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Auction Description for Early American: Autographs - Civil War Era - Colonial Currency - Americana
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Autographs - Civil War Era - Colonial Currency - Americana

by Early American


334 lots with images

June 28, 2014

Live Auction

P. O. Box 3507

Rancho Santa Fe, CA, 92067 USA

Phone: 00 1 858 759 3290

Fax: 00 1 858 759 1439

Email: auctions@earlyamerican.com

334 Lots
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Astronaut JOHN GLENN Signed Classic Color Photo

Lot 1: Astronaut JOHN GLENN Signed Classic Color Photo

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Description: Autographs(ASTRONAUTS), JOHN GLENN.Color publicity Photograph Signed and Inscribed, "To Mike--John Glenn", 10" x 8," Choice Mint. A waist-length portrait of Glenn posing in his "civies."

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PHINEAS TAYLOR BARNUM Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 2: PHINEAS TAYLOR BARNUM Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsAutograph Letter Signed "P.T. Barnum" 100% poorer!PHINEAS TAYLOR BARNUM (1810-1891), Famous American Showman, Legendary Entrepreneur and Promoter.June 28, 1837-Dated Autograph Letter Signed "P.T. Barnum", 1 page, 8" x 6", onboard the Steam Boat Nimrod, Choice Very Fine. This lovely high quality, clean and well written Letter is sent to Charles Hawley Esq., regarding a legal matter. It is boldly penned in deep brown upon light blue lined period wove paper and easily readable, bearing an attractive 2" long "P.T. Barnum" signature. It reads, in full:"Dr. Sir --- I have just returned home from a tour South and shall be on my way back in a few days. A.B. Trowbridge informs me you are employed as counsel in a case of myself against Marcus Wagoner. As my evidence will be necessary in the case you will have the kindness to drop me a line by next mail to Philadelphia, informing me how the deposition is to be directed & c and I will give it there and forward it to you immediately. I leave that city for the 'far west' in about a week, 100 per cent poorer than usual. Please accept an apology for this scrawl as the jarring of the Boat is much against me. -- Yours &c -- (Signed) P.T. Barnum".This Autograph Signed Letter was written less than a year after the death of Barnum's first "promotion" - an African-American woman who passed herself off as the nurse of George Washington. According to documents she carried with her as proof, she would have been 161 years of age. Barnum bought the rights to her "show," and proceeded to tour with her for the next 18 months. Upon her death in 1836, an autopsy proved her to be closer to 80 than 160.In a stroke of genius, P.T. Barnum exploited this in the newspapers, announcing to any reporter who would listen that he had been "duped" by this imposter, assuring his notoriety. Thus began Barnum's famous half-century career in showmanship!

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PIERRE GUSTAVE TOUTANT de BEAUREGARD Partially-Printed Document Signed

Lot 3: PIERRE GUSTAVE TOUTANT de BEAUREGARD Partially-Printed Document Signed

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Description: AutographsThe Confederate States Army "The Little Napoleon" & "The Hero of Fort Sumter" Nicknamed, "G.T. Beauregard"PIERRE GUSTAVE TOUTANT de BEAUREGARD. (1818-1893). First Prominent General of the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War as the First Confederate Brigadier General. Nicknamed: "The Little Napoleon" & "The Hero of Fort Sumter."July 15, 1880-Dated, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "G.T. Beauregard," as the organization's President, 1 page, measuring 13.75" x 18.5", being a (Confederate) Certificate of Membership, Fine. This historic Document grants Membership in "The Association of the Army of Tennessee," to L. R. Burdge, a private in Company C of the 11th Louisiana Regiment, nicknamed the "Continental Guards." It is Signed at lower center in rich brown ink, "G.T. Beauregard" as President (with paraph), and also by J. D. Taylor, as Secretary. General soiling and some tears, one of which bisects the signatures. This is the first example of this historic Signed Document we have encountered.This original Document os odorned with decorative classic "CSA" engraved vignettes of Jefferson Davis and Six CSA Generals, plus a central Battle Scene with Confederate Flags with their troops. It further lists his War service with the medical department for hospital duty and that he served until the end of the Civil War, being paroled at Macon, Georgia on May 4, 1865. This impressive rare Document has even moderate tone to the paper, a top center repaired tear from the outer edge to the border design, a number of sealed edge splits and is linen-backed for overall reinforcement and added stability. A very impressive, desireable and exceedingly rare Confederate States Army display item Signed "G. T. Beauregard" the First Confederate Brigadier General !

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Sensational Red Cross CLARA BARTON Autograph Letter Signed Appology Letter

Lot 4: Sensational Red Cross CLARA BARTON Autograph Letter Signed Appology Letter

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Description: AutographsSuperb 1902 "Clara Barton" Autograph Letter Signed "To The President of the United States" (Theodore Roosevelt)CLARA BARTON (1821-1912), Organizer and First President of the American Red Cross.c. 1902 Autograph Letter Signed, "Clara Barton," 4 pages, measuring 8.5" x 10.75", no place or date, addressed "To The President of the United States" (Theodore Roosevelt), Very Fine. Some prior archival repairs and conservation to various mailing folds with reinforced separations and trivial paper loss. Overall, in nice vivid condition with dark, easily legible holograph text and an excellent concluding signature "Clara Barton" measuring fully 2" long. Barton neatly and beautifully Hand-pens this historic and passionate Letter regarding the American Red Cross and profusely apologizes for prior disputes with the government. This highly important, rather amazing Letter reads, in full, and is headed... "To The President of the United States. ---- Most Honored President: --- Having received your commands through the hand nearest your own, which should be regarded as from yourself, it is perhaps temerity to address even a word beyond the reply given that messenger; but recalling the adage that great generosity attends great power, I trust to your clemency if this be an act of Trespass.The Red Cross having been the result of an International Treaty accepted through the Executive Department, and not by congressional action, it seemed indispensable that this distinguished department act as counselor of the body created to represent the treaty if such counsel were required.Article 4. of the first constitution of the American Red Cross, 1881, reads as follows; 'The officers of this association shall consist of a President, first Vice-President; other vice-presidents, not to exceed one from each State, Territory and the District of Columbia; a Secretary; Treasurer; an Executive Board; a Board for 'Consultation, which shall consist of the following officers of The United Sates Government, viz: The President and his cabinet: General of the Army: Surgeon General; Adjacent General, and Judge Advocate General and such other officers as many hereafter be deemed necessary.' This provision was fully inclined and Accepted by President Arthur, his entire Cabinet and all other officers named in the constitution, and as an open guarantee of good faith to the public was placed as the leading line of official appointments on all paper issued by the organization from that time to the present.Every administration has been duly and personally consulted, and cordial cooperation assured. The existing administration, through its great souled, genial Head perhaps the most warmly of all, for both had the greater need of each.Mr. Cleavland [sic], our only surviving past President will not have forgotten the cordial relations never interrupted.It would seem that in continuing these time honored relations there existed no usurpation of power, on the part of the organization, and the idea of the assumption of authority could have presented itself only to such of its members as were new to its records and unacquainted with its history.I recite these facts to you Mr. President as an earnest that neither was usurpation practiced nor discourtesy intended in the late needed changes of the articles of the organization.For twenty years this Red Cross work, so small at first; - a mere spark, - has grown up under our hands until its welcome blaze lighted the footsteps of relief for an entire and direful content of nations, and of which none better than your own honored self know the hardships, or the needs: or can better judge if this body of relief were aggressive in its conduct, imperious or injured in its demands, or if its president assumed unwanted or unauthorized power, or manifested love of distinction, pride of place, or greed of spoils.Great trials test characters. The fundamental principle of good citizenship is willing acquiescence. The foundation on which all good government rests is faithful conformity to its laws. All of these great principles are expressed in unquestioned obedience to it's rulers.Thus Mr. President, if in the continuing of your honored name and that of your Cabinet in our administration of the Red Cross under its Treaty. I have committed an error so grave as to merit a personal reprimand, and be required to make an open denial before the world of the privileges I have assumed, - the powers I have usurped, the disrespect shown the Honored Heads of the nation and my unavoidable and deep humiliation there at, I shall prove my good citizenship by exact, and willing conformity with, and obedience to the command, by the publication of your honored letter, and such replies as I have been able to make, in order that no misunderstanding of your relations can possibly occur.Relying upon the ready acceptance of each appointment, the endorsement and cooperation of every honored Head of our nation for a score of years, and remembering more tenderly than all, the cordial hand-grasp that welcomed us into the present Administration in its beginning - and - so silently, and reverently the vacant place had been supplied that among many cares, and much grief, the courtesy of your high permission had been overlooked.For this error, My Honored President I earnestly beg your gracious pardon.I will, with your permission take the liberty of publishing with This, the letter of resignation of our late Treasurer Mr. Wm. T. Flather, whose subsequent relations with me have been most cordial, and who named no dissatisfaction.Trusting that these concessions, faithfully submitted, may prove a sufficient notice and guarantee to the public, of the disconnection which you desire from the organization which I have so long had the pain to conduct, I have the honor to subscribe myself. --- Your obedient Countrywoman, --- (Signed) Clara Barton."A fantastic and historic content original Signed Letter, highly personal and asking for forgiveness, written by Clara Barton herself to President Roosevelt, during a most tumultuous time in the history of the American Red Cross. (Read more regarding the history behind the writing of this truly remarkable Letter on our Auction website: www.EarlyAmerican.com)During the Spanish-American War, members of the Red Cross began to express concerns about the organization's efforts to cope with the mounting needs of a growing nation. In 1900, Congress granted a charter to address concerns over the way the organization - and in particular, Clara Barton - managed the operation.Accused that her financial record-keeping was sloppy and incomplete, the charter attempted to insure more systematic governance and greater fiscal responsibility. However, in the view of a growing number of people, some of whom had been staunch Barton supports in the past, more radical steps needed to be taken. It was Led by Mabel T. Boardman (a member of the Red Cross since 1900 and a powerful force within it for the next 44 years), a group was organized, dubbed the "remonstrants," that openly opposed Barton.They took their concerns to President Roosevelt and to Congress. Barton and her remaining followers put up a strong fight - at one point expelling "remonstrants" from the Red Cross organization, and at another, declaring Clara Barton "President for life." However, in the end, the opposition prevailed.Faced with a congressional investigation, Clara Barton resigned from the Red Cross on May 14, 1904, at the age of 83. The very founder of the Red Cross had been forced out by the same organization she had created and nurtured. Barton was particularly hurt by what she felt was President Theodore Roosevelt's indifference to her plight. She later wrote, "The government I though I loved and loyally tried to serve has shut every door in my face."

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IRVING BERLIN Signed Handsome Head-and-shoulders Portrait Photograph

Lot 5: IRVING BERLIN Signed Handsome Head-and-shoulders Portrait Photograph

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Description: AutographsSuperb Irving Berlin Signed Handsome Portrait PhotographIRVING BERLIN (1888-1990). Historic and Famous American Composer.Beautiful Signed Photograph, "Irving", measuring 7.5" x 9.5", light sepia-tone. A handsome head-and-shoulders portrait of the famous American composer and songwriter. Irving Berlin has drawn a staff with musical notation and lyric handwritten, "Come on and hear... come on and hear..." from his song "Alexander's Ragtime Band." Signed boldly in black pen perfectly to the white area of his shirt in this image. Signed by the photographer "Tycko - L.A." at bottom right. A gorgeous image for framing and display.

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Abolitionist JOHN BROWN, Sr. 1851 Partial Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 6: Abolitionist JOHN BROWN, Sr. 1851 Partial Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsRare Abolitionist "John Brown" Plus His Son John Brown Jr. Signed Letter "Your Affectionate Father, John Brown" JOHN BROWN (1800-1859). Abolitionist Leader who sought to start an Armed Slave Rebellion, culminating in the historic Raid on Harper's Ferry for which he was Executed by Hanging in 1859.March 24, 1851-Dated Pre Civil War Era, Portion of an Autograph Letter Signed, "Your Affectionate Father, John Brown," measuring 3.5" x 3.5" with notation below "Autograph of John Brown from letter addressed to John Brown Jr. March 24th, 1851 (Signed) - J. B. Jr.," Choice Near Mint. An impressive association piece, with Brown's signature and his son's signature on the bottom corner of a letter from father to son, which has been pasted to the blank front flyleaf of a First Edition of Stephen Vincent Benet's novel in verse, "John Brown's Body."This letter fragment has been neatly trimmed, having the original letter folds, and some light glue stains in the corners, and otherwise is in excellent condition, no doubt protected for many decades by the book. The 377 page book, with black, cloth boards, measuring 8.5" x 6," was published by Doubleday, Doran and Company, New York in 1928, and is marked "First Edition." The bookplate of Otto Orren Fisher is attached inside the front cover, and there is a short pencil notation above it noting that this is a first edition and has the Brown autographs. Protected by a mylar covering, this book has bumps to the top and bottom of the spine, and otherwise in is in perfect condition, though lacking a dust jacket.John Brown (1800-1859) was one of the most defining figures in American history. Brown's activities - culminating in the raid on Harper's Ferry - have long been debated as either the butchery of a madman or the zealous labors of a passionate abolitionist. While credited or blamed for being one of the dominoes that tumbled to start the Civil War, few remember that his capture was orchestrated by Col. Robert E. Lee. Like his other brothers, John Brown Jr., though supportive of his father's anti-slavery activities, refused to take part in the Harper's Ferry Raid. Following his father's execution, John Jr., worked tirelessly to defend his father's character against public criticism.

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Abolitionist JOHN BROWN, Rare 1852 Autograph Letter Signed to His Son John

Lot 7: Abolitionist JOHN BROWN, Rare 1852 Autograph Letter Signed to His Son John

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Description: Autographs1852 Abolitionist Leader JOHN BROWN Letter to His Eldest & Dear Son JOHN BROWN JUNIOR (1821 - 1895)JOHN BROWN (1800-1859). Abolitionist Leader who sought to start an Armed Slave Rebellion, culminating in the historic Raid on Harper's Ferry for which he was Executed by Hanging in 1859.July 20, 1852-Dated, Excellent Content Autograph Letter Signed, "John Brown," 1 page, measuring 7.75" x 9.75", from Akron, Ohio, to his son John Jr., and was John Brown Sr. most trusted son, Choice Very Fine. John Brown Jr., was the eldest son of the abolitionist John Brown, was born in Ohio in July 1821.Along with four brothers, John Jr. moved out west to Kansas in 1854. After his father's actions in "Bloody Kansas," John Jr. was arrested, mistreated while in prison, and later released. Shortly after this, John Jr. left Kansas with his father. John Jr. might have also personally been aware of the plans for the historic Raid at Harpers Ferry in Virginia. He was not a part of that raid itself, yet he knew all the details, and even was part of the process. John Brown Sr. appointed John Jr. as the intelligence agent and liaison. This meant that John Jr. would be the go between for John Brown Sr. and other members. Thus providing added safety for John Brown Sr. and secrecy. Scouting around Harper's Ferry, John Jr. acted as his father's liaison for the raid in Virginia. In 1858, John Brown sent John Jr. to Virginia to survey the area surrounding the Harper's Ferry US Federal Armory and the Town. Here, Brown writes, in full:"Akron, Ohio 20th July 1852 ---- Dear Son John ---I wrote you a few days before the death of our infant son saying we expected to loose him. Since then we have some of us been sick constantly. The measles & Hooping Cough went so hard with Sarah that we were quite anxious on her account; but were much more alarmed on account of my wife who was taken with bleeding at the Lungs Two or Three days after the death of her child. She was pretty much confined to her bed for some weeks, & suffered a good deal of pain; but is now much more comfortable, & able to be around. About the time she got about, I was taken with Fever & Ague & am unable to do much now, but have got the Shakes stoped [sic] for the present. The almost constant wet weather put us back very much about our crops, & prevented our getting in much Corn. What we have is promising. Our Wheat is of very good quality but the crop is quite moderate. Our Grass is good; & we have a good deal secured. Shall probably finish harvesting Wheat to day. Potatoes promise well. Sheep & Cattle are doing well & I would most gladly [be able] to add; that in Wisdom & good morals we are all improveing [sic]. The Boys have done remarkably well about the work. I wish I could see them manifest an equal regard for their future well being. Blindness has happened to us in that which is of most importance. We are at a loss for the reason that we do not hear a word from you. The friends are well so far as I know. Heard from Henry & Ruth a few day[s] since. Your Affectionate Father -- (Signed) John Brown".An important, early and very personal content Letter from John Brown Sr. to his beloved son John Jr.Provenance: The Library of Estelle Doheny, Christie's 21 February 1989, lot 1720.From the mid-1840s John Brown Sr. had built a reputation as an expert in fine sheep and wool, and entered into a partnership with Col. Simon Perkins of Akron, Ohio, whose flocks and farms were managed by Brown and sons. Brown eventually moved into a home with his family across the street from the Perkins Stone Mansion located on Perkins Hill.The John Brown House (Akron, Ohio) still stands and is owned and operated by The Summit County Historical Society of Akron, Ohio. As Brown's associations grew among sheep farmers of the region, his expertise was often discussed in agricultural journals even as he widened the scope of his travels in conjunction with sheep and wool concerns (which often brought him into contact with other fervent Anti-Slavery people as well).Some popular narrators have exaggerated the unfortunate demise of Brown and Perkins' wool commission in Springfield with Brown's later life choices. In actuality, Perkins absorbed much of the financial loss, and their partnership continued for several more years, with Brown nearly breaking even by 1854.In 1855, Brown learned from his adult sons in the Kansas territory that their families were completely unprepared to face attack, and that pro-slavery forces there were militant.Determined to protect his family and oppose the advances of slavery supporters, Brown left for Kansas, enlisting a son-in-law and making several stops just to collect funds and weapons. As reported by the New York Tribune, Brown stopped en route to participate in an anti-slavery convention that took place in June 1855 in Albany, New York. Despite the controversy that ensued on the convention floor regarding the support of violent efforts on behalf of the free state cause, several individuals provided Brown some solicited financial support.As he went westward, however, Brown found more militant support in his home state of Ohio, particularly in the strongly anti-slavery Western Reserve section where he had been reared.The most noted screen portrayal of Brown have both been given by actor Raymond Massey. The 1940 film Santa Fe Trail, starring Errol Flynn, Ronald Reagan and Olivia de Havilland. That film depicted Brown completely unsympathetically as an out-and-out villainous madman, and Massey added to that impression by playing him with a constant, wild-eyed stare. The film gave the impression that it did not oppose African-American slavery, even to the point of having a black "mammy" character say, after an especially fierce battle, "Mr. Brown done promised us freedom, but... if this is freedom, I don't want no part of it".

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1848 JOHN BROWN HARPERS FERRY RAID, Participants, SIGNED Document

Lot 8: 1848 JOHN BROWN HARPERS FERRY RAID, Participants, SIGNED Document

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Description: Autographs1848 John Brown's Harpers Ferry Raid Related DocumentIncluding: Fontaine Beckham - The Harper's Ferry Mayor Killed(HARPER'S FERRY RAID) by JOHN BROWN and BATTLE PARTICIPANTS FROM VIRGINIA. April 5, 1848-Dated Important Pre-Civil War Era, Partially-Printed Document, Signed Twice (front and back), by Fontaine Beckham, Mayor of Harper's Ferry who was killed by John Brown's men during the famous Raid on Harpers Ferry, also Signed on the reverse by James H. Holt, who captured one of Brown's men John L. Copeland (a Free Black), during that Raid, Choice Extremely Fine. It is said that Holt put a gun to Copeland's head when captured. He fired the gun but the powder was wet and the gun failed to discharge. After pistol whipping Copeland, Holt dragged him ashore and with others, tried to Lynch Copeland with a rope made of handkerchiefs tied together, but was prevented from carrying it out. Copeland was tried and hanged two months later.A historic, 1 page, Official Document that is very boldly printed on period wove paper. It fully completed where required in easily readable, deep rich brown ink, having excellent clear signatures, being only folded for storage. It is a legal Court Summons of Jefferson County, VA (now West Virginia) to bring John Brighton to court to answer for a debt of $6.58 owed by Brighton to James H. Holt.This Document is Signed Twice, by Fontaine Beckham, Mayor of Harper's Ferry (on its front and back), who was killed by John Brown's men during the raid on Harpers Ferry. Fontaine Beckham was the third of the five men killed, and was also the most prominent. He was killed along the railroad, near a watering station. Besides being the Mayor at the time of the raid, he was a County Magistrate (in which capacity he signs this document), and a Station Agent for the B & O Railroad. Beckham's death so infuriated the towns people that they seized one of John Brown's men who had been captured, and riddled his body with bullets.This Document is also Signed Twice on its reverse side by George Koonce (1818-1908), who served the summons, indicating that he had executed the writ and that the debt owed to Holt was being assigned to him. Koonce also had a noted role in defending Harper's Ferry shortly after the Civil War broke out.On April 18, 1865, Harpers Ferry was approached by 2,000 Virginia soldiers. The Armory was only guarded by 42 Regular U.S. Army soldiers. Koonce responded to a request for help by the officer and led some local militia in stopping the larger Virginia Army at Smallwood's Ridge, near Bolivar. This gave time for the Union Officer to burn the arsenal and the armory. Koonce and his men fled North and didn't return again to Harpers Ferry until the Union again got control of the town in 1862. Koonce lost his home and his business as a result of his involvement in the April 1861 fight. After returning, he operated a general store in Harper's Ferry with a Mr. Horner from 1863 to 1864. Following the war, Koonce served as a Member of the West Virginia House of Delegates (1865-1867) and a Member of the West Virginia Senate (1870-1871). This unique document that would fit into any collection of John Brown, Harper's Ferry Raid, Abolition, Black History, or Civil War, signed historic documents.

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WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN, 1900 Typed Letter Signed Rare Bryan Money Content

Lot 9: WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN, 1900 Typed Letter Signed Rare Bryan Money Content

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Description: AutographsWilliam Jennings Bryan Signed Letter With Rare "Bryan Money" Historic Political & Numismatic Content In 1900WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN, Three-time Democratic Candidate for President, proponent of "Free Coinage" of both Gold and Silver, with all of the Gold and Silver Currency now in circulation coined at the ratio of "16 to 1." Scopes Evolution "Monkey Trial" Lawyer against Clarence Darrow.December 17, 1900 Dated, Typed Letter Signed, " W. J. Bryan," upon his Personal Letterhead Stationery, at Lincoln, Nebraska, measuring 11" x 8.5," Very Fine. Bryan writes to a W. H. Carmody, of Pleasant Hill, Missouri and important explanation which reads, in part:"... the term '16 to 1' as used in the Democratic platform, means that we favor the coinage laws of this country as they existed prior to the demonetization act of 1873. Before the demonetization (sic) we had the free Coinage of both gold and silver at the present legal ratio of 16 to 1. To-day we have the free coinage of gold, but our government is not coining silver on public account but on government account. All of the gold and silver currency now in circulation was coined at the ratio of 16 to 1, and the government now is coining silver dollars each month from its stock of bullion at the ratio of 16 to 1. The ratio of 16 to 1 means that one part of gold shall be equal to sixteen parts of silver, or that the silver dollar shall contain in weight sixteen times as much silver bullion as the gold dollar contains gold bullion..."This is an important, historic content Political and Numismatic related Typed Autograph Letter. It calls out to both collectors of Numismatists "Bryan Money" and to Political, Presidential Campaign and Gold and Silver Backed Currency collectors alike!Accompanied by an actual, authentic original 52mm solid Silver "Bryan Dollar," which was struck by Spaulding & Co., Goldsmiths & Silversmiths, grading Extremely Fine with some trivial rim bumps. We cannot say for certain if this actual "Bryan" Political coin accompanied this letter which would actually make complete sense. It certainly illustrates the "16 to 1"Gold to Silver concept and could have been the reason for this writing. Also Accompanied by a quality steel-plate image Engraving of Bryan, with the plate measuring 4.5" x 3.75" upon a larger piece of card stock. A remarkable small archive, with premium content, the Letter having an outstanding, bold deep brown large signature "W. J. Bryan." This is a meaningful letter, that would make an absolutely fantastic present to current Presidential Candidate Ron Paul, who holds many of Bryan's "Free Coinage" and Monetary Policy, Hard Coinage beliefs! (3 items).William Jennings Bryan (1860-1925) of Lincoln, Nebraska was Born in Illinois in 1860, William Jennings Bryan influenced Nebraskan and United States politics for thirty years. Bryan came to Lincoln in 1887 at the beginning of the Populist Revolt, an agrarian political movement spurred on by the depression of the late 1880's. Often regarded as the greatest orator of his time, Bryan capitalized on his tremendous personal magnetism and speaking ability to champion the Populist cause. Initially, the Populist wrath was directed at the railroads, who farmers felt unfairly discriminated against them when they shipped their produce to market, but later, their platform encompassed not only government ownership of the railroad and telegraph lines,but also the Free Coinage of Silver (to help loosen the tight reins on lending, especially to farmers) and an adjustment of taxation such that the wealthy "bear its just burdens."In 1896, backed by Populist support, Bryan received the Democratic nomination for the office of President of the United States, but was defeated by the Republican nominee William McKinley. Bryan was just 36 years of age. Bryan was again nominated in 1900 and 1908, but was defeated in both elections. In the presidential election of 1912, Bryan was influential in Woodrow Wilson gaining the Democratic nomination and when Wilson became president, Bryan was made secretary of state. He resigned the post three years in a disagreement over foreign policy. Bryan was known as the "Great Commoner" because of his concern for the working man. The newspaper he founded in Lincoln, Nebraska, in 1901, was named "The Commoner" and served to carry his political views. For two years prior to his 1896 presidential nomination, Mr. Bryan was editor of the Omaha World-Herald. Bryan is also nationally known as the prosecution lawyer in the "Scopes Monkey Trial," one of the most sensational trials of its era.In 1925, John Scopes was brought to trial for teaching evolution theory in his classroom.While Bryan helped secure a conviction in the nationally prominent case, it was widely felt that the famous lawyer Clarence Darrow, who defended Scopes, made a fool of Bryan and the prosecution with his legal arguments. Mr. Bryan died soon after the trial's completion.

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Original BUTLER PROJECTILE Improvement Patent Granted to General John G. Butler

Lot 10: Original BUTLER PROJECTILE Improvement Patent Granted to General John G. Butler

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Description: AutographsOriginal United States Patent for the Historic Refined "Butler Projectile" for Rifled Cannon Dated Christmas 1883(JOHN GAZZAM BUTLER). Noted military ordinance expert and Inventor, best known for his "Butler Projectile" for Rifled Cannon, Author of "Projectiles and Rifled Cannon," 1875.December 25, 1883-Dated, Partially-Printed U.S. Patent Document, for a "New and Useful Improvement in Projectiles," Granted to (General) John G. Butler and Signed by Merritt L. Joslyn, as the Secretary of the Interior, Choice Crisp Very Fine. This is an original Patent No. 290970, dated Christmas Day, December 25th, 1883, headed "Projectiles" and described as for: "an alleged new and useful improvement in PROJECTILES," Signed "M. L. Joslyn" (Merritt Lindsey Joslyn) as Acting U.S. Secretary of the Interior, and "Benj. Butterworth" as U.S. Commissioner of Patents (he was formerly Secretary of the Chicago World's Fair).Official U.S. Patent with Embossed Red Seal with Blue Silk Ribbon, printed on Vellum, 4 pages, measuring 12" x 8" with the official vignette at Washington, DC at top center. (General) John G. Butler of the U.S. Army, is granted a Patent. The inside of the Document provides the Illustration for Butler's improvement as well as a full 1-1/4 page description of that improvement. The original application for this U.S. Patent was likely initiated while Butler was stationed at the Army's Watertown Arsenal, Mass., from 1880 to Nov. 29, 1882 and was then placed in Command to April 7, 1883. Extremely rare and important in the Military Ordinance History of the United States.JOHN GAZZAM BUTLER:Military History. - Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1859, to June 11, 1863, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to Second Lieut., 4th Artillery, June 11, 1863. Served during the Rebellion of the Seceding States, 1863-66: in the Tennessee Campaign (Army of the Cumberland), Aug.- Sep., 1863, being engaged in the Battle of Chickamauga, Ga., Sep. 19-20, 1863; in Defense (Bvt. First Lieut., Sep. 20, 1863, for Gallant and Meritorious Services at the Battle of Chickamauga, Ga.) of Chattanooga, Ten., Sep. to Nov., 1863; in garrison at Bridgeport, Ala., Nov., 1863, to Jan., 1864; and as Asst. Ordnance Officer (Transferred to Ordnance Corps, Jan. 29, 1864). Frankford Arsenal, Pa., Feb. 1 to Dec. 11, 1864, being detached to Trenton, N. J., to arm and receive arms of New Jersey Volunteers, May 19 to July 1, 1864, and to Hilton Head, S. C., to provide arms for General Sherman's Army, then marching to the coast, Nov. 23 to Dec. 10, 1864. Served: as Asst. Inspector and Constructor of Ordnance, headquarters New York City, Dec. 11, 1864, to June 4, 1867 and at Scott Foundry, (First Lieut., Ordnance, Mar. 7, 1867) Reading, Pa., Mar. to June 4, 1867; as Asst. Ordnance Officer at Leavenworth Arsenal, Kan., June, 1867, to May 9, 1870, - and at Ft. Monroe Arsenal, Va., May 9, 1870, to May, 1873; in temporary command of New York Ordnance Agency, May to Sep., 1873; as Asst. to Constructor of Ordnance, New York, Sep., 1873, to May, 1876; as Asst. (Captain, Ordnance, June 23, 1874).Ordnance Officer at Watervliet Arsenal, N. Y., May, 1876, to May 25, 1880, - at Watertown Arsenal, Mass., to Nov. 29, 1882 (in command to Apr. 7, 1883), - Rock Island Arsenal, Ill., May 17, 1883, to Sep. 8, 1886, - and at Springfield Armory, Mas., Sep. 15, 1886, to Dec. 24, 1887; and in command of the St. Louis Powder Depot, Mo., Jan. 6, 1888, to -----. Civil History. - Author of "Projectiles and Rifled Cannon," 1875. Inventor of the "Butler Projectile" for rifled cannon. Military History. - (Major, Ordnance, Sept. 15, 1890) Served: In command of St. Louis Powder Depot, from Jan. 6, 1888 to Nov. 20, 1890. - In command of Arsenal, Augusta, Ga., from Nov. 25, 1890 to Oct. 28, 1895. - At Watervliet Arsenal, Troy, N. Y., from Nov. 1, 1895 to July 30, 1898. - In command of Kennebec Arsenal, Augusta, Me., from Aug. 20, 1898 to June 7, 1899. - In command of the New York Arsenal, from June 10, 1899 to -----; President of the Ordnance Board, and member of the Board for Testing Rifled Cannon, from June 10, 1899 to ----- Military History. - In command of the New York Arsenal, N. Y., from June 10, 1899 to Aug. 14, 1900. - President of the Ordnance Board p111from June 10, 1899 to Aug. 14, 1900. - Member of Board for Testing Rifled Cannon from June 10, 1899 (Lieut.-Colonel, Ordnance Dept., Feb. 2, 1901) to Aug. 14, 1903. - In command of the Watertown Arsenal, Mass., from Sept. 11, 1900 (Colonel, Ordnance Dept., Aug. 16, 1903) to Jan. 21, 1904. (Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Jan. 21, 1904) Retired from Active Service Jan. 22, 1904, at his own request, after over 40 Years' Service.-----------------------------------------Merritt L. Joslyn was the son of Lindsey Joslyn, a probate and county judge in Woodstock, IL. Merritt served as Captain of Co. H., 36th IL. Vols.,. during the Civil War and was afterwards a member of the House and Senate of Illinois. He was the first Assistant Secretary of the Interior in Chester Arthur's administration, and was Secretary of the Interior ad interim from March 4-6, 1885, in Grover Cleveland's administration. His son, Marcellus L. Joslyn (1873-1963) formed the Joslyn Manufacturing and Supply, Co. of Chicago, which was the U.S. leader in electrical surge and transient protection for power, communications, transportation and industrial process control. Benjamin Butterworth was the son of a Virginia slave-owner, who had a personal awakening, freed his slaves and moved to Ohio where Benjamin was later born. He became associated with Levi Coffin in the "underground railroad" helping to free slaves before and during the Civil War. Beginning in 1861, Benjamin practiced law in Cincinnati. He was Asst. U.S. District Attorney in 1868 and was a Ohio state senator in 1874 and 1875. He served in the U.S. Congress from 1879-83, and 1885-91. For a time, while in Congress, he served as chairman of the Committee on Patents. In 1883 he was appointed a commissioner of the Northern Pacific Railroad. From late 1883 until March 1885 he served as Commissioner of Patents. He served as Secretary of the 1893 World's Fair (Columbian Exposition). He again served as Commissioner of Patents from 1896 to his death in 1898, from pneumonia. John G. Butler (1842-1914), the recipient of this patent, graduated from West Point in 1863. After graduating he was appointed 2d Lt. of Battery M, 4th U. S. Artillery in the Army of the Cumberland, Tenn. campaign. He was Brevetted for gallant and meritorious services in battle of Chickamauga. He was then transferred to Ordnance Corps in 1864. After the war he stayed in the Army and served on various special duties and at 15 Arsenals and stations over a 40 year period, retiring in 1904 as a Brigadier General in the regular army. He also held a number of other U.S. Patents for improvements to ordnance and armaments.

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Superb RICHARD E. BYRD Signed Photograph Shows Byrd in his Naval Uniform

Lot 11: Superb RICHARD E. BYRD Signed Photograph Shows Byrd in his Naval Uniform

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Description: AutographsSuperb RICHARD E. BYRD Signed Photograph RICHARD E. BYRD. American Naval Officer, Aviator and Polar Explorer.Excellent Signed Photograph, "R E Byrd," measuring 9" x 11.5", black & white, sepia tone photo, no date or place. Image shows Byrd in his Naval uniform, with the inscription: "47 Rue Dumont G.I. Mauel Freres -". This gorgeous image is tipped to 10" x 12" heavy brown card stock for framing and display purposes.

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JOSE RAUL CAPABLACA Cuban Chess Master, Six Year World Champion. 1926 ALS

Lot 12: JOSE RAUL CAPABLACA Cuban Chess Master, Six Year World Champion. 1926 ALS

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Description: AutographsJOSE RAUL CAPABLACA Champion Cuban Chess Master JOSE RAUL CAPABLACA. Cuban Chess Master, Six Year World Champion.May 27, 1926-Dated Autograph Letter Signed, "J.R. Capablanca," 3 pages, measuring 5.25" x 6.75", New York, Choice Crisp Near Mint. Handwritten in English to George Shipley of the Pocono area of Pennsylvania. Capablanca pens, in full:"Dear Geo. Shipley: -- I am going this morning to Pocono Manor to look over the place. On Saturday I shall take the 11 o'clock train from N.Y. on the Penn. and will immediately upon arrival go to your office. As regards the consultation game in the afternoon, I wish you would make it instead a single game against yourself, as I find consultation very slow and tiring and I should like to lie down for one hour before playing at night in order to get a rest as I find I have not the same resistance power I had before. I could not do myself justice at night without a rest after having playing in the afternoon - Looking forward to the pleasure of our next meeting, I remain Very sincerely your friend -- (Signed) J.R. Capablanca"Capablanca's chess style had a deceptive appearance of simplicity, and at his best, he could make the defeat of another master look easy. However, just one year after this letter was written, his spectacular six-year championship career came to an end in a surprising loss to Alexander Alekhine. An excellent quality letter with nice content, which wonderfully illustrates the extreme mental fatigue the game exacts on its best players. Capablanca material rarely is available to collectors or comes on the market.

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ANDREW CARNEGIE Typed Signed Letter on His Personal Stationary 1907 Framed

Lot 13: ANDREW CARNEGIE Typed Signed Letter on His Personal Stationary 1907 Framed

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Description: AutographsAndrew Carnegie Signed Letter on His Personal StationaryANDREW CARNEGIE (1835-1919). Steel Tycoon and Philanthropist.November 26, 1907-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "Andrew Carnegie" in black ink on his personal stationary, fine-laid paper, New York, 1 page, 7.5" x 6.5" (by sight), Choice Extremely Fine. Beautifully and ornately framed to an overall size of 24" x 14" along with a classic black and white photo of Carnegie in his coat and top hat. The huge, boldly written rich brown signature, "Andrew Carnegie" measures approximately 3" long and is prominent upon his letterhead.This Letter Typed upon Andrew Carnegie's personal Letterhead reads, in full: "November 26, 1907. --- Dear Doctor Gilman: --- Many thanks for your kind congratulations. -- I have so many engaements these days that it will not be practicable for me to stop over at Baltimore, but I hope to see you and your dear wife on the tenth at Washington. --- Very truly yours, - (Signed) Andrew Carnegie".Andrew Carnegie was a 19th century steel tycoon who became one of the 20th century's most famous philanthropists. His life story is one of the most famous rags-to-riches accounts in United States history. Born in Scotland, Carnegie moved to Pennsylvania with his family in 1848 and began working in factories as a teenager. Hard work and a wise investment in a sleeping car company during the 1850s led to Carnegie's early success in the railroad business as well as the financial world.During the Civil War he invested in Oil, worked in transportation for the U.S. War Department and became interested in the iron and steel business. After the war he concentrated on steel, and by 1888 he owned control of the Homestead Steel Works and other manufacturing plants, which he eventually consolidated as the Carnegie Steel Company.With his longtime partner, Henry Clay Frick, Carnegie competed fiercely in business and tried to quash organized labor, in spite of his belief that it was the duty of the wealthy to help society (a belief he outlined in an influential 1889 essay, "The Gospel of Wealth").In 1901 Carnegie Steel merged with the U.S. Steel Corporation, and Carnegie sold out to J.P. Morgan for $480 million, making Carnegie the richest man in the world. After his retirement he became a philanthropist, donating more than $350 million to further public education, build libraries and lobby for international peace.He also created the Carnegie Corporation of New York, endowing it with $125 million to support benefactions after his death. Although he spent much of his later life on his estate in Scotland, during World War I he returned to the U.S., where he died in 1919 at Shadowbrook, his estate in the Berkshire Hills of Massachusetts.

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GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER 1927-Dated Choice Content Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 14: GEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER 1927-Dated Choice Content Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsEx: Slave George Washington Carver 1927 Credits "God's Heavenly Guidance" for His Recent ProgressGEORGE WASHINGTON CARVER, Agronomist Noted For Discoveries Relating To The Peanut And Sweet Potato.March 27, 1927-Dated Autograph Letter Signed "Geo W. Carver", 8.5" x 11", 2 pages, Tuskegee, Alabama, Choice Very Fine. Wriiten to Miss Candill, a colleague. Carver writes, in part:"I have just returned from a most delightful trip to the country, and my how I enjoyed it. Your letter was such a welcome messenger upon my return. It was so good of you to send me 'The Romance of an Old Shoe'. You have captioned it correctly, it is so readable and abashingly interesting. I like the last paragraph best of all; it is so true we can find beautiful and useful things in every thing if we will only qualify and search for truth, even the mud puddle will gladly yield up its treasures... How I wish you could come down and see what God is doing in His little workshop with some Clays, sent down by the L.F.N. R.R. from your city..."A wonderful, Handwritten Signed Letter from the brilliant botanist, in which he credits God's heavenly guidance for the recent progress in his "little workshop". Slight separation to center horizontal fold.Born into slavery, George Washington Carver exhibited an interest in plants very early in life, and was encouraged to pursue an education - a challenging prospect for any black man in the post-war South.He studied chemistry and botany at Iowa State University, and after completing his master's degree in 1896, he was recruited to Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute by Booker T. Washington in Tuskegee, Alabama. He remained there for 47 years until his death in 1943. Taking an interest in the plight of poor Southern farmers working with soil depleted by repeated crops of cotton, Carver advocated employing the nitrogen cycle by alternating cotton crops with legume planting, such as peanuts, to restore nitrogen to the soil. Thus, the cotton crop was improved and new cash crops added.He developed an agricultural extension system in Alabama to train farmers in raising these crops and an industrial research laboratory to develop uses for them. In order to make these new crops profitable, Carver devised numerous uses, several of which were unique, for the new crops, including more than 300 uses for the peanut. These applications included glue, printer's ink, dyes, punches, varnishing cream, marble, rubbing oils, and Worcestershire sauce.He made similar investigations into uses for plants such as sweet potatoes and pecans. Until 1915, Carver was not widely known for his agricultural research. However he became one of the best-known African-Americans of his era following the funeral of Booker T. Washington when he was praised by Theodore Roosevelt, and his contributions to agriculture were widely praised by both his academic peers and American businesses interests, including Henry Ford, who built a special laboratory for Carver.

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1945

Lot 15: 1945 "JIMMY" CARTER ALS as U.S. Navy Midshipman Signed Twice

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Description: Autographs1945 "Jimmy" Carter ALS as U.S. Navy MidshipmanJAMES EARL "JIMMY" CARTER, 39th President of the United States.August 10, 1945-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed Twice, "Jimmy" at the end and "J.E. Carter, Jr. Mids USN" in the P.S., 2 pages, measuring 7.25" x 11" on "United States Navy" embossed stationary, Choice Extremely Fine. Written while enroute from Florida to Annapolis. Jimmy writes to his sweetheart, Miss Jacquelyn Reid of Georgia, most likely a former classmate of his at Georgia Southwestern College in Americus. Not only is this Personal Letter dated just days following the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki (August 6 & 9, respectively), but it comes during a crucial year in Carter's personal life, as well.The following July, he would marry Rosalynn, the future First Lady. This Letter is Accompanied with its Original Transmittal Air Mail Stamped and Postmarked Envelope, dated of August 17, 1945. Carter pens, in part:"Dear Jackie, --- I wish you had started your job in New York about a week ago. We've been here now ever since last Monday & I would certainly have liked to see you. When will you come up to start working? Or have you changed your mind?By the way, you haven't forgotten me, have you? It does seem like a long time since we left y'all at Ponte Vedra Beach. We left on cruise right after we got back to the Academy and won't get back to Annapolis for another week. I'll have to wait until then to mail this 'cause the censor wouldn't pass my telling you we are in New York.Jackie, I don't want to 'cut Evan's throat' or any thing but I would like for you to come to the Academy if you can. Maybe when you're on the way to New York (or any other) weekend. I can find out about the hogs, football games, etc. later & let you know, if you think you might be able to come & would like to.We've been hoping that the war would end while we were here, but it didn't. We've just left. It seemed that it would yesterday & everybody here was listening to radios & reading the notices of Times Square, etc... -- Love, Jimmy --- P.S. -- My address will be J.E. Carter, Jr. Mids USN / 2211 U.S. Naval Academy / Annapolis, Md."A superb content, historic timeframe Handwritten and Twice Signed personal Lletter from a momentous period in the life of this future President. Following this cruise, Carter returned to the Naval Academy for his final year. He continued to see Miss Reid well into the fall of 1945, until he changed his romantic focus to 18-year-old Rosalynn Smith, whom he knew through his sister Ruth and in whom he had showed interest earlier that summer. Carter and Rosalynn were married less than one year later (July 7, 1946), shortly after his graduation from the Academy. Existing original Letters of James Earl "Jimmy" Carter from this time period nearing the end of World War II are exceedingly scarce and considered a prize, being needed by most collectors.

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1850 SALMON P. CHASE Exceptional Fiery Political Content Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 16: 1850 SALMON P. CHASE Exceptional Fiery Political Content Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsExceptional Political Content 1850 Autograph Letter Signed by Salmon P. Chase Fiery Amazing Content From Chase !SALMON P. CHASE. American Lawyer and Statesman. Served as U.S. Senator (1849-55-1860); Governor of Ohio (1855-59); served as Secretary of the Treasury (1861-64) under President Abraham Lincoln; originated the National Banking System (1863). Resigned due to strained relations with the President, and served as Chief Justice, U.S. Supreme Court (1864-73); in 1868, Chase presided over the Senate trial of President Andrew Johnson after the House voted for his impeachment. Chase was known as a strong anti-slavery advocate and prominent defender of fugitive slaves.February 20, 1850-Dated, Historic Firsthand Pre Civil War and Slavery Related, Autograph Letter Signed, "S.P. Chase" as United States Senator from Ohio, 2 pages, measuring 8" x 10", headed "Senate Chamber," Choice Very Fine+. Minor archival fiber tape reinforcement to in centeral folds, one tiny edge chip and overall bright, clean and beautifully written in rich brown ink. This important Letter being written to W.S. Groerbach, Esq., of Cincinnati. Here, Salmon Chase pens, in full:"Senate Chamber, Feb. 20, 1850 --- My dear Sir:There is no possibility of the Richard case being reached until some time in the Summer-and not much possibility of it being reached then. The Judges have determined not to go on their circuits next Summer. They will adjourn from the 1st of April & then work on I do not know exactly how long. In the Course of March Judge McLean (John McLean, Assoc. Justice of US Supreme Court 1829-61) will visit Cincinnati, & may perhaps, determine himself to attend his Circuit court instead of returning. In his absence I should be unwilling to take up the case either on a motion to dismiss the appeal or upon the merits. The motion to dismiss has not yet been argued and I am not sanguine of success though I am inclined to press it. It is well settled that two appeals may be taken, if one is taken irregularly & therefore dismissed. My hope of success in the motions ... in terms of the decision to reinstate the case upon the docket when Mr. Ewing (most probably Thomas Ewing, Ohio's other US Senator, Whig leader, Secty Treasury 1841, Secty Interior 1849-50) made a motion with that object after the original dismissal, and some other technical considerations.As to my expected speech in the Senate, I am sadly afraid that my friends will be disappointed: but I mean unless circumstances should change, to express my views on Mr. Clay's (Henry Clay, then serving as U.S. Senator from Kentucky) resolutions before the debate on them closes.I wish I could describe to you the scene now transpiring in the Senate. Clemens (Jeremiah Clemens, then Alabama Senator) & Davis (Jefferson Davis, then Mississippi US Senator) denounce the Nicholson letter. Cass (Lewis Cass, then Michigan US Senator) protests against the fanaticism of the South! Clay speaks against the disunionists with thrilling effect. Foote (Henry Foote, then U.S. Senator from Mississippi) is now running out. His mouth is open & he can't help letting the current flow. When his speech is over the scene now becomes rather tame-will probably close. --- Truly your friend, - (Signed) S.P. Chase". Amazing, fabulous and historic political content from Chase, who himself opposed the Compromise of 1850 as "sentiment for the North, and substance for the South." Written from within the hallowed halls of the US Senate during one of the most important debates ever raised. This remarkable Letter is a crucial record of those historic proceedings.Debate on the proposals formally opened on February 11th, and extended to march 27th, with all the leading men in the Senate giving powerful voice to their approval or disapproval. As the other senators spoke, Henry Clay frequently interrupted to explain what he meant by a particular resolution or to reject ideas or words falsely attributed to him.On February 18th, just two days prior to the date of this letter, Foote accused Clay of failing, as a native son, in his responsibilities to the South. In one of his most famous and eloquent statements from the Senate floor, Clay responded: "I know whence I came, and I know my duty, and I am ready to submit to any responsibility, which belongs to me as a senator from a slaveholding State. Sir, I Have heard something said on this and one a former occasion about allegiance to the South. I know no South, no North, no East, no West, to which I owe my allegiance... My allegiance is to his Union and to my own State; but if gentlemen suppose they can exact from me an acknowledgment of allegiance to any ideal or future contemplated Confederacy of the South, I here declare that I own no allegiance to it; nor will I, for one, come under any such allegiance if I can avoid it."In his April 1850 address, Vice President Fillmore lamented that, since many senators appeared reluctant to call their colleagues to order, he would do his duty to contain the first spark of disorder before it ignited a conflagration that would be more difficult to control. "A slight attack, or even insinuation, of a personal character, often provokes a more severe retort, which brings out a more disorderly reply, each Senator feeling a justification in the previous aggression." Two weeks later, Fillmore's worst fears were realized. When he ruled Missouri Senator Thomas Hart Benton out of order, Kentucky's Henry Clay, no friend of Benton, angrily charged that the vice president's action was an attack on the power and dignity of the Senate. The ensuing debate sparked a bitter exchange between Benton and Mississippi Senator Henry Foote. As the burly Benton pushed aside his chair and moved menacingly up the center aisle toward the diminutive Foote, Foote pulled a pistol.As pandemonium swept the chamber, Benton bellowed, "I have no pistols! Let him fire! Stand out of the way and let the assassin fire!" Fillmore quickly entertained a motion to adjourn, a bit wiser about the near impossibility of maintaining order in a deeply fractured Senate.

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SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS (MARK TWAIN) Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 17: SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS (MARK TWAIN) Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsSamuel Clemens (Mark Twain) AdmitsUS Military Books "make me swear!"SAMUEL LANGHORNE CLEMENS, "MARK TWAIN" (1835-1910). American Author and Humorist.September 28 (no year), Autograph Letter Signed, "S L Clemens," One page, 8.75" x 5.5", Octavo, from Hartford, Conn., written in pencil to "Mrs. Parker," Very Fine. The "S L Clemens" signature is very clear, measures approximately 2" long. This entire Letter being very easily readable having typical light mailing folds and minor traces of prior mounting in its four reverse corners. Here, Samuel Clemens writes, in full:"Hartford, Sep. 28. --- Dear Mrs. Parker: --- No, I don't like to read US books; they make me swear. And I can't publish a story - or other work - because we are full of military literature for several years yet. I greet you again with pleasure; you were a good audience all by yourself. -- Truly Yours, (Signed) SL Clemens". According to the 7th Edition, published January 2009, of the "Sanders Autograph Price Guide" their listed value for a Samuel Clemens ALS with excellent content can rise to a lofty $19,000 as per prior auction sales records. This very personal content and somewhat opinionated Letter is certainly a reference to the avalanche of Civil War literature that flooded the American publishing market in the years following war. In addition to first-person and fictional accounts of nearly every battle, many of the aging generals and statesmen who shaped the outcome of the war had taken to writing memoirs of their war experiences during their twilight years. In fact, Twain himself had collaborated with Ulysses S. Grant in writing the General's own memoirs!As a Missourian during the Civil War, Twain served in the militia to defend his state in the event of a Union invasion, but his unit was disbanded after a very short period of service. It's possible that his reference to "US books" in the present letter shows him taking issue with Unionist writings specifically; however, it's more likely that he is siding against war literature in general.For most of his life, Twain remained opposed to war as a "wanton waste of projectiles", and later wrote in his autobiography, "Before I had chance in another war, the desire to kill people to whom I had not been introduced had passed away."

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ELIZABETH B - LIBBIE - CUSTER. Oct 29, (1864) Civil War Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 18: ELIZABETH B - LIBBIE - CUSTER. Oct 29, (1864) Civil War Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: Autographs"Libbie" Wife of George Armstrong Custer Writes to George on October 29, 1864Who had Just Been Brevetted "Major General""... Oh if I could only have one dear Kiss!" Superb ContentELIZABETH B "LIBBIE" CUSTER. Wife of George Armstrong Custer.October 29, (1864)-Dated, Superb Content Civil War Period Autograph Letter Signed, "Libbie," 5" x 8", 4 pages, Washington, Choice Extremely Fine. An extensive, long and very passionate and personal Letter, written very privately to her husband, the vaunted "Boy-General" George Armstrong Custer.At this point in his celebrated military career, George had just been Brevetted Major General of Volunteers, for his gallant and heroic conduct at the Battle of Cedar Creek (October 19, 1864). This lot also includes the Original Handwritten Transmittal Postal Envelope addressed to "General G.A. Custer, 3rd Division Cavalry, Middle Military Department". Here, "Libbie" pens, in full:"Washington Oct 29 - --- My darling boy Autie - --- I feel such a longing to see you tonight. I'm all ready to receive a card from you my darling - The hearth is swept & the fire bright and the room is cheerful if only the one who lately was here would come again! But I don't think much of your coming but indeed I think of my going to you. I wish people would not discourage me about going down - oh but they do and make me fear myself. I may have to stay here several weeks more - oh wouldn't I be so glad to be there with you tonight! I suppose you have your happy family about you - my corn & your dogs and squerril [sic]. Do you think you would make an exchange tonight and take me instead of your pets! I would promise you something 'to boot' - How I do want to see my new pony - If I get attached to it I can take it back to Michigan can't I hay!Won't we have some nice rides this winter! You neednt think your urging to have me ride into some one of the staff and you go on in front. I know you think you rank me but you don't for though I did not fight all the battles I think I have seen a great many persons wear the laurels who did not win them. So remember unless you ride right by my side whenerer I go out, I won't go at all. Now aint you sorry you are married because you have a wife who says wont to you and 'she can't do forty things at once'. Since you showed me what nice fires you could make last winter I have him trying your place this fall and oh such nice fires as I can make! They make me think of our old Virginia fire place and Mrs. Tripletts. Oh Autie did ever any two people have such nice times as we do! Today I went riding with Mrs. Page - She was telling me her little baby drooled and ____ the waists of its dresses. Few could see the connexion but it reminded me of that instance in English history when the waiter of the prince was brushing his clothes and discovered the carelessness of the prince. The Prince blamed the serfs at dinner and to cut a long story short if I had been the waiter I should have suggested a bit - tho' it need not be worn as Mrs. Page's baby does. I wonder should Mr. Moreley be reading this letter in addition to several others I think he has of mine. If he would remember this instance from English history & its application at the present time. Mrs. Page took me out to Soldier's Home today. She was so pleased with your promotion & safety. She says Mr. Page says you are the most brilliant cavalry officer in the service and one of the Richmond papers gives you all the credit of the last valley victory. I want to get the paper with the Rebel Extract. She has such a nice little boy baby - she said to me now Mrs. Autie you ought to have such a little one as that. Indeed if I had such nice opportunity to care for it & a nice place to keep it I should be certainly glad of such a baby - I told her. I went to market this morning with Mrs. G. - We got some apples grapes &c, which I would treat you to if you were here to take some tonight. All the cannon of an army seemed to be passing tonight. Lieut Wallis & Captian Dodge have just called and confirm what I hear this afternoon that the artillery was that captured in the valley. I was so proud as I saw it passing by I stood in the sidewalk and watched it and thought proudly that my boy had captured it nearly all. Oh but these gentlemen have disturbed me so by saying Early - No Johnson is now in command I believe may make another attack. Oh my darling why must it be - I began to feel a little safe but now I must be anxious again. Oh when will these troubles cease! Do you really think that there will be another battle this fall. Oh if there is Autie heed I beg you to take care of yourself. I am going to send another letter by Lieut Wallis on Monday - Then let be sure that you will get it and so soon too.I am keeping 'somebody's' letter in such a safe place. Oh Autie it is such a dear letter. I am going to read it before I go to bed. I love you so dearly I cannot bear to stop writing you. Oh if I could only have one dear Kiss! Lord nightly my love my life my world, --- (Signed) Ever your Dear Libbie".A sensational, if not truly fantastic original Civil War-Date Letter from Libbie to her most remarkable husband, General George Armstrong Custer. (2 items).George Armstrong Custer first met Libbie Bacon during the winter of 1862-63, when he returned to Monroe, Michigan to visit his half-sister Lydia Reed. But it was during September 1863, after he was wounded by a shell on the inside of his thigh at the Battle of Culpepper Courthouse, that he was declared unfit for active duty and returned on sick leave to Monroe to recover (he arrived September 16).While there, he petitioned Judge Bacon for his daughter's hand in marriage, and the two were married on February 9, 1964. After his return to active duty, he served with Major General Philip Sheridan (1831-1888) in the Shenandoah Valley Campaign (August 7, 1864 -March 2, 1865), taking command of the 3rd Cavalry Division in Sheridan's army (September 30, 1864), and was brevetted Major General of Volunteers for his gallant actions at Cedar Creek (October 19, 1864), the very Civil War battle that Libbie refers to here in this letter.

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WILBER H. CHERRY, Autograph Letter Signed 1851 Texas Printer and Publisher

Lot 19: WILBER H. CHERRY, Autograph Letter Signed 1851 Texas Printer and Publisher

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Description: Autographs1851 Wilber Cherry Texas Pioneer Autograph Letter He Ran Away at Age Fifteen to Join The Texas Revolution!WILBER H. CHERRY (1820-1873). American Soldier, historic early Printer and Publisher in the Republic of Texas, at the age of fifteen ran away from home to join in the Texas Revolution.July 14, 1851-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "W. Cherry," at Galveston, Texas., Very Fine. This original letter measures 11" x 9" and is written to H. B. Balton concerning a "Survey made for Clark Beach, lying somewhere on the San Jacinto in its Tributaries". Wilber Cherry (a very active Texas pioneer) was with Ben Milan in the siege of Bexar (present day San Antonio) in 1835, with Brisoe's, "Liberty Men". He is also credited with beginning the "Galveston News" in 1843.Wilbur H. Cherry was a Soldier, Printer, and Publisher in the Republic of Texas. He was born in Oswego, New York, on January 4, 1820, and at the age of fifteen ran away from home to join in the Texas Revolution. On November 21, 1835, he joined Capt. Andrew Briscoe's company of Liberty Volunteers and subsequently participated in the siege of Bexar.After the Texas Revolution Cherry joined the Army of the Republic of Texas, on December 24, 1839; he received a bounty payment of thirty dollars for enlisting as a private in Second Lt. R. W. Lee's Company F of Col. Edward Burleson's First Regiment, Infantry. He served briefly in Capt. Benjamin Y. Gillen's Company I and on May 19, 1840, transferred into Capt. Adam Clendenin's Company A at Galveston.For a time thereafter Cherry worked as a printer in Austin and in Liberty. He moved to Galveston in 1843 and there, in 1844, with Michael Cronican, whom he had first met during the siege of Bexar, became a publisher of the Galveston Weekly News. Its first issue appeared on January 6, under the editorship of Richard D. Sebring, who soon bought out Cronican's interest in the paper. Although the News claimed to be politically independent, it was in fact staunchly anti-Houston in its editorial stand, largely in response to the Houston administration's antipathy toward the Texas Navy, whose home port was Galveston. When Sebring died in July 1844, Cherry brought Benjamin F. Neal into the partnership to form the firm of Cherry, Neal, and Company. These two men then hired Willard Richardson as their new editor. Within a year, however, Cherry and Neal sold their shares of the paper to Richardson and printer Gideon K. Lewis.In February 1850, at age thirty-one, Cherry joined John M. Gibson in publishing the Galveston Democratic Journal, a Whig newspaper. Robert H. Howard was their editor. Cherry bought out Gibson in July 1851 and left the paper himself in June 1853.Cherry was a member of the Texas Veterans Association. On August 8, 1847, he married Mrs. Catherine French, the Irish-born widow of George H. French. The couple had four children. Cherry died in Galveston on June 12, 1873. At the time of his death he was working as a printer at the Galveston Weekly News.

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JAMES J. (GENTLEMAN JIM) CORBETT, Inscribed and Signed Photograph

Lot 20: JAMES J. (GENTLEMAN JIM) CORBETT, Inscribed and Signed Photograph

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Description: AutographsSigned Photograph "Jim Corbett" (Gentleman Jim) BoxerJAMES J. (GENTLEMAN JIM) CORBETT (1866-1933). American Boxer and a former World Heavyweight Champion, best known as the man who defeated the great John L. Sullivan.Impressive Signed Photograph, "Jim Corbett," measuring 7.5" x 9.5", Sepia-tone, a formal portrait of the dapper athlete wearing a suit and tie. Inscribed in green ink at the lower left corner of the image, it reads: "To my dear pal Leo Kahn with warmest regards from your friend, Jim Corbett". Minor stains at the extreme outer edge upper margins, with one trivial surface abrasion at the upper right and tipped to a presentation heavier paperboard. James John "Gentleman Jim" Corbett was best known as the man who defeated the great John L. Sullivan. Despite a career spanning only 24 bouts, Corbett faced the best competition his era had to offer; squaring off with a total of nine fighters who would later be enshrined alongside himself in the International Boxing Hall of Fame. Scarce.

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Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS Signed + Inscribed CDV Photograph

Lot 21: Confederate President JEFFERSON DAVIS Signed + Inscribed CDV Photograph

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Description: Autographs"Jefferson Davis" Signed & Inscribed Carte-de-VisiteJEFFERSON "JEFF" DAVIS (1808-1889). Leader of the Confederate States of America, serving as its President, during the American Civil War, serving as President for its entire history. Previously a Senator and United States Secretary of War under Democratic President Franklin Pierce.This original "" Signed Carte-de-Visite Photograph is also inscribed, reading in full: "Your friend - Jefferson Davis," Very Fine. It is and early image, showing his head and face in profile, undated, produced by Tanner & Van Ness, Lynchburg, Virginia, measuring 3.5" x 2.5" the top edge slightly trimmed to the top of the photograph.Jefferson Davis's inscription and signature are well written in deep brown and appear very clear within the open area of the Photograph itself, which is very desirable. A prior owners notation "Jeff Davis" in pencil on the reverse and a central notation above the makers black imprint. Signed images of Jefferson Davis are very rare and highly valued by collectors.

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1896 JEFFERSON DAVIS CSA President, Monument Laying of Corner Stone Silk Ribbon

Lot 22: 1896 JEFFERSON DAVIS CSA President, Monument Laying of Corner Stone Silk Ribbon

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Description: Autographs1896 Jefferson Davis Monument Corner Stone and United Confederate Veterans, Richmond Virginia Reunion Ribbon(JEFFERSON "JEFF" DAVIS) (1808-1889). Leader of the Confederacy during the American Civil War as the CSA President.June 30th, July 1st & 2d, 1896-Dated, Commemeorative Silk Ribbon, With Portrait Of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, Very Fine. This original Portrait of Confederate President Jefferson Davis Silk Ribbon is printed in blue upon White Silk. It is for the Jefferson Davis Monument 1896 United Confederate Veterans, Richmond Virginia. It measures 8" x 2 3/8" with the legend reading: "Sixth Annual Reunion - U.C.V. And- Laying Corner Stone Of Monument - To President Jefferson Davis - At Richmond, Va. - June 30th, July 1st & 2d, 1896 - Official: D. A. Brown, Jr." Frayed, vertical thread tears yet having an overall whole appearance. Blue Lettering is very clear and readable, and the Portrait Image stands out well upon the white silk ribbon. Very Rare.

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1876 Ex: Confererate President JEFFERSON DAVIS Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 23: 1876 Ex: Confererate President JEFFERSON DAVIS Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: Autographs1876 "Jefferson Davis" President of the Confederacy ALSJEFFERSON "JEFF" DAVIS (1808-1889). American Statesman and Leader of the Confederacy during the American Civil War, serving as the CSA President for its entire history.March 19, 1876-Dated United States Centennial Period, Autograph Letter Signed, "Jefferson Davis" on very clean light blue ruled wove period paper, 4 pages, measuring 8" x 5", Choice Very Fine. This letter is written to General William Montague Browne, who had been on the personal staff of Davis during the Civil War, regarding a failed business venture. Davis became president of the Carolina Insurance Company in 1870. In this finely and well written letter, two small file pinholes in the top blank margin. Davis denies his responsibility for a company's failure. It reads, in part:"...I lost enough of money by that loosely conducted injudicious transaction to be quite unwilling to bear the responsibility of the failure of that company which I believe only lasted thus long by the means it derived from the Carolina. Had my proposition to examine into its affairs been adopted its unsoundness would have been revealed soon after examination commenced...Our babes in the woods went into a den of wolves. Not knowing even the meaning of the terms employed they bargained with two of the sharpest and least accomplished men in the town and relied on their oral appearances and on their 'honor'..."Jefferson Davis goes on to relate payouts from the liquidation of the company by Carolina Insurance in Virginia and South Carolina. A scarce and beautifully written letter having a very large 3.75" long full signature "Jefferson Davis." Also accompanied by a separate letter from 1979 of authenticity by noted Autograph dealer Joseph Rubinfine. The current Sanders Autograph price guide lists his ALS at $4,000 in value. This Letter is a particularly lovely, clean example.

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Presidents of the United States of America + DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE Litho

Lot 24: Presidents of the United States of America + DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE Litho

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Description: AutographsOutstanding 1850s Color Lithograph "The Presidents of the United States of America and Declaration of Independence."DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.c. 1850s, Highly Ornate Color "On Stone" Lithograph by J. Britton, entitled, "The Presidents of the United States of America and Declaration of Independence." by Ensign, Thayer & Co., New York, Framed, Choice Very Fine. This beautiful original, historical Lithograph measures 31.5" x 42" (by sight) and is framed to an overall size of 34.5" x 45". It is highly detailed and ornate, and portrays the Birth, Death and Inauguration Dates of our First 13 Presidents of the United States of America including, George Washington (1789) through Millard Fillmore (1850). Central to the image is a Printing of the Declaration of Independence with facsimile Signatures of all the documents Signers. Minor scattered toning, creasing, folds, splits and having some early conservation being linen backed for support and preservation. Overall, extremely rare and this is the first example we have offered. Framed and ready for hanging upon display, having a colorful and exciting appearance with so many wonderful historic American themes presented.

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(1843) DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE.  Peter Force Printing on Rice Paper

Lot 25: (1843) DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. Peter Force Printing on Rice Paper

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Description: Autographs"Declaration of Independence" From "American Archives" Historic Beautiful 1843 Peter Force Printing on Rice Paper DECLARATION OF INDEPENDENCE. (1843) Peter Force Printing, From the Original Plate with "W.J. Stone SC. WASHn." Imprint. Crisp Rice Paper. Choice Near Mint.An important opportunity to obtain one of the best, and earliest, original copies of one of America's greatest documents. This original, very beautiful and impressive crisp rice paper copy of The Declaration of Independence, measures 30" high x 25.5" wide. It is one of the nicest we've seen or handled and is removed from its book for display. Slight creases in the rice paper from its original folded position within the book, which attests to its full, absolute authenticity. One faint tone spot is hardly of notice. It has the essential "W.J. Stone SC. WASHn." plate imprint at the lower left. This is an impressive, very clean and attractive specimen.In 1843, Peter Force used the original Stone Copperplate to print additional copies of the Declaration of Independence on rice paper for inclusion in Volume I of his multi-volume book "American Archives." Congress authorized up to 1,500 copies of that book to be printed, but subscriptions fell far short of that number. The actual number of copies printed is unknown, with best estimates of about 500 copies made. All examples of the rice paper Declaration were meant to be folded for insertion in the inside front cover of Volume I of the Fifth Series, and by now, most have been removed. It is not known how many of the rice paper copies could have survived. Speculation suggests estimates of fewer than half of this printing have survived, in varying states of preservation.The Stone and Peter Force copies represent a double-edged sword. Certainly, they allowed additional people and institutions to obtain an identical facsimile of this most beloved of all historic American documents, but Stone's Wet-Ink transfer process contributed to the deterioration of the original signed copy of the Declaration. Parchment does not respond well to water. The unfortunate result is that the Declaration of Independence, now on display in Washington, DC, is a rather sad-looking, old faded document. Conversely, the Stone and Force printings that have survived are much nicer in appearance and they generally retain the fresh appearance with which the original was once endowed. This current offering is beautiful and simply perfect for framing and display.In 1823, Congress authorized the production of facsimile copies of the Declaration of Independence. Previous writers have claimed that this was done because the document was deteriorating rapidly, but another reason may have been the demand for copies of the document by some of the aging surviving original signers and others. John Quincy Adams, then Secretary of State, oversaw the project. Noted engraver, William J. Stone, was commissioned to use a new Wet-Ink transfer process to create a copper-plate from which facsimile copies could then be made. By wetting the original document, some of the original ink was transferred to the copper-plate, which was then used for printing. Stone printed 201 copies on parchment (or vellum, the same type of material on which the original was handwritten).He kept one for himself (this copy now resides in the Smithsonian), and other copies were distributed to Thomas Jefferson, President James Monroe, members of Congress, surviving original Signers, various colleges and universities, and others. Of the original 201 copies, only 31 examples are currently known to exist, 19 of which are permanently impounded in museums. The remaining dozen vellum examples rarely are offered for sale and today typically bring $550,000 and more!

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MAMIE DOUD EISENHOWER, 1974 Typed Manuscript Re: Ike's Paintings!

Lot 26: MAMIE DOUD EISENHOWER, 1974 Typed Manuscript Re: Ike's Paintings!

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Description: AutographsMamie Eisenhower Story Regarding Ike's Painting Hobby Titled: "Ike's Paintings - The Ones I Love the Most" Published In The "Saturday Evening Post" March of 1974MAMIE DOUD EISENHOWER (1896-1979). First Lady of the United States (1953-1961) wife of President Dwight D. Eisenhower.c. March 1974, Exceptional Content, Typed Manuscript Article Signed, "Mamie Doud Eisenhower" being boldly and massively executed in deep black felt pen at its conclusion, measuring 5.25" long, Choice Crisp Near Mint. This is a truly wonderful and heartfelt Typed Article, 1 page, no date or place, entitled, "Ike's Paintings - The Ones I Love the Most - By: Mamie Doud Eisenhower." The page measures 8.5" x 11" and is typed on fresh white erasable bond typing paper.This article was actually Published in the March 1974 Edition of the Saturday Evening Post. Mrs. Eisenhower lovingly reminiscences about the first time Ike attempted to paint, and also tells the story behind her favorite painting, "St. Louis Creek." Transcribed in full, it reads:"The beginning of Ike's painting as a hobby is really quite a story. It was in 1947 and I had one of my streptococcus infections. Tom Stevens, the artist, was doing portraits of Ike and me. he called to arrange another sitting. I said, "Well, after all, Tommy, I'm sick in bed." But Tom said, "I don't want anything but your hands." So he came up to my bedroom to do my hands. he sat there and painted, working from a paper palette. When he finished, he tore off the sheet with the paints on it. Ike saw all those beautiful colors on the palette and asked Tom what he was going to do with it. Tom answered, "I intend to throw it away." Ike said, "Don't do that. Leave it here for me, and I'll fool around with the paints." So he called down from my bedroom to the houseman, Sergeant Moaney: "Moaney, bring me up a piece of board, some thumb tacks and an old dust cloth." He put the dust cloth on a piece of board and started to paint. I was his first subject. His effort was the most awful looking thing you've ever seen. I always wear a pink ribbon in my hair when I'm in bed, so of course here I was in my pink bed and my pink hair ribbon. But the hair ribbon by the time Ike finished with it was there times the size it was in my hair! But anyway, that was the beginning.On Valentine's Day, the thirty-second anniversary of our engagement, I gave Ike a set of paint equipment. he painted everything -- landscapes, portraits. He'd make up things, anything. It didn't make any difference to him at all. He loved to mix colors.I think you can tell a log about the kind of man Ike was from his paintings. he never forgot the growing-up years from Abilene. So many of this paintings are familiar scenes from his past -- the little boy with the fishing pole going down the country lane, the old red barn, and all the other pictures that were dear to his hear. But the painting that tells the most about Ike as a person -- that tells about his stubbornness and his courage -- is "St. Louis Creek." He started the painting the day he had his first heart attack. He had just returned from a fishing trip in the Colorado mountains and had played a round of golf in the afternoon as well. That evening he was rushed to Fitzsimmons Army Hospital with a heart attack. Ike didn't complete the painting until the last weeks of his recuperation in the hospital. As soon as he was strong enough, the nurses put up a screen around the corner of the hallway outside his bedroom and he painted in his wheelchair by the light of the hall window. We cam home from the hospital on November 11, and he finished the painting by Christmas. The story behind this painting says a lot about Ike.In over thirty years of marriage, I never dreamed that he would start painting as a hobby. The knuckles of both Ike's hands had been broken because of football and baseball playing when he was young. All the experts didn't think he could pick up a paintbrush. But he did; it was a gift and joy to him."

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JOHN ERICSSON 1860 Autograph Letter Signed Built the Union Ironclad Ship Monitor

Lot 27: JOHN ERICSSON 1860 Autograph Letter Signed Built the Union Ironclad Ship Monitor

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Description: AutographsUnion Ironclad Ship Monitor Designer JOHN ERICSSONJOHN ERICSSON (1803-1889). Swedish-American Engineer and Designer who built the Civil War Union's Ironclad Ship "Monitor," the first screw propeller-powered vessel and made improvements in locomotives.January 22, 1860-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "J. Ericsson," 1 page, measuring about 7.75" x 9.75" having excellent Railway engineering content, Choice Very Fine. This letter is very clean and well written in deep brown ink, one blue check mark at the top edge, having a wonderful very large 3.5" long flowing signature of John Ericsson. It reads, in part:"... The second accident with the 18 in. is easily accounted for as poor Linnan was trying to make the engine do by excessive heat what it lacked in legitimate power... I cannot tender specific advise... the 18 inch... has the power to do the pumping at a Railway Station which sends off twenty trains a day...".John Ericsson (1803-1889). Swedish-American naval inventor and engineer, he invented the screw propeller and made improvements in locomotives and naval guns. He is best remembered for building the famed Civil War Ironclad boat Monitor, which had one of the first moving turrets.

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CYRUS W. FIELD, 1874 Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 28: CYRUS W. FIELD, 1874 Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: AutographsCyrus Fields Thanks Congressman S.S. Cox For A SpeechCYRUS W. FIELD, Famous American Industrialist, who laid the first successful Telegraph Cable across the Atlantic Ocean.April 27, 1874-Dated. Autograph Letter Signed, "Cyrus W. Field," 7.75" x 5.25" with huge, bold 2.5" by 1.5" signature, Choice Very Fine. In this letter, Field expresses thanks to Samuel S. Cox, who the following year would be Chairman of the Congressional Committee on Banking and Currency, for sending a printed copy of a Congressional speech Cox had delivered on financial matters.Samuel Sullivan Cox (1824-1889) was a member of the U. S. House of Representatives from Ohio and from New York. A delegate to the Democratic National Conventions of 1864 and 1868, he was elected to the House as a Democrat from Ohio (1857-1865) and served as the Chairman of the Committee on Revolutionary War Claims. He moved to New York City in 1865, and resumed the practice of law and was again elected to the House, this time from New York (1869-1889). He was Chairman of the Committee on Banking and Currency (1875-1877).

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CYRUS W. FIELD, Signature On Letter Dated 1849, First Atlantic Telegraph Cable

Lot 29: CYRUS W. FIELD, Signature On Letter Dated 1849, First Atlantic Telegraph Cable

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Description: AutographsCyrus W. Field Signed Letter Atlantic Telegraph Company Laid the First Telegraph Cable Across the Atlantic in 1858CYRUS WEST FIELD (1819 - 1892), Famous American Industrialist, who created the Atlantic Telegraph Company and laid the first successful telegraph cable across the Atlantic Ocean in 1858.November 28, 1849-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Cyrus W. Field & Co.," 1 page, Choice Very Fine. Measuring 10" x 8" this Letter is tipped into a modern paper folder. This is a commercial letter with the company name is regarding the shipment of rope and the payment of the shipping charges. Unlike his later signatures which are large and bold, this early letter is signed with a distinctly more modest flair.

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GERALD FORD + BETTY FORD Lot of Two Letters Signed, One mentions Jimmy Carter!

Lot 30: GERALD FORD + BETTY FORD Lot of Two Letters Signed, One mentions Jimmy Carter!

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Description: AutographsTwo Letters "Jerry Ford" and First Lady "Betty Ford" Who Laments Her Husband's Loss to Jimmy Carter !GERALD FORD & BETTY FORD.1. May 2, 1963-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "Jerry Ford" as Congressman, in blue fountain-pen ink on Congress of the United States letterhead, Washington, DC, 10.5" x 8", 2 pages, addressed to a constituent interested in mental health legislation, Choice Near Mint. Letter has staple holes in the top margin, not affecting the signature. 2. Accompanied by a December 1, 1976-Dated, Typed Letter Signed, "Betty Ford", in bright blue ink on "The White House" stationery measuring 9.25" x 6.25", Choice Near Mint. Outstanding content! Addressed to well-wisher who laments President Ford's recent Presidential Campaign loss to Jimmy Carter: "While I am disappointed at the results of the election, my pride in the President's achievements and the support and faith millions of Americans gave him make the defeat easier to bear." Includes the original stamped, "White House" envelope of transmittal, canceled December 2, 1976.(3 items).

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(FIRST LADIES), Four Items Signed by 3 First Ladies CLEVELAND, HARRISON, HOOVER.

Lot 31: (FIRST LADIES), Four Items Signed by 3 First Ladies CLEVELAND, HARRISON, HOOVER.

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Description: AutographsThree "First Lady" Autographs with President Benjamin Harrison's Widow Quotes His Tribute to Abraham Lincoln! (FIRST LADIES), FRANCES CLEVELAND, MARY LORD HARRISON, LOU H. HOOVER.1. January 8, 1907, Autograph Letter Signed, "Frances F. Cleveland," in black ink on embossed stationery, "Westland, Princeton, New Jersey," Choice Very Fine. Addressed to Mr. Johnson, advising that "Mr. Cleveland & I shall be glad to attend... the entertainments for the Keats-Shelley Memorial" if it is possible for them to be in New York at the time, adding: "This isn't promising to be there! We are uncertain folks - & we couldn't think of saying more than a month ahead that we will surely do a thing... The Committee are very good to suggest a box for us. Mr. Cleveland joins me in thanks and all good wishes..." Grover Cleveland died a year and a half later, having served as a trustee of Princeton University after leaving the White House.2. November 22, 1927, Autograph Note Signed, "Mary Lord Harrison," in fountain pen ink, no location, quoting a portion of her late husband's tribute to Lincoln on his 1898 birthday, 9" x 4", Very Fine. Titled "Lincoln." The text reads: "He stands like a great lighthouse to show the way of duty to all his countrymen and to send afar a beam of courage to those who beat against the winds." She then identified the quotation as being "from a speech made by Ex-President Harrison at the Marquette Club Chicago Feb. 12th 1898. Copied for Mr Boos..." Very unusual! Accompanied by a print engraving of Lincoln, his Gettysburg Address, measuring 9" x 6.25", and a note written at the bottom: "'Lest we forget!' Mary Lord Harrison December 2nd 1938." Mary Lord Harrison was Benjamin Harrison's second wife; his first wife died while he was in office in 1892, and he married Mary Scott Lord Dimmick in 1896.3. February 24, 1928, Typed Letter Signed, "Lou Henry Hoover," 2300 S. Street, Washington, DC, 10" x 7.75", two pages, Fine. Mrs. Hoover pays a doctor's bill that was sent unanswered to an address in Europe. This toned, waterstained letter has a large, expressive signature.(3 items)

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HENRY FORD, LEE IACOCCA + ASSORTED AUTOGRAPHS, 9 Cards, Envelopes and Letters

Lot 32: HENRY FORD, LEE IACOCCA + ASSORTED AUTOGRAPHS, 9 Cards, Envelopes and Letters

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Description: Autographs"Henry Ford" Commemorates The Automotive Industry HENRY FORD, LEE IACOCCA, & ASSORTED AUTOGRAPHS.Lot of 9 Items, Signed Cards, Envelopes and Letters, from assorted celebrities from around the world, Extremely Fine. Includes a First Day of Issue Cover, Commemorating the "Automotive Industry," Signed "Henry Ford," "Lee Iacocca," and "Leonard Woodcock," (October 15, 1960, Detroit, Michigan). Other autographs from Cecil Day-Lewis (Poet Laureate of England); Bernard Buffet, and Korczak Ziolkowski, artists; and Sir Bernard Lovell, of the Nuffield Radio Astronomy Laboratories, England. (9 items)

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ROBERT FROST Autograph Signed

Lot 33: ROBERT FROST Autograph Signed "Mountain Interval" Book

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Description: Autographs"Robert Frost" Author Signed Book "Mountain Interval"ROBERT FROST (1874-1963). American Poet and Writer on complex social and philosophical themes, awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 1960 for his Poetical works.Original 1931-Dated Hardcover Book, Author Signed, "Robert Frost" of "MOUNTAIN INTERVAL", Choice Near Mint. This important work was written by renowned American Poet Robert Frost, published by Henry Holt and Co., New York. The present treatise was author's first book to be published originally in the United States. It includes the first appearance of arguably his best known poem, "The Road Not Taken". The front flyleaf bears the Inscribed and Signed special presentation, which reads: "To Dorothy Hood - from - Robert Frost - Hanover 1948".Interesting and timely association with Hanover, home to Dartmouth College where Frost taught in the 1940s. He would depart Hanover the same year (1948) for his beloved Amherst College, where he returned as the Simpson Lecturer, a position he will hold until his death. This rare book remains in excellent overall condition, being bound in original green publisher's cloth with gilt lettering; light cover wear, a few of the deckled page edges remain uncut, fresh and clean throughout. Volume numbers 75 pages with terminal publisher's leaf; and measures approx. 9" tall x 6" wide x .5" thick. Quite a find and a very worthy collector acquisition indeed.Robert Frost (1874-1963) was a celebrated American poet, highly regarded for his realistic depictions of the rural life and his command of American colloquial speech. His work often employed themes from the early 1900's rural life in New England, using the setting to examine complex social and philosophical themes. An immensely popular and often-quoted poet, Frost was honored frequently during his lifetime, receiving four Pulitzer Prizes.Although he is commonly associated with New England, Robert Frost was a native of California, born in San Francisco, and having lived there until he was 11 years old. In 1894 he sold his first poem, "My Butterfly: An Elegy" to the "New York Independent" for fifteen dollars. He married Elinor Miriam White shortly after and began supporting his growing family. Grandfather Frost purchased a farm for the young couple in Derry, New Hampshire, shortly before his death. Frost worked on the farm for nine years.He wrote early in the mornings, producing many of the poems that would later become famous. His attempts at farming were not successful however, and Frost returned to education as an English teacher at Pinkerton Academy from 1906-11, then at the New Hampshire Normal School [now Plymouth State University] in Plymouth, New Hampshire. In 1912, Frost sailed with his family to Great Britain, living first in Glasgow, before settling in Beaconsfield, outside London. His first book of poetry, "A Boy's Will," was published the next year. In England he made some important acquaintances, including Edward Thomas [a member of the group known as the Dymock Poets], T.E. Hulme, and Ezra Pound. Pound would become the first American to write a [favorable] review of Frost's work. Surrounded by his peers, Frost wrote some of his best work while in EnglandFrost returned to America in 1915, buying a farm in Franconia, New Hampshire, where he launched a career of writing, teaching, and lecturing. From 1916-38, Frost was an English professor at Amherst College, encouraging his students to account for the sounds of the human voice in their craft. Starting in 1921, and for most of the next 42 years, Frost spent his summers and into late fall teaching at the Bread Loaf School of English of Middlebury College in Ripton, Vermont. In 1940 Frost bought a five acre property in Coconut Grove, Florida [which would later become South Miami]. He called the place "Pencil Pines" and spent the winters there for the rest of his life.Frost was 86 when he spoke at the inauguration of President Kennedy in 1961. He died in Boston a little more than two years later, from a blood clot in the lungs, and was buried at the Old Bennington Cemetery in Bennington, Vermont. Harvard's 1965 alumni directory indicates his having received an honorary degree there; Frost also received honorary degrees from Bates College and Oxford and Cambridge universities, and he was the first to receive two honorary degrees from Dartmouth College. During his lifetime, the Robert Frost Middle School in Fairfax, Virginia, as well as the main library of Amherst College, were named after him. Though widely acclaimed, Frost's poems are also sometimes criticized for their frequently pessimistic and menacing undertones.

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Two ROBERT FULTON Original Hand Drawn Sketches Dated 1807 and 1813

Lot 34: Two ROBERT FULTON Original Hand Drawn Sketches Dated 1807 and 1813

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Description: AutographsTwo Exceedingly Rare Original Sketches by Robert FultonROBERT FULTON, Artist and Perfector of the Steamboat.Two small Sketches, both Signed "R.F." (for Robert Fulton), one dated 1807 and the other 1813, both Extremely Fine:1. 5.25" x 3.75," dated 1807, in pencil. A weird image of a dog(?)-man in a gauzy coat. 2. 4" x 3.5," dated 1813, in ink. An image of two men (or two images of the same man), looking a lot like Rembrandt. Some math scribbling on upper right.Although Fulton is best remembered as an inventor, he spent the first thirty years of his life pursuing a career in art, including painting miniatures. At age 30, he decided to discontinue his art career, but his ability to translate ideas into sketches continued to serve him well in his future.Robert Fulton (November 14, 1765 - February 24, 1815) was an American engineer and inventor who is widely credited with developing the first commercially successful steamboat. In 1800, he was commissioned by Napoleon Bonaparte to design the Nautilus, which was the first practical submarine in history. He is also credited with inventing some of the world's earliest naval torpedoes for use by the British Navy

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1872 Letter to President (ULYSSES S. GRANT) by Utah Chief Justice James B McKean

Lot 35: 1872 Letter to President (ULYSSES S. GRANT) by Utah Chief Justice James B McKean

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Description: Autographs1872 Political Letter to President U.S. Grant Signed by James B. McKean Chief Justice of Utah at Salt Lake City Directly Leading to the Future Federal & Mormon Conflict (ULYSSES S. GRANT) (1822 - July 23, 1885). 18th President of the United States (1869-1877), Civil War Union Commanding General.December 3rd, 1872-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "Jas.(mes) B. McKean, Chief Justice," Salt Lake City, Utah to, "His Excellency, U. S. Grant, President." Choice Very Fine. Here, James B. McKean has written to President U.S. Grant regarding the appointment of General George R. Maxwell as United States Attorney for the Salt Lake area. It is boldly written and Signed by James B. McKean, measuring 8" x 11" of 2 pages, back to back, having minor archival repair on two fold lines where letter was separated, and is in overall very bold, well written and clean condition. The content is about General Maxwell running for a Congressional Seat, yet he can't hold the two important offices simultaneously. This is an important and historic letter that led to the subsequent treatment of Utah, the Mormons and their faith while in conflict with the authority of the Federal government. Transcribed in full, it reads:"Salt Lake City, Utah -- December 3d, 1872Mr. President, Sir: -- When in Washington last spring, I had the honor to recommend that Gen. George R. Maxwell be appointed United States Attorney for this Territory. For satisfactory reasons no change was then made in the incumbent of that office. Since then reasons have arisen for recommending that a gentleman not then assured be appointed to that position. Among those reasons is the fact that General Maxwell has become a contestant for a seat in Congress as delegate from this Territory. He cannot lawfully hold two Federal offices at the same time.I now respectfully recommend that Stephen DeWolfe, Esq. of this city, be appointed United States Attorney for Utah.Mr. DeWolfe has resided here for a number of years; he came from the State of Tennessee; is a Democrat in politics, and did not sympathise with the government in its efforts to put down the late rebellions. But he is a good lawyer; is under all circumstances a gentleman; is a man of integrity and character; is thoroughly acquainted with the situation here; is thoroughly in sympathy with the government in its desire to correct the abuses existing here, and, if appointed, he will discharge the duties of the office with courage, promptness, and prudence. I need not dwell upon, nor can suggest, the good policy of such an appointment. Respectfully, Your Ob't. Serv't. - Jas. B. McKean, Chief Justice."James Bedell McKean (1821-1879 died Salt Lake City, Utah), was an American politician from New York and Utah. McKean was elected as a Republican to the 36th and 37th United States Congresses, and served from March 4, 1859, to March 3, 1863. He was Chairman of the Committee on Expenditures in the Department of State. During the American Civil War, he organized the Seventy-seventh Regiment, New York Volunteers, in 1861 and served as colonel of the regiment until July 27, 1863, when he resigned his commission. He was appointed Treaty Commissioner to Honduras in 1865. In 1867, he ran for Secretary of State of New York on the Republican ticket, but was defeated. He was appointed Chief Justice of the Superior Court of the Utah Territory by President Ulysses S. Grant in 1870 and served until 1875.General Maxwell joined the 1st Michigan Cavalry, where he became a General at age 22 and fought in the Michigan Cavalry Brigade serving under General George Armstrong Custer. He fought in battles at Brandy Station, Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, Yellow Tavern and in Virginia.Wounded eight times on the battlefield over a four-year period, Gen. Maxwell suffered the loss of one leg among many other injuries. His courage earned him the Custer Medal, given only to the most deserving officers of the Michigan Brigade. After the war, General Maxwell was sent to the Utah Territory as a Federal Marshal with the purpose of bringing the Mormons into compliance with federal law. He battled the Mormon Church's leadership over ownership of land, water and timber. He also fought their affirmation that God's law was superior to Federal law. He was the first to conduct a Federal trial in the Utah Territory, where he investigated the "Mountain Meadows Massacre" of 1857 in which Mormon militiamen killed 120 settlers from Arkansas.

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ULYSSES S GRANT, GROVER CLEVELAND & PHILIP H SHERIDAN Letters

Lot 36: ULYSSES S GRANT, GROVER CLEVELAND & PHILIP H SHERIDAN Letters

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Description: AutographsSpecialized Collection of Three Notable Letters In Regard to Various Invitations to St. Patrick's Day CelebrationsULYSSES S GRANT, GROVER CLEVELAND & PHILIP H SHERIDAN.Rare Collection Archive of (3) Different Letters regarding invitations to St. Patrick's Day celebrations.1. March 10, 1882-Dated Autograph Letter Signed in the third person "General Grant", 4.75" x 8", 1 page, New York, Choice Very Fine. U.S. Grant pens in full: "General Grant accepts with pleasure the invitation of the Society of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick to dine with them on the occasion of their 98th Anniversary, at ________, March 17th at 6.30 O'Clock".2. March 14, 1901-Dated Autograph Letter Signed "Grover Cleveland", 4.5" x 6.75", 2 pages, Princeton, Choice Extremely Fine. Written to John J. Ramey, Esq. Cleveland pens, in full:"Dear Sir: I am in receipt of the courteous invitation of the Friendly Sons of St. Patrick to attend its one hundred and seventeenth anniversary dinner on the eighteenth instant. I remember with especial pleasure such an occasion a number of years ago when I was allowed to be present; and I shall always recall with delight, the good cheer and hearty hospitality that paraded the assemblage. The anniversary of the Saint's Society this year falls however - or rather its celebration occurs - on my son's birthday; and I am not so old that my wife and children are willing to relieve me from the celebration of that day at home and with them. I feel obliged therefore to decline the invitation you kindly tender me. -- Yours very truly, (Signed) Grover Cleveland".3. March 1, 1884-Dated Manuscript Letter Signed "P.H. Sheridan", 7.75" x 9.75", 1 page, on "Headquarters Army of the United States" letterhead, Choice Very Fine. Minor light even tone and small chips along the right edge. This Letter written by a secretary and then Signed by General Philip Sheridan himself. It reads, in full:"Dear Sir: -- I have the honor to acknowledge receipt of your invitation to be present at the One Hundreth Celebration of the Annual Festival of your Society at the Hotel Brunswick, New York, on the 17th instant, and I regret my engagements here are such that I will be unable to accept your courteous invitation. Very truly yours, P.H. Sheridan, Lieut. General".A wonderful, unusual and hard to ever replicate, archive of Three Signed Letters of prominent American figures, regarding St. Patrick's Day!

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1765 JOHN HANCOCK Signed FANEUIL-HALL LOTTERY Ticket Rarity

Lot 37: 1765 JOHN HANCOCK Signed FANEUIL-HALL LOTTERY Ticket Rarity

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Description: Autographs1765 "John Hancock" Signed "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Historic Boston, Mass. Lottery Ticket & Superbly FramedJOHN HANCOCK (1737-1793). First Signer of the Declaration of Independence, President of the Continental Congress, Governor of Massachusetts.June 1765-Dated Pre-Revolutionary War, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "John Hancock," bold "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Boston, Massachusetts, Signed Lottery Ticket, Framed, Choice Extremely Fine. John Hancock was the famous First Signer of the Declaration of Independence and Acted as the President of the Continental Congress and the Governor of Massachusetts. This original, fully authentic Colonial Period Lottery Ticket measuring a full 2" x 3.5" is boldly Signed in rich brown ink "John Hancock." This historic, "Faneuil-Hall LOTTERY" Boston, Massachusetts, Lottery Ticket has a virtually invisible small deft repair at its top center edge with sharply printed deep black text. It is very well centered with full margin border designs. Overall, this extremely rare and historic lottery ticket has a pleasing, even appearance and the large deep brown signature "John Hancock" is very attractive. Custom Framed to about 14" x 15.5" with black and brown inner felt matting in a most expensive, high quality "museum" glass and standards frame.This important "John Hancock" Signed Lottery Ticket is particularly important because it is from early in his public career. He signed this Lottery Ticket in the year following his first election to the Massachusetts General Court. A similar "John Hancock" Signed Faneuil Hall Lottery Ticket has previously sold for about $26,450 in a 2007 Stack's, New York City auction in about the same condition. This example is truly impressive, being of museum quality, certainly an important highlight centerpiece for any autograph, lottery ticket or Colonial Americana collection. Magnificently custom double felt matted and professionally framed in its extremely expensive, absolutely gorgeous gold-gilt wooden museum quality frame. Ready to immediately hang prominently on display.John Hancock's (1737-1793) political career began in 1764, the year he inherited his uncle's fortune and shipping business, when he became a Boston Selectman (member of the city council). In 1766 he was elected to the Massachusetts General Court. During the 1770's his fame as a Patriot spread, and he was elected or appointed to increasingly important offices.

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First Lady ANNA HARRISON -1844 Autograph Letter Signed

Lot 38: First Lady ANNA HARRISON -1844 Autograph Letter Signed

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Description: Autographs1844 Anna Harrison First Lady and Widow of President William Henry Harrison Autograph Letter Signed ANNA SYMMES HARRISON (1775-1864). First Lady and Wife of President William Henry Harrison. The First Lady of the United States during her husband's One-Month Term in 1841 (President Harrison died on April 4th), and she never entered the White House!September 10, 1844-Dated, Autograph Letter Signed, "A Harrison" in brown ink on a double sided page, North Bend, 2 pages, front and back, measuring 10" x 7.75", Choice Extremely Fine. This fresh appearing very personal Handwritten and Signed Letter by Anna Harrison is addressed to a "Mrs Carman." The content expresses general complaints about her poor health and speaks of various social affairs and of her friends. This Letter is very well written, easily readable, having vivid brown nicely written text upon clean, period wove paper with standard light mailing folds. The "Sanders" Autograph Price Guide lists her average ALS at $1,844, while this is a rather more extensive, high quality Letter. Anna Harrison's personal Letters are indeed rare. Anna Harrison (1775-1864), was wife of President William Henry Harrison and grandmother of President Benjamin Harrison. She was nominally First Lady of the United States during her husband's one-month term in 1841, but she never entered the White House.When William was inaugurated in 1841, Anna was detained by illness at their home in North Bend. She decided not to accompany him to Washington. President-elect Harrison asked his daughter-in-law Jane Irwin Harrison, widow of his namesake son, to accompany him and act as hostess until Anna's proposed arrival in May. Half a dozen other relatives happily went with them. On April 4, exactly one month after his inauguration, President Harrison died. Anna was packing for the move to the White House when she learned of William's death in Washington, so she never made the journey.

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HENRY HOLLAND Jr., Manuscript Document Signed, Colonial Merchant and Privateer

Lot 39: HENRY HOLLAND Jr., Manuscript Document Signed, Colonial Merchant and Privateer

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Description: Autographs1746 Henry Holland Paid In "current money of New York" HENRY HOLLAND Jr., (1704 - 1782). Colonial Sheriff of Albany, New York, Colonial Merchant and Privateer. Also... Signed by New York Ship Captain Peter Van Bergen.July 10, 1746-Dated Colonial America, Manuscript Document Signed, "Henry Holland," at [New York], and by Captain Peter Van Bergen, Fine. It has moderate folds with slight edge tears reinforced long ago on the blank reverse with clear rich brown ink text and signatures. This original Document is a Promissory Note and Receipt which reads, in full:"I promise to pay Henry Holland, or order the sum of forty four pounds six shillings current money of New York on or before the first day of November next for Value received this 10th of July 1746. ---- (Signed) Peter Van Bergen -- Received Dec. 1, 1746 the above sum of forty four Pounds - (Signed) Henry Holland". Endorsed on the blank reverse, "Capt. P. V. Bergen - £44" as having received the funds.Henry was the son of Garrison Officer and Sheriff, Henry Holland (1661-1736). He served in his father's military company until 1719, when he was apprenticed to a N.Y. Merchant. Returning to Albany after his apprenticeship, he was elected an Assistant Alderman in Albany in 1727. Over the next 20 years he received Royal Appointments as Justice of the Peace, Master of the Chancery Court, and Sheriff of Albany County. He served as Sheriff from 1739-46. Dabbling in frontier land patents, he acquired valuable land in the Mohawk Country and to the north of Albany. During this same period he began to ship cargoes out to frontier developer Sir William Johnson. During the British troubles with the French and Indians in the period 1744-48, Holland served as a commissary - procuring provisions and supplies on behalf of the British war effort. Still sheriff, he came under fire in Albany for his tactics in securing materials from Albany storehouses and was replaced as sheriff in September 1746. He moved to New York City and became a merchant, owned two privateers, and an estate on Staten Island where he represented Richmond County in the provincial Assembly from 1761-69. He was also a Slave owner. He died sometime before 1782.Peter Van Bergen (sometime called "Petrus") was a Captain in an Albany Militia company in 1767, and like Holland was also a Slave holder. In 1775, he contributed for the relief of Fort Ticonderoga, and after the Revolutionary War he was accorded a land bounty right for his services with the Albany militia regiment. In 1785 he was appointed Assessor for the first ward of Albany and in 1789 served as Election Inspector.

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Signer FRANCIS HOPKINSON + WILLIAM BINGHAM, Plus JOHN BENEZET

Lot 40: Signer FRANCIS HOPKINSON + WILLIAM BINGHAM, Plus JOHN BENEZET

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Description: AutographsFrancis Hopkinson Signer of the Declaration of Independence from New Jersey & Other Noted AmericansFRANCIS HOPKINSON (1737-1791) & WILLIAM BINGHAM (1752-1804), Plus JOHN BENEZET (see text).Hopkinson was an American Author, was one of the Signer of the Declaration of Independence as a Continental Congress Delegate from New Jersey and helped in the design of the First American National Flag, First graduate of what is now the University of Pennsylvania.William Bingham was an American Statesman from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was a Delegate for Pennsylvania to the Continental Congress from 1786 to 1788, and later served in the United States Senate from 1795 to 1801 and as President Pro Tempore of the United States Senate.December 31st, 1778-Dated Revolutionary War Period, Partially-Printed Document Signed, "F. Hopkinson" as Continental Congress Treasurer of Loans, Third Bill of Exchange $30 Sight Draft, printed in Turquoise - Blue and Black, Very Choice Extremely Fine. This Continental Treasury form being beautifully printed upon watermarked "UNITED STATES 3" fine quality laid period paper. It is made to "Arthur Lefferts" on interest due on Money borrowed by the United States. This form is made:"To the Commissioner or Commissioners of the United States of America, at Paris. - Countersigned, Tho(mas) Smith - Commissioner of the Continental Loan-Office in the State of Pennsylvania -- (Signed) F(rancis) Hopkinson - Treasr. of Loans."This form is in excellent overall quality having a bold brown signature of Hopkinson measuring over 2.25" long. The blank reverse is endorsed at top by Lefferts, being signed to William Bingham, authorized by John Benezet, and then further endorsed and noted in French on July 13, 1779, Signed by "Wm. Bingham" with his bold signature with a lovely flourish below.John Benezet was a native of Philadelphia and the son of Daniel Benezet, a prominent Philadelphia merchant. Benezet briefly attended the College of Philadelphia in 1757 and was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 1768. In 1775, he married Hanna Bingham, and with that, his father gave him £3,000 plus £6,000 in stock to set up an import business. Benezet became active in political affairs, but only briefly. In early 1775, John Benezet served as one of the Secretaries who recorded proceedings at the Pennsylvania Provincial Congress. In August of that year, he was named to Philadelphia's Committee of Correspondence. Two years later, in 1777, the Continental Congress appointed Benezet as Commissioner of Claims in the Treasury Office, later resigned and returned to his business interests. Benezet died in the Winter of 1780-81, when his ship, the Shillelagh, was lost at sea during a voyage to France.Francis Hopkinson, Signer of the Declaration of Independence, signs this Continental Congress Treasury Bill of Exchange, as Treasurer of Loans. Francis Hopkinson (September 21, 1737 - May 9, 1791), an American author, was one of the signers of the Declaration of Independence as a delegate from New Jersey.Hopkinson later served as a Federal Judge in Pennsylvania. His supporters believe he played a key role in the design of the First American flag. Francis Hopkinson was born at Philadelphia in 1737, the son of Thomas Hopkinson and Mary Johnson. He became a member of the first class at the College of Philadelphia (now University of Pennsylvania) in 1751 and graduated in 1757, receiving his masters degree in 1760, and a doctor in law (honorary) in 1790.He was secretary to a Provincial Council of Pennsylvania Indian commission in 1761 that made a treaty with the Delaware and several Iroquois tribes. In 1763, he was appointed customs collector for Salem, New Jersey. Hopkinson spent from May 1766 to August 1767 in England in hopes of becoming commissioner of customs for North America. Although unsuccessful, he spent time with the future Prime Minister Lord North and his half-brother, the Bishop of Worcester Brownlow North, and painter Benjamin West. After his return, Francis Hopkinson operated a dry goods business in Philadelphia and married Ann Borden on September 1, 1768. They would have five children. Hopkinson obtained a public appointment as a customs collector for New Castle, Delaware on May 1, 1772.He moved to Bordentown, New Jersey in 1774, became an assemblyman for the state's Royal Provincial Council, and was admitted to the New Jersey bar on May 8, 1775. He resigned his crown-appointed positions in 1776 and, on June 22, went on to represent New Jersey in the Second Continental Congress where he signed the Declaration of Independence.He departed the Congress on November 30, 1776 to serve on the Navy Board at Philadelphia. As part of the fledgling nation's government, he was Treasurer of the Continental Loan Office in 1778; appointed Judge of the Admiralty Court of Pennsylvania in 1779 and reappointed in 1780 and 1787; and helped ratify the Constitution during the Constitutional Convention in 1787.On September 24, 1789, he was nominated by President George Washington to the newly created position of Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Pennsylvania. He was confirmed by the United States Senate, and received his commission, on September 26, 1789.As a Federal Judge, Hopkinson died in Philadelphia at the age of 53 from a sudden epileptic seizure. He was buried in Christ Church Burial Ground in Philadelphia. He was the father of Joseph Hopkinson, member of the United States House of Representatives and Federal judge.

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1805 THOMAS JEFFERSON Autograph Endorsement As United States President

Lot 41: 1805 THOMAS JEFFERSON Autograph Endorsement As United States President

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Description: AutographsThomas Jefferson American Founding Father 1805-Dated Autograph Endorsement As PresidentTHOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826). 3rd President of the United States, an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776) and the third President of the United States (1801-1809). He served in the Continental Congress representing Virginia and then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779-1781). Jefferson served as a diplomat, stationed in Paris. In May 1785, he became the United States Minister to France.May 6, 1805-Dated Autograph Endorsement Signed "Th: Jefferson" as President, 2 pages separated, measuring 7.75" x 12.5", penned at the bottom of a Manuscript Transcript of a Letter by James Day, the "Keeper" of the Squam Lighthouse in Gloucester, Massachusetts, Fine. Together with a second page inclusive of the Integral Mailing Envelope Cover which has severe tearing from being opened by ripping its wax seals, not affecting the Document sheet itself. Thomas Jefferson's handwriting and signature are clearly readable and dark against the even moderately toned period paper with minor deeper browning at its edges. James Day's transcript reads, in part:"Gloucester April 22nd, 1805. I the subscriber keeper of the Light House in Squam in Gloucester County of Essex & State of Massachusetts, being aged & infirm & not able to attend to my duty so far as I should wish, Do hereby express a desire to resign my office, & my son George Day having kept the Light under me ever since its establishment & assisted me in my duty relative thereto I would beg leave to recommend him as a fit & suitable person to take my place. & I hope he may be appointed, as I am confident he will at all times strictly & faithfully attend to his duty..." He continues: "My son is a good pilot for Squam harbour & for the ports in this neighbourhood & has at considerable hazard often assisted vessels in distress. Copy (signed) James Day.Thomas Jefferson pens his Endorsement in full: "The appointment of George Day is approved. Th: Jefferson / May 6. 05".Beneath Thomas Jefferson's endorsement in yet another hand, is a six-line note which reads, in full: "The son lives in the house where the light is kept & is always on the spot. His father seldom visits the place & is a mile from it & is now dangerously ill with a dropsy. His recommendation has been several months at Genl. Lincoln's office Boston. The son has been the real keeper of the light for many years & it has been faithfully kept."Also present is a Leaf of the same size, addressed in an unknown hand to, "Honble Albert Gallatin, Secretary of the Treasury, Washington." Above the address is an Autograph Note Signed by Gallatin to "Mr. Shaw." It reads, In full:"Mr. Lincoln to be apprised that the President has appointed George Day Keeper of the light house. A.G. (Albert Gallatin)"While James Day was appointed First Keeper, the tower was lighted for the first time by his 31-year old son, George, on March 23, 1801. George held his post until retirement in 1850 when he was 80 years old. An interesting early Federal Appointment Signed by President Thomas Jefferson, mentioning Revolutionary War General Lincoln and Albert Gallatin all upon one document.

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THOMAS JEFFERSON 1824-Dated Autograph Letter Signed Twice from Monticello

Lot 42: THOMAS JEFFERSON 1824-Dated Autograph Letter Signed Twice from Monticello

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Description: AutographsThomas Jefferson Autographed Letter Signed Twice to His Son-In-Law For Specific Law Books Used For TeachingTHOMAS JEFFERSON (1743-1826). 3rd President of the United States, an American Founding Father, the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776) and the third President of the United States (1801-1809); served in the Continental Congress representing Virginia and then served as a wartime Governor of Virginia (1779-1781). Jefferson served as a diplomat, stationed in Paris. In May 1785, he became the United States Minister to France.January 4, (18)24-Dated Autograph Letter Signed Twice, "Th. Jefferson," 7.75" x 9.75" fully opened measuring 9.75 x 15.5", 1 page, Quarto, from Monticello, with Integral Free Franked Mailing Cover, with Second Signature, "free - Th. Jefferson," Choice Extremely Fine. Written to Col. Thomas M. Randolph, Jr., of the legislature of Virginia, now in Richmond." Thomas Mann Randolph married Martha Jefferson, the oldest daughter of Thomas Jefferson and they had twelve children. Here, Thomas Jefferson pens, in full:"Monticello Jan. 4. 24. --- Dear Sir --- In compliance with the request of Col. Bowyer, conveyed through you, to furnish a list of books proper to prepare his son for the bar, I inclose you copies of two letters [not present], written formerly, and on occasions which called on me for full and mature consideration of the subject. These will not only specify the books to be read but also the reasons for their preference, and the course of other reading auxiliary to the accomplishment of a well prepared lawyer, above all things I would press on him the procuring of Thomas's edition of [Sir Edward] Coke's commentary on Sir Thomas Littleton, as being the only basis on which a good lawyer can be formed. Any importing merchant in Richmond could obtain it from London within 4. or 5. months; as could the importing booksellers; but they would lay on their 10. Dollars of profit. Col. Bowyer is free to make what use of these letters he pleases, perhaps they might be useful to some young students if permitted to be printed, to which, in this case, I have no objection. There is a Mr. White in Richmond, a printer, who writes me that he wants something to do, & perhaps would print this on hos own account. It would make a pamphlet of a single sheet only, and might sell during a session of the legislature. -- With my best respects to Col. Bowyer, accept yourself the assurance of my affectionate and respectful friendship and attachment. -- (Signed) Th. Jefferson"Integral Free Franked Mailing Cover, with Second Signature, "free - Th. Jefferson," measuring 2" long and boldly written in deep rich brown. The 3.75" x 8.25" integral envelope portion was red wax sealed and torn, when originally opened. The irregularly shaped paper tear is lacking, measuring about 2.5" x 1.5" at bottom, between the two panes not anywhere near or affecting any of the written text. Docket noted at far right center in the recipient's hand, "Th: Jefferson - Januy 4: 24 - recd (received) 8". Round Red Postal Mailing Date Stamp upon the envelope panel at left. Overall, a museum quality, boldly written and presented Twice Signed Thomas Jefferson Autographed Letter worthy of the finest of Presidential autograph collections.Thomas Mann Randolph, Jr. was a planter, soldier, and politician from Virginia. The Randolphs were among the First Families of Virginia.Born at Tuckahoe Plantation in Goochland County, Virginia, Thomas was the first son of Thomas Mann Randolph, Sr. (1741-1793) and Anne Carrey (1745-1789), both of the elite planter class.During the War of 1812, he was a Colonel of the Twentieth Infantry. He served as a member of both houses of the Virginia General Assembly, a Representative of the U.S. Congress and as 21st Governor of Virginia from 1819-1822, the first Son-in-law of a Virginia Governor to be elected Governor in his own right.He married Martha Jefferson (1772-1836), the oldest daughter of Thomas Jefferson, and they had twelve children, eleven of whom survived childhood. Randolph and his wife became estranged after he became an alcoholic, as he became violent and abusive when drinking. After Jefferson's death in 1826, Martha Randolph took her two youngest children with her to Boston to gain distance from her husband. He lived apart from his family for most of the rest of his life. He and his wife were reconciled shortly before his death, and he was cared for at Monticello. Randolph died there and was interred in the Jefferson family burial ground.The existence of the two letters about which Jefferson speaks are apparently unknown, but a letter sent by Jefferson to Mr. A. Stewart, dated May 23, 1795, refers to books he had sent to Staunton. First listed among the books was the "Coke Littleton" mentioned in this letter. A fascinating letter of Jefferson's own recommendation for the education of a young lawyer. Autograph address and franking signature, "free Th. Jefferson," on the verso,reception docket by Randolph on verso. Seat tear with paper loss, minor separations to integral blank leaf. Housed in a half blue Morocco folding case with Morocco spine labels.

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1863 WILLIAM JOHNSTON Great Content ALS Civil War + Emancipation Proclamation !

Lot 43: 1863 WILLIAM JOHNSTON Great Content ALS Civil War + Emancipation Proclamation !

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Description: Autographs1863 Civil War Date Autograph Letter Signed by William Johnston Former Governor of Pennsylvania, Discussing Politics, the Civil War and Emancipation ProclamationWILLIAM F. JOHNSTON (1808-1872), 11th Governor of Pennsylvania, Autograph Letter Signed, Discussing Politics, the Civil War and Emancipation Proclamation!May 17, 1863-Dated Civil War Period, Outstanding Historic Content, Autograph Letter Signed, "William Johnston," 4 pages, Choice Very Fine+. There is significant important content discussing the ongoing Civil War and the historic Emancipation Proclamation. This extensive, fully Handwritten Letter, from William Johnston, the former Governor of Pennsylvania, is addressed to General Gray. It is very well written in deep rich brown ink upon light blue lined period wove paper. Folded from mailing it measures approximately 7.75" x 9.75" (folded size), clearly and sharply signed "William Johnston" at its conclusion. The first part of this letter deals primarily with a mortgage and interest, then turns to important Politics. The latter portion adds more detail regarding the ongoing Political situation, the Civil War and further repercussions of the Emancipation Proclamation which was issued just a few months before writing this letter. It reads, in part:"Appleton May 17th 1863 --- Dear General Gray ---(Bottom of page two)... Gen. what do think of the war, and what will be the end, will it be a restoration of Union, or separation and a Southern Confederacy. Are you a Breckinridge Democrat yet, I expect not, for I have not doubt of your being a true Union Man, and think likely you entertain similar views to D.S. Dickinson who was also a Breckinridge Democrat, and of the same wing of the Democratic party with yourself, or at least I so considered it. I like his course or what I have heard of him.I believe the President to be honest and patriotic his course from the beginning of the rebellion, in the first place to restore the Union with all the rights to the south that they ever had under the Constitution. When that did not effect it in stopping the rebellion, he then issued his proclamation giving the rebellious states 100 days notice, that at the expiration of that time, those states who were in rebellion that their slaves should be free, and that no officer or soldier in the service of the U.S. should return or assist in returning slaves who had escaped from slavery to enjoy freedom.I believe that the proclamation was right, and I also believe that had Fremont's Proclamation been sustained in giving freedom to the slaves of rebels, and confiscating the property of rebels, it would have prevented thousands from joining the rebels, if for no better principle than holding their slaves and the rest of their property they would have been Union men. I think the President has missed in retaining some officers in high commands so long, so as it seems to me that they cared more for safety of the rebels, than their own troops, but the President had to reconcile his political opponents or tried to do so but some of them would not be recounseled..."William Freame Johnston (November 29, 1808 - October 25, 1872) was the 11th Governor of Pennsylvania from 1848 to 1852. A lawyer by training, Johnston became district attorney of Westmoreland County at the age of 21 in 1829. He was elected to the Pennsylvania state legislature and switched from the Democratic Party to the Whig Party in 1847 to run for the Pennsylvania Senate.He was named Senate Speaker in 1848 and, upon the resignation of Governor Francis Shunk, assumed the position of governor. Although, because of the transition, Johnston could have delayed the scheduled October elections, he chose to let them proceed and was narrowly elected to the position, defeating Democratic candidate Morris Longstreth by only 297 votes. Although he was part of the Free Soil faction of Whigs opposed to slavery, Johnston faced the federal Fugitive Slave Act and fought its enforcement in Pennsylvania. Johnston lost re-election to Democrat William Bigler in 1851.Johnston Commons on Penn State University is named for the former governor. His father built and operated the Kingston House in Unity Township, Pennsylvania. It was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983.(From Wikipedia)

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1972-Dated Hardcover JFK Commemorative Book: Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye

Lot 44: 1972-Dated Hardcover JFK Commemorative Book: Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye

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Description: AutographsFirst Edition: "Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye" Hardcover Commemorative Inscribed by the Author David Powers (JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY) DAVID FRANCIS POWERS, (1912-1998). Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy.1972-Dated Hardcover Commemorative Book entitled, "Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye," First Edition. Inscribed by J.F. Kennedy's David Powers, with Original Dust-Jacket, Choice Extremely Fine". Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye', Memories of John Fitzgerald Kennedy" by Kenneth P. O'Donnell and David F. Powers with Joe McCarthy, Published by "Little Brown and Company, Boston & Toronto", 1972. First edition; with original pictorial dust-jacket over yellow cloth and decorative spine hardcover, 434 pp., measuring 9.5 x 6.25". The original Dust-jacket shows typical wear, minor rubbing, else strong bound, overall excellent condition. Inscribed by the author David Powers: "To Maury, I hope you enjoy reading "Johnny" as much as I did living it. My best wishes always, Dave Powers". David Francis Powers was Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy. Powers served as Museum Curator of the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum from 1964 until his retirement in May 1994.Kenneth P. O'Donnell and David F. Powers had a closer personal relationship with President John F. Kennedy during his years in the White House than any of the other members of his inner-circle of advisers and aides... Both O'Donnell and Powers managed to remain almost unknown to the reading public.They were always within the beckoning distance of the President around the office and always at his side when he traveled, but the stayed so anonymous that they were usually mistaken for a couple of Secret Service agents. Devoted to the President and sharing his intimates confidences, but keeping out of his limelight and cloaking themselves in closed-mouth reticence, they were dubbed by the White House press corps the "Kennedy's Irish Mafia".Both O'Donnell + Powers knew Kennedy and all of his family since Jack ran for Congress in Boson in 1946. They were among the first few men whom he named as special assistants when he was elected. O'Donnell's official title was Appointments Secretary. Pierre Salinger, JKF's press secretary called O'Donnell the most powerful member of the White House staff.Outside of Bobby Kennedy's had only one really close friend and that was Dave Powers. He was warm and genial and completely unpretentious, who had been a poor newspaper boy in Charlestown. He enjoyed an incredible memory of names, faces, and poll statistics. He simply was a guy Kennedy liked to have around him as much as possible. They swam together in the warm White House pool. Dave helped organize the Kennedy Library and became the first Curator of its Museum.

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1972-Dated Signed Paperback Commemorative Book: Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye

Lot 45: 1972-Dated Signed Paperback Commemorative Book: Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye

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Description: Autographs"This is a book we owed the memory of President John F. Kennedy. Best wishes always. Dave Powers" - Inscribed(JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY) DAVID FRANCIS POWERS (1912-1998). Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy.1972-Dated, First Paperback Edition, Commemorative Book entitled, "Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye," Inscribed by J.F. Kennedy's David Powers, with Original Dust-Jacket, Choice Extremely Fine. "Johnny, We Hardly Knew Ye," Memories of John Fitzgerald Kennedy by Kenneth P. O'Donnell and David F. Powers with Joe McCarthy, Published by "Little Brown and Company, Boston & Toronto", 1972. A FIRST PAPERBACK EDITION, in original green pictorial wrappers, measuring 7.75 x 5", 495 pages ,Dust jacket shows minor wear/loss, creases in spine, tight bound condition. (According to OCLC, this edition was re-issued by the same publishers in 1983.) This First Paperback Edition is Inscribed by Dave Powers upon the half-title: "To my friend Maury. For all your help with President Kennedy's Papers. Dave Powers". And on the title-page: "This is a book we owed the memory of President John F. Kennedy. Best wishes always. Dave Powers". There is an invaluable "A Note about the Narrators" in the introduction, written by Joe McCarthy. "Kenneth P. O'Donnell and David F. Powers had a closer personal relationship with President John F. Kennedy during his years in the White House than any of the other members of his inner-circle of advisers and aides... Both O'Donnell and Powers managed to remain almost unknown to the reading public. They were always within the beckoning distance of the President around the office and always at his side when he traveled, but the stayed so anonymous that they were usually mistaken for a couple of Secret Service agents. Devoted to the President and sharing his intimates confidences, but keeping out of his limelight and cloaking themselves in closed-mouth reticence, they were dubbed by the White House press corps the "Kennedy's Irish Mafia". Both knew Kennedy and all of his family since Jack ran for Congress in Boson in 1946. They were among the first few men whom he named as special assistants when he was elected. O'Donnell's official title was Appointments Secretary. Pierre Salinger, JKF's press secretary called O'Donnell the most powerful member of the White House staff. Outside of Bobby Kennedy's had only one really close friend and that was Dave Powers. He was warm and genial and completely unpretentious, who had been a poor newspaper boy in Charlestown. He enjoyed an incredible memory of names, faces, and poll statistics. He simply was a guy Kennedy liked to have around him as much as possible. They swam together in the warm White House pool. Dave helped organize the Kennedy Library and became the first Curator of its Museum. David Francis Powers was Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy. Powers served as Museum Curator of the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum from 1964 until his retirement in May 1994.

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c. 1964, Commemorative Book entitled, A Tribute to John F. Kennedy

Lot 46: c. 1964, Commemorative Book entitled, A Tribute to John F. Kennedy

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Description: Autographs1964 "A Tribute to John F. Kennedy" Edited by Pierre Slinger and Sander Vanocur Inscribed by "Dave Powers"(JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY) DAVID FRANCIS POWERS (1912-1998). Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy.c. 1964, Commemorative Book entitled, "A Tribute to John F. Kennedy", Dedication by L.B.J., Hand-Inscribed by "Dave Powers," Choice Extremely Fine." A Tribute to John F. Kennedy" edited by Pierre Slinger and Sander Vanocur. Published by "Encyclopedia Britannica, Inc., Chicago", c. 1964. Original black cloth, with a facsimile signature of John F. Kennedy in gold, in the original black cloth slipcase with the title in gold. With 17 illustrations, including a copy of a colored watercolor by Mrs. Jacqueline Kennedy of Hammersmith Farm painted in 1961, 162 pages, measuring 9.5 x 6.5". With a dedication by President Lyndon B. Johnson and a foreword by Theodore C. Sorensen. Inscribed by Dave Powers on the front flyleaf; "To my friend Maury, in memory of the Golden Days of J.F.K. My best always, Dave Powers". With a printed greeting card from Dave Powers in the original envelope stating, "this night should see something born in each of us...". Inside this card is written: "Maury :Love... The light and Hope of the World, Dave."Pierre Salinger was President Kennedy's Press Secretary. Sander Vanocur is a journalist, Corespondent for ABC and NBC and writes for the New York Times. This volume was he first published collection of tributes paid to the memory of the late President. It appeared in the emotion-filled days following the Dallas assassination. The co-editors selections include artist from newspapers and magazines, radio, television broadcasts, eminent U.S. citizens and foreign leaders, as well as letters received by the Kennedy family. Among the contributors are: Harry Golden, Peter Lisagor, Daniel P. Moynihan, Joseph Alsop, Art Buchwald, John Mansfield, Norman Cousisns, Romulo Bentacourt, Albert Schweitzer, Theodore H. White, Norman Mailer, Robert F. Kennedy. Exquisite condition. David Francis Powers was Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy. Powers served as Museum Curator of the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum from 1964 until his retirement in May 1994.

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TRIUMPH and TRAGEDY, STORY OF THE KENNEDYS. Dave Powers PERSONAL COPY

Lot 47: TRIUMPH and TRAGEDY, STORY OF THE KENNEDYS. Dave Powers PERSONAL COPY

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Description: Autographs"Triumph And Tragedy, Story Of The Kennedys"Dave Powers' Signed Personal Copy(JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY) DAVID FRANCIS POWERS (1912-1998). Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy. "Triumph And Tragedy, The Story Of The Kennedys" Dave Powers' Signed Personal Copy With Inscription!"Triumph and Tragedy, The Story of the Kennedys" by The Associated Press. Published by "Western Publishing Company, New York", 1968. Blue cloth, gilt letters, with illustrations (some colored), 256 pp., 10.5 x 7", Near Mint. This copy was presented, INSCRIBED, by Dave Powers to his long-time secretary, Charlotte Wooding, who sold it to Maury A. Bromsen when she left to work in Chicago. With Mr. Power's small bookplate on inside cover. This volume contains, perhaps, the finest collection of Kennedy Family Illustrations and portraits yet published. There is a very detailed and useful "Index" printed in three columns, also includes a "Bilbliography". The printing was a very small one, OCLC reports that only 36 libraries have copies (there was another edition printed in New York by Morrow with the same pagination, also in 1968, with a larger numbers reporting copies, according to OCLC).NOTE: This comes from the famed Boston dealer and Kennedy expert Maury Bromson's personal holding. His price sheet details it as being offered (15+ years ago!) for $350. BIDS start at a FRACTION of that amount!!!Edles worn, cover-boards slightly rubbed, strong bound, overall fantastic condition. David Francis Powers was Special Assistant and assistant Appointments Secretary to President of the United States John F. Kennedy. Powers served as Museum Curator of the John F. Kennedy Library and Museum from 1964 until his retirement in May 1994. WikipediaBorn: April 25, 1912, Boston, MADied: March 27, 1998

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ROBERT F. KENNEDY Inscribed and Signed Photograph

Lot 48: ROBERT F. KENNEDY Inscribed and Signed Photograph

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Description: Autographs"Robt F Kennedy" Inscribed and Signed Photograph ROBERT F. KENNEDY (1925-1968). American Politician, 64th Attorney General Serving Under his Brother JFK.Inscribed and Signed Photograph, "Robt F Kennedy," black & white Portrait Photo measuring 8" x 10" no date or place, Choice Extremely Fine. A wonderful head and shoulders image of the younger Kennedy brother wearing a suit and tie. Inscribed on the image in black ink, "For Ilene Bolderan - With Best Wishes - Robt. F. Kennedy". A clean and very pleasing image that appears excellent for display.

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American Aviator CHARLES A. LINDBERGH Autograph Letter Signed in 1936

Lot 49: American Aviator CHARLES A. LINDBERGH Autograph Letter Signed in 1936

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Description: AutographsAviator Charles A. Lindbergh Writes to His Aunt on Behalf of the Minnesota Historical Society for Her SupportCHARLES A. LINDBERGH. American Aviator, Author, Inventor, Explorer and Social Activist.May 12th, 1936-Dated, Exceptional Typed Letter Signed, 2 pages, 8" x 10" Quarto, on personal "Long Barn - Weald - Sevenoaks" fine blue Letterhead Stationery, New York, Choice Crisp Extremely Fine. Written to his aunt, Mrs. June Butler of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Typewritten letter with manuscript signature. The deep rich black ink Fully Executed Signature, "Charles A. Lindbergh" measures approximately 1.75" long, along with his location, "Long Barn, Weald, Sevenoaks, Kent, England" also being written in Lindbergh's own hand. This historic Letter reads, in part:"Dear Aunt June, --- I talked to you last summer about the Minnesota Historical Society and the work they are doing in collecting manuscripts and information concerning the part my father took in Minnesota politics and the conditions which the family encountered after they settled near Melrose... The Minnesota Historical Society is one of the best organizations of its kind in the United States and any thing you can tell them will be treated with the utmost dignity and respect. The Society is in no way connected with the newspapers...I have written to Uncle Perry concerning this and I think it would be a great help if you would write to him also. I am very anxious for him to realize that he can talk freely to any one from this Society and that he will not bring a flood of reporters and newspaper men upon himself by doing so. As you know he has been considerably annoyed in the past by press representatives. I would like to hear from you whenever you have time to write. With best wishes," --- (Signed by hand) - "Charles A. Lindbergh Long barn Wald, Sevenoaks, Kent, England".Here Charles Lindbergh is asking his Aunt June to prevail upon his Uncle Perry Lindbergh, who immigrated from Sweden with his Father, Charles Augustus Lindbergh Sr. (born Carl Månsson; January 20, 1859 - May 24, 1924), to grant an interview about Lindbergh Sr., to the Minnesota Historical Society. Lindbergh Sr. was a U.S. Congressman (Republican-Minnesota (6th)) from 1907 to 1917, was one of just fifty House Members to vote against House bill 37350, the official Entry of the United States into World War I.

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1927 CHARLES A. LINDBERGH Signed Dinner-Banquet Program, Springfield, Vermont

Lot 50: 1927 CHARLES A. LINDBERGH Signed Dinner-Banquet Program, Springfield, Vermont

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Description: Autographs1927 "C.A. Lindbergh" Signed Dinner-Banquet ProgramCHARLES A. LINDBERGH. American Aviator, Author, Inventor, Explorer and Social Activist.July 26, 1927-Dated Historic Signed Menu, "C.A. Lindbergh", 4.5" x 7.5", Springfield, Vermont, Choice Crisp Near Mint. The special decorated menu is printed in two shades of blue with silver accents, featuring the airplane "Spirit of St. Louis" in flight across a star-studded sky midway between the Statue of Liberty and the Eiffel Tower. This important Banquet was given in Lindbergh's honor during his visit to Springfield, Vermont, at a special dinner held at the Community House on July 26, 1927 - just two months after his historic flight and Atlantic Crossing. Springfield, Vermont was one of Lindbergh's stops on his triumphant tour of the U.S. in 1927 to promote aviation after his courageous flight. Beautifully Signed boldly upon the front program cover in deep black ink, "C.A. Lindbergh" measuring fully 2.5" long. A great item for display!Signed Program, "C. A. Lindbergh," in black ink, October 18, 1927, Baltimore, MD, 11" x 8.5", Choice Extremely Fine. He has penned his excellent, huge signature, "C.A. Lindbergh" in deep black fountain pen on this Program's cover, just below an image of his historic airplane. His autograph is outstanding, presenting "10 out of 10" in strength and is scripted at an angle just below a printed drawing of the "Spirit of St. Louis" in flight. This is a wonderful looking four-page special Program that was printed for a tribute dinner held for the celebrated and famous aviator Charles A. Lindbergh. It was hosted by the Mayor and many notable citizens of Baltimore, Maryland on October 18, 1927. At the time, Lindbergh was just five months removed from his historic, first flight across the Atlantic Ocean to Paris. The interior pages of this fabulous, large program include a list of the evening's speakers as well as the dinner menu. A white ribbon has been tied at the spine to further accentuate the ornate quality of this incredible piece. Overall, there is some light circulation wear from that dinner, yet these imperfections are minor and unobtrusive. A premium, simply great piece of "Lindbergh" memorabilia and excellent for display.

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