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Auction Description for Huberty & Breyne Gallery: Bande Dessinée / Legendary Comics
Viewing Notes:
Exposition publique :
A Paris Sur rendez-vous : Jeudi 17 novembre Vendredi 18 novembre Samedi 19 novembre
Entrée libre de 11h à 19h : Vendredi 2 décembre Samedi 3 décembre
Galerie Huberty & Breyne Paris 91, rue Saint-Honoré 75001 Paris
France +33 (0)1 40 28 04 71 contact@hubertybreyne.com
A Genève : 12h à 19h : Vendredi 25 novembre 10h30 à 17h30 : Samedi 26 novembre
Galerie Papiers Gras 1, place de l'Île 1204 Genève - Suisse +41 22 310 87 77 galerie@papiers-gras.com
A Bruxelles : 11h à 18h : Vendredi 9 décembre Samedi 10 décembre 11h à 13h : Dimanche 11 décembre

Bande Dessinée / Legendary Comics (53 Lots)

by Huberty & Breyne Gallery


53 lots with images

December 11, 2016

Live Auction

Bruxelles, Belgium

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Paul CUVELIER (1923-1978)  - L'extraordinaire Odyssée de Corentin

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Description: Indian Ink for the cover of issue Tintin no 50 December 11, 1947. Monogrammed on the left (stamped on the right). 22x24 cm. Comments: L’Odyssée extraordinaire de Corentin Feldoë (Corentin Feldoë’s Extraordinary Odyssey) appeared on the 50th front cover of Journal Tintin on Thursday 11 December 1947. The start of young Corentin Feldoë’s adventures coincided with the launch of the magazine itself, on 26 September 1946. Along with Hergé, Jacobs and Laudy, Cuvelier was thus one of the four Belgians who were the driving force behind the "Belgian" Tintin before it ever came to be published in France. When Paul Cuvelier was first introduced to Hergé in 1945, he was a mere 21 years of age! He drew his very first cover for the fourth issue of the magazine, but by the time he drew this scene depicting Feldoë riding into the city he had already produced 14 previous covers. Cuvelier was particularly good at drawing beautiful images like this. Talking about his art, he said: “I didn’t like doing so many drawings. I minded the fact that I couldn’t spend longer on any one image. Strictly speaking, illustration would have suited me better. I think it’s closer to what I’m trying to do” (in P. Goddin, Corentin et les Chemins du Merveilleux, Editions du Lombard, 1984).

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Edgar P. JACOBS (1904-1987)  - Blake et Mortimer – Le secret de l’Espadon I

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Description: Indian ink for the page 46 of the album, prepublished in issue 32 of the second year of Tintin magazine of august 7, 1947. 30x40 cm. Lombard, 1950. Comments: Page 46 published in Journal Tintin no 32, on 7 August 1947, in the Secret de l’Espadon (The Secret of The Swordfish) series, which had been appearing in the Belgian weekly since its first issue, dated 26 September 1946. Talking about the early days of the magazine and about this particular story, which spanned 140 pages in total, E. P. Jacobs said to François Rivière in 1975: “That was still the age of the great novel, the ‘High Epoch’ when it was possible to get away with anything. Proof that what we were interested in was not, of course,the album but the way things unfolded like a story without end. We’d go from one plot twist to the next and, quite simply, all that mattered was the suspense and how readers were reacting to the story” (Entretiens du Bois des Pauvres, Les Éditions du Crabe, 2000, p. 56).

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Eddy PAAPE (1920-2012)  - Jean Valhardi – Le château maudit

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Description: Indian ink with colors on the back for the page 19 of the album. Signed and dedicated. 58x40 cm. Dupuis, 1953. Comments: Page 19 published in Journal Spirou in January 1952 under the title “Valhardi contre le Monstre” (Valhardi against the Monster). Published the following year as a paperback album, it bore the revised title Valhardi et le château maudit (Valhardi and the Doomed Castle). The text was written by the up-and-coming comics writer Jean-Michel Charlier. With reference to this album, Hughes Dayez said: “In Le Château Maudit, Paape totally freed himself from Jijé’s legacy, and it’s only thanks to the generic name ‘Jean Valhardi Detective’ that we know we’re still dealing with the same series…” (in Le Duel Tintin-Spirou, Éditions Luc Pire, 1997, p. 229). So, Eddy Paape really set about reinventing the art of inking, just at a time when he was leaving Dupuis to join World Press (founded by Georges Troisfontaines), an employer of which he was fond of saying “They let me draw in peace.” And just consider for a moment the format of this page: 58 x 40 cm!

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Victor HUBINON (1924-1979)  - Buck Danny – Un avion n'est pas rentré

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Description: Indian ink with colors on the back for the page 302 published as page 30 of the album. 42x57 cm. Dupuis, 1954. Comments: "Un avion n’est pas rentré" (A Plane Failed to Return) was the thirteenth album in the series first launched almost seventy years ago, on 2 January 1947, in Journal Spirou. Published in Spirou between March and August 1954, the story was brought out as an album by Éditions Dupuis that same year. Illustrators Hubinon and Charlier sent their naval heroes home on board the USS Valley Forge aircraft carrier. This page (B.302) shows Buck Danny with other young trainee recruits on board their Grumman F9F Panthers. The plane was designed to be mounted on an aircraft carrier and was actually in service throughout the Korean War, which had just ended with an armistice in July 1953.

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JIJÉ (1914-1980)  - Jerry Spring – Golden Creek

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Description: Ink and watercolor for the back cover of the legendary first album of the series. Signed, dedicated to the famous editor-in-chief of Journal Spirou, Thierry Martens. 47x50 cm (cross fold). Dupuis, 1955. Comments: Given that Journal Spirou was suffering from the absence of Morris’s Lucky Luke, which had been shelved since the summer of 1953, Paul Dupuis suggested to Joseph Gillain, aka Jijé, that they ought to think about creating a Western. Jijé has just turned forty and his visit to the USA and Mexico had focused his mind on wide open spaces, and here was a whole new historic chapter beginning for him! “Monsieur Paul Dupuis said to me one day: ‘What’s lacking in Spirou is a good Western. You’re good at drawing horses. You should do one!’ Paul Dupuis has always had a sharp eye, you know, and not only for the business side of things” (interview with Jijé conducted by A. Leborgne, J. M. Dehousse and J. Hansenne in 1975, published in HOP no. 40). So it was that, on 4 March 1954, Jerry Spring and Pancho made their grand entrance in the pages of Spirou no 829. It was at the time that Franquin was publishing his "Le Dictateur et le Champignon" (The Dictator and the Mushroom), Peyo his "Maître de Roucyboeuf" (Master of Roucyboeuf), and Will his suspenseful "Oscar et ses Mystères" (Oscar and his Mysteries)… The album appeared the following year under the title Golden Creek and qualified for a hardcover edition. The back cover was to carry this night scene under the Milky Way worthy of the very best illustrators of Westerns. This legendary scene is one of the 9th art’s most iconic images and one of the most iconic ever published by Éditions Dupuis . Jijé dedicated it to Thierry Martens, celebrated editor of Journal Spirou from 1968 to 1978, also known as the “Monsieur Album” of Éditions Dupuis, comic strip historian and expert, and author of a number of books and articles on the subject.

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JIJÉ (1914-1980)  - Jerry Spring – Yucca Ranch

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Description: Indian ink for the page 5 of the second album of the serie. 32x48 cm. Dupuis, 1955. Comments: 1954 was to be a very “Western-style” year for Joseph Gillain – the year he published the first two Jerry Spring stories in Spirou, and the year he adapted "Blanc Casque" for Le Moustique based on a novel by Joseph Pirot. For his second cowboy story, Gillain sought the help of Maurice Rosy, who was the inspiration behind Franquin’s Le Dictateur et le champignon (The Dictator and the Mushroom) and whom Dupuis had just hired as an “ideas man”. Rosy later admitted, in fact: “I had got the storyline as far as the eighth page. I’d written a synopsis, but Jijé went off at a tangent… And in the end I let it go” (talking to Philippe Capart in 2009). Page no 5, with magnificent inking and lettering by Jijé, was published in Journal Spirou for the second Jerry Spring story, which first appeared in no. 850 and then continued for the next 18 weeks. It was entitled “Le Splendide Cavalier” (The Magnificent Rider) but was then renamed Yucca Ranch the following year when Éditions Dupuis brought out the hardback album.

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Pierre JOUBERT (1910-2002)  - Le Prince Éric

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Description: Pencil and gouache for that iconic cover of Serge Dalens’s novel from the famous collection "Signe de Piste". Signed. 22x26 cm. Éditions Alsatia, 1956. Comments: Serge Dalens, the pen name of Yves de Verdilhac, who was a magistrate by profession, was the author of the six-volume Prince Eric saga, published by Editions Alsacia between 1937 and 1992. In 1954, he helped to launch the legendary Signe de Piste collection with the same publisher. Pierre Joubert, a friend of Dalens since the thirties, illustrated several books in this series, which sold millions of copies. This full-colour drawing appeared on the dust jacket of the 1956 edition of "Le Prince Eric", the second volume in the series. It was also in the portfolio which accompanied the deluxe edition of "Signé de Piste" 1937-1955. Volume 1. Three years earlier, Pierre Joubert had begun illustrating Bob Morane’s celebrated covers for Éditions Marabout .

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André FRANQUIN (1924-1997)  - Spirou et Fantasio – Le nid des Marsupilamis

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Description: Indian ink for the last strip of the page 4 and the two first of the page 5 of the album. Originally published for the cover of the issue no 971 of Spirou magazine in 1956. Cross fold in the middle of the second strip. Signed Franquy Pop. 28x31 cm. Dupuis, 1960. Comments: From the moment it first appeared, in April 1938, Journal Spirou’s front cover was devoted to the adventures of the character from which it took its name. Spirou’s young readers were thus spared the trouble of turning the page in order to discover what their favourite hero had been up to. With a few rare exceptions, the magazine would continue presenting its weekly serial in this fashion right up until 1965 – the year when the cover illustration took over, as it did for most of the magazine’s competitors. Le Nid des Marsupilamis (The Marsupilamis' Nest), launched in Spirou on 8 November 1956, followed on from Gorille a bonne mine (Gorilla's in Good Shape). The page shown here came quite naturally to be divided by Franquin into an initial sequence of three strips, since it was printed on the cover of issue no. 971 on 22 November. The following sequence is to be found further inside the magazine, on a second page comprising four strips. Young readers were thus rather spoilt by this long episode appearing week after week at the heart of what was then Éditions Dupuis dream team’s very best offering. For ten years, Franquin had been breathing life into this character that was not his own creation and he was a few months away from creating his famous jobless hero (who would appear for the first time the following February). It was just at this time that Franquin’s wife Liliane gave birth to their daughter Isabelle – and Franquin dreamed up his story Le Nid des Marsupilamis, a mythical episode of the series produced when his drawing skills were at their absolute height… And all the central figures are present, including Seccotine, the journalist with the little pointy nose, a product of Franquin’s imagination who emerged at a time when heroines were rather rare in the pages of this beautiful magazine.

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WILL (1927-2000)  - Tif et Tondu – Le retour de Choc

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Description: Indian ink for the end page of the album. 34x47 cm. Dupuis, 1957. Comments: All the protagonists of this episode are gathered on this shingle beach for the final act! This is a spectacular page with its large panel depicting the hovercraft and encapsulating the word END. And it is a historic moment for the readers of Spirou no. 933, dated 1 March 1956, when they finally discover the true face of Mr Choc – at least what they think is the true face of Mr Choc… until they learn of their mistake in the next episode. Like a Fantômas, he will keep coming back to haunt the series, giving it a real dynamism for decades to come. While he was working on the Tif et Tondu series, Will was also meeting up every week with his friend Franquin to work on the background illustrations for the latter’s Pirates du silence (The Pirates of Silence), the Spirou story which appeared simultaneously in the pages of the magazine. Regarding the genesis of his mystery character, the Belgian comics writer Maurice Rosy, who was responsible for albums four to 15, explains: “My aim was to inject some new energy into the series, but Tif and Tondu didn’t seem to me to have it in them to achieve that. By bringing them face to face with an adversary, a major villain, a villain of the highest order, my thinking was that they’d raise their game too. At first, I was picturing a thug we’d only ever see from behind. But, in terms of scene setting, there was a risk that that would quickly become very limited. So I began to think about the bad guys who frightened me when I was a child. And from my earliest childhood memories I dredged up the figure of Fantômas! The very embodiment of evil for generation after generation! From Cocteau to the surrealists! The covers of the novels were fascinating! There’s that famous image where Fantômas, in full evening dress, is towering over Paris. (…) Of course, I want his face and his identity to remain a mystery. Fantômas had any number of different faces, but the reader of Tif and Tondu would have got confused. So, I came up with the idea of that knight’s helmet. Along with the dinner jacket, it creates an aristocratic look, something rather solemn. After all, isn’t Mr Choc a prince of crime?” (Rosy c’est la vie ! Conversation with Maurice Rosy, Éditions Dupuis, 2014)

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HERGÉ (1907-1983)  - Good morning, Mr. Bookseller!

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Description: Indian ink drawing for the 7th in a series of 8 made in 1958. Hergé made an update for the 1947’s prospectus. The original drawings was made in 1945. 10x12 cm Comments: It was in 1958 that Hergé learnt from Charles Lesne’s successor at Editions Casterman that the London-based company Methuen, which would be publishing Tintin across the Channel, was enchanted by the flyer he had created for his Belgian publisher… in 1945! Better known by collectors as “Hello, Mr Bookseller!”, this fullcolour leaflet advertises the albums available in the series via the medium of a conversation between the young reporter and a bookseller. Methuen pointed out, however, that the latter did not look sufficiently English and needed adapting! So, Hergé personally took care of the makeover, dressing his bookseller in tweed suit, suede shoes and bow tie. The leaflets, printed in England in 1958, promoting the first two titles published by Methuen (The Crab with the Golden Claws and King Ottokar’s Sceptre) have vanished entirely. Not even the most avid Tintin fans have been successful in tracking any down. Thanks to the publications of experts Messrs Goddin et Wilmet, however, we are able to complete the speech bubble in the leaflet’s seventh scene by inserting the words “Let’s go over to the last page…” Hergé Chronologie d’une oeuvre, volume VII, by Philippe Goddin, Editions Moulinsart, 2011, p.11 Hergé no 4, September 2008, Editions Moulinsart, p.19

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WILL (1927-2000)  - Tif et Tondu – Passez muscade

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Description: Indian ink, color and color code on the back for the cover of the album. Signed in the upper right. 27x37 cm. Dupuis, 1958. Comments: "Passez Muscade" is the sixth title in this series, which was brought out as an album from 1954, while also having a successful run in Journal Spirou from its inception in 21 April 1938, when Fernand Dineur first breathed life into these two modern-day adventurers. The album was published by Éditions Dupuis in 1958 in two versions – hardback for the French market and paperback for the Belgian. Such a luxury was only extended to the privileged few. To the delight of its young readers, the year of Expo 58 saw the Belgian publishing house from Marcinelle lining up several beautiful full-colour albums that were absolute classics. Among them were (Pirates of Silence) by Franquin, Valhardi against the Black Sun by Jijé, Lucky Luke against Joss Jamon by Morris, Buck Danny against Lady X by Hubinon and The Source of Gods by Peyo.

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François CRAENHALS (1926-2004)  - Pom et Teddy – Le talisman noir

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Description: Indian ink for the cover of the album. 28x34 cm. Lombard, 1958. Comments: After the end of the Second World War, it was through Journal Tintin and Journal Spirou that Franco-Belgian publishers of children’s comics vied with one another for a share of the market. And when, in the early 1950s, Editions du Lombard and Éditions Dupuis got into their stride, they began developing their own album departments and promoting their own series, filling the bookshops with beautifully produced books full of colour illustrations. Of the two, it was Éditions du Lombard which really made their mark, in 1950, by creating a luxury object that was to prove a veritable publishing milestone: the red linen album with a “bearskin” or “chequered” back cover – the ultimate collector’s item! In March 1958, Le Talisman Noir (The Black Talisman) in the Pom et Teddy series, the creation of François Craenhals, was the 40th addition in this Lombard linen-book publishing saga. With its mythical blue-check back cover, the book was to feature in the lists of those future collectors who really knew their stuff…

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Jacques MARTIN (1921-2010)  - Alix – La griffe noire

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Description: Indian ink for the page 13 of the last album published in the famous Collection du Lombard. 31x42 cm. Lombard, 1959. Comments: Jacques Martin was first associated with Journal Tintin in 1948 and five years later had become one of the Studios Hergé’s staunch collaborators. This 13th page from La Griffe Noire (The Black Claw) was published in Tintin’s 12th issue on 19 March 1958, opposite another colour page for the Spike and Suzy series. Here, Alix confronts the main protagonists of this episode, which takes place in Pompeii – Nubio, with his dreaded weapon, and his master, who is none other than the High Priest of a Carthaginian sect that worships the god Baal. This magus with hypnotic powers was to instigate the vengeance of Icara, launching Alix on a mad race across the African continent. This story ensured the success of Tintin throughout the year of Expo 58, with young readers discovering in its pages such great classics as “S.O.S. Météores” by Jacobs, “La Cavale d’Or” by Vandersteen, “Zizanion le Terrible” by Macherot and “Tintin au Tibet”, which began appearing in September of that same year.

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PEYO (1928-1992)  - Johan et Pirlouit – La flèche noire

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Description: Indian ink for that unseen cover at the time of the album in 1959. Signed and dedicated at the back. 27x33 cm. Dupuis, 2008. Comments: In an interview Peyo (alias Pierre Culliford) gave in 1982 for Les Cahiers de la Bande Dessinée , Thierry Groensteen asked him whether the creation of Peewit helped much to enrich the series. “Definitely,” said Peyo. “My friends tell me that he’s the character most like me, and I really think that’s right. Without quite realising it, I gave him my own major character traits, in the same way that Franquin projected himself into Gaston, and Roba did the same with Billy’s father, and so on and so forth.” And Peewit is certainly the focal point of this cover, executed in 1959 for the publication of the seventh Johan et Peewit album. Peyo wanted to create a particularly elaborate composition, with an unusually detailed background worthy of a Bayeux tapestry! Unfortunately, however, his publisher suggested that he think up something else, focusing on the tournament, and altogether simpler. This rare cover for La Flèche noire (The Black Arrow) was not published therefore for almost half a century, until the publisher (Dupuis) decided to use it to illustrate an album in this series. And so in 2008 it was used for the second volume in the complete series published under the title Sortilèges et Enchantements (Witchcraft and Enchantments). Meanwhile, in 1991, Peyo used the illustration for a silk-screen version in 250 copies, all of them signed. In the words of his former assistant, Derib, “Peyo was Journal Spirou’s Hergé, but a more lively, a more humorous Hergé.” Hughes Dayez, Peyo l’enchanteur, Niffle, 2003, p. 55 Full-colour silk-screen print, 250 signed copies, 1991 Cover of the Golden Creek portfolio for the 44 pages in their original format

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Jacques MARTIN (1921-2010)  - Alix

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Description: Indian ink and watercolor for this drawing dedicated by Jacques Martin in march 1971, but which has probably been made in 1962-1963 when "Les légions perdues" were published in Tintin magazine. 9x12 cm. Small smudge on the bottom right of the drawing. Comments: This full-colour illustration of Alix and his friendly wolf was drawn to accompany the Légions Perdues (Lost Legions) episode. It probably dates from around 1962 because that was when Jacques Martin came up with the idea of launching Alix in the footsteps of his Gallic ancestors and involving him in a conspiracy that revolves around the famous sword of Brennus. In the early 1960s, Martin and his creations were becoming something of a rarity in the pages of Journal Tintin. Martin always took care of his covers, however. Whether they were destined to illustrate a Tintin issue or a new album for his current publishing house, he produced all these beautiful illustrations himself, taking the time to devise several images for a single project. The publisher or the editor could then choose what suited them best. That was also the case here. The image shown here was offered (with a dedication) to a collector in 1971, which explains why it has never been reproduced before.

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HERGÉ (1907-1983)  - La valse de Tintin, Milou et du Professeur Tournesol

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Description: Indian ink and colour ink for this wonderful colored dedication accompanied by 4 sending lines. Signed. 9,5x10,5 cm January 1965. Comments: 1965 was a special year for Hergé because it saw the publication of the third edition of his L’Ile Noire (The Black Island) in Journal Tintin, where it was billed as the publishing novelty of the year. This new version, which was revised and corrected by Bob De Moor, gave readers something to chew on while waiting for the album which was to follow the famous Bijoux de la Castafiore (The Castafiore Emerald, as it is known in English translation), published two years earlier. More importantly, it was in 1965 that Hergé – alias Georges Remi – began planning the next episode in his Adventures of Tintin, producing his first synopsis for what was soon to become Vol 714 pour Sydney (Flight 714 to Sydney). And the young Dominique was to receive a personal dedication from the hand of Hergé himself, beneath the image of Tintin, Professor Cuthbert Calculus and Snowy all waltzing through the air!

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Victor HUBINON (1924-1979)  - Barbe Rouge – L’île de l’homme mort

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Description: Indian ink for the page 25 of the album. 38x58,5 cm Dargaud, 1967. Comments: Page 25 of "L’Ile de l’Homme Mort" (The Island of the Dead Man), first published in Pilote no 207, on 10 October 1963. Sequel and conclusion to Le Vaisseau Fantôme (The Phantom Ship), the album, which was the seventh in the Démon des Caraïbes (Caribbean Demon) series, only came out in hardback edition in 1967 (published by Dargaud), although it was available in paperback from Lombard. This page presents us with the story’s various protagonists: Eric, adoptive son of Redbeard, accompanied by his two faithful companions, Pegleg and Baba. As for the Black Falcon, it finds itself once more in difficulties in the middle of a storm. The Caribbean Demon series, created by the prolific Jean-Michel Charlier, appeared in Pilote magazine from its inception in 1959, along with his two other flagship series, Astérix et Obélix and Tanguy et Laverdure. Talking about the pirate series in an interview he gave in 1978, Hubinon said: “I created this comic strip above all for the ships. Old ships are fascinating things! The difficulty lies in getting the direction of the sails right; that always worries me” (in Les Cahiers de la Bande Dessinée, n°35).

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André FRANQUIN (1924-1997)  - Gaston Lagaffe – Un gaffeur sachant gaffer

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Description: Indian ink for the gag 472 published in the issue No. 1531 from 1967. Signed. 30x39 cm. Dupuis, 1969 Comments: As a seasoned humourist, Franquin was entirely at home with running gags, the most famous of which must surely be the one about Monsieur De Mesmaeker and the contracts which never get signed! Others were to follow, like the one about the cop Longtarin and his parking meters. The gag about the office burglary by Freddy-les-doigts-de-Fée (fairy-fingered Freddy) was extended through at least four episodes. Number 472 was the very first gag and it was followed by three others – nos. 497, 757 et 816. Franquin’s famous “Idées Noires” (Dark Thoughts) sprang, in the 1970s, from the artist’s preference for drawing characters all in black. This preference is apparent here, where Freddy-les-doigts de Fée et Cloclo-l’Acrobate – two “artists” with typical Franquinesque names – turn up at night at the offices of Ducran Lapoigne et Cie, a company famous for manufacturing metal bridges, which are housed in a building immediately adjacent to the offices of Journal Spirou. Gaston sleeps during the day and works at night: everyone knows that. Here we see him once more, in the company of his faithful friend Jules-de-chez-Smith-en-face (Jules-from-Smith's-acrossthe- street), wrecking Beethoven with the sound of sirens. Nine months before the events of May 1968, this was something of a bold move on Franquin’s part! Gag no. 472 was published in Spirou no. 1,531, on 17 August 1967. Then, in 1969, it was incorporated in album no. 7, entitled Un gaffeur sachant gaffer (A Joker Who Knows How to Joke).

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Maurice TILLIEUX (1921-1978)  - César et Ernestine

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Description: Indian ink and gouache for the no 1644 Journal Spirou cover. Signed. 21x26 cm. 1969 Comments: César et Ernestine is a series by Maurice Tillieux which was key to the success of Éditions Dupuis. It was in 1957 that the character César appeared for the first time in the pages of Journal Spirou before being transferred to Le Moustique on 31 December 1959. In total, Tillieux produced 297 weekly gags up until the year 1966. Spirou reprinted a number of them between 1969 and 1973. During this same period, nine colour illustrations in the form of gags were to grace the magazine’s front cover. Four of these were running gags relating to César parking his Ford T in his garage. One such gag is being offered for sale here.

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JIJÉ (1914-1980)  - Tanguy et Laverdure – Les vampires attaquent la nuit

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Description: Indian ink for the page 15 of the album. 42x52 cm. Dargaud, 1971. Comments: Tanguy, at the controls of his Mirage and taking off from his French base in Dijon, “tearing along at top speed as he goes to confront mysterious invaders in the sky over France” – thus Jean-Michel Charlier in Les Vampires attaquent la nuit (Vampires Attack at Night), from which this page – the 15th – is taken. It was published in Pilote no 547, on 30 April 1970. Tanguy and Laverdure were associated with Journal Pilote from its inception in 1959, at which time Albert Uderzo was responsible for the drawing. In an interview conducted in October 1978, Jijé explained to Henri Filippini how he had come to take over the series: “Uderzo wanted to give up this realistic series, which – given how successful we all know Astérix was – he didn’t feel particularly confident about. Jean-Michel Charlier asked me if I knew a cartoonist capable of taking over the series, and I offered my services. (…) At first, I tried to do it the ‘à la Uderzo’, but that was really laborious, so I very soon reverted to my own style.” And he noted that “Commercially speaking, a Tanguy is worth two Jerry Springs” (published in Les Cahiers de la Bande Dessinée, no 39).

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André FRANQUIN (1924-1997)  - Gaston Lagaffe – Gaffe à Lagaffe

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Description: Indian Ink for the drawing/gag Nº673 published in 1971 in Le Journal de Spirou Nº1733. Signed. 20x27 cm. At the back, a business card on wich André Franquin himself wrote “This page was not sold by the author but offered. AF”. Marsu Productions, 1996 Comments: Gaston Lagaf fe’s cat has no name – although his creator André Franquin had a cat called César. But Franquin acknowledges that César inspired the many gags relating to Gaston’s cat! In his 673rd gag, on 1 July 1971, the famously inventive Gaston causes hilarity among Spirou readers thanks to his capacity to miniaturise a strange accessory for Cheese, the mouse. Speaking to Patrick Pinchart, editor of Journal Spirou , in 1992, Franquin said that “to create a gag, you could say that three things need to come together: a character, an accessory and a situation or an atmosphere” (Signé Franquin, 1992, Dupuis). And this is exactly what we have here, where once again the accessory provides the pretext for putting his favourite animals – including THE cat – in the frame. As for the animals themselves, Franquin acknowledges that “I’ve always been surrounded by animals. I used to breed white mice. I had a squirrel that I’d picked up living with me for years. When I went to my aunt Hortense’s house in the holidays, I’d spend time with the chickens, turkeys, guinea fowls, sheep, pigs… and I used to milk the goat. All that stuff is terrific for a kid. It’s part of childhood – loving animals, enjoying their company. Gaston is an overgrown child, so naturally I made him like animals.”

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PEYO (1928-1992)  - Poussy – Poussy Poussa

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Description: Indian ink for the gag no 2, published in issue No. 1804 of Spirou magazine from 1972. Page 23 of the third book. 28x38 cm. Éditions Dupuis, 1977. Comments: While Éditions Dupuis only brought out the first album of Poussy’s adventures in 1976, the origins of Peyo’s character actually go back much further in time. On 22 January 1949, a small gag in four panels relating to Poussy the cat appeared in Le Soir, a well-known Brussels daily newspaper. Fewer than 15 such gags appeared that first year. From 1951 onwards, Peyo was given two weekly strips to fill and his feline creation had just a little more space in which to stretch its limbs. But it was after the re-launch of the weekly children’s supplement, Le Soir Jeunesse (first launched in 1940 by Hergé to accommodate his Tintin & Milou), that on 15 September 1955 Peyo’s little cat began occupying a whole half-page a week – a presence that amounted to 240 gags in total. All those Poussy gags originally published in Le Soir Jeunesse were later reprinted in Spirou, beginning with no. 1,438 (5 November 1965) and continuing, one after another, until no. 2,047 in 1977. This one appeared in Spirou no 1,804 (9 November 1972), and was special in that it occupied a full page.

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Jean GIRAUD (1938-2012)  - Blueberry – Le spectre aux balles d’or

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Description: Indian ink for the page 4 of the album. 36x46 cm. Dargaud, 1972. Comments: Le Spectre aux Balles d’Or comprises 52 pages, published in Pilote magazine by Giraud and Charlier over a period of six months. At the rate of one double-page spread a week, 1970s readers were introduced to the story that made Blueberry one of the legends of the 9th art. Here is Mister Gir talking to Numa Sadoul about the Spectre album in 1988 – 18 years after its creation for Pilote: “I still wonder how I came to draw Le Spectre aux Balles d’Or. I am amazed by the amount of work, and also the level of success, it represents. (…) In Spectre, all of a sudden, I started producing drawings I had no idea I was capable of. (…) With Blueberry, what I love are the action scenes and the violence, not so much the explosions as the personal encounters. That’s what it was all about, at the start, Blueberry: a comic that’s supposed to be tough, play with danger, with a certain amount of violence. Young readers love that, older ones love it too, everyone loves it!” (in Docteur Moebius et Mister Gir, Casterman, 1991).

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André FRANQUIN (1924-1997)  - Modeste et Pompon – Tout plein de gags

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Description: Indian ink for this medley of characters from the famous family series created by André Franquin for Tintin magazine in 1955. We also include a little card handwritten by André Franquin which accompanied the shipment. 38x27 cm. Lombard, 1973. Comments: In 1973, several pages which failed to be published in the first two Lombard linen albums at the end of the 1950s appeared in Tout plein de Gags (Plenty of Gags). Following a contractual dispute with his publisher Dupuis, and somewhat on a whim, André Franquin had switched allegiance in 1955. Three months after leaving Dupuis, he signed a new contract with Raymond Leblanc and Journal Tintin – which was how he came to be creating this new series based on a single-page weekly gag. These front pages, where all the characters of his fictional family are to be found (including the baby inspired by the birth of the artist’s own daughter, Isabelle), appear exactly as the great Franquin had been dreaming them up since 1950 and his album Quatre Aventures de Spirou et Fantasio (Four Adventures of Spirou and Fantasio). That much is clear from the excellent Chronologie d’une oeuvre by J. L. Bosquet and E. Verhoest, published by Dupuis. Flick through this and you will note the consistency of these pages where the characters and the story are systematically developed against a coloured ground. Created in 1973, Franquin’s pages thus dovetail beautifully between the pages of the Gaston albums for Le Géant de la Gaffe (1972) and Gaffes, Bévures et Boulette (1973).

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Philippe DRUILLET (né en 1944)  - Lone Sloane – Nova

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Description: Indian ink for this big page of the story published in the first issue of Pilote mensuel. It also appears in the album Lone Sloane 66. Signed and artist’s stamp. 71x92 cm. Humanoïdes associés, 1977. Comments: Just imagine this page hanging on your wall – 70 cm by one meter! Because this page – one of the last ten in the "Lone Sloane" saga published in Pilote in 1974 – is one whole meter high! This legendary series first appeared in Pilote in 1970, revolutionising the modern comic book by boldly deconstructing the traditional comic strip format – light years away from what other illustrators were doing at the time. From now on, the panel format would no longer be de rigueur. In 1974, following a disagreement with the magazine’s editor, Druillet left Pilote after publishing “Nova”, a story in ten pages. The following year, he founded Métal Hurlant and the publishing house Les Humanoïdes associés with Jean Giraud and Jean-Pierre Dionnet.

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UDERZO (né en 1927)  - Astérix – La grande traversée

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Description: Indian ink for the page 14 of the album Signed and dedicated. 44,5x52,5 cm. Dargaud, 1975. Comments: The kindness of a great artist is epitomised in Uderzo’s magnificent dedication to Duchêne: “For Alain Duchêne, as a thank you for all your hard work and the huge amount you have done to bring people’s attention back to my early works. In deepest gratitude. Uderzo” Turkey – or “gobble-gobble” – stuffed with wild boar! Another piece of fine irony from René Goscinny after he has just disembarked his famous Galls and their little dog Idéfix on the shores of the New World, more than fifteen hundred years before Christopher Columbus! "La Grande Traversée" (The Great Crossing), illustrated by Albert Uderzo, is the 22nd album in the series. Asterix and Obelix were key to the success of Pilote magazine from its inception in 1959 – a great many years before they became such a hit in the French cinema, enchanting adults and children alike. The story was first published in the French daily newspaper Sud Ouest in 1975, while coming out in book form the same year with Éditions Dargaud/Lombard , with an initial print run of 1,350.000 copies! Twenty years later, an animated movie was released under the title Astérix et les Indiens and Asterix Conquers America in its English-language version.

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DERIB (né en 1944)  - Buddy Longway – Trois hommes sont passés

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Description: Indian ink for the page 3 of the album. 31x40 cm. Lombard, 1976. Comments: It was in 1972 that Buddy Longway first made his appearance in the 16th issue of Tintin Sélection with a 16-page story. This page is taken from Trois hommes sont passés (Three Men Came By), which is the story published in Tintin in 1975, and the following year as the third album in the series for Éditions du Lombard and Dargaud Editeur. This is the story of Jérémie, the son of Buddy and Chinook, and a speeded-up account of the first seven years of his life, from a babe in arms to his first horse-riding lesson. “Seven years went by…”, we read. In addition to his three main protagonists, Derib also deals with a number of themes that are particularly dear to him in this series: family, horses, wide open spaces, nature. All this is illustrated in a totally fluid way, with nothing to separate the images one from the next, so that the scenes flow together, giving the characters and their actions a feeling of complete freedom.

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Jean-Michel NICOLLET (né en 1944)  - Métal Hurlant

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Description: Acrylic for the iconic cover of the 5th issue of the magazine. Signed. 30,5x39,5 cm. Humanoïdes associés, 1976. Comments: Jean-Michel Nicollet is, first and foremost, an illustrator. He created several covers for Métal Hurlant, including this first one for the magazine’s first issue in 1976 (no 5). For the same issue, he also collaborated with Picaret on a few short fantasies, for which he provided the illustrations. Published by Les Humanoïdes associés from 1975 onwards, Métal Hurlant was founded by Druillet, Moebius, Farkas and Dionnet with the intention of creating a comic devoted to science fiction.

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GREG (1931-1999)  - Achille Talon – Le trésor de Virgule

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Description: Indian ink and colour ink for the cover of the album. Signed. 27x36 cm. Dargaud, 1977. Comments: Achille Talon is another famous creation of Greg dreamt up in 1963 for Pilote magazine. He brought the character to life in a series of stories famous for their dialogue brimming with puns. Dargaud started publishing the adventures of Achille Talon in 1966, bringing out a total of 48 albums, the last of which appeared in 2009. The cover shown here is for the 16th volume, published in 1977 under the title of "Le Trésor de Virgule".

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Marcel GOTLIB (né en 1934)  - Rhââ Lovely

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Description: Indian ink for the cover of the third album. 22,5x29 cm Audie, 1978. Comments: It was in the Fluide Glacial series published by Audie that Gotlib brought out his three-volume Rhââ Lovely between 1976 and 1978, and from 1987 onwards it was printed in the J’ai lu BD series, in Pocket Book format. These three volumes bring together the humorous illustrations Gotlib published in Fluide Glacial and L’Echo des Savanes, which he co-founded, and they are considered by fans as a masterpiece on a level with Rubrique-à-Brac and the Dingodossiers. Gilles Verlant tells us that the title of the trilogy was inspired by Alfred Hitchcock’s film Frenzy and the words Hitchcock’s killer uses while he is raping his victims (in Ma Vie-en-vrac, Flammarion, 2006).

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Enki BILAL (né en 1951)  - Exterminateur 17

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Description: Indian ink for the page 3 of the album. Signed. 30x40 cm. Humanoïdes associés 1979. Comments: A classic story of Man pitting his wits against the world of the Machine! The blurb on the back cover of the second edition, published in 1981 by Les Humanoïdes associés, tells us that what we are dealing with here is “theological science fiction”. “Imagine, at some point in the future, a resurgence of the Cathar religion…” we read. “Imagine Howard Hughes become – at last – immortal… Imagine… a thousand years after Spartacus, an android revolution… the sheer weight of Dionnet’s words, the shock of Bilal’s images.” This futuristic story, illustrated by Enki Bilal, was first published in 1977 in issues 11 to 19 of the legendary magazine Métal Hurlant . The creation of a handful of defectors from Pilote, Métal Hurlant had a profound impact on an entire generation of readers. Appearing in the magazine at around the same time, the “Garage Hermétique de Jerry Cornélius” (Jerry Cornélius’s Airtight Garage) was the creation of the great Moebius, one of Métal Hurlant’s founders, whose influence Bilal would have found it hard to refute. We see it clearly demonstrated in the third page of his Exterminator 17. The story was later reissued as part of La Trilogie d’Ellis (The Ellis Trilogy), published by Casterman.

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Philippe DRUILLET (né en 1944)  - Schtroumpf – Les cahiers de la bande dessinée

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Description: Indian ink and colour ink for the 45th cover of the magazine. Signed. 41x46 cm.. Schtroumpf, 1979. Comments: It was in 1972, for its seventh issue, that the fanzine Schtroumpf (The Smurf) became Schtroumpf – Les Cahiers de la Bande Dessinée, a magazine devoted to comics in which leading comics authors of the time are interviewed and subjected to close scrutiny by a team of dedicated specialists. The likes of Hergé, Jacobs, Franquin, Gotlib, Roba, Uderzo, and others, achieved their moment of glory in the pages of what was to become the most celebrated fanzine of its time. Philippe Druillet, one of the leading cartoonists of the period, enjoyed his moment in issue 42, published in the last quarter of 1979. He was to be followed by Morris, Hermann and Will. The magazine ceased publication in 1990 with issue no 89, devoted to Hugo Pratt.

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Milo MANARA (né en 1945)  - Giuseppe Bergman – HP et Giuseppe Bergman

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Description: Indian ink for the first page of the album. 48x65,5 cm. Casterman, 1980. Comments: In the history of the comic strip, the magazine (A Suivre) occupies a very special place. First published in February 1978, it served as the springboard for a whole series of authors who created genuine graphic novels. Every month a chapter would be dedicated to each of the greatest comic-book writers of the time, among them Tardi, Bourgeon, Pratt, Servais, Munoz, Schuiten, Comès and Boucq. Milo Manara made his first appearance in October 1978, in the magazine’s ninth issue, announcing his new series with an illustration on the cover. Here, then, is the very first page of the very first chapter, entitled “Le Maître de Venise” (The Master of Venice), with which Manara’s H.P. and Giuseppe Bergman opens, H.P. being none other than his great friend Hugo Pratt. «L’aventure commence!!» The “adventure begins” with this historic page. It is worth noting that panels three and four were also used to illustrate the back cover of the original edition when the album was published by Casterman in 1980.

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MOEBIUS (1938-2012)  - John Difool & Deepo

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Description: Indian ink for the cover of the issue no 58 of Métal Hurlant, where this epic series begins. Signed. 15x30 cm. Comments: Original cover of Métal Hurlant no 58, published in December 1980 – an historic issue in which John Difool and Deepo, his concrete seagull, make their first appearance in “Night at the Red Ring”, the first chapter of L’Incal Noir (The Black Incal). This new hero with his long red hair, whom Jodorowsky and Moebius had plucked straight from their imagination, was to grace the pages of the magazine for the first ten issues of the following year. There were eleven chapters in all, with between six and eleven pages each depending on the month, the colouring for which was entrusted to a young illustrator who was just starting to make a name for himself in the magazine: Yves Chaland. John Difool was thus to join the eternal ranks of the Moebius pantheon, along with the likes of Arzach and Major Fatal, and the first volume in the saga saw the light of day, encompassing in one fell swoop all the material that would go to make up the two albums issued in 1981 and 1982. In 2011, Les Humanoïdes associés re-used a close-up of this cover for the back cover of Moebius’s re-editions L’Incal Noir and L’Incal Lumière (Luminous Incal).

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Régis LOISEL (né en 1951)  - La quête de l’oiseau du temps – Le temple de l’oubli

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Description: Indian ink for the page 23 of the album. Signed. 35x47 cm. Dargaud, 1983. Comments: Page 23 of the "Temple de l’Oubli" (The Temple of Oblivion), the second volume of La Quête de l’Oiseau du Temps (The Quest for the Time-Bird) created by Régis Loisel, was published in 1984 by Dargaud. Loisel was responsible for illustrating the four albums in the first cycle. In the opinion of the fans, it was with this story that the series truly took off. Here, Pélisse and the Bragon Knight discover Bulrog waiting to be devoured, in his turn, by the desert worms!

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Jacques TARDI (né en 1946)  - Tueur de cafards

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Description: Indian ink and screentone for the cover of the album. 60x28 cm. Casterman, 1984. Comments: In 1984, Casterman published Tardi’s last album in its Studio (A Suivre) collection with a flap at each corner, back and front, so that when it was unfolded it extended to 80cm of soft cover. Tueur de Cafards (Roach Killer) was first published in 1983 in the magazine (A Suivre) and was based on a true story Tardi had heard. He asked Benjamin Legrand to set the story against the backdrop of New York; the action is all in black and white, while the central character is dressed throughout in red. In February 1989, Jacques Tardi did an interview with Eric Verhoest, published under the title “Tardi, ou l’art de la couverture” (Tardi, or the art of covers). Asked what a good cover should look like on a comic album, Tardi’s response was: “It needs to reflect what’s going inside the album. I’ve always been annoyed by covers that don’t correspond to the content of the book.” And asked about the comparison between his own highly theatrical covers and Jacob’s covers, Tardi answered that his own were “… static! I don’t draw movement. My characters are motionless. I create freeze frames… We’re not at the cinema!” (in La Lettre de Dargaud, no 45).

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François SCHUITEN (né en 1956)  - Les Cités Obscures – La Fièvre d'Urbicande

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Description: Indian ink for the page 34 of the second album. 50x36,5 cm. Casterman, 1985. Comments: The readers of the magazine (A Suivre) were introduced to La Fièvre d’Urbicande (The Fever of Urbicande) in September 1983 in a monthly serial lasting six episodes, with the final one appearing in February the following year. This story was the second volume in the series entitled "Les Cités obscures" (The Obscure Cities) created by Benoit Peeters and François Schuiten. The album was published by Casterman at the beginning of January 1985, just a few days prior to winning the Alfred for best album at the 12th Angoulême International Comics Festival.

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Jacques TARDI (né en 1946)  - Adèle Blanc-Sec – Le noyé à deux têtes

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Description: Indian ink for the page 32 of the album. Signed. 28x40 cm. Casterman, 1985 Comments: The Paris Law Courts and the Sainte Chapelle, Quai des Orfèvres and Passage Verdeau, Paris’s famous covered arcade off rue du Faubourg-Montmartre – these are just some of the locations dear to Tardi. The creator of Adèle Blanc-Sec whisks us around his familiar Paris haunts in the footsteps of his heroine, whom we find in the joke shop Au Fou Rire in fits of giggles after being dosed up with laughing gas! This 32nd page for Le Noyé à Deux Têtes was first published in (A Suivre) no 79 in August 1984. Talking about his locations – invariably limited to Paris and its suburbs – Tardi told Numa Sadoul that “I think it’s the consequences of the method of location scouting that E.P. Jacobs did for S.O.S. Météores. I’ve always thought that it was far easier to set a story in a place you know, i.e. on the spot, in front of your house, because all you have to do then is lean out of the window to note the shape of a manhole… I live in Paris. So, the stories take place in Paris” (in Entretiens avec Numa Sadoul, Éditions Niffle-Cohen, 2000).

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MOEBIUS (1938-2012)  - L’Incal – Ce qui est en haut

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Description: Indian ink for the page 41 of the album. 30x38 cm. Humanoïdes associés, 1985. Comments: The Incal series first appeared Métal Hurlant in December 1980. Ce qui est en haut (What Is Above) is the fourth volume in the series. It was published in the first five issues, in 1985, before Les Humanoïdes associés brought it out as an album in June of the same year. In order to learn a little more about the genesis of this saga, it is worth hearing what Jean-Pierre Dionnet, one of the co-founders of the magazine along with Moebius and Druillet, says about the Incal series: “I think that Jodorowsky brought out something by Moebius that may have seemed rather ridiculous till now. With the Incal, Jodorowsky was encouraging him to create longer stories – something Moebius, as Moebius, had never done before” (in C. Marmonnier and G. Poussin, Métal Hurlant 1957-1987: La Machine à Rêver, Éditions Denoël, 2005). In the same commemorative work, Alexandro Jodorowsky is recorded as having said: “I told the Incal story to Moebius. I didn’t write it down or record it. Moebius made sketches at super-human speed while I recounted the story. I’d play a character and he’d add the dialogue. […] each album took four days to dictate. The idea was to start off with a rather pathetic character, a detective, and to develop things into a story of initiation – an expansion of consciousness; the mutation of the hero’s consciousness.”

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Jacques TARDI (né en 1946)  - Nestor Burma – 120, rue de la Gare

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Description: Indian ink for the announcement of the following of the story appeared in no 105 of (A SUIVRE). 18x21 cm. Casterman, 1988 Comments: Publishing in the monthly magazine (A Suivre), Tardi decided to break off temporarily after the ninth chapter of his adaptation of 120, Rue de la Gare by Léo Malet. Hence this illustration, which was specially drawn for this issue of the magazine and replaces the last two panels of page 102. This is why, in (A Suivre) no. 105, page 102 concludes with the announcement “You will get to know more if you read the second part… etc…” And the reader is thus obliged to wait seven months, for (A Suivre) no. 112, to learn how the story continues, as the train in which Burma is travelling enters the occupied zone.

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Yves CHALAND (1957-1990)  - Spirou et Fantasio – Coeur d'acier

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Description: Indian ink for the last of the 4 pages of the pilot made by Yves Chaland for the rework of the emblematic character of Éditions Dupuis. 30x40 cm. 1986. Comments: It was in response to a request from the then editor of Journal Spirou that Yves Chaland took over the series of the famous groom in the summer of 1982. For 22 weeks, Chaland’s two black-andwhite strips appeared at the bottom of the magazine’s second and third pages under the title “Spirou et les robots” (Spirou and the Robots). Four years later and after publishing two new Freddy Lombard albums, Chaland went back to his beloved robots, but this time he abandoned the constraints of the comic strip in favour of fullpage illustrations. The result was three quite different and distinct storylines: Coeurs d’acier (Steel Hearts), Moustic Journal and Le Groom Vert-de-Gris (The Verdigris Groom”), totalling a mere 22 pages of pencil drawings. Two out of six of the pages in Moustic Journal were drawn and inked entirely by Chaland himself, however. Page four, published in 1993 in Les Inachevés (The Unfinished) by Champaka Book , is one of them. As Yann Lepennetier explains, “Chaland re-situates the action in Brussels. Having heard nothing from his friend Fantasio, our hero goes to Fantasio’s house and tells him that the newspaper has just fired him because of an article he wrote about the mysteries of the North Pole – such a fanciful article that at the last moment the editor preferred to publish a blank page… But our nutty hero isn’t the least bit bothered and proudly produces the robot he claims to have found and dismantled in order to learn its secrets” (Les Inachevés, Champaka). Les Inachevés, Champaka Book, 1993, p. 56

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MOEBIUS (1938-2012)  - Dessin inédit

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Description: Colored pencils on colored paper for this beautiful portrait. 17x26,5 cm. Casterman, 1988. Comments: Moebius spent time in a great many different locations in the course of his life – France, Japan, Mexico, Tahiti, and of course the United States. Los Angeles occupied a special place in his artistic life. When asked how long he had been living there full time, Moebius told Numa Sadoul: “Since 1985. I lived in Santa Monica first, then in Venice, and now I’m in Woodland Hills, near L.A.” And Moebius in L.A. is the title given to a collection of 136 pages brought out by Casterman in 1988 and containing a large quantity of previously unpublished material. Page 56 of this album represents a beautiful young woman wearing a long tunic, executed on blue paper and signed © Moebius 86 – one of numerous variants which employ the same subject matter, the same technique and the same support, and date back to the days of his company, Starwatcher Graphics Inc, in LA.

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Jacques TARDI (né en 1946)  - Nestor Burma – 120, rue de la Gare

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Description: Indian ink for the page 102 of the album. 29x40 cm. Casterman, 1988. Comments: In 1986, Jacques Tardi adapted his second Nestor Burma: "120, Rue de la Gare". It was to be an absolute comic-book masterpiece. Written in the spring of 1942, a year after his release from the Stalag on medical grounds, 120, Rue de la Gare was Léo Malet’s first novel centring on the detective from the Fiat Lux agency. Not until 1953, however, did he come up with the idea of writing “Nouveaux Mystères de Paris” (New Paris Mysteries), with each novel taking place in a different area of Paris. Page 102 corresponds to the one that appeared in the album published by Casterman in January 1988. Burma and his fellow travelling companions bowl along towards the next page – where they will be entering occupied territory.

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Frank LE GALL (né en 1959)  - Théodore Poussin – Marie Vérité

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Description: Indian ink for the cover of the third album of the series. 24x32 cm. Dupuis, 1988. Comments: "Marie Vérité" is the third volume in the saga by Frank Le Gall which appeared in the pages of Journal Spirou in 1984. The first two albums were brought out together in 1987, and the following year Éditions Dupuis published this third volume, which went on to win the Alph-Art for best French album in January 1989! From 1990 onwards, all the Théodore Poussin albums appeared in the Repérages collection published by Dupuis. At the request of Le Gall, who was struggling by now, Yann brought his attention definitively to bear on this third volume, and the text is credited to him. Speaking about Yann’s intervention, Le Gall said: “Yann had some difficulty working with all the very different ideas I’d had, but he loves working like that, improving, restructuring… What he taught me above all was how to really establish my characters. He helped me take the storylines further. He also taught me to think about the album as such, as a finished object in which each element has a role to play, from the cover via the flyleaves to the most modest tailpiece” (in PLG no. 29, October 1993).

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Jacques TARDI (né en 1946)  - Nestor Burma – 120, rue de la Gare

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Description: Indian ink and watercolor for the cover of the most famous novel of the series. 12,5x18,5 cm. Presses de la Cité, 1990. Comments: Léo Malet was a poet and mad about surrealism. He was a friend of Jacques Prévert, who got Malet a walk-on part in Carné’s celebrated Port of Shadows. But it is to his fictional character Nestor Burma that Malet really owes his fame – Nestor Burma the great detective, “l’homme qui met le mystère KO” (the man who knocks the mystery out), as his motto proudly claims. Malet wrote his first Burma in the spring of 1942, but publication, under the title 120, Rue de la Gare, was delayed until the following year. In 1946, the book – which is set during the Nazi occupation of Paris and Lyons – was made into a film, and some 30 other titles were published in the years that followed. In 1986-87, Jacques Tardi produced a cartoon version of 120, Rue de la Gare, having begun by adapting Malet’s Brouillard au Pont de Tolbiac (Fog on the Tolbiac Bridge) a few years earlier. This detective saga was thus successively published by more than one publishing house. At the request of Fleuve Noir and Presses de la Cité, Tardi began illustrating the covers in 1989. En 1996, Fleuve Noir published several episodes under the title Les Aventures de Nestor Burma. Tardi illustrated them all and 120, Rue de la Gare appeared, logically enough, as volume 1. This is the cover here.

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Enki BILAL (né en 1951)  - Nikopol – Froid Équateur

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Description: Indian ink and colour ink for the page 45 of the album. Signed. 32x42 cm. Humanoïdes associés, 1992. Comments: Froid Equateur (Cold Equator) is the third part of the Nikopol trilogy and came out in the last quarter of 1992, following La Foire aux Immortels (The Carnival of Immortals), published in 1980, and La Femme piège (The Woman Trap), which appeared in 1986. In an interview conducted in 1994, Bilal commented: “I’d certainly say that Cold Equator is the most accomplished of my albums. It’s a mixture of things: it’s absolutely typical of my comic-book work, but it also involves an understanding of cinematic writing. It’s a disconcerting album for conventional readers precisely because it disrupts the familiar fluidity of the traditional comic book. (…) I felt some really good vibes with this album at times. It’s less graphic than the two previous ones but, in the end, that wasn’t what I was after. What I wanted to do was to play with the narrative…” (in Sapristi ! no. 29, A. Ledoux et O. Maltret, 4th quarter 1994)

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WILL (1927-2000)  - Quai des Bulles

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Description: Pencils, Indian ink and watercolor for the poster of the 1993’s edition of the famous Saint-Malo festival of comic strip. We add to it a small project made with pencil and Indian ink. On the back of it there's the top of a drawing project for the « La 27e lettre » cover. Signed. 55x40 cm and 22x15 cm. Comments: Quai des Bulles, the original colour drawing accompanied by its preparatory sketch for the official poster for the Quai des Bulles comics festival in Saint-Malo, in November 1993. The actual poster was printed in a 40cm x 57cm format. The scene dreamt up by Will represents a mermaid blowing soap bubbles, on each of which sits one of his best-known characters: Isabelle, Calendula, Uncle Hermès, Tif and Tondu. In the background, we see Saint-Malo itself, birthplace of Robert Surcouf, with its famous ramparts awaiting visitors under a blue, blue sky… This is how Philippe Vandooren, editorial director of Dupuis and editor-in-chief of Journal Spirou, describes Will in an interview he gave with Rudi Miel: “What a good designer! What a keen sense of balance and elegance. (…) And I don’t propose to talk here about those young women whose mysterious beauty and grace we all know so well; nor about Isabelle, that wonderful series where the artist’s graphic imagination reaches such extraordinary heights; nor about the transparency and magical freshness of his watercolours; nor about the other many superb creations whose reproduction would fill several books” (Will Collection privée, 1995). In the same tribute work, Sirius, creator of Timour and the Epervier Bleu, emphasised that “Willy has a feeling for colour. I don’t know many artists who are as talented in that way as he is: his plates in direct colour are splendid.” Will Collection privée, Éditions Concerto, 1995, p. 46

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MIDAM (né en 1963)  - Kid Paddle – Jeux de vilains

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Description: Indian ink and colour ink for the back cover of the first 7 albums. 18x25 cm. Dupuis, 1996-2001. Comments: Ten to midnight! The time when all little boys are sound asleep… And Kid Paddle is no exception. His smile tells its own story… His joystick is on standby, ready to jump into action when Kid wakes again. Like Tintin’s tuft, it is his cap, within easy reach at the end of his bed, which is Kid’s distinguishing feature. This poetic image is the one that appeared on the back cover of the first seven albums in the Kid Paddle series, published by Éditions Dupuis between 1996 and 2001, and is thus firmly imprinted on the collective imagination of Kid Paddle readers from "Jeux de vilains" (Naughty Games) to "Waterminator". Such replication makes the image desirable in more ways than one, and not only for young fans of this intergenerational series, but for older fans too!

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Jacques TARDI (né en 1946)  - Nestor Burma – Casse-pipe à la Nation

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Description: Indian ink for the page 5 of the album. 27x39 cm. Casterman, 1996. Comments: Candy floss, waffles and crepes, Montélimar nougat and bumper cars: these are just some of the things we associate with Paris’s famous Foire du Trône and which have found their way into Tardi’s fifth page for Casse-Pipe à la Nation, published in (A Suivre) no 217 in 1996. Casse-Pipe à la Nation is Tardi’s fourth and penultimate adaptation of a Nestor Burma story. Penned by Léo Malet, it was published in 1957 by Laffont in their “Les Nouveaux Mystères de Paris” series. Malet chose once again to set his story in the heart of Paris, and here we see his detective wandering around the 12th arrondissement. Talking to Numa Sadoul about this particular adaptation, Tardi remarked that “The character’s name struck me as a bit ‘nerdy’ and at the same time perfect for a popular series. Malet left me to get on with it. He never intervened in my adaptations. Comics weren’t his thing. (…) Once I’ve got rid of that whiff of Malet xenophobia – racism, even – there’s no problem and I can just enjoy moseying about, which is something I really love doing. That’s the only reason for adapting his novels. I choose the book according to the arrondissement where I fancy having a wander” (in Entretiens avec Numa Sadoul, Éditions Niffle-Cohen, 2000).

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William VANCE (né en 1935)  - Bruce J. Hawker

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Description: Indian ink for the drawing of screen printing on Plexiglas published by Espace BD in 60 copies. Signed. 36x29 cm. 1998. Comments: William Van Cutsem, aka William Vance, is a Belgian comics artist who started out as an illustrator in the world of advertising at the end of the 1950s. He was first introduced to cartoon work as assistant to Dino Attanasio on a Bob Morane in 1961. And it was thanks to Henri Vernes, creator of Bob Morane, that Vance continued to publish illustrations for the same series in the magazine Femmes d’Aujourd’hui from 1967. In 1976, he created a maritime series for the Belgian weekly, which only published the first episode. It was thus that Bruce J. Hawker, Lieutenant of the British Navy, was born, and thanks to the quality of this series Vance was able in the end to get all the stories published in France and Belgium, where they appeared in the weeklies Journal Tintin and Hello Bédé between 1979 and 1990. Talking about his passion for writing this particular series, Vance explains: “Without wishing to sound pretentious, I’d say that it has to be part and parcel of who you are. It’s difficult, almost impossible, to explain what I feel. When I’ve got my drawing in front of me and I’m working on one of these sequences, my mind becomes detached from reality and whisks me off into all that welter of spray. (…) I’ve spent a lot of time looking at the sea, especially when it’s wild. When I’m drawing, I can recreate all those sensations quite naturally and spontaneously. It’s in my guts!” (interview with Alain Ledoux in 1996, in Sapristi ! no 36).

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