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Auction Description for Louis J. Dianni, LLC: AUG 11, Day 2 West Point/Garrison Landing, NY
Viewing Notes:
Day 2-August 11, 2013 - Includes part IV of the Jay & Miki Mangan collection and the day promises a fine collection of Colt's, Native American, historical Hudson Valley, Civil War items, New York State and Hudson Valley related documents, historical prints, military and naval items as well as swords, armor and firearms. This year's sale will be held in cooperation with the Garrison's Landing Association and the Garrison Art Center at the Historic Landing. The event is located on Garrison's Landing Road at the water's edge and directly across the Hudson River from West Point. Garrison, New York is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a pleasurable experience as is the rest of the Hudson Valley with numerous historic restorations within an hour's drive. National Geographic Traveler named the Hudson Valley one of the top 20 must-see destinations in the world. Designated as a National Heritage Area, the Hudson River Valley is steeped in history and offers insights into the beginnings of the United States. It's the country's oldest wine producing area with magnificent scenery that inspired the Hudson River School of Painting, the first art movement in the United States.
Sale Notes:
Day 2-August 11, 2013 - Includes part IV of the Jay & Miki Mangan collection and the day promises a fine collection of Colt's, Native American, historical Hudson Valley, Civil War items, New York State and Hudson Valley related documents, historical prints, military and naval items as well as swords, armor and firearms. This year's sale will be held in cooperation with the Garrison's Landing Association and the Garrison Art Center at the Historic Landing. The event is located on Garrison's Landing Road at the water's edge and directly across the Hudson River from West Point. Garrison, New York is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is a pleasurable experience as is the rest of the Hudson Valley with numerous historic restorations within an hour's drive. National Geographic Traveler named the Hudson Valley one of the top 20 must-see destinations in the world. Designated as a National Heritage Area, the Hudson River Valley is steeped in history and offers insights into the beginnings of the United States. It's the country's oldest wine producing area with magnificent scenery that inspired the Hudson River School of Painting, the first art movement in the United States.

AUG 11, Day 2 West Point/Garrison Landing, NY

by Louis J. Dianni, LLC


454 lots with images

August 11, 2013

Live Auction

Garrison's Landing Road at the Hudson River Waterfront

Garrison, NY, 10524 USA

Phone: 954-895-8727

Email: ljdmarine5@aol.com

454 Lots
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Teapot, Cast Iron, Japanese w/Crab, Artist Signed

Lot 601: Teapot, Cast Iron, Japanese w/Crab, Artist Signed

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Description: Japanese TeapotForm: TeapotMaterial: Cast IronMarks: Signed under lidFeatures: Depicts crabs. Artists signature underneath lid.Period: 18th CenturySize: 8" H x 6" W x 6" DWeight: 4 lbsCondition: Good. Meta: Asian, Chinese, Japanese

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Teapot, Japanese, Cast Iron, Tsuba lid

Lot 602: Teapot, Japanese, Cast Iron, Tsuba lid

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Description: Japanese teapotMaterial: Cast ironFeatures: Depicts a village with trees and calligraphy. Lid is made from a Tsuba. Lid depicts a tree and bird.Period: Late 18th CenturySize: 9" H x 7" W x 7" DWeight: 3 lbs 8 ozCondition: Good. Some rust. Meta: Asian, Chinese, Japanese

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Large, Mechanical bank,

Lot 603: Large, Mechanical bank, "Jolly Nigger"

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Description: Mechanical BankMaterial: Cast IronFeatures: Cast Iron "Jolly Nigger" Mechanical Bank. The lever on the back moves his arm to slide the coin in his mouth and his eyes roll back in his head. Original paint. The back reads, "Jolly Nigger Bank, Pat. Mar. 14 '82" the base reads, "MANUFACTURED BY THE J.AE.STEVENS CO CROMWELL CONN. U.S.A" Pat. on metal base plug.Size: 6.5" H. x 5" W. x 3.25" D.Weight: 4lbsCondition: Excellent, all original paint and in working condition. Mild craquelure on paint. Meta: African American, Black Americana

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Planter, English, Cast Iron, 19th Century

Lot 604: Planter, English, Cast Iron, 19th Century

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Description: Form: PlanterMaterial: Cast ironColors: WhiteFeatures: An English handled planter on a square base.Period: 19th CenturySize: 26" H x 18" DiameterWeight: 75 poundsCondition: Good. Some paint losses.

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Plaque, Abraham Lincoln, Cast Iron

Lot 605: Plaque, Abraham Lincoln, Cast Iron

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Description: PlaqueMaterial: Cast IronMarks: NoneColors: WhiteFeatures: An enameled profile of Abraham Lincoln.Period: 19th CenturySize: 9.5" H 9" W x 1" DWeight: 4 poundsCondition: Good. Shows scratches.History: Abraham Lincoln was the 16th President of the United States, serving from March 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the United States through its greatest constitutional, military, and moral crises-the American Civil War-preserving the Union, abolishing slavery, strengthening the national government and modernizing the economy. Reared in a poor family on the western frontier, Lincoln was self-educated, and became a country lawyer, a Whig Party leader, Illinois state legislator during the 1830s, and a one-term member of the United States House of Representatives during the 1840s.After a series of debates in 1858 that gave national visibility to his opposition to the expansion of slavery, Lincoln lost a Senate race to his arch-rival, Stephen A. Douglas. Lincoln, a moderate from a swing state, secured the Republican Party presidential nomination in 1860. With almost no support in the South, Lincoln swept the North and was elected president in 1860. His election was the signal for seven southern slave states to declare their secession from the Union and form the Confederacy. The departure of the Southerners gave Lincoln's party firm control of Congress, but no formula for compromise or reconciliation was found. Lincoln explained in his second inaugural address: "Both parties deprecated war, but one of them would make war rather than let the Nation survive, and the other would accept war rather than let it perish, and the war came."When the North enthusiastically rallied behind the national flag after the Confederate attack on Fort Sumter on April 12, 1861, Lincoln concentrated on the military and political dimensions of the war effort. His goal was now to reunite the nation. He suspended habeas corpus, arresting and temporarily detaining thousands of suspected secessionists in the border states without trial. Lincoln averted British recognition of the Confederacy by defusing the Trent affair in late 1861. His numerous complex moves toward ending slavery centered on the Emancipation Proclamation in 1863, using the Army to protect escaped slaves, encouraging the border states to outlaw slavery, and helping push through Congress the Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, which permanently outlawed slavery. Lincoln closely supervised the war effort, especially the selection of top generals, including commanding general Ulysses S. Grant. Lincoln brought leaders of the major factions of his party into his cabinet and pressured them to cooperate. Lincoln's Navy set up a naval blockade that shut down the South's normal trade, helped take control of Kentucky and Tennessee, and gained control of the Southern river system using gunboats. He tried repeatedly to capture the Confederate capital at Richmond, Virginia. Each time a general failed, Lincoln substituted another until finally Grant succeeded in 1865.An exceptionally astute politician deeply involved with power issues in each state, Lincoln reached out to War Democrats and managed his own re-election in the 1864 presidential election. As the leader of the moderate faction of the Republican party, Lincoln found his policies and personality were "blasted from all sides": Radical Republicans demanded harsher treatment of the South, War Democrats desired more compromise, Copperheads despised him, and irreconcilable secessionists plotted his death. Politically, Lincoln fought back with patronage, by pitting his opponents against each other, and by appealing to the American people with his powers of oratory. His Gettysburg Address of 1863 became the most quoted speech in American history. It was an iconic statement of America's dedication to the principles of nationalism, republicanism, equal rights, liberty, and democracy. At the close of the war, Lincoln held a moderate view of Reconstruction, seeking to reunite the nation speedily through a policy of generous reconciliation in the face of lingering and bitter divisiveness. Six days after the surrender of Confederate commanding general Robert E. Lee, however, Lincoln was assassinated by actor and Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth. Lincoln's death was the first assassination of a U.S. president and sent the nation into mourning. Lincoln has been consistently ranked both by scholars and the public as one of the greatest U.S. presidents. Meta: Government, President, America

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Doorstop, 'Punch', England  c.1880

Lot 606: Doorstop, 'Punch', England c.1880

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Description: DoorstopMaterial: Cast IronColors: SilverFeatures: The figure of the seated Punch accompanied by his dog. Old repaint.Period: Circa 1880Size: 12" H x 9" W x 4" DWeight: 10 poundsCondition: Good. Some paint losses.History: Punch and Judy is a traditional, popular puppet show featuring Mr. Punch and his wife, Judy. The performance consists of a sequence of short scenes, each depicting an interaction between two characters, most typically the violent Punch and one other character. It is often associated with traditional English seaside culture.The show is performed by a single puppeteer inside the booth, known since Victorian times as a "Professor" or "Punchman," and assisted sometimes by a "Bottler", who corrals the audience outside the booth, introduces the performance and collects the money ("the bottle"). The Bottler might also play accompanying music or sound effects on a drum or guitar and engage in back chat with the puppets, sometimes repeating the same or the copied lines that may have been difficult for the audience to understand. In Victorian times the drum and pan pipes were the instruments of choice. Today, the audience is also encouraged to participate, calling out to the characters on the stage to warn them of danger, or clue them into what is going on behind their backs. Also nowadays most Professors work solo since the need for a bottler became less important when busking with the show gave way to paid engagements at private parties or public events.

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Frame, America, Cast Iron, 1862, Civil War

Lot 607: Frame, America, Cast Iron, 1862, Civil War

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Description: Form: FrameMaterial: Cast IronMarks: Design Patented Nov. 25 1862Colors: Red, white,blueFeatures: Depicts an eagle at the top with an American shield at the bottom.Period: Patented 1862Size: 19" H x 11" W x 1" DWeight: 5 poundsCondition: Some paint losses, part of crest on right side of top is missing. Meta: Government, United States of America

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Balance Scale, Brass, Portuguese

Lot 608: Balance Scale, Brass, Portuguese

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Description: Balance ScaleMaterial: BrassConstruction: CastFeatures: Marked "Portugal" near base. With 7 brass weights which rest in the base.Period: Circa 1900Size: 16" H x 11" W x 5" DWeight: 3 lbsCondition: Good. Meta: Copper

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Binoculars, Brass, Cary Optician London

Lot 609: Binoculars, Brass, Cary Optician London

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Description: BinocularsMaterial: BrassConstruction: Tubular Brass, Turned Eye PiecesFeatures: Marked "Cary Optician London" on eye pieces.Period: Circa 1880Size: 4.5" H x 5" W x 2.25" DWeight: 1 lb 6 ozCondition: Good, functioning.History: William Cary (1759-1825) was a prominent scientific instrument maker during the early part of the 19th century. After his death, the firm was continued by his relatives while retaining the Cary name. Meta: Copper

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Candlestick, Brass, 18th Century

Lot 610: Candlestick, Brass, 18th Century

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Description: CandlestickMaterial: BrassConstruction: CastFeatures: Square drip plate.Period: Circa 1760Size: 8.75" H x 5.75" L x 8.75" DWeight: 1lbCondition: Very good. Small dent on one side of the drip plate. Meta: Copper

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Candlestick, Heavy Brass, 19th Century

Lot 611: Candlestick, Heavy Brass, 19th Century

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Description: CandlestickMaterial: BrassConstruction: CastFeatures: Stem screws into footed basePeriod: 19th centurySize: 9" H x 3.5" L x 3.5" DWeight: 3lbsCondition: Good. Meta: Copper

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Fireplace Garniture Set (3), Brass, English, 1860

Lot 612: Fireplace Garniture Set (3), Brass, English, 1860

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Description: Fireplace garniture setMaterial: BrassConstruction: Cast w/ hand finishingFeatures: English made. Floral and foliate decoration. Each retains the original tole liner.Period: Circa 1860Size: 17.25" x 11.5" x 10.5"Weight: 56 lbsCondition: Very good. Two of the three pieces have one slightly loose handle. Meta: Copper

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Fireplace Crane, 18th C Iron

Lot 612A: Fireplace Crane, 18th C Iron

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Description: Fireplace Crane, wrought iron, 18th/19th Century.Size: 29.75" L X 10.5" WWeight: 5lbsCondition: Fine Meta: Copper

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Chestnut Roaster, Brass, c.1860

Lot 613: Chestnut Roaster, Brass, c.1860

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Description: Chestnut RoasterMaterial: BrassConstruction: Stamped & cast. Riveted to handlesFeatures: Two handles. One is curved and riveted to the lid of the chestnut roaster. The other handle is riveted to the bottom of the chestnut roaster. Both handles lock together with a cast brass lock.Period: Circa 1860Size: 2" H x 22.5" L x 6.75" DWeight: 2lbsCondition: Good. Lid is slightly misshapen.

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Copper Pot With Wrought Iron Handles, 18th C.

Lot 614: Copper Pot With Wrought Iron Handles, 18th C.

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Description: Copper potMaterial: Copper & ironConstruction: Hand hammeredFeatures: Copper pot with wrought iron handles riveted to the sides.Period: 18th CenturySize: 7.5" H x 15.5" DiameterWeight: 7.4 poundsCondition: Scratches, dents, and discoloration. Meta: Brass

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Candlestick, Brass, 18th Century

Lot 615: Candlestick, Brass, 18th Century

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Description: CandlestickMaterial: BrassConstruction: Cast in halvesPeriod: 18th CenturySize: 5" L x 5" W x 8.5" HWeight: 1.3lbCondition: Minor oxidation and wear around edges. Meta: Copper

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Skimmer, Brass, Medical Theme, 1911

Lot 617: Skimmer, Brass, Medical Theme, 1911

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Description: SkimmerMaterial: BrassConstruction: Copper riveted to handleFeatures: The dished scoop having a spread eagle form; the handle fashioned as a caduceus with the wings of Mercury and the entwined serpents of Asclepius. On the underside is marked BR 568501?Period: 1910-11Size: 22.5" L x 8.25" WWeight: 1lbCondition: Very good.Provenance: The estate of Arthur J. Connolly Meta: Copper

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Skimmer, Brass, Medical Design, Mid 19th Century

Lot 618: Skimmer, Brass, Medical Design, Mid 19th Century

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Description: SkimmerMaterial: BrassConstruction: Riveted to handleFeatures: Dished scoop. The handle fashioned as a caduceus with the wings of Mercury and the entwined serpents of Asclepius.Period: Circa 1840-1850Size: 22.5" L x 7.25" WWeight: 1lbCondition: Very good.Provenance: The estate of Arthur J. Connolly Meta: Copper

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Skimmer, Brass, Medical Theme, 19th Century

Lot 619: Skimmer, Brass, Medical Theme, 19th Century

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Description: SkimmerMaterial: BrassConstruction: Cast, riveted to handleFeatures: Dished scoop. The handle fashioned as a caduceus with the wings of Mercury and the entwined serpents of Asclepius. Back of handle is marked 'R No. 072994'Period: Circa 1860Size: 23.25" L x 7.25" WWeight: 1lbCondition: Very good.Provenance: The estate of Arthur J. Connolly Meta: Copper

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(7) Items, Knives, Fishing Hooks, Tape Measures

Lot 619A: (7) Items, Knives, Fishing Hooks, Tape Measures

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Description: Features: 1) Treble Fishing Hook Kit by Dunks. In an aluminum case with three separate hooks that attach to one piece creating a treble hook. Also includes a spear and two threaded pieces which connect to the hook. Sides of hooks are marked "Pat Pend Dunks Dayton." Condition: Very good. 2) Knife, Delaware Tercentenary, 1938, Finnish Features: Handle is made of bone and reads "Delaware Tercentenary Finland U.S.A. 1638-1938". Blade is engraved and reads "Made in Finland" along with unclear words above it. There is zipper engraving on the base of the handle and on areas of the sheath. The leather sheath is also decorated with a diamond pattern and foliate scroll. Blade Size: 4.25" L x 0.75" W Overall Size: 8.75" L x 1.25" W x 0.75" D Condition: Very good 3) L.S. Starrett cylinder machinist level on block base. In a pine slide-top box. Condition: Very good. Box shows wear. 4) A knife with Asian engravings on the blade. Handle and sheath is made of wood and bone. The wood sheath has rope tightly wrapped around it. Blade Size: 3.5" L x 0.5" W Overall Size: 6.5" L x 0.75"W x 0.5" D Condition: Good. Small loss in bone on sheath approximately 0.25" x 0.25" 5) Folding ruler made by Stanley. Marked "Warranted Boxwood Stanley Made." 24" length. Condition: Good. Some discoloration on both sides. 6) Retractable tape measure. Steel ruler. Marked "Made in Germany." Size: 2.25" Diameter Conditon: Good. Some minor discoloration. 7) Tomlinson gun cleaner in its original box. Marked on it is "U.H. Co. Timlinson 12 GA Made in U.S.A." Manufactured by The Union Hardware Company. Size in box: 4.25" L x 1.75" W x 1" D Conditon: Good. Both sets of brass cleaners are lightly used. Material: Steel and wood Marks: "L.S. Starrett Athol Mass." Features: L.S. Starrett cylinder machinist level on block base. In a pine slide-top box. Date: 20th Century Size: Level - 1.25" H x 6" W x 1.5" D Weight: 1 lb 1 oz Condition: Box shows wear. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Trapper's Axe, 1849, G. Bon, cast steel

Lot 620: Trapper's Axe, 1849, G. Bon, cast steel

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Description: Form: AxeMaterial: Wood and SteelMarks: G. BonConstruction: CastFeatures: The wooden and steel axe is a Trapper's axe engraved with "G Bon, Cast Steel, 1849" and "L.H.G" on the reverse side.Date: 1849Size: 10" LWeight: 6.9ozCondition: Good. Light wear. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Food Chopper, Starrett, Gear Driven

Lot 621: Food Chopper, Starrett, Gear Driven

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Description: Form: Food ChopperMaterial: Cast iron, wood base & tin bucketMarks: NoneFeatures: Starrett gear driven food chopper. Bucket rotates as the blade goes up and down. From Enfield kitchen.Date: C. 1900Size: 13" H x 17" W x 8" DWeight: 14 poundsCondition: Good. Some rust and scratches, age appropriate wear.History: The history of Starrett has been one of continuous expansion through the patenting of products and takeovers of other manufacturers. In 1878 Laroy S. Starrett invented and patented the combination square and in 1880 he founded the L.S. Starrett Company in Athol, MA in order to produce the combination square and other precision tools. In 1882 Starrett traveled to London and Paris to appoint sales representatives, thereby starting up the international marketing of his products. In 1887 Starrett acquired further patents.In 1890 L.S. Starrett patented a micrometer with other improvements, transforming the rough version of this tool into a modern micrometer. During the same year Starrett began making and refining saw blades and today Starrett is the world's largest saw blade manufacturer. In 1895 Starrett patented the divider with trammel. In 1920 the company added its first gage to the product line and quickly became the world's largest innovator and maker of precision calibrators.Between 1941 and 1945 Starrett increased its production by 800% and won the Army and Navy "E" prize. At the same time, more than 400 employees went into the US armed forces. The post-war period was a time of overseas expansion, with Starrett opening a factory in S?o Paulo, Brazil, in 1956. In the early 1960s, the Brazilian factory was moved to a new location in the city of Itu, 100 km from S?o Paulo, and has grown to become one of the region's biggest employers. During an event to mark the 50th anniversary of Starrett in Brazil in 2006, Douglas A Starrett announced that Salvador de Camargo would take over from Antony McLaughlin as president of Starrett in Brazil. McLaughlin had held the post of president for 44 years from 1962 when the Starrett factory was set up in Itu and de Camargo had worked there since 1963.In 1958 a plant was opened in Scotland and this plant currently makes a great variety of Starrett products for the European and Asian markets. In 1962 Starrett acquired the Webber Gage Company, adding gage blocks to the Starrett product line. In 1970 Starrett took over the Herman Stone Co., a granite product maker, and in 1985 it relocated production to a new plant in Mount Airy, NC. This plant also makes saws and measuring equipment. In 1975 the S?o Paulo factory reopened in the city of Itu, in an extremely modern plant which currently manufactures saws and precision instruments.In 1986 Starrett took over the Evans Rule Company, the world's largest tape measure manufacturer, and in 1990 the company bought Sigma Optical, a British manufacturer of optical profile projectors. In 1998 Starrett expanded into China, opening a new plant in Suzhou. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Animal Come-Along

Lot 622: Animal Come-Along

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Description: Form: Animal come-alongMaterial: OakConstruction: BoltedFeatures: For small animals. Made with large square nuts and bolts.Date: Circa 1876Size: 43" L x 9.5" W x 3" HWeight: 5 poundsCondition: Good. Some age cracks. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Collection of 27 Shaker Nails, 1846

Lot 623: Collection of 27 Shaker Nails, 1846

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Description: Form: 27 Shaker nailsMaterial: Wood and ironFeatures: 27 shaker nails from 1846 Brethren shop in Enfield, NH.Date: 1846Size: Box- 9" H x 23" W x 3" DWeight: 4 poundsCondition: Good. Some bent and rusted. One of the large headed nails is broken.History: The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, known as the Shakers, is a religious sect. Founded upon the teachings of Ann Lee, Shakers today are mostly known for their cultural contributions (especially their style of music and furniture), and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s.The Shakers were one of a few religious groups that formed in eighteenth-century England which branched off of mainstream Protestantism. New communities of "charismatic" Christians also took shape during this time. One of the most important of these new movements was the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (USBCSA), or the Shakers. While their monastic, communitarian life has been studied extensively, little attention has been given to Shaker preaching, particularly in the early days of the order. The first members of the group were known as "Shaking Quakers" because of the ecstatic nature of their worship services. Begun in 1747, the members looked to women for leadership. Jane Wardley and Ann Lee were the most important. Ann Lee joined them by 1758 and soon assumed leadership of the small community. The loss of four children in infancy created great trauma for "Mother Ann," as her followers later called her. She claimed numerous revelations regarding the fall of Adam and Eve and its relationship to sexual intercourse. She had become the "Mother of the new creation," who called her followers to confess their sins, give up all their worldly goods, and take up the cross of celibacy. Her small community was soon known for its enthusiastic worship given to "singing and dancing, shaking and shouting, speaking with new tongues and prophesying, with all those various gifts of the Holy Ghost known in the primitive church." The Shakers, as they were called, saw themselves as the avant garde of the kingdom of God, preparing the way for the new era when God's will was done on earth. In the kingdom, as in the Shaker fellowship, there was "neither marrying nor giving in marriage." Celibacy was a preparation for the kingdom. By 1774, Ann Lee and some eight of her followers had emigrated to New York state. There they preached their doctrines but, at first, had a difficult time establishing Shakerism in America. The members of the religion had to split up in order to generate revenue to establish Shakerism. They finally managed to buy a piece of land in the wild-approximately eight miles northwest of Albany-which later became known as Watervliet. Ann herself was a powerful preacher and charismatic personality, travelling around the colonies, particularly in New England, preaching her gospel views. When confronted about a female's right to preach, she responded that "all the children, both male and female, must be subject to their parents; and the woman, being second, must be subject to her husband, who is the first; but when the man is gone, the right of government belongs to the woman: So is the family of Christ."As their communities grew, women and men shared leadership of the Shaker communities. Women preached and received revelations as the Spirit fell upon them. Thriving on the religious enthusiasm of the first and second Great Awakenings, the Shakers declared their messianic, communitarian message with significant response. One early convert observed: "The wisdom of their instructions, the purity of their doctrine, their Christ-like deportment, and the simplicity of their manners, all appeared truly apostolical." The Shakers represent a small but important Utopian response to the gospel. Preaching in their communities knew no boundaries of gender, social class, or education.The Shakers built more than twenty settlements that attracted at least 20,000 converts over the next century. Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers acquired their members through conversion, indenturing children, and adoption of orphans. Some children, such as Isaac N. Youngs, came to the Shakers when their parents joined, then grew up to become faithful members as adults. The Shaker educational system was very advanced. The educational subjects included reading, spelling, oration, arithmetic and manners. The boys would pick them up in several years to reap the benefits. The boys would attend class during the winter and the girls in the summer. Parents outside of the community respected the Shakers' schooling so much that they often took advantage of schooling that the Shaker villages provided. Parents would drop their child off at the village to be educated, only to return several years later to pick up the children. Those who were not removed from the Shaker community by their parents were not the only ones to leave. Once the child reached twenty-one years of age, they were given the option to remain Shakers. Less than 25 percent of the young adults remained in the community. Turnover was high; the group reached maximum size of about 5,000 full members in 1840, but as of December 2009 had only three members left. They currently reside in Sabbathday Lake, Maine. Only a few of the original Shaker buildings are still in use today.Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Bean Sifter, Shaker, Meredith NH

Lot 624: Bean Sifter, Shaker, Meredith NH

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Description: Form: Bean SifterMaterial: WoodConstruction: Hinged and nailedFeatures: A Shaker bean sifter with label that reads "Patented Aug 6th 1878 A. S. Clough Manufacuter Meredith Village, NH."Date: Circa 1910Size: 3" H x 17.75" W x 19" DWeight: 3 poundsCondition: Good. Loss on wood approximately 1" x 0.5" and some scratches. Separation in wood near nails approximately 4" in length.History: The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, known as the Shakers, is a religious sect. Founded upon the teachings of Ann Lee, Shakers today are mostly known for their cultural contributions (especially their style of music and furniture), and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s.The Shakers were one of a few religious groups that formed in eighteenth-century England which branched off of mainstream Protestantism. New communities of "charismatic" Christians also took shape during this time. One of the most important of these new movements was the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (USBCSA), or the Shakers. While their monastic, communitarian life has been studied extensively, little attention has been given to Shaker preaching, particularly in the early days of the order. The first members of the group were known as "Shaking Quakers" because of the ecstatic nature of their worship services. Begun in 1747, the members looked to women for leadership. Jane Wardley and Ann Lee were the most important. Ann Lee joined them by 1758 and soon assumed leadership of the small community. The loss of four children in infancy created great trauma for "Mother Ann," as her followers later called her. She claimed numerous revelations regarding the fall of Adam and Eve and its relationship to sexual intercourse. She had become the "Mother of the new creation," who called her followers to confess their sins, give up all their worldly goods, and take up the cross of celibacy. Her small community was soon known for its enthusiastic worship given to "singing and dancing, shaking and shouting, speaking with new tongues and prophesying, with all those various gifts of the Holy Ghost known in the primitive church." The Shakers, as they were called, saw themselves as the avant garde of the kingdom of God, preparing the way for the new era when God's will was done on earth. In the kingdom, as in the Shaker fellowship, there was "neither marrying nor giving in marriage." Celibacy was a preparation for the kingdom. By 1774, Ann Lee and some eight of her followers had emigrated to New York state. There they preached their doctrines but, at first, had a difficult time establishing Shakerism in America. The members of the religion had to split up in order to generate revenue to establish Shakerism. They finally managed to buy a piece of land in the wild-approximately eight miles northwest of Albany-which later became known as Watervliet. Ann herself was a powerful preacher and charismatic personality, travelling around the colonies, particularly in New England, preaching her gospel views. When confronted about a female's right to preach, she responded that "all the children, both male and female, must be subject to their parents; and the woman, being second, must be subject to her husband, who is the first; but when the man is gone, the right of government belongs to the woman: So is the family of Christ."As their communities grew, women and men shared leadership of the Shaker communities. Women preached and received revelations as the Spirit fell upon them. Thriving on the religious enthusiasm of the first and second Great Awakenings, the Shakers declared their messianic, communitarian message with significant response. One early convert observed: "The wisdom of their instructions, the purity of their doctrine, their Christ-like deportment, and the simplicity of their manners, all appeared truly apostolical." The Shakers represent a small but important Utopian response to the gospel. Preaching in their communities knew no boundaries of gender, social class, or education.The Shakers built more than twenty settlements that attracted at least 20,000 converts over the next century. Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers acquired their members through conversion, indenturing children, and adoption of orphans. Some children, such as Isaac N. Youngs, came to the Shakers when their parents joined, then grew up to become faithful members as adults. The Shaker educational system was very advanced. The educational subjects included reading, spelling, oration, arithmetic and manners. The boys would pick them up in several years to reap the benefits. The boys would attend class during the winter and the girls in the summer. Parents outside of the community respected the Shakers' schooling so much that they often took advantage of schooling that the Shaker villages provided. Parents would drop their child off at the village to be educated, only to return several years later to pick up the children. Those who were not removed from the Shaker community by their parents were not the only ones to leave. Once the child reached twenty-one years of age, they were given the option to remain Shakers. Less than 25 percent of the young adults remained in the community. Turnover was high; the group reached maximum size of about 5,000 full members in 1840, but as of December 2009 had only three members left. They currently reside in Sabbathday Lake, Maine. Only a few of the original Shaker buildings are still in use today. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Sieve, Small, Shaker, 19th Century

Lot 625: Sieve, Small, Shaker, 19th Century

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Description: Form: Small sieveMaterial: OakConstruction: Banded and nailedFeatures: Woven cloth on bottom with a rope wrapping around the exterior.Date: 19th CenturySize: 3.5" H x 4.25" DiameterWeight: 4 ouncesCondition: Good. Dark residue approximately 1.25" x 2" on exterior.History: The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, known as the Shakers, is a religious sect. Founded upon the teachings of Ann Lee, Shakers today are mostly known for their cultural contributions (especially their style of music and furniture), and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s.The Shakers were one of a few religious groups that formed in eighteenth-century England which branched off of mainstream Protestantism.[3] New communities of "charismatic" Christians also took shape during this time. One of the most important of these new movements was the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (USBCSA), or the Shakers. While their monastic, communitarian life has been studied extensively, little attention has been given to Shaker preaching, particularly in the early days of the order. The first members of the group were known as "Shaking Quakers" because of the ecstatic nature of their worship services. Begun in 1747, the members looked to women for leadership. Jane Wardley and Ann Lee were the most important. Ann Lee joined them by 1758 and soon assumed leadership of the small community. The loss of four children in infancy created great trauma for "Mother Ann," as her followers later called her. She claimed numerous revelations regarding the fall of Adam and Eve and its relationship to sexual intercourse. She had become the "Mother of the new creation," who called her followers to confess their sins, give up all their worldly goods, and take up the cross of celibacy. Her small community was soon known for its enthusiastic worship given to "singing and dancing, shaking and shouting, speaking with new tongues and prophesying, with all those various gifts of the Holy Ghost known in the primitive church." The Shakers, as they were called, saw themselves as the avant garde of the kingdom of God, preparing the way for the new era when God's will was done on earth. In the kingdom, as in the Shaker fellowship, there was "neither marrying nor giving in marriage." Celibacy was a preparation for the kingdom. By 1774, Ann Lee and some eight of her followers had emigrated to New York state. There they preached their doctrines but, at first, had a difficult time establishing Shakerism in America. The members of the religion had to split up in order to generate revenue to establish Shakerism. They finally managed to buy a piece of land in the wild-approximately eight miles northwest of Albany-which later became known as Watervliet. Ann herself was a powerful preacher and charismatic personality, travelling around the colonies, particularly in New England, preaching her gospel views. When confronted about a female's right to preach, she responded that "all the children, both male and female, must be subject to their parents; and the woman, being second, must be subject to her husband, who is the first; but when the man is gone, the right of government belongs to the woman: So is the family of Christ."As their communities grew, women and men shared leadership of the Shaker communities. Women preached and received revelations as the Spirit fell upon them. Thriving on the religious enthusiasm of the first and second Great Awakenings, the Shakers declared their messianic, communitarian message with significant response. One early convert observed: "The wisdom of their instructions, the purity of their doctrine, their Christ-like deportment, and the simplicity of their manners, all appeared truly apostolical." The Shakers represent a small but important Utopian response to the gospel. Preaching in their communities knew no boundaries of gender, social class, or education.The Shakers built more than twenty settlements that attracted at least 20,000 converts over the next century. Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers acquired their members through conversion, indenturing children, and adoption of orphans. Some children, such as Isaac N. Youngs, came to the Shakers when their parents joined, then grew up to become faithful members as adults. The Shaker educational system was very advanced. The educational subjects included reading, spelling, oration, arithmetic and manners. The boys would pick them up in several years to reap the benefits. The boys would attend class during the winter and the girls in the summer. Parents outside of the community respected the Shakers' schooling so much that they often took advantage of schooling that the Shaker villages provided. Parents would drop their child off at the village to be educated, only to return several years later to pick up the children. Those who were not removed from the Shaker community by their parents were not the only ones to leave. Once the child reached twenty-one years of age, they were given the option to remain Shakers. Less than 25 percent of the young adults remained in the community. Turnover was high; the group reached maximum size of about 5,000 full members in 1840, but as of December 2009 had only three members left. They currently reside in Sabbathday Lake, Maine. Only a few of the original Shaker buildings are still in use today. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Sieve, Large, Shaker, 19th Century

Lot 626: Sieve, Large, Shaker, 19th Century

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Description: Form: SieveMaterial: OakConstruction: Banded and nailedFeatures: Woven cloth on bottom with rope wrapping around the exterior.Date: 19th CenturySize: 4.75" H x 12" DiameterWeight: 1 poundCondition: Very good.History: The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, known as the Shakers, is a religious sect. Founded upon the teachings of Ann Lee, Shakers today are mostly known for their cultural contributions (especially their style of music and furniture), and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s.The Shakers were one of a few religious groups that formed in eighteenth-century England which branched off of mainstream Protestantism.[3] New communities of "charismatic" Christians also took shape during this time. One of the most important of these new movements was the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (USBCSA), or the Shakers. While their monastic, communitarian life has been studied extensively, little attention has been given to Shaker preaching, particularly in the early days of the order. The first members of the group were known as "Shaking Quakers" because of the ecstatic nature of their worship services. Begun in 1747, the members looked to women for leadership. Jane Wardley and Ann Lee were the most important. Ann Lee joined them by 1758 and soon assumed leadership of the small community. The loss of four children in infancy created great trauma for "Mother Ann," as her followers later called her. She claimed numerous revelations regarding the fall of Adam and Eve and its relationship to sexual intercourse. She had become the "Mother of the new creation," who called her followers to confess their sins, give up all their worldly goods, and take up the cross of celibacy. Her small community was soon known for its enthusiastic worship given to "singing and dancing, shaking and shouting, speaking with new tongues and prophesying, with all those various gifts of the Holy Ghost known in the primitive church." The Shakers, as they were called, saw themselves as the avant garde of the kingdom of God, preparing the way for the new era when God's will was done on earth. In the kingdom, as in the Shaker fellowship, there was "neither marrying nor giving in marriage." Celibacy was a preparation for the kingdom. By 1774, Ann Lee and some eight of her followers had emigrated to New York state. There they preached their doctrines but, at first, had a difficult time establishing Shakerism in America. The members of the religion had to split up in order to generate revenue to establish Shakerism. They finally managed to buy a piece of land in the wild-approximately eight miles northwest of Albany-which later became known as Watervliet. Ann herself was a powerful preacher and charismatic personality, travelling around the colonies, particularly in New England, preaching her gospel views. When confronted about a female's right to preach, she responded that "all the children, both male and female, must be subject to their parents; and the woman, being second, must be subject to her husband, who is the first; but when the man is gone, the right of government belongs to the woman: So is the family of Christ."As their communities grew, women and men shared leadership of the Shaker communities. Women preached and received revelations as the Spirit fell upon them. Thriving on the religious enthusiasm of the first and second Great Awakenings, the Shakers declared their messianic, communitarian message with significant response. One early convert observed: "The wisdom of their instructions, the purity of their doctrine, their Christ-like deportment, and the simplicity of their manners, all appeared truly apostolical." The Shakers represent a small but important Utopian response to the gospel. Preaching in their communities knew no boundaries of gender, social class, or education.The Shakers built more than twenty settlements that attracted at least 20,000 converts over the next century. Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers acquired their members through conversion, indenturing children, and adoption of orphans. Some children, such as Isaac N. Youngs, came to the Shakers when their parents joined, then grew up to become faithful members as adults. The Shaker educational system was very advanced. The educational subjects included reading, spelling, oration, arithmetic and manners. The boys would pick them up in several years to reap the benefits. The boys would attend class during the winter and the girls in the summer. Parents outside of the community respected the Shakers' schooling so much that they often took advantage of schooling that the Shaker villages provided. Parents would drop their child off at the village to be educated, only to return several years later to pick up the children. Those who were not removed from the Shaker community by their parents were not the only ones to leave. Once the child reached twenty-one years of age, they were given the option to remain Shakers. Less than 25 percent of the young adults remained in the community. Turnover was high; the group reached maximum size of about 5,000 full members in 1840, but as of December 2009 had only three members left. They currently reside in Sabbathday Lake, Maine. Only a few of the original Shaker buildings are still in use today. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Collection of 19 Shaker Nails, 1793

Lot 627: Collection of 19 Shaker Nails, 1793

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Description: Form: Box of shaker nailsMaterial: Wood & IronFeatures: 19 small, medium and large size nails from Enfield, NH 1793.Date: 1793Size: Box- 7.5" H x 17" W x 3" DWeight: 2.2 poundsCondition: Good.History: The United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing, known as the Shakers, is a religious sect. Founded upon the teachings of Ann Lee, Shakers today are mostly known for their cultural contributions (especially their style of music and furniture), and their model of equality of the sexes, which they institutionalized in their society in the 1780s.The Shakers were one of a few religious groups that formed in eighteenth-century England which branched off of mainstream Protestantism.[3] New communities of "charismatic" Christians also took shape during this time. One of the most important of these new movements was the United Society of Believers in Christ's Second Appearing (USBCSA), or the Shakers. While their monastic, communitarian life has been studied extensively, little attention has been given to Shaker preaching, particularly in the early days of the order. The first members of the group were known as "Shaking Quakers" because of the ecstatic nature of their worship services. Begun in 1747, the members looked to women for leadership. Jane Wardley and Ann Lee were the most important. Ann Lee joined them by 1758 and soon assumed leadership of the small community. The loss of four children in infancy created great trauma for "Mother Ann," as her followers later called her. She claimed numerous revelations regarding the fall of Adam and Eve and its relationship to sexual intercourse. She had become the "Mother of the new creation," who called her followers to confess their sins, give up all their worldly goods, and take up the cross of celibacy. Her small community was soon known for its enthusiastic worship given to "singing and dancing, shaking and shouting, speaking with new tongues and prophesying, with all those various gifts of the Holy Ghost known in the primitive church." The Shakers, as they were called, saw themselves as the avant garde of the kingdom of God, preparing the way for the new era when God's will was done on earth. In the kingdom, as in the Shaker fellowship, there was "neither marrying nor giving in marriage." Celibacy was a preparation for the kingdom. By 1774, Ann Lee and some eight of her followers had emigrated to New York state. There they preached their doctrines but, at first, had a difficult time establishing Shakerism in America. The members of the religion had to split up in order to generate revenue to establish Shakerism. They finally managed to buy a piece of land in the wild-approximately eight miles northwest of Albany-which later became known as Watervliet. Ann herself was a powerful preacher and charismatic personality, travelling around the colonies, particularly in New England, preaching her gospel views. When confronted about a female's right to preach, she responded that "all the children, both male and female, must be subject to their parents; and the woman, being second, must be subject to her husband, who is the first; but when the man is gone, the right of government belongs to the woman: So is the family of Christ."As their communities grew, women and men shared leadership of the Shaker communities. Women preached and received revelations as the Spirit fell upon them. Thriving on the religious enthusiasm of the first and second Great Awakenings, the Shakers declared their messianic, communitarian message with significant response. One early convert observed: "The wisdom of their instructions, the purity of their doctrine, their Christ-like deportment, and the simplicity of their manners, all appeared truly apostolical." The Shakers represent a small but important Utopian response to the gospel. Preaching in their communities knew no boundaries of gender, social class, or education.The Shakers built more than twenty settlements that attracted at least 20,000 converts over the next century. Strict believers in celibacy, Shakers acquired their members through conversion, indenturing children, and adoption of orphans. Some children, such as Isaac N. Youngs, came to the Shakers when their parents joined, then grew up to become faithful members as adults. The Shaker educational system was very advanced. The educational subjects included reading, spelling, oration, arithmetic and manners. The boys would pick them up in several years to reap the benefits. The boys would attend class during the winter and the girls in the summer. Parents outside of the community respected the Shakers' schooling so much that they often took advantage of schooling that the Shaker villages provided. Parents would drop their child off at the village to be educated, only to return several years later to pick up the children. Those who were not removed from the Shaker community by their parents were not the only ones to leave. Once the child reached twenty-one years of age, they were given the option to remain Shakers. Less than 25 percent of the young adults remained in the community. Turnover was high; the group reached maximum size of about 5,000 full members in 1840, but as of December 2009 had only three members left. They currently reside in Sabbathday Lake, Maine. Only a few of the original Shaker buildings are still in use today.Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Large Fid, 22 Inch, 19th Century

Lot 628: Large Fid, 22 Inch, 19th Century

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Description: Form: FidMaterial: Iron, Wood BrassMarks: NonneFeatures: This fid is typically used to work with 1" D ropes. Has wooden top, decorated with a brass plate that attaches to an iron tapered shaft, drilled through at the neck of the shaft. Wood is likely mahogany.Date: 19th CenturySize: 22"LWeight: 6.14lbCondition: Some scratches on surface of piece. Top has cracks on sides (4"L). Losses to wood.History: A fid is a conical tool traditionally made of wood or bone. It is used to work with rope and canvas in marlinespike seamanship. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool, maritime, marine, seafaring, nautical

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Fishing Pole, Wood, Chas. Farlow & Co., c. 1900

Lot 629: Fishing Pole, Wood, Chas. Farlow & Co., c. 1900

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Description: Form: Fishing poleMaterial: Wood and BrassMarks: Chas. Farlow & CoFeatures: Wooden and brass fishing pole. Has five sections. On bottom brass plaque "Chas. Farlow & Co, Maker 191 Strand, London"Date: C. 1900Size: 305inches / 25.4 feetWeight: 2.6lbCondition: Fishing pole shows some scratches and wear on surface.History: Charles Farlow is one of the earliest British fishing tackle manufacturers. He began his business in 1840. His first reels were all brass with ivory crank knobs and engraved in script with "C. Farlow, Maker, 221 Strand, London." In 1852 the company moved to a new address at 191 Strand, London. The company name was later changed to C. Farlow & Co. LTD in 1894. Farlow made a wide range of reels from the early brass reels to the more common fly, salmon, spinning and wooden reels. They also made a Big Game reel and Tournament casting reels. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Cotton Bale Scale, U.S. Customs, 19th century

Lot 630: Cotton Bale Scale, U.S. Customs, 19th century

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Description: Cotton bale scaleMaterial: Wood and ironConstruction: Nailed, screwed & formedMarks: US Customs 549 400Features: Two arms hold up the cross beam which supports and weighs the bale of cotton. The cross bar has been re-painted but the original U.S. Customs stencil can be seen through the new paint.Easily comes apart for transport.Period: 19th CenturySize: 76" Height x 55" WWeight: 50 poundsCondition: Paint loss and rust. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Clarinet In Case, Carl Fischer

Lot 631: Clarinet In Case, Carl Fischer

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Description: ClarinetMaterial: WoodMarks: "Carl Fischer Artist Model New York"Features: Comes in a boxed lined in red velvet.Period: Early 20th CenturySize: 7" H x 13.5" W x 3.5" DCondition: Good. Chip on mouth piece approximately 1/4" x 1/4".History: In 1872, Carl Fischer opened his musical instrument repair shop in the East Village neighborhood of New York City. Noticing that many of his customers were searching for instrumental arrangements of well-known works that didn't exist, Fischer began creating and reproducing arrangements, which led him into the music publishing business.Walter S. Fischer, son of the founder and President from 1923-1946, sits at his desk in the 1940s.As the company grew and diversified, Fischer's three sons joined the team: Carl, Jr., Walter S. and George. In 1924, Carl Fischer Music was invited to be a member of ASCAP, adding the company's publications to a respected network of artists and composers. The company continued to grow, necessitating the building of Carl Fischer's new headquarters in 1926, located in Cooper Square, Manhattan. This building housed administrative offices and a sprawling retail store.Carl Fischer became the pre-eminent publisher of music for concert band composers such as Percy Grainger, John Philip Sousa and the famous transcriptions of Erik W. G. Leidzen and Mayhew Lake.

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(2) Compasses, Longines, Brass, 1900 & 1950

Lot 632: (2) Compasses, Longines, Brass, 1900 & 1950

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Description: Features: 1) A brass compass made by Longines. Inside of the top reads "Swiss 1950." Size: 1.75" Diameter Weight: 1 oz Condition: Very good. Minor black discoloration near top where it opens. 2) A nickel plated fob compass. Marked "4" inside of the top. In a pine box with a label that reads "The Ansonia Clock Co., Manufacturers New York, United States of America". Circa 1900 Size: 1.75" Diameter Weight: 2 oz Condition: Very good. Some light green discoloration around glass. Label on the box has some losses. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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3 draw Field Telescope, Brass/Leather

Lot 633: 3 draw Field Telescope, Brass/Leather

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Description: Material: Brass & leatherMarks: UnmarkedFeatures: Field Telescope having 3 draws, constructed of brass with leather hand grasp. Functions well and produces an upright clear image when focused. Eyepiece has a slide cover.Period: 19th centurySize: 6.75" L., 17.75" extended x 1.5" WWeight: 8ozCondition: very good, functions, missing end cap yet retains its slide eyepiece cover. Meta: Tool, implement

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Telescope, Presentation Captain  D. Godfrey, 1846

Lot 634: Telescope, Presentation Captain D. Godfrey, 1846

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Description: TelescopeMaterial: Wood, Brass, LeatherMarks: (See Features)Features: Inscribed telescope, "Presented to Capt. David Godfrey, for his skill and prudence as a seaman, and urbanity of Maners(SIC) as a Gentleman by his Guests on the 4th July, 1846" and the maker's mark of "Spencer Browning & Co. London, Improved."The wooden box has an appliques, cut brass depiction of the planet Saturn on the cover of the box.Pine box with lap joinery, carrying handle and having hook and screw latches.Scope has a leather wrapped, tapered barrel and is single draw, both lens covers are present and the optics are clear and bright.Probably the Capt. David Godfrey of Cape Cod origins..Period: 1846Size: 27.5"L x 4" W x 4'"H boxWeight: 6.12lbCondition: Some denting to brass tube under leather. Wear on leather. Box has scratches and dings. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Hat Sizer/Stretcher, 1926, Garve Co. Inc.

Lot 635: Hat Sizer/Stretcher, 1926, Garve Co. Inc.

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Description: Hat SizerMaterial: WoodMarks: The Garve Co. Inc.Features: The hat sizer and stretcher has an adjustment handle for hat size and a plaque with measurement indicators. Inscribed on the label "Gorve No.3 De Luosce, manufactured & Sold only by the Garve Co. Inc. 33 W 60th St. New York City" and "Protected by U.S. Patent April 20th 1926, Foreign Patents Pending"Period: 20th CenturySize: 12" L x 12" W x 6.5" HWeight: 13.6lbCondition: Good. Minor discoloration and wear around edges of wooden platform. Plaque on base missing two screws. Light wear. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Oxen Horse Yoke Single Tree, Blue

Lot 636: Oxen Horse Yoke Single Tree, Blue

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Description: Features: Oxen Horse Yoke Single Tree. Wood is painted blue with iron fittings. Size: 8.5" H. x 28.25" W. x 1.25" DWeight: 4lbs Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Terrestrial Globe, Gilman Joslin C. 1870

Lot 637: Terrestrial Globe, Gilman Joslin C. 1870

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Description: Terrestrial globeMaterial: Brass, iron, woodMarks: See FeaturesFeatures: Twelve printed paper gores laid on metal sphere. The countries are depicted in various colors and the oceans in beige. Analemma Showing the Declination of the Sun placed in the Pacific Ocean. Full calibrated brass meridian ring and adjustment screw. Brass hour circles at the poles. The walnut horizon band is marked "Manufactured by Gilman Joslin Corrected to 1870" and signs of the zodiac, calendar and equation of time table all in green, salmon and brown enclosed in a Greek key border.Period: Circa 1870Size: Overall: 24"H x 20"Diameter - Globe:15"Weight: 25 lbsCondition: Very good. Slight losses on wood and discoloration on horizon band. A few tight age checks in paper with no significant loss.History: Gilman Joslin (1804-c. 1886), one of America's most prolific globe makers, began making globes for Josiah Loring (1775-c. 1840) in 1837, and took over the business two years later. Loring had begun selling globes in 1832. He advertised that his globes were superior to British globes of the period. Yet, early Loring globes were either imported from C. Smith & Sons, one of the leading British globe makers of the late Georgian period, or re-engraved versions of Smith & Sons globes. Gilman Joslin began as a wood turner and maker of looking glass mirrors. After taking over Loring s business, he began producing globes under the Loring name and under his own name. Joslin set up a globe manufacturing facility in Boston, and by 1850 had five workers. Gilman Joslin was joined by his son William B. Joslin in 1874 and the firm continued in operation as Gilman Joslin & Son until 1907.

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Opera Glasses, Mother of Pearl, 19th c.

Lot 638: Opera Glasses, Mother of Pearl, 19th c.

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Description: BinocularsMaterial: Mother of PearlMarks: Paris, Mon L. FischerFeatures: Binoculars. Mother of Pearl throughout body of item. Has handle and an adjustable focusing knob. Inscription " Mon L. Fisher, Oculiste Opticien" and "19 Avenue De L'Opera, Paris." Inscription on opposite side " Flammarion" with a medieval helmet.Period: 19th c.Size: 5" L x 2" W x 3" HWeight: 10.8ozCondition: Working. Minor scratches on brass. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Binoculars, LeMaire, Paris, Mother of Pearl

Lot 639: Binoculars, LeMaire, Paris, Mother of Pearl

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Description: BinocularsMaterial: Mother of PearlMarks: Lemmaire, ParisFeatures: Binoculars. Mother of Pearl throughout body of item and an adjustable focusing knob. Inscription "LeMaire, F.I., Paris." Case has zipper and handle.Period: 19th c.Size: 4" L x 1.5" W x 2.5" HWeight: 9.0ozCondition: Working with minor discoloration on bottom edge of glass. Binocular case has fading and wear. Bottom right edge has rip (1"L) Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Ship's Compass, Brinton, Ross Evans, London 1841

Lot 640: Ship's Compass, Brinton, Ross Evans, London 1841

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Description: CompassMaterial: BrassConstruction: TurnedMarks: Brinton Compass Ross Evans LondonFeatures: Th Brass brinton compass has inscriptions of " Brinton Compass, Ross Evans, London" with arrow and "1814 - 1841 MKI" on top cover. The lid is hinged and has an interior mirror. Weight 1.4lb The compass has inscribed "Ross Evans, London" underneath the arrow. These have been reproduced.Period: Age unknownSize: 3" x 3" x 1.5"Weight: 1.4lbCondition: Good. Working compass. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool, maritime, marine, seafaring

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Barometer, by Selon Torricelli,18th C, American

Lot 641: Barometer, by Selon Torricelli,18th C, American

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Description: BarometerMaterial: Glass , metal, gilt woodConstruction: Carved and moldedMarks: Selon TorricelliFeatures: Oval case with original glass, hand colored printed face with the central element a compass rose, part manuscripted. Wood carved eagle at top with quiver, arrows and bow with a dove joined over the top. Original back board with wheel for line and remnants of tube.Probably made for the American market.Period: 18th centurySize: H. 35" W. 18" D. 2"Weight: 9 poundsCondition: Losses especially to gesso, later reinforcement of carved elements on reverse, resurface of gilt with paint. Not functional.History: Evangelista Torricelli (Italian: (1608-1647) was a physicist and mathematician, best known for his invention of the barometer. Meta: Instrument, implement, tool

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Bone Chess Set, 32 Pieces, Garcia Factory

Lot 642: Bone Chess Set, 32 Pieces, Garcia Factory

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Description: Chess setMaker: GarciaMaterials: Wood and BoneConstruction: CarvedLabels/Tags: El Destino - GarciaAge: Late 19th Early 20th C.Description: 32 piece set. Wooden box has slide top. Chess set is made of bone, castles for rooks and horses for knights.Size: 8" L x 5.5" W x 3" HWeight: 1.7ozCondition: Wooden box has some cracks. Pieces have minor fading.History: In 1875 the Garcia factory founded Destiny for manual manufacturing quality cigars. A good test of the plausibility of such date of foundation is the appearance in 1879 of an ad in the newspaper Voice of Spain, published for the Spanish colony in Mexico, where he promoted the quality of snuff from the plains of San Andr?s Tuxtla , Ameyalpam, Caleria and Comoapan. Destiny was the first truly modern factory in Mexico at the time and the first to establish for the first time there reading practice at his factory. Soon tripled its production and was in the need to build a two-storey building with a capacity of more than 200 workers in the city of Veracruz..

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Chess Set, J & T. Forgie, Carved Pieces

Lot 643: Chess Set, J & T. Forgie, Carved Pieces

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Description: Chess setMaker: J.& T. ForgieMaterials: WoodConstruction: CarvedLabels/Tags: J.& T. ForgieAge: Late 19th Early 20th C.Description: 32 piece set. Wooden box contains a set of carved chess pieces, with rules for the game dated 1907. Slide top box with label on bottom "J.& T. Forgie, 143 Buchannan St., Glasgow".Size: 8"L x 4.5" W x 4" HWeight: 1.6lbCondition: Wooden box has wear on all sides. Wood has some cracks. Pieces are polished. Paper with instructions has wear-age appropriate.History: The business successfully founded by Thomas Forgie in the year 1854, bears witness to the doctrine of the survival of the fittest. Thirty-four years ago Messrs. J. and T. Forgie, the sole proprietors, launched their successful venture in Buchanan Street, and continued it at one address for twenty-two years. Twelve years ago the firm decided to remove their trade to premises better adapted to modem requirements and their rapidly growing trade, and finding what they required at the above address, they removed there. By energy and industry they have succeeded in making a business of which any firm might be justly proud. Messrs. Forgie's shop has a handsome exterior, and has double windows with workrooms beneath. The goods as displayed in the windows show to much advantage, and evidence the taste of the proprietors in their arrangements. Their specialities are dressing-bags and writing-cases, of kinds and values varying as widely as the tastes and requirements of their widely distributed clientele. Dressing-bags fitted with the most costly fittings in gold, gilt, or solid silver, and cut glass, to suit the most luxurious taste, and the deepest purse. On the other hand, less showy but perhaps as useful, articles to suit the workman, tourist, or commercial man. In writing-desks there is an endless, bewildering choice, from the simplest to the most perfectly furnished and appointed. Messrs. Forgie, however, do not confine themselves to the dressing-bag and case trade, but are general importers of foreign fancy goods of all kinds. Athletic requirements are also a leading line with them. Tennis bats, balls, nets, &c.; cricketing bats, stumps, pads, gloves, &c., are here in variety and of all makes. It may be interesting to note that the premises at present occupied by Messrs. Forgie were formerly known as the original "Western Club", and the dining-hall of the club is what is now used as the shop by Messrs. Forgie. Birmingham, London, and Sheffield goods are not neglected, but are in evidence on the shelves and counters. Messrs. J. & T. Forgie's name and trade is not confined to Glasgow, but is widely known throughout the West of Scotland, and the firm's business reputation is highly appreciated wherever known. Their goods are sound, well finished, and marketable, and the firm deserve well the rewards their business capacity has won.

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Photo Album, Russian Lacquerware, Circa 1900

Lot 644: Photo Album, Russian Lacquerware, Circa 1900

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Description: Form: Photo albumAge: Circa 1900Marks: NoneDescription: Hand painted scene depicts a Cossack and a woman giving a horse water. Some gold leaf underlay. 18 sturdy gilt-edged pages with pre-cut photo windows. Black lacquer back with brass studded feet.Size: 12.5" H x 9.5" W x 2.5" DWeight: 6lbsCondition: Very good. Some fine cracks in paint. Minor discoloration and foxing on some pages.History: Lacquer ware originated in China over two thousand years ago, and in later centuries spread through Asia. It was brought to Europe for the first time in the 16th century. Over the next two hundred years, artisans in England, France, Germany and Holland adopted this art form, and used it for miniatures with a more western style. It was Peter the Great who had the art brought to Russia. In 1721 he ordered the Monplaisir Palace at Peterhof (St. Petersburg) decorated with 94 lacquered panels which were hand-painted by Russian craftsmen. Through the remainder of the 18th century through the 19th century, Russian artisans devoted greater attention to the production of lacquered items. By the end of the 18th century, there were lacquerware-producing factories around Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as the provinces. Russian artisans refined production techniques, most importantly adopting the use of papier-mache instead of wood as a material for their pieces. In the history of Russian lacquer miniatures, the factories which opened in the Moscow area, especially the Lukutin factory, are of great significance. By the mid-19th century, Lukutin lacquer miniatures were highly prized by connoisseurs. The art depicted on these objects was exquisite: fine portraits, genre scenes, landscapes and folk drawings, done by specially trained craftsmen. Other contemporary lacquer workshops, such as the Vishnyakov factory, were also renowned for their products. The Lukutin factory was closed in 1904. In 1912 former craftsmen of the factory reopened it as the Fedoskino Cooperative Association, taking the name from the village where it was located. Surviving two Russian Revolutions, beautiful lacquer boxes continue to be produced by Fedoskino artists to this day. The other Russian lacquer-producing villages, Palekh, Mstera and Kholui, began their craft following the Revolution of 1917. For centuries prior to the revolution, these villages had made icons, but they were forced to stop this when the state suppressed the creation of religious art. In Palekh, Ivan Golikov was the first artist to transfer the styles and techniques of icon-painting to papier-mache boxes in 1922. Soon Golikov and his fellow Palekhians turned to painting secular subjects close to their heart, such as fairy-tales and folk scenes. Similar transformations took place in the icon-producing villages of Mstera and Kholui as well. Today, the art of these four villages, which continue to produce fine lacquer miniatures, is enjoying a broader audience, and it brings delight to all who have an eye for the rare and exquisite beauty of superb craftsmanship and fine skill.

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Photo Album, Russian Lacquerware,  C. 1900

Lot 645: Photo Album, Russian Lacquerware, C. 1900

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Description: Form: Photo albumAge: Circa 1900Materials: Papier-macheDescription: Hand painted scene depicts two men and three women. Containing 24 sturdy gilt-edged pages with pre-cut photo windows and a leather spine. Back is marked with Russian coat of arms. First page is ornately decorated and reads "HIBUM"?Size: 6.25" H x 5" W x 2.25" DWeight: 2 lbsCondition: Very good. Fine cracks in paint on lid. Some foxing and minor tears on the pages.History: Lacquer ware originated in China over two thousand years ago, and in later centuries spread through Asia. It was brought to Europe for the first time in the 16th century. Over the next two hundred years, artisans in England, France, Germany and Holland adopted this art form, and used it for miniatures with a more western style. It was Peter the Great who had the art brought to Russia. In 1721 he ordered the Monplaisir Palace at Peterhof (St. Petersburg) decorated with 94 lacquered panels which were hand-painted by Russian craftsmen. Through the remainder of the 18th century through the 19th century, Russian artisans devoted greater attention to the production of lacquered items. By the end of the 18th century, there were lacquerware-producing factories around Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as the provinces. Russian artisans refined production techniques, most importantly adopting the use of papier-mache instead of wood as a material for their pieces. In the history of Russian lacquer miniatures, the factories which opened in the Moscow area, especially the Lukutin factory, are of great significance. By the mid-19th century, Lukutin lacquer miniatures were highly prized by connoisseurs. The art depicted on these objects was exquisite: fine portraits, genre scenes, landscapes and folk drawings, done by specially trained craftsmen. Other contemporary lacquer workshops, such as the Vishnyakov factory, were also renowned for their products. The Lukutin factory was closed in 1904. In 1912 former craftsmen of the factory reopened it as the Fedoskino Cooperative Association, taking the name from the village where it was located. Surviving two Russian Revolutions, beautiful lacquer boxes continue to be produced by Fedoskino artists to this day. The other Russian lacquer-producing villages, Palekh, Mstera and Kholui, began their craft following the Revolution of 1917. For centuries prior to the revolution, these villages had made icons, but they were forced to stop this when the state suppressed the creation of religious art. In Palekh, Ivan Golikov was the first artist to transfer the styles and techniques of icon-painting to papier-mache boxes in 1922. Soon Golikov and his fellow Palekhians turned to painting secular subjects close to their heart, such as fairy-tales and folk scenes. Similar transformations took place in the icon-producing villages of Mstera and Kholui as well. Today, the art of these four villages, which continue to produce fine lacquer miniatures, is enjoying a broader audience, and it brings delight to all who have an eye for the rare and exquisite beauty of superb craftsmanship and fine skill.

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Box, Russian Lacquerware, C. 1890

Lot 646: Box, Russian Lacquerware, C. 1890

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Description: Form: BoxAge: Circa 1890Materials: Papier-macheConstruction: HingedMarks: Factory mark under lidDescription: Hand painted scene depicts two men and a woman around a table. Some gold leaf underlay. Ebonized sides. Red lacquered interior. Factory mark under lid.Size: 1.75" H x 6" W x 3.75" DWeight: 8 ozCondition: Very good. Some fine cracks in paint on lid. Factory mark is fadedHistory: Lacquer ware originated in China over two thousand years ago, and in later centuries spread through Asia. It was brought to Europe for the first time in the 16th century. Over the next two hundred years, artisans in England, France, Germany and Holland adopted this art form, and used it for miniatures with a more western style. It was Peter the Great who had the art brought to Russia. In 1721 he ordered the Monplaisir Palace at Peterhof (St. Petersburg) decorated with 94 lacquered panels which were hand-painted by Russian craftsmen. Through the remainder of the 18th century through the 19th century, Russian artisans devoted greater attention to the production of lacquered items. By the end of the 18th century, there were lacquerware-producing factories around Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as the provinces. Russian artisans refined production techniques, most importantly adopting the use of papier-mache instead of wood as a material for their pieces. In the history of Russian lacquer miniatures, the factories which opened in the Moscow area, especially the Lukutin factory, are of great significance. By the mid-19th century, Lukutin lacquer miniatures were highly prized by connoisseurs. The art depicted on these objects was exquisite: fine portraits, genre scenes, landscapes and folk drawings, done by specially trained craftsmen. Other contemporary lacquer workshops, such as the Vishnyakov factory, were also renowned for their products. The Lukutin factory was closed in 1904. In 1912 former craftsmen of the factory reopened it as the Fedoskino Cooperative Association, taking the name from the village where it was located. Surviving two Russian Revolutions, beautiful lacquer boxes continue to be produced by Fedoskino artists to this day. The other Russian lacquer-producing villages, Palekh, Mstera and Kholui, began their craft following the Revolution of 1917. For centuries prior to the revolution, these villages had made icons, but they were forced to stop this when the state suppressed the creation of religious art. In Palekh, Ivan Golikov was the first artist to transfer the styles and techniques of icon-painting to papier-mache boxes in 1922. Soon Golikov and his fellow Palekhians turned to painting secular subjects close to their heart, such as fairy-tales and folk scenes. Similar transformations took place in the icon-producing villages of Mstera and Kholui as well. Today, the art of these four villages, which continue to produce fine lacquer miniatures, is enjoying a broader audience, and it brings delight to all who have an eye for the rare and exquisite beauty of superb craftsmanship and fine skill.

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Box, Russian Lacquerware, Woman & Children

Lot 647: Box, Russian Lacquerware, Woman & Children

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Description: Form: BoxAge: Circa 1890Materials: Papier-macheConstruction: HingedMarks: Marked under lidDescription: Hand painted scene depicts a woman and two children. Gold leaf underlay, ebonized sides and silver leaf interior.Size: 4.25" H x 3.75" W x 3.75" DWeight: 11 ozCondition: Very good. Fine cracks in paint on lid.History: Lacquer ware originated in China over two thousand years ago, and in later centuries spread through Asia. It was brought to Europe for the first time in the 16th century. Over the next two hundred years, artisans in England, France, Germany and Holland adopted this art form, and used it for miniatures with a more western style. It was Peter the Great who had the art brought to Russia. In 1721 he ordered the Monplaisir Palace at Peterhof (St. Petersburg) decorated with 94 lacquered panels which were hand-painted by Russian craftsmen. Through the remainder of the 18th century through the 19th century, Russian artisans devoted greater attention to the production of lacquered items. By the end of the 18th century, there were lacquerware-producing factories around Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as the provinces. Russian artisans refined production techniques, most importantly adopting the use of papier-mache instead of wood as a material for their pieces. In the history of Russian lacquer miniatures, the factories which opened in the Moscow area, especially the Lukutin factory, are of great significance. By the mid-19th century, Lukutin lacquer miniatures were highly prized by connoisseurs. The art depicted on these objects was exquisite: fine portraits, genre scenes, landscapes and folk drawings, done by specially trained craftsmen. Other contemporary lacquer workshops, such as the Vishnyakov factory, were also renowned for their products. The Lukutin factory was closed in 1904. In 1912 former craftsmen of the factory reopened it as the Fedoskino Cooperative Association, taking the name from the village where it was located. Surviving two Russian Revolutions, beautiful lacquer boxes continue to be produced by Fedoskino artists to this day. The other Russian lacquer-producing villages, Palekh, Mstera and Kholui, began their craft following the Revolution of 1917. For centuries prior to the revolution, these villages had made icons, but they were forced to stop this when the state suppressed the creation of religious art. In Palekh, Ivan Golikov was the first artist to transfer the styles and techniques of icon-painting to papier-mache boxes in 1922. Soon Golikov and his fellow Palekhians turned to painting secular subjects close to their heart, such as fairy-tales and folk scenes. Similar transformations took place in the icon-producing villages of Mstera and Kholui as well. Today, the art of these four villages, which continue to produce fine lacquer miniatures, is enjoying a broader audience, and it brings delight to all who have an eye for the rare and exquisite beauty of superb craftsmanship and fine skill.

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Box, Russian Lacquerware, Woman Feeding Chickens

Lot 648: Box, Russian Lacquerware, Woman Feeding Chickens

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Description: Form: BoxAge: Circa 1890Materials: Papier-macheMarks: Marked under lidDescription: Hand painted scene depicts a young woman feeding chickens in a barn. Gold leaf underlay and ebonized sides. Silver leaf interior. Marked under lid with the year 1882.Size: 3.5" H x 3.75" DiameterWeight: 6 ozCondition: Very good. Fine cracks in paint on lid.History: Lacquer ware originated in China over two thousand years ago, and in later centuries spread through Asia. It was brought to Europe for the first time in the 16th century. Over the next two hundred years, artisans in England, France, Germany and Holland adopted this art form, and used it for miniatures with a more western style. It was Peter the Great who had the art brought to Russia. In 1721 he ordered the Monplaisir Palace at Peterhof (St. Petersburg) decorated with 94 lacquered panels which were hand-painted by Russian craftsmen. Through the remainder of the 18th century through the 19th century, Russian artisans devoted greater attention to the production of lacquered items. By the end of the 18th century, there were lacquerware-producing factories around Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as the provinces. Russian artisans refined production techniques, most importantly adopting the use of papier-mache instead of wood as a material for their pieces. In the history of Russian lacquer miniatures, the factories which opened in the Moscow area, especially the Lukutin factory, are of great significance. By the mid-19th century, Lukutin lacquer miniatures were highly prized by connoisseurs. The art depicted on these objects was exquisite: fine portraits, genre scenes, landscapes and folk drawings, done by specially trained craftsmen. Other contemporary lacquer workshops, such as the Vishnyakov factory, were also renowned for their products. The Lukutin factory was closed in 1904. In 1912 former craftsmen of the factory reopened it as the Fedoskino Cooperative Association, taking the name from the village where it was located. Surviving two Russian Revolutions, beautiful lacquer boxes continue to be produced by Fedoskino artists to this day. The other Russian lacquer-producing villages, Palekh, Mstera and Kholui, began their craft following the Revolution of 1917. For centuries prior to the revolution, these villages had made icons, but they were forced to stop this when the state suppressed the creation of religious art. In Palekh, Ivan Golikov was the first artist to transfer the styles and techniques of icon-painting to papier-mache boxes in 1922. Soon Golikov and his fellow Palekhians turned to painting secular subjects close to their heart, such as fairy-tales and folk scenes. Similar transformations took place in the icon-producing villages of Mstera and Kholui as well. Today, the art of these four villages, which continue to produce fine lacquer miniatures, is enjoying a broader audience, and it brings delight to all who have an eye for the rare and exquisite beauty of superb craftsmanship and fine skill.

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Box, Russian Lacquerware, Woman At Lake, C. 1890

Lot 649: Box, Russian Lacquerware, Woman At Lake, C. 1890

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Description: Form: Tobacco boxAge: Circa 1890Materials: Papier-macheConstruction: HingedMarks: NoneDescription: Hand painted scene depicts a seated woman at a lake with two sail boats on the water. Gold leaf underlay and ebonized sides. Orange paper covers interior.Size: 5.25" L x 3.5" W x 3.25"DWeight: 6 ozCondition: Very good. Craquelure along sides of box. Some losses and stains on paper inside the box.History: Lacquer ware originated in China over two thousand years ago, and in later centuries spread through Asia. It was brought to Europe for the first time in the 16th century. Over the next two hundred years, artisans in England, France, Germany and Holland adopted this art form, and used it for miniatures with a more western style. It was Peter the Great who had the art brought to Russia. In 1721 he ordered the Monplaisir Palace at Peterhof (St. Petersburg) decorated with 94 lacquered panels which were hand-painted by Russian craftsmen. Through the remainder of the 18th century through the 19th century, Russian artisans devoted greater attention to the production of lacquered items. By the end of the 18th century, there were lacquerware-producing factories around Moscow and St. Petersburg, as well as the provinces. Russian artisans refined production techniques, most importantly adopting the use of papier-mache instead of wood as a material for their pieces. In the history of Russian lacquer miniatures, the factories which opened in the Moscow area, especially the Lukutin factory, are of great significance. By the mid-19th century, Lukutin lacquer miniatures were highly prized by connoisseurs. The art depicted on these objects was exquisite: fine portraits, genre scenes, landscapes and folk drawings, done by specially trained craftsmen. Other contemporary lacquer workshops, such as the Vishnyakov factory, were also renowned for their products. The Lukutin factory was closed in 1904. In 1912 former craftsmen of the factory reopened it as the Fedoskino Cooperative Association, taking the name from the village where it was located. Surviving two Russian Revolutions, beautiful lacquer boxes continue to be produced by Fedoskino artists to this day. The other Russian lacquer-producing villages, Palekh, Mstera and Kholui, began their craft following the Revolution of 1917. For centuries prior to the revolution, these villages had made icons, but they were forced to stop this when the state suppressed the creation of religious art. In Palekh, Ivan Golikov was the first artist to transfer the styles and techniques of icon-painting to papier-mache boxes in 1922. Soon Golikov and his fellow Palekhians turned to painting secular subjects close to their heart, such as fairy-tales and folk scenes. Similar transformations took place in the icon-producing villages of Mstera and Kholui as well. Today, the art of these four villages, which continue to produce fine lacquer miniatures, is enjoying a broader audience, and it brings delight to all who have an eye for the rare and exquisite beauty of superb craftsmanship and fine skill.

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