We have lost more men from Salem in these last battles than at any other of the wars. Yet there has been comparatively few killed but a great number wounded. We all think old [Robert E.] Lee has got his match this time?It rather puts a long face on McClellan?s men just now and it is amusing to hear them croak about the news, being all lies. Poor deluded, ignorant, willful devils. If they (the Coppers [Copperheads]) don?t get hooted at after this war is over, then I mistake. I think Old U.S. has got them fine now and is sure of his prize, but perhaps it may be well to wait until we are out of the bushes before we crow too loud. Has John gone back to his regiment yet or have they heard from Enoch?? March 30, 1862: ??I suppose you saw in the paper that Lieut. Col. [Henry] Merritt of the Mass 23rd was killed in the Glorious Battle of Newbern. [A statue was erected of him in Salem to celebrate his contributions to the Civil War.] The day that he was buried was a sad day in Salem. He was a very fine fellow and much beloved by all who knew him. About all of those that were wounded have come home. I will send some Salem papers which will give particulars?I have heard it said that the shoe business is on the rise and if you have not got work?I will go over to Lynn, if you would like for me to, and see what I can do for you?? September 8, 1862: ?I just returned from Lynn [MA] having just got time to go over and do your errand. I found the shoe bosses in rather live spirits in consequence of the late war news. They say the if the war is to be transferred into the West that shoe business is knocked in the head?[Lynn was considered one of the largest shoe producing cities in America.]?War news looks mighty blue?I think we got a mighty licking as far as we can judge?The draft is postponed until the 17th of this month in this state. I have not enlisted yet but is getting to be mighty mean to be at home now in this place. I don?t know how long I can stand the pressure?? September 8, 1862: ??I would go [into the army] if his reverence would give me a good billet. I think a praying chaplain would be a good institution in the army if he don?t forget it after he gets away from home?I think there is a chance to use up a couple of hundred thousand more before our grand army gets into Richmond. However they have taken Washington without much trouble and we must look on the bright side for Richmond?.Tell old Snow I will go if he wants a good orderly and I can bring a recommendation from a number of military men?? May 17, 1863: ??I suppose the folks are looking ahead for the return of our soldier boys. No doubt they will feel quite brave after fighting around Washington so many months. However, it is not their fault as they have done all that was required of them. I suppose they will all reenlist after a short furlough of course. Well we must take things as they come if our Uncle S[am] calls us we must go or pay the Slums. I don?t see much to encourage anyone to enlist just now?When gold comes down or when Richmond is taken, perhaps I can steal one [a dog] in the bustle of excitement?Why I could buy a good Nigger for about that money?? January 31, 1864: ??We have had a grand holiday this last week on Thursday. They gave the returned & reenlisted Veterans a reception that was quite imposing, really it was a quite and extensive affair. The Military turned out?to the number of about three hundred in five companies and took the Veterans under escort & marched all about town to the music of two Bands and it being a lovely warm day, the fair ladies (for which Salem is noted) turned out?to do honor to the returned braves. Everybody that could muster a flag put it out & those that had none contended themselves with dressing their windows with red, white & blue. We think we done ourselves some credit in decorating our vast establishment with the assistance of Mr. Griffin and numerous flags and devices borrowed from a ship owner?Now about the draft. Well we have got to furnish 177 men & have got 80 odd of them?& have an agent out in the army to look up Veterans which I imagine will be few and far between. They have published the names of those liable to draft?and have omitted my name as also they have William?s and now it seems as if they did not have my name in the box before and won?t this time if some fool don?t make it a business to go and inform the Provost?as people are requested to do?My friends have been in and congratulated me?I suppose they will get Ab He wrote to William that he might enlist?but perhaps he wanted to see how it would look on paper but if he does, I hope he will not go in Calvary?I think he would be wiser to go in heavy artillery?I don?t think they will repeat the $300 clause. If they do, it will be mean as dirt?Captain Richardson of Forts Lee & Pickering paraded the company up Town in the morning making a fine appearance?Oh it is bully fun to be a solider (at home)? March 6, 1864: ??We are out of the Draft in Salem?but of course [we] shall keep looking for more until the war is over. You will see that we are very patriotic in the good old town. I believe they have given us credit for men enlisted in the Navy which helps us amazingly. So, I am safe for a while at least?? September 4, 1864: ??I feel quite pleased with Military aspect of late. Young Napoleon, a candidate for the Presidency, is to be sure a big thing, but Gen. Sherman?s Victory is a more ? affair and it takes the wind out of the Copperheads? sails?In fact, Copper has declined all of fifty cents and now if Grant gets Richmond?why old Abe will be all hunk. We all think that the Chicago Platform is too big a close for war Democrats to swallow without salt or pepper?? Expected folds, toning, foxing. First letter is missing the top right corner, affecting some words. One letter is a little light, but all are readable and a fine assemblage of one important town?s contributions to and stresses about the Civil War. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph and The Ephemera Society. [CW182]

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Superb Civil War Battle Letter: Forts Spanish, Blakely, Mobile, Lee Surrender; Rebels Leave Dead and Wounded in Gun Pits

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: The 94th Regiment Illinois Volunteer Infantry was mustered into Federal service on August 20, 1862, and was mustered out on July 17, 1865. It participated in the Battle of Prairie Grove, Siege of Vicksburg, Fort Morgan and in significant operations against Mobile, Alabama, which began in March 1865 and concluded the day before Gen. Lee surrendered. The Union Army carried out several small raids during the fall of 1864 but it was not until March 1865 that they were finally ready to begin the primary land campaign against Mobile. The main body of 32,000 men was led by Maj. Gen. Canby. Some of the men went by water, while others marched overland. A second Union column, commanded by Maj. Gen. Frederick Steele, marched north across much of northern Escambia County. After cutting Confederate telegraph and rail connections, he turned west toward Fort Blakeley, a key Mobile Bay defense, and later closed in on massive Confederate defenses at Spanish Fort. Canby launched a final assault on the Confederates on April 9, 1865, capturing 3,700 men and 40 pieces of artillery. The fall of Spanish Fort and Blakeley opened Mobile to attack. Unwilling to expose the civilian popular to a bloody siege, Confederate Gen. D.H. Maury prepared to evacuate. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant in Virginia on April 10, 1865, and Spanish Fort and Blakely were evacuated and blown up the night before. Maj. R.H. Slough surrendered the city of Mobile at noon on April 12, 1865. Our writer, C.C. Boling [very likely also spelled Bowling] was mustered in on August 20, 1862 and mustered out on July 17, 1865. In this fascinating and extraordinarily detailed account, Boling takes the reader into a nearly play by play account of the capture of Fort Spanish and Blakely and the closing in on Mobile, which takes the reader to the surrender of Lee. His 4 pp, 8 x 10 letter, dated April 9th, 1865, to his wife, and tightly written provides exceptional battle details. ??I am spared to write you a few lines in answer to your welcomed letters?received yesterday eve just before sundown as the rebs were trying to break out on the right on Smith lines and there was an awful shelling and continued round of musketry. Well the best news first is that last night at one oclock, the rebs surrendered these forts [Spanish and Blakely] on move properly evacuated through we got (so says rumor) 15,000 prisoners. I saw 650 just pass with 26 officers and one colonel. They were taken here and yesterday evening as they tried to break through Smith?s lines he took 600 besides the wounded and prisoners. Our loss of killed and wounded were 40?We had but 1 killed and 6 or 7 wounded?Truly the Lord is good to us for which I do feel to thank him?Our mortars and artillery all opened on them yesterday evening and shelled them about 2 hours during which time Smith was having very hot fighting, very heavy fast piercing of artillery and musketry and about midnight would come down the line for us to cease firing which we did though the rebs kept us as much firing as usual though they were then evacuating, went out in shifts to a fort on an island that has a battery on it opposite Spanish Fort from a point we could not see them. So when we came in, we found their house empty and all just as if they had just dropped and run?leaving their blankets, tents, mules hitched to the wagons where they had been hauling things to the landing to take to Mobile but had to leave?in all 30 or 40 pieces of artillery mostly spiked with a rough nail to it can be easily taken out?There is a few rebs there and there is so many torpedoes the fleet can?t yet pass up though our boat was slowly coming up?to camp?seeing the prisoners? ?These works are not as strong as we supposed though strong enough and the fallen timber would have been so hard to got over we would of got badly cut up before we got to the fort, and sharpened brush would have stopped us till we would have been slaughtered by the hundred. I was pretty well satisfied we didn?t have it to change. They left their dead and wounded at our mercy in the rifle pits and when they left here, several lay in there advanced pits where we had killed them till we dug up to them?and pushed them into his pit and threw dirt on him from the new pit we were digging. They stank awfully and here we found them just laying where they were shot. They are a very unfeeling set?Our next place will be Mobile?I heard today that Thomas had come up in the rear and it had surrendered but I don?t believe it?I think our hard fighting is over?This was a pretty?close battle or fight though the Lord has safely brought me through?The johnnies looked well but with the same dirty white and looked for all the world like a big nasty gray back. There was about 400 bushels of corn in sacks, shelled, so the horses and mules will live fine a while?I long to raise it again though I may have to fight as some of our johnnies said today they intend to fight long as there was women in the south to raise young soldiers and we will fight as we have women to raise soldiers to fight them or kill them off but from all news they soon will play out as Sherman has gone in on Lee again?I have strong hope that the war will be over before my time is out? ?I was surprised to hear johnnies serious on the subject of religion?If we educate him and train him right, he may be a blessing to society?The 17th of March [we] got here, the 25th and 26th, we began to seize it?lasted about 14 days part of the time it was raining, bad chilly weather but there we were in the works at midnight. We come in, lit torches to let our gun boats know we were in but they threw one shell after we come in at the water battery. Then, the signal officer come over, signaled with a torch and got an answer and all was right then. Well we lit torches, went around hunting johnnies, found some left in their pits?2 hours later I was detailed in another man?s place. He come up so I didn?t have to go out but went out to see the boat come up the channel. She made the trip nicely?After she got to the landing?one shot just missed her?She lay awhile then backed out and went down to the fleet? ?I hear that Smith went out to Blakely yesterday and took 4,000 prisoners. I hear this morning that we took from 1,500 to 2,000 prisoners, 35 guns besides a lot of muskets?The water battery from which we have been shooting?one gun burst wide open this morning [and] hurt no one?One gun was made at Selma in March 1865 so they had it about a month. It is a very long?gun, throws an 84 pound shot?Some guns on the monitors have 200 pound guns?I hear very heavy firing of artillery around up the end of the bay. Mobile is now surrounded and still we will close in on it. Soon it will have to fall? ?Well Sarah, being tired of writing, I went out here about 100 yards to see if the fleet was coming up?She has come up a little ways and is laying in the channel and the shift are busy hunting torpedoes?I counted 32 boats?It?s dangerous coming up on account of the torpedoes? ?10 Monday morning finds me in usual health but my eyes have got some since the siege and feel real bad. Now Sarah I don?t know why you did not get as many letters?I wrote whenever I saw any chance for a letter to go?? Much more. Expected toning, folds. Boling has written this superb four-page letter with a mind to conserve paper. On pages three and four, he has written in between the lines. This is not the traditional cross-hatching and is much more readable. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [CW165]

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Price: $450

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The 1832 Cyphering Book of Noel J. Relph, Prince George County, VA; Later Postmaster

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: NOEL J. RELPH was the postmaster in Prince George County, VA, in 1869, earning $42 annually. He ran a store across from the courthouse at one point. Some records show that he died on March 27, 1874. Pleased to offer his self-identified ?Cyphering Book? dated January 1832 with beautifully written script of mathematical rules, exercises on compound addition, various measures and weights, along with examples demonstrating the principle of mathematics. 8? x 12?, bound by string, 106 individual pages, both front and back filled, bringing the total to 212 pages. Rules include, ?Federal Money Rule,? ?Division of Vulgar Fractions,? Extraction of the Cube Root,? The Fall of Bodies.? Extensively and elaborately detailed by this obviously devoted and committed student, the journal is held together by string. A number of separate items are included, involving Relph?s penmanship and a certificate of approval for Nathan Relph, likely the same person. Toning to the pages, but overall in very good condition and a superb and beautifully executed early 19th century example of Americana. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [AM143]

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Price: $395

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Confederate Roger Pryor, Captured as a Spy, Recommends Post-Civil War Appointment

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: ROGER ATKINSON PRYOR (July 19, 1828 ? March 14, 1919) was a firebrand secessionist member of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1859-61. He urged the attack be made on Fort Sumter but declined to fire the first shot. He entered the Confederate State Army as Colonel of the 3rd Virginia Infantry. Distinguished for gallantry at the Battle of Williamsburg, he won promotion to Brig. General. He fought through the 7-Days, 2nd Bull Run and the Antietam Campaign, commanding the 5th and 8th Florida, 3rd Virginia and 14th Alabama. In 1864, while on a solitary intelligence mission, he was captured and held prisoner in Ft. Lafayette. Post-war, an impoverished Pryor moved his family to New York City, where he established a profitable law firm. He served as judge of the New York Court of Common Pleas from 1890 to 1894 and justice of the New York Supreme Court from 1894 to 1899. Pryor was appointed official referee by the appellate division of the New York Supreme Court on April 10, 1912, and served until his death. One page, 5? x 5 ??, ALS, to the Governor of New York, no place or date but probably written during his service on the New York Supreme Court. In part, ?My dear Governor: ?Informed that Robert Coleman Taylor, Esq. requests the appointment of judge of General Sessions, I respectfully beg the privilege of urging his application. ?As your excellency is undoubtedly aware, he has argued all his criminal cases in the Court of Appeals with eminent success. ?I venture to assure your Excellency that he is in every respect?qualified for the office he seeks. ?Very Respectfully your ?Obedient Servant ?Roger A. Pryor? Letter is in excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [CW133]

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Price: $195

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Cowboy Artist Bill Bender Signed Print -- Red Man's Telegraph

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Noted Cowboy artist, Bill Bender (b. 1919) was once a working cowboy himself. He moonlighted as a movie stuntman and entered rodeos. Fine boldly signed print of his vivid impressionist scene, Red Man's Telegraph. 91/4" by 7". Wonderful example in excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [PA100]

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Price: $110

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Davis Cup Founder, Secretary of War Defends Honor of The Star-Spangled Banner

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: DWIGHT FILLEY DAVIS, SR. (July 5, 1879-November 28, 1945) was an American tennis player and a politician. He?s best remembered as the founder of the Davis Cup international tennis competition. He was Assistant Secretary of War from 1923-1925 and the nation?s 49th Secretary of War from 1925-1929, appointed by Calvin Coolidge. He was later Governor-General of the Philippines. PERRITON MAXWELL was editor of Cosmopolitan and Hearst?s Magazine and later editor of Wildman Magazine & News Service in New York. In response to Maxell, Davis provides a wonderful defense of ?The Star Spangled Banner? as the nation?s anthem. One page, TLS, October 6, 1926, on War Department stationary, he writes: ??You state that the anthem is condemned by allegations that it is not properly representative by reasons of its spirit of hatred, its pitch, popular ignorance of its words, and its unworthy source. On only one of these points do I feel qualified to express an opinion. To me the anthem never has appeared to inspire hatred, but on the other hand, it has carried that appeal for loyalty and public service with which it impressed me in my school days. ?Though my suggestion should not be credited with the authority of careful reflection, it seems to me that ?The Star Spangled Banner? should retain its prestige until there proposed another anthem which receives public approval as a better medium for the expression of our patriotism, our recognition of self-sacrifice, our gratitude to our forefathers and our reverence for our traditions.? Folds, toning and a stray mark at the bottom, but overall in excellent condition and a superb defense of the nation?s anthem by this notable American. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P115]

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Price: $195

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Unfairly Convicted Sacco-Vanzetti Proved Innocent after Execution; Two Post-Execution Pamphlets Describing the Case

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Italian born American anarchists NICOLA SACCO and BARTOLOMEO VANZETTI were convicted of murdering a guard and a paymaster during an armed robbery of the Slater and Morrill Shoe Company on April 15, 1920, in South Braintree, Massachusetts. Seven years later after being found guilty of first-degree murder, and exhausting a series of appeals, they were executed at Charlestown State Prison on August 23, 1927. Subsequent investigations throughout the 1930s and 1940s cast doubt on their guilt. The case was further clouded later by ballistic tests and incriminating statements by the men?s acquaintances. In 1977, then Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis issued a proclamation that the two had been unfairly tried and convicted and ?any disgrace should be forever removed from their names.? Offering two post-execution pamphlets, the first ? 6? x 9? -- being ?There is Justice; A Summary of the Sacco Vanzetti Case, published by the Sacco-Vanzetti National League, a private advocacy group, c. 1927. 21 pp and signed in type by William Floyd. The second pamphlet, 46 pp, entitled ?Outstanding Features of the Sacco-Vanzetti Case Together with Letters from the Defendants by Elizabeth Glendower Evans, was published by the New England Civil Liberties Committee in Boston, c. 1927. Portions of Vanzetti?s impassioned letters of innocence, laced with broken English, are contained in the second pamphlet. In very small part, he wrote, ?I did not spittle a drop of blood, or steal a cent in my life?I wish to convince my fellow-men that only with virtue and honesty is possible for us to find a little happiness in the world. I preached; I worked. I wished with all my faculties that the social wealth would belong to every umane [sic] creatures, so well as it was the fruit of the work of all. But this do not mean robbery for a insurrection. ?The insurrection, the great movements of the soul do not need dollars. It need love, light, spirit of sacrifice, ideas conscience, instincts. It need more conscience, more hope and more goodness. And all this blassing [sic] things can be seeded, awoked, growed up in the heart of man in many ways, but not by robbery and murder for robbery?? Covers are loose and have been reinforced with archival tape. Expected toning and light soiling but overall very good and a wonderful combination record of one of the most notorious human injustices in the 20th century criminal justice system. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph and The Ephemera Society. (AM151)

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Price: $135

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Statesman Cordell Hull, Renowned for His Work with the United Nations; Known as

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: CORDELL HULL (October 2, 1871 - July 23, 1955) held the position of Secretary of State for 11 years, from 1933 to 1944. He received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1945 for his role in establishing the United Nations. FDR referred to him as the "Father of the United Nations." In 1939, Hull advised Roosevelt not to let in 936 Jews who were seeking asylum in the United States. They were sent back to Germany on the eve of the holocaust. He left office due to ill health and, upon his departure, Roosevelt described him as "the one person in all the world who has done his most to make this great plan for peace (the United Nations) an effective fact." One page, 5" x 6", TLS on his letterhead, May 12, 1949, to Paul Mallon, Washington. "I have been wondering as to your present whereabouts. I have the greatest admiration for Notre Dame and would do anything reasonably possible to manifest my deep interest in its welfare. I am just out of the hospital after two and a half years, and also am endeavoring in every feasible manner to encourage and aid Cumberland University, my Alma Mater, which is struggling desperately to tide over a very difficult financial situation. With all good wishes, Sincerely yours, Cordell Hull" A couple of fold marks and a paper clip mark but overall in excellent condition. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph and The Ephemera Society. [P122]

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Price: $95

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Naval Officer, Explorer Admiral Byrd Sends Photograph with Sentiments

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: REAR ADMIRAL RICHARD E. BYRD (October 25, 1888-March 11, 1957) was a U.S. Naval Officer who specialized in exploration. He was an American aviator, polar explorer and organizer of polar logistics. Byrd claimed that his expeditions had been the first to reach the North Pole and the South Pole by air. Byrd gained much acclaim and was the recipient of the Medal of Honor, the highest honor for valor given by the United States, although some claimed that he had not actually reached the North Pole. Byrd was able to serve as a retired officer on active duty during World War I, although he was technically retired. He was assigned to the Office of Naval Operations during the war and served as secretary and organizer of the Navy Department Commission on Training Camps, training men in aviation. He then commanded naval air forces at Naval Air Station Halifax in Nova Scotia, Canada. In 1928, Byrd began his explorations of Antarctica with the first expedition to his Little America base, which was followed in 1929 by a flight with three companions over the South Pole, the first such flight. He led subsequent expeditions that discovered and mapped large areas of Antarctica. His several books include ?Discovery? and ?Alone,? which chronicled his months spent in a camp near the South Pole. Offered is a beautiful sepia signed and inscribed photograph the year of his first expedition, approximately 6? x 9? ?To Walter Mellody with best of good wishes. R.E. Byrd N.Y. City June 22, 1928? This may be Walter ?Dutch? Mellody, the pro football player. The photograph is matted to an overall size of 11? x 13?. A few insignificant foxing specs on the matt and minor mark in left corner of the photograph, affecting nothing. Else in excellent condition and a wonderful image of this American great. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph and The Ephemera Society. [NAS128]

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Price: $160

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Early Feminist Dealt with Aaron Burr, Daniel Webster to Secure Land Ownership Taken from Her in Utica, New York

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: MARTHA BRADSTREET (1780-1869) was steeped in early American land history of Utica, New York, though she has gone largely unnoticed notwithstanding her intense and decades? long legal battles to take possession of land once owned by her great grandfather, Gen. John Bradstreet. Aaron Burr, Daniel Webster and Thomas Addis Emmet, an Irish Revolutionary all acted as her attorneys. Alexander Hamilton?s father-in-law, Gen. Philip Schuyler, attempted to claim the land for himself. Newspapers nicknamed her ?Martha Bradstreet, attorney.? In 1851, Pomeroy Jones would write in "Annals and Recollections of Oneida County" (page 529): "For many years past, the original settlers of a large portion of the city, or their heirs or grantees, have been compelled to defend suits brought against them by Martha Bradstreet, and although she has sometimes obtained verdict, yet those verdicts have never enabled her to obtain possession of any city property." Offering two ALSs to BRADSTREET relating to her land related challenges. Both letters contain her docketing on the verso and one contains her signature. The first one offered is one-page, 7" x 13", Deposit, Tompkins [NY], May 20th,1822, John Hulse (November 24, 1781-May 16, 1862). He writes: "I inform you that I received your letter and agreeable to your request I now feel you [an] answer. I should be glad to purchase that lot of land. But the circumstances is such that it is out of my power at present as I have not got the money at present to pay down and as I wish you good luck in life, I wish you to dispose of it in the best way that you can to your advantage" Martha has docketed on the verso: John W. Hulce Letter, May 20, 1822, Can not purchase a lot of land, has not the money, I think this must mean Lot No. 44 Evans Patent? [Hulce spells his name with a "c" and Martha spells it with an "s".] Integral address leaf. The letter was likely hand carried. Folds, toning, seal tear, phonetic spelling. The second letter, 2 pp, 8" x 10", September 4, 1841, John Bont, writes to Martha. "Your favour of the 31st of Aug. is now before me, which I should have replied to before this but not finding any mortgage among my papers I have come to the conclusion that I never had the mortgage in my possession. Mr. H.P. Mabee I find has the mortgage. Mrs. Martha Bradstreet to Harman P. Mabee Mortgage, dated Nov. 8th, 1837, consideration $1,000 Bonded as follows Lot No. Seventy-nine in the Crosby Manor beginning at the distance of seventy two [?] from the river on a course of South thirty six degrees west on the line between lots No. 78 & 79, a stake marked out?[much more]" Martha's docketing: "Letter John B. Boist to Martha Bradstreet [thus her autograph is included] Sept. 4th 1841 As to Mortgage on Lot No. 2 of Sub Division of Lot No. 79, Crosby's Manor, Town of Frankfort." Folds, toning, integral address leaf with red postmark. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph and The Ephemera Society. [AM138]

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Price: $145

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Confederates Burn Steamer

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: The "James Woods" was a sidewheel paddle steamer built in Jeffersonville, Indiana in 1860 with commercial service between Nashville and New Orleans. Late in 1861 the boat was purchased by Lt. I.N. Brown of the CS Navy for conversion and use as a gunboat. Plans for the conversion were interrupted by the approach of the Union forces at Nashville and the "James Woods" was burned by the Confederates on the Cumberland River at Nashville on Feb. 23, 1862 to avoid capture by Union Forces. One page, 7 ?? x 11 ?? superb manifest of the steamer James Woods, Captain James M. Lee from Nashville, listing shippers, consignees, a description of goods being shipped and the shippers? marks. Goods shipped include cotton, one cotton gin, tobacco, lard, bacon. Toning and one brush to a letter. Two small fold breaks reinforced with archival tape. Else excellent condition and a great piece of Confederate Civil War history. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society.[CW150]

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Price: $195

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Free Frank, Autographs of Grant's Cabinet -- Impeached Belknap, Successor Cameron

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: Free Frank, Autographs of Grant?s Cabinet, Impeached Belknap, Successor Cameron WILLIAM WORTH BELKNAP (September 22, 1829-October 12, 1890) served with distinction as a Major in the Civil War during Sherman?s Atlanta Campaign. He later became President Grant?s Secretary of War. His tenure was mired in controversy for having sold weapons to France and accepting kickbacks in exchange for making a tradership appointment. He was later impeached but not convicted as Grant accepted his resignation before the House had a chance to vote. He was tried in the Senate but acquitted. Two autographs of Belknap, one with a partial War Department stationary page attached and the date Aug. 6th, 1872. The other is his free frank on the front portion of an envelope tipped to a piece of paper with the War Department Official Business as the return address. It is addressed to George H. Williams, the 32nd attorney general of the United States, who was also forced to resign over allegations that his wife had accepted payments to have the Justice Department drop litigation against a custom house firm. Autographs are boldly executed and clean. Some toning and some foxing to other portions and some ink brushing. Another item in this offering includes a one-page, ALS, by Grant?s Secretary of War James Donald Cameron to Alexander Kelly McClure. CAMERON (May 14, 1833-August 30, 1918) succeeded the ousted controversial William Belknap as Secretary of War, who was accused of taking bribes. Cameron was part of Grant?s cabinet realignment. Cameron?s father, Simon, served as Secretary of War under President Lincoln. During James Cameron?s tenure, the nation was challenged by the Great Sioux War and the threat of a second Southern secession. The South was dissatisfied with the election of President Rutherford B. Hayes, which ended Reconstruction. MCCLURE (January 9, 1828-June 6, 1909) was an avid abolitionist, an editor, active in Pennsylvania Whig politics and a biographer of President Abraham Lincoln. He was appointed to the staff of the first Whig governor of Pennsylvania, William F. Johnson, and given the honorary rank of colonel. Lincoln appointed him as an assistant adjutant general with the rank of major in 1862. McClure?s home in Chambersburg was threatened several times by Confederate forces. He was captured but released. In 1864, his home was burned to the ground by Confederates during their third occupation of Chambersburg. Dated Nov. 6, 1884, Cameron writes a terse one sentence question, possibly searching for an answer to a question that only the two of them are aware of. ?My dear Sir, Have you anything late and reliable? Yours Truly, J.D. Cameron.? Soiling and a couple of small tears. Pencil notation in another hand identifying the letter as having been written by James D. Cameron, Secretary of War under Grant. Nice piece of Grant administration history. Everything we sell is guaranteed authentic forever to the original buyer. We also offer a 30-day return policy. If you discover a problem or are dissatisfied with an item, please contact us immediately (617-236-4893). Our goal is to please every customer. We are pleased to be members of The Manuscript Society, Universal Autograph Collectors Club and The Ephemera Society. [P114]

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Price: $95

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Constable George Koonce Defended Harper's Ferry Arsenal from Confederates; Second Wheeling Convention

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: GEORGE KOONCE was born in April 1818 in Ohio to Nicholas and Elizabeth Koonce. Soon after his birth, the family moved to Harper's Ferry, Virginia [now West Virginia]. He was married twice, first to Emily Piles, and then to Bettie Ellen Brittain. He had at least one son, George William Koonce (b. 1840). On April 18, 1861, less than a day after Virginia seceded from the Union, Lieutenant Roger Jones was stationed at Harper's Ferry, with a company of 42 regular United States soldiers. Upon learning of the approach of Confederate soldiers, whose intent was to take over the armory, he made preparations for its defense, calling upon the local citizens for volunteer aid. Many responded, including George Koonce, a former town constable according to the 1860 census and Justice of the Peace for Jefferson County, who led the local men against the Virginia army of 2,000 soldiers. Koonce and his fellow citizens halted the larger Virginia army at Smallwood's Ridge, near Bolivar. Meanwhile, Lieutenant Jones, acting on orders received from Washington, set fire to the armory and arsenal and, with his men, retreated northward. Koonce and his fellow volunteers did not return to Harper's Ferry until it had once again fallen into the hands of the U. S. government in 1862. In June 1861, Koonce represented Jefferson County at the Second Wheeling Convention to vote on the secession of western Virginia. However, Koonce, who harbored ill feelings towards the Confederacy after the events of April 1861 and who was a Unionist, was not representative of the majority of citizens of Jefferson County, most of whom supported the Confederacy. Koonce lost his home and his business as a result of his involvement in the April 1861 fight. During the Civil War, he operated a general store in Harper's Ferry with a Mr. Horner from 1863 to 1864. Following the war, Koonce became active in politics once again, serving as a member of the West Virginia House of Delegates (1865-1867) and a member of the West Virginia Senate (1870-1871), running on the Radical ticket. He was also a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Koonce died at 90 in Halltown, WVa, in 1908. GEORGE B. STEPHENSON served in the 5th Artillery Regiment, New York Volunteers, during the Civil War. One-page, 5 3/4" x 7", April 16, 1852, Virginia warrant signed by Koonce as constable and Stephenson, as Justice of the Peace, summoning John R. Zimmerman "in a plea of debt for four dollars and 20 cents" for Charles Johnson. Stephenson has signed on the front and Koonce on the verso. Folds and some ink blotching on the verso. The two signatures are clean. The document comes with a biography on Koonce and a copy of a Civil War letter written by Stephenson.

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Price: $85

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40-Letter Archive: Traveler Comfort Reports Southern Negroes are Ignorant, but Subdued; Southern Women are Sloppy

Ships From: Boston, MA US

Description: The COMFORT FAMILY of Pennsylvania had various business interests during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Offering more than 40 family letters written by a number of family members, including JAMES F. COMFORT, M.P. COMFORT, CLYDE COMFORT, describing family events, deaths, expressions of love, observations about southern Negroes and women, mental illness, farm news, storm damage, the family?s interest in oil, a mob labor riot in Pittsburgh, incited or led by communists. Nearly each of the multi-page letters comes with its original cover and stamp. A brief sampling unearths some fine content and takes the reader back to the concerns within and outside this family in the late 19th century. On August 6, 1872, REV. M.P. COMFORT writes to his brother James, referring to Pittburgh strikers, in part, ??Communism is false in theory, fiendish in its action and wicked in its fruits. It will raise the plausible??Bread for the starving and work for the idle? and them show the hollowness of its pretensions by destroying 4,000 bushels of wheat (as I am informed the mob did at Pittsburgh) and millions of dollars? worth of property?It takes bread from the hungry and keeps work from the laborer by its wanton destruction?It is safe to say that the strikers did not anticipate or desire the sad results which followed?Neither did they?participate in the fearful and wicked exercises which the mob committed. And yet they cannot escape the responsibility for punishing the occasion for?vicious idleness and?infidelity to show themselves reckless of life and property. I use the word ?infidelity? advisedly for, I think, that term does not misrepresent the?attitude of the Communists?? On August 6, 1901, CLYDE COMFORT writes of a horrific storm in Montgomery, Alabama. ?I had to stay overnight here in Montgomery as the terrible storm they have been having along the gulf has completely shut off all travel to New Orleans?The conductor of our train told all us passengers about the water at Mobile and advised us to stay overnight?I am somewhat worried about the people in Gulfport as they are completely shut off from the world by telegraph. This storm is a yearly occurrence only it is much worse this year?The country that I have gone through so far is not very different from that at home?There are hills & trees, the same as in NY & PA. The greatest difference is in the towns: they are old and dingy?and the Negroes that one sees are awful. You would think that they would be more troublesome than they are according to their numbers and ignorance?I have not seen any water mellon yet and beautiful southern women. They are all common looking and seek so ?sloppy? in regard to their dress. I have seen women let their dresses trail through the mud and they were covered with mud for about 6 inches around the bottoms to say nothing of their shoes?? On October 12, 1901, Fred [possibly Fred Comfort] writes to Miss Mary Comfort about Clyde?s mental illness. ??Clyde had a little setback last night. He did not take any medicine & when I got home he was burning up?When I asked why he did not take the medicine, he claimed there were 2 men in the room that frightened him & got the medicine all dirty & he threw it out the window & then the fellows were arrested so we cannot trust him any more?? On November 13, 1901, CLYDE COMFORT writes to Miss Mary Comfort, in part, discussing railroad construction. ??They are working on the pier filling it in with clay and the railroad company are going to build about twenty-one tracks out to the anchorage basin and build a sea wall to protect the wharf...We will get rooms in Miss Stewart?s new house. It is exactly on the beach and will be delightfully cool in summer?? Folds, toning, light soiling. A few tears but overall in very good condition.

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Price: $175

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