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Auction Description for Auctionata Paddle8 AG: 708: Craftsmanship & Tradition: Meissen
Auction Description:
  Porcelain objects have always been very popular collectibles, and this auction is dedicated to one of the giants of European porcelain manufacture. Meissen was the first European company to develop hard-paste porcelain, in 1708, and its pieces remain highly desirable to collectors. Highlights of this collection include a figural group portraying an allegory of the four seasons, cast in the late 19th century, from a model created c.1760; a mantel clock, made in the mid-19th C., depicting Zeus, Chronos and Hephaistos; and a collection of 24 ‘Cris de Paris’ figures, from the famous cycle of the Paris Barker, representing the traders of the 18th century, made in the late 19th/early 20th century. If we receive your payment by December 12, the item(s) you ordered will be delivered by December 23 (only applicable within the EU).
Viewing Notes:
A preview at Auctionata is only possible by prior appointment. Contact: Tel: +49 30 9832 0222, E-mail: preview@auctionata.com Auction Location: Havelstudios Havelchaussee 161, 14055 Berlin, Germany
Sale Notes:
Porcelain objects have always been very popular collectibles, and this auction is dedicated to one of the giants of European porcelain manufacture. Meissen was the first European company to develop hard-paste porcelain, in 1708, and its pieces remain highly desirable to collectors. Highlights of this collection include a figural group portraying an allegory of the four seasons, cast in the late 19th century, from a model created c.1760; a mantel clock, made in the mid-19th C., depicting Zeus, Chronos and Hephaistos; and a collection of 24 ‘Cris de Paris’ figures, from the famous cycle of the Paris Barker, representing the traders of the 18th century, made in the late 19th/early 20th century. If we receive your payment by December 12, the item(s) you ordered will be delivered by December 23 (only applicable within the EU).

708: Craftsmanship & Tradition: Meissen (79 Lots)

by Auctionata Paddle8 AG


79 lots with images

December 13, 2016

Live Auction

Berlin, Germany

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Meissen, Figural Group 'Allegory - The Four Seasons' 

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1760Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model mark 1068, repairer's number Height: 14 cmGood condition, consistent with ageFour putti with the attributes garland of flowers, ears and sickle, wine, hogshead and can as well as fur and pot with carbon symbolising the seasons Condition:The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. The flower garland and ears showing some chips, the flowers in the hand of one girl missing. Scattered leaves and two hands are restored. The height measures 14 cm. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Group of Figures ‘Spring is Here’, Porcelain, c. 1920

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Description: Porcelain, glazed, painted polychromeMeissen, c. 1920Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Erich Hösel, c. 1907Underglaze blue sword mark, incised model number ‘V 124’ and further numbersUpon polygonal natural base are positioned a shepherd boy making music and being surrounded by a young shepherdess, a goat and her kidLiterature: Kurt Krockenberger, Edles Meissner Porzellan aus 3 Jahrhunderten, Winneden 2002, p. 390Height: 17 cmVery good, restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The group of figures is in very good, restored condition. The height measures 17 cm. (nlu)Erich Hösel (1869-1953)The sculptor was born on the 05th of April, 1869 in Annaberg and studied from 1886 onwards as pupil of Leon Pohle at the Art Academy in Dresden. From 1889 onwards he worked at the studio of Johannes Schilling, later (1892-95) at Robert Diez’s studio. During this time, he visited numerous countries, including Asia Minor, Belgium, France, Denmark, Sweden and England. From 1899 to 1903 Hösel was teacher at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kassel, eventually he was appointed head of the design department at the Meissen Porcelain Manufactory on the 1st of April, 1903, the promotion to to director of design took place in 1912. Previously Hösel was appointed professor in June 1904. During his life he received several prizes, for example, he was awarded the gold medal for an equestrian Hun figure at the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris. Hösel was a member of the Deutscher Künstlerverband and the Deutscher Künstlerverband der Dresdner Künstlervereinigung. Works by the artist can be found in public places as well as in museums, e.g. at the zoo in Dresden, at the Grassi Museum in Leipzig and at the Karl May Museum in Radebeul.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Group of Figures ‘Spring’, Porcelain, Post 1934

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychromeMeissen, post 1934Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Erich Hösel, c. 1907Underglaze blue sword mark, incised model number V 124, impressed numbers painter's signetHeight: 17 cmVery good conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Kurt Krockenberger, Edles Meissner Porzellan aus 3 Jahrhunderten, Winneden 2002, p. 390. Condition: The group of figures is in very good condition with minor signs of age and wear. Some flowers are missing. The tip of the flute and some flowers are restored. The height measures 17 cm. (nlu) Erich Hösel (1869-1953) The sculptor was born on the 05th of April, 1869 in Annaberg and studied from 1886 onwards as pupil of Leon Pohle at the Art Academy in Dresden. From 1889 onwards he worked at the studio of Johannes Schilling, later (1892-95) at Robert Diez’s studio. During this time, he visited numerous countries, including Asia Minor, Belgium, France, Denmark, Sweden and England. From 1899 to 1903 Hösel was teacher at the Academy of Fine Arts in Kassel, eventually he was appointed head of the design department at the Meissen Porcelain Manufactory on the 1st of April, 1903, the promotion to to director of design took place in 1912. Previously Hösel was appointed professor in June 1904. During his life he received several prizes, for example, he was awarded the gold medal for an equestrian Hun figure at the 1900 World Exhibition in Paris. Hösel was a member of the Deutscher Künstlerverband and the Deutscher Künstlerverband der Dresdner Künstlervereinigung. Works by the artist can be found in public places as well as in museums, e.g. at the zoo in Dresden, at the Grassi Museum in Leipzig and at the Karl May Museum in Radebeul. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Group 'Der Sommer', c. 1760

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, around 1760Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1750Blue swords mark on unglazed standHeight: 16 cmGood condition, consistent with ageFrom a series of cupid groups depicting the allegories of the seasons; particularly delicate painting of the 18th century Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figural group is in good condition, consistent with age. The bottom of the base with a patched fire crack and a hairline crack. One leave, some spike tips as well as one putto toe are minor chipped. The sickle is restored. The gilded décor of the socket is slightly rupped. The height measures 16 cm. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelaine Group 'Der Herbst', Late 19th Century

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1750Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model mark '2499'Height: 16.5 cmGood, restored conditionFrom a series of cupid groups depicting the allegories of the four seasons Condition:The group of figures is in good, restored condition. The sword mark with tow cancellation marks. Both horns of the he-goat, the wine garland and the leaves, two cupid's leggs, the basket handles and the base with old resaurations. The height measures 16.5 cm. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelaine Group 'Der Herbst', 19th Century

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Description: Porcelaine, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, first half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1750Underglaze blue crossed sword mark Height: 17 cmFrom a series of cupid groups depicting allegories of the four seasonsObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in age-related condition. Some wine leaves and toes of a cupid are minor chipped. Few wine leaves and one hand are restored. The socket with some manufakture flaws. The gilt decor is rubed in places. The height measures 17 cm. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Mantel Clock with Zeus, Chronos and Hephaistos, 19th C

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, mid-19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Japy Frères & Cie. – French clockmaker of the 19th centuryUnderglaze blue swords mark, painter’ s signetBack plate signed ‘Japy Fréres et Cie.’ as well as numbered ‘6292’ and ‘4-11’Circular brass movement, spring driven, lever escapement, spring suspensionBrass fronton with reliefs, 12 white enamel cartouches for the Roman hour-markers, copper-plated handsFigural rendered porcelain case with Zeus, Chronos and Hephaistos, embellished with rocailles and lush flower appliquésHeight: 70 cmGood condition, consistent with ageObject is regular taxed. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. The magnificent clock has a curved body consisting of three porcelain parts. It is decorated throughout with sculptural worked flowers and leaves. The finial is depicting Zeus sitting enthroned on a cloud with his attributes in his hand and accompanied by an eagle. On a rocaille base is Hephaistos shackling Chronos to a rock.Condition:The mantel clock is in good condition, consistent with age and has been partially professionally restored. The enamel cartouches in places slightly rubbed and with delicate hairline cracks, a larger chip at 6 o’clock. The floral decor shows some smal chips. The gold paint is partially rubbed. In places manufacturing related flaws. Pendulum and winding key are not included. The timepiece was not tested on functionality; no guarantee on long term precision and regularity. The height measures 70 cm.Japy Frères & Cie.The company was founded in 1773 in Montbéliard by Fréderic Japy in the form of a small workshop for a mechanized production of watches. In 1777 it was transferred to Beacuourt, where two years later, about 50 employees were engaged with the production of movements. In 1806 his three sons were integrated into the company's management and Japy became an international business. After his father's death, the movements were signed with Japy Frères & Cie from 1850 onwards. In addition to the manufacture of watches in the course of the years more products were manufactured. Finally, the clock production had to be stopped in the 1930s. Today, however, Japy Frères & Cie produces engines under Renault.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated.  Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Small Figurine 'Cupid as Doctor', c. 1770

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, circa 1770Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1765Barely visible underglaze blue crossed swords mark on the side of the baseNo. 18 from the series 'Verkleidete Amoretten'Height: 9 cmSmall cupid with wig and enema syringe in the disguise of a doctorObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature:Cf. Rückert, Rainer, Meissener Porzellan, 1710-1810, Ausstellung im Bayerischen Nationalmuseum München, 1966, No. 935 et seq. No. 1015, Taf. 248.The series of 28 disguised cupids has been created after copper engravings in the vicinity of Johann Joachim Kaendler respectively corrected by him. Some figurines are ascribed to Friedrich Elias Meyer others to Peter Reinicke. Condition:The figure is in age-related but visually appealing condition. The wings and parts of the scarf as well as the syringe have been restored. The painting partial with age-related abrasion. The left hand is minor chipped. The height measures 9 cm.  Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a priest and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a brilliant creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Small Figurine 'Cupid with Tambourine', circa 1770

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, circa 1770Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed swords mark on the back of the base  Height: 9 cmGood condition, consitent with ageObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figurine is in good condition, consistent with age. The tambourine as well as leaves on the base have been restored professionally. One leaf has a minor chip. The painting with partially age-related abrasion. The height of the figurine measures 9 cm.  Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a priest and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a brilliant creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Group ‘Allegorie-Die Arithmetik‘, 1860-1924

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, 1860-1924Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), 1768-1770Underglaze blue sword mark, model number C36, impressed mark and painter’s signetHeight: 11.2 cmVery good conditionAllegorical depiction of arithmetic with two cupids, books and a diceObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Cf. Sabine & Thomas Bergmann, Meissen-Figuren Modellnummern A 1 – Z 99, Erlangen 2014, vol. 2, p. 156, cat.-no. 289. Condition: The figure is in very good condition. The height measures 11.2 cm. Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Cupid Salutes with a Flag, Porcelain, Late 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome on-glaze painting, parcel-giltMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: August Ringler (1837-1918)Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘O 191’, painter’s signet, and repairer’s numberHeight: 17.3 cmGood condition, consistent with ageObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. The gilded décor and the hair are rubbed minimal to slightly. Scattered tiny chips on the outer socket rim. The neck, the right wing, the rear edge of the garment and the outer socket with old restorations. Slight manufacture flaws can be found in places. The height measures 17.3 cm. August Ringler (1837-1918) Born in 1837 in Kirchheim the later modeler August Ringler studied at the vocational school in Nördlingen. Between 1856 and 1904 he worked at the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. He created a versatilely oeuvre, which comprises numerous models, genre figures in the style of rococo, cupids, realistic bird groups and dogs. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Allegorical Group of Figures ‘Arigculture‘, 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain,  polychrom on-glaze painting and highlighted in silver and goldMeissen, 2nd half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Carl Christoph Punct (died 1765), 1762Underglaze blue sword mark, incised model number ‘2902’ and further numbersAllegorical group of figures, depicting the viniculture and agriculture on a rocaille-shaped socketHeight: 13 cmGood, restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Cf.: Königlich Sächsische Porzellanmanufaktur zu Meissen, Meissner Preisverzeichnis 1904, ill, plate no. 40.Condition:The group of figures is in good, restored condition. The pruning hook and the shaft of the rake with material losses. The tip of the plow with a minimal chip. The height measures 13 cm. (nlu)Carl Christoph Punct (died 1765)For most of his life, Punct worked as an independent designer, however, in 1761 he was appointed to Meissen as successor to Elias Meyer. In 1763 he was nominated court sculptor. His figures are characterized by elongated faces with high foreheads, the bases are predominately pierced. Punct was particularly interested in depictions of shepherds and allegorical, mostly two figure children sculptures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Cupid Groupe, Porcelain, 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome painting, parcel-giltMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), from the year around 1769Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘2904’, painter’s number, and repairer’s numberHeight: 13 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in age-related condition with partial manufacture flaws. The gilded décor is partial minimal rubbed. Three wings, the wreath, the tendril and the leafs in the background with old restorations. The height measures 13 cm.Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799)Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Cupid Salutes with a Flag, Porcelain, Late 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome on-glaze painting, parcel-giltMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: August Ringler (1837-1918)Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘O 191’, painter’s signet, and repairer’s numberHeight: 17.3 cmGood condition, consistent with ageObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in good condition, consistent with age. Small manufacture flaws can be found in places. The gilded décor and the hair are scattered rubbed minimal to slightly. The wings and the flag show old restorations. The height measures 17.3 cm.August Ringler (1837-1918)Born in 1837 in Kirchheim the later modeler August Ringler studied at the vocational school in Nördlingen. Between 1856 and 1904 he worked at the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. He created a versatilely oeuvre, which comprises numerous models, genre figures in the style of rococo, cupids, realistic bird groups and dogs.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelainfigure, Cupid as a Messenger, Late 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome overglaze painting, parcel-giltMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: August Ringler (1837-1918), c. 1895-96Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number O. 175., painter’s signet, and repairer’s numberHeight: 15.2 cmGood restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in good restored condition. The gilded décor is partially slightly rubbed. The height measures 15.2 cm. August Ringler (1837-1918) Born in 1837 in Kirchheim the later modeler August Ringler studied at the vocational school in Nördlingen. Between 1856 and 1904 he worked at the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. He created a versatilely oeuvre, which comprises numerous models, genre figures in the style of rococo, cupids, realistic bird groups and dogs. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, a Cupid Group, Porcelain, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome painting, parcel-giltMeissen, around 1900Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘2990’, painter’s number, and repairer’s numberHeight: 11.5 cmGood condition, consistent with ageObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in good, age-related condition. The gilded decor of the socket is partial rubbed. Three hands, the flower as well as the wreath are restored. The height measures 11.5 cm.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Allecorical Cupid Group, Porcelain, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintingMeissen, around 1900Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), from the year around 1769Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘2904’, painter’s number, and repairer’s numberHeight: 12.6 cmGood condition, consistent with ageObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in good, age-related condition with partial manufacture flaws. The gilded decor and the painting on both heads are partial minimal rubbed. The painting of the laurel leafs are patched in places. The height measures 12.6 cm.Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799)Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects which mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Group of  Cupids, Porcelain, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintingMeissen, c. 1900Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Carl Christoph Punct (died 1765), from the year 1765Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘2991.’, painter’s number, and repairer’s numberHeight: 12 cmGood condition, consistent with ageObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in good, age-related condition. The gilded décor is partial minimal rubbed. The left arm of the female figure, the wreath and the flower bouquet with old restorations. The wreath is presumably repainted. A small fire crack can be found on the left arm of the male figure. The height measures 12 cm. Carl Christoph Punct (died 1765) Between 1761 and 1765 Carl Christoph Punct was a modeler in the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. Superficial he collaborates with Johann Joachim Kaendler. He created numerous and often two-figured children groups, which are characterized of a long face and a high forehead. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, a Cupid Saluting, 1st Quarter 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, 1st quarter of the 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: August Ringler (1837-1918), 1889/90Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model mark O 173, painter number, repairer's numberHeight: 16 cmGood, restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in good, restored condition. Amor's left wing and the right hand are professionally restored. Bow with a minor patched. The height of the figure measures 16 cm. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pair of Mirrors with Cupids, 2nd H. 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold painted, mirror glass, brass and bronzeMeissen, second half 19th centuryMeissen porcelain factory, established in 1710Model: Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893), 1849-51Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, one mirror with not visible mark covered by the mounting Fixed metal mountings with hinged standsHeights: 24 cm and 25 cm Good restored conditionPair of oval mirrors with sculptural forget-me-not wreath and two cupids with a flower garland and a palm branchObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The porcelain frames are in good restored condition. Some leaves, blossoms and one loop with minimally chips or losses. The gold décor is slightly rubbed in places. Differing metal mountings. One mirror glass with slight signs of age. The height measures 24 cm and 25 cm. Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) At first the German sculptor Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) worked as a repairer apprentice in the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. After his studies at the Dresdner Kunstakademie in the class of Ernst Rietschel between 1838-43 he returns as a modeler to the manufactory. From 1849-86 he was the director of the design department in Meissen. His porcelain ware was in the style of neo-gothic and neo-renaissance. Later he adapted several services and vessels of the 18th century. Great popularity rejoices his déjeuners with motifs of lillies of the valley and of fans. Also the snake handle vase, which was inspired by ancient forms, established as a bestseller for the manufactory. Still today the vase is produced in two sizes and different decorations. Leuteritz considered presumably to the most productive modelers of the 19th century in Meissen. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pair of Wall Mirrors with Cupids, 2nd H. 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold painted, original mirror glass, silver plated white metalMeissen, second half 19th centuryMeissen porcelain factory, established in 1710Model: Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893), 1849-51Underglaze blue crossed swords marksWhite metal plate with fine graved blossoms and mounting fixed on the backHeight: c. 24 cm eachPair of oval mirrors with sculptural worked forget-me-not wreath and two cupids with garland of flowers and palm branch as crownObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The frames are in age-related, but visually appealing condition. The original mirror glass with usual signs of age. One glass is missing and the metal plate is enclosed separately. Some leaves and blossoms, the ribbon as well as one cupid each have been restored professionaly. Some leaves with minimal chips. The height measures 24 cm each. Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) At first the German sculptor Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) worked as a repairer apprentice in the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. After his studies at the Dresdner Kunstakademie in the class of Ernst Rietschel between 1838-43 he returns as a modeler to the manufactory. From 1849-86 he was the director of the design department in Meissen. His porcelain ware was in the style of neo-gothic and neo-renaissance. Later he adapted several services and vessels of the 18th century. Great popularity rejoices his déjeuners with motifs of lillies of the valley and of fans. Also the snake handle vase, which was inspired by ancient forms, established as a bestseller for the manufactory. Still today the vase is produced in two sizes and different decorations. Leuteritz considered presumably to the most productive modelers of the 19th century in Meissen. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Group of Figures, Armor Sharpening Arrows, Late 19thC.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome as well as gold and silver paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: c. 1772Underglaze blue sword mark, incised model number ‘E 26’, impressed and painter numberHeight: 21 cmGood, restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Cf.:Königlich Sächsische Porzellanmanufaktur zu Meissen, Meissner Preisverzeichnis 1904, ill, plate no. 16.Condition:The group of figures in in good, restored condition. The décor is minimal rubbed in places. The leafs with scattered minimal chips. The height measures 21 cm. (nlu)Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Gallant Group of Figures ‘Die Liebesprüfung‘, 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, glazed, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, second half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), 1775Underglaze blue sword mark, model number ‘E 71‘, impressed mark and painter’s signetHeight: 23.3 cmGood conditionA gallant couple upon oval base in front of the column monument with vase motif; the elegantly dressed cavalier is presenting his beloved a bouquet of flowersObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Cf. Sabine & Thomas Bergmann, Meissen-Figuren Modellnummern A 1 – Z 99, Erlangen 2014, vol. 2, p. 36, cat.-no. 32. Condition: The group is in good condition with minor signs of age and wear. Occasionally professional restorations. Partially smallest chippings in the area of the flower garland, the flower in the lady’s hand is missing. The gold painting is slightly rubbed in places. The height measures 23.3 cm. Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Winemaker & His Wife with Wine Casks, 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, mid-19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen (est. 1710)Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), of the year 1778Underglaze blue swords marks, model number F80, as well as impressed marks and painter's signetsHeight: max. 17.5 cmVery good condition Pair of figures of a winemaker with his wife each equipped with a wine barrel and different kinds of taps in different amount. Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The porcelain figurines are in very good condition. The lace of the skirt with minimal losses. Minimal gold abrasion. Hat and taps of the winemaker have been restored. The height of max. 17.5 cm.Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799)Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (tm) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Gallant Group of Figures with Birdcage, 2nd H. 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, second half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory MeissenModel: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), 1779Underglaze blue swords mark, model no. G 22, impressed mark and painter's signetHeight: 19.5 cmVery good condition Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The porcelain group is in very good condition with restorations of the leaves. The painting of tke left shoe with a tiny loose. The height of 19.5 cm. Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (tm) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Pair of Gallant Figures, Lady and Cavalier, 1860

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, 1860-1924Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: attributed Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), 1764-1766Blue sword marks on unglazed base, model numbers A 56 and A58, impressed marks, painter’s signets and further marksHeights: 19.2 cm and 19.5 cmVery good conditionA pair of courtly dressed figures comprising ‘Dame mit Fächer’ (lady with fan) and ‘Kavalier mit Rose’ (cavalier with rose)Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Cf. Sabine & Thomas Bergmann, Meissen-Figuren Modellnummern A 1 – Z 99, Erlangen 2014, vol. 2, p. 50, cat.-no. 68 & 69. Condition: The couple is in very good condition with minor signs of age and wear. Occasionally manufacturing related flaws and smallest chips in the area of the ruffles. The cavalier’s figure is restored in the area of sword / sword sheath and rose. The heights measure 19.2 cm and 19.5 cm. Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 'Lady with Muff' & 'Cavalier with Telescope', 19th C. 

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), 1771Underglaze blue crossed swords marks, incised model marks D 65 and D 66, painter's signetHeights: 21 cm eachGood restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: Both figures are in professionally restored condition. The porcelain lace and hat of the lady are partially chipped. The height measures 21 cm each. Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Cavalier With Flower Bouquet, Porcelain, 2nd H. 18th C

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome overglaze painting, parcel-giltMeissen, second half 18th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed swords markHeight: 18 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in age-related restored condition. The gilded decor is partial minimal rubbed. The blossoms and leaves as well as the small finger on the right hand with partial material losses. However, the figure is optically in appealing condition. The height measures 18 cm.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Figurine, Cavalier with Wreath, 19th C. 

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, est. 1710Underglaze blue sword mark, incised swords mark within triangle as well as model number z696Subsequently paintedHeight: 17.7 cmGood conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in good condition with minor signs of age and wear. In the area of the ruffle sleeves tiny blemishes as well as occasionally tiny restorations. A hat or basket in the left hand of the man is presumably missing. The height measures 17.7 cm. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Figurative Inkwell, Porcelain, Bohemia, around 1880

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Description: White porcelain, polychrome paint on- and underglazeBohemia, around 1880 Architectural corpus with humorous scene on naturalistic base Dimensions: 15 x 16 x 14 cm (H x W x D) Good restored condition The inkwell presented here was created in Bohemia around 1880. The architectural corpus with humorous figurative scene is on verso equipped with six openings for pen holders. With candlestick in the form of a tree stump besides the building. Two round openings on top for the ink container and sander. The inkwell is in good restored condition (the man arm, hat, bottom). The roof, inkwell and sander inserts missing. The dimensions are 15 x 16 x 14 cm. (cru) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Gallant Group of Figures ‘Schäfergruppe‘, Late 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), 1764-1766Underglaze blue swords mark, model number ‘A 29‘, impressed mark and painter’s signetHeight: 20.2 cmGood conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature:Cf. Sabine & Thomas Bergmann, Meissen-Figuren Modellnummern A 1 – Z 99, Erlangen 2014, vol. 2, p. 53, cat.-no. 76.Cf. Till Alexander Stahlbusch, Figürliches Porzellan vom Barock bis Art Déco, Battenberg 1995, illustration p. 406.Condition:The figure is in good condition with minor signs of age and wear. In places professional restorations, primarily in the area of the foliage. Partially smaller manufacture flaws. The height measures 20.2 cm.Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Group of Figures ‘Schäfergruppe’, Early 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain, glazed, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, early 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), c. 1770-1772Underglaze blue sword mark, model number ‘D19’, further incised mark and painter’s signetHeight: 23.3 cmGood conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature:Cf. Sabine & Thomas Bergmann, Meissen-Figuren Modellnummern A 1 – Z 99, Erlangen 2014, vol. 2, p. 53, cat.-no. 77.Condition:The group of figures is in good condition and partially displays professional restorations. An oak leaf of the treetop is chipped. The height measures 23.3 cm.Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a priest and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a brilliant creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Group of Figures ‘Schäfergruppe‘, 1986

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Description: Porcelain, glazed, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, 1986Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893), 1864Underglaze blue sword mark, model number ‘61028‘, repairer’s number, year mark and painter’s signetHeight: 18.7 cmGood overall conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Literature: Cf. Sabine & Thomas Bergmann, Meissen-Figuren Modellnummern A 1 – Z 99, Erlangen 2014, vol. 1, p. 27, cat.-no. 38. Condition: The group is in good overall condition. In places professional restorations, the lady’s torso has been affixed newly. Partially blemishes in the area of the flower décor and the gallant’s right hand. The height measures 18.7 cm. Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) At first the German sculptor Ernst August Leuteritz (1818-1893) worked as a repairer apprentice at the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. After his studies at the Dresdner Kunstakademie in the class of Ernst Rietschel between 1838-43 he returned to the manufactory as a modeler. From 1849-86 he was director of the design department in Meissen. His porcelain ware was in the style of neo-gothic and neo-renaissance. Later Leuteritz adapted several services and vessels of the 18th century. Of great popularity are his déjeuners with motifs of lilies of the valley and fan patterns. The snake handle vase, too, which was inspired by ancient forms, became one of the manufactory’s bestsellers. Still today the vase is produced in two sizes and with different decorations. Leuteritz counts among Meissen’s most productive modelers of the 19th century. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Shepherd Group 'The Love Letter', Early 20th Century

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, early 20. Jh. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1765Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, incised model mark A 29, repairer's number, painter's markHeight: c. 22 cmGood restored conditionObjekt unterliegt der Regelbesteuerung. Bei Lieferung innerhalb der EU fallen auf den Kaufpreis 19% Umsatzsteuer an. Condition:The figure group is in good condition. The oak leaves, hat and feet of the shepherdess, the ears of dog and lamp as well as the right dog's paw have been restored professionaly. The height measures c. 22 cm.  Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Sheperds Group as Amorous Couple, Early 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, early 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), 1770-72Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, incised model no.19, repairer's number, painter's markHeight: c. 22 cmGood, restored conditionAmorous couple in shepert's style with lamp and dog seated in front of a tree and holding their handsObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:Oak leaves, both ears and right paw of the dog, the right hand of sheperd and sheperdess as well as their shoe tips have been restored by a specialist. The painting and gold rim on the shepert's hat with age related abrasion. The height measures c. 22 cm.  Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Shepherd Group, Porcelain, c. 1900

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome overglaze painting, parcel-giltMeissen, c. 1900Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), from the year 1770-72Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘D.19.’, painter’s number, and former's numberHeight: 21 cmGood, restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in good, age-related condition with partial manufacture flaws. The gilded décor is partial minimal rubbed. The figure with extensive restorations. However, the figure is in appealing condition. The height measures 21 cm.Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Group 'Sheperd with Flowers', 1924-34

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Description: Auction announcements 07th December 2016 Lot 37: One leaf is broken and missing.br> Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, 1924-34Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed sword mark with point mark between the blades, incised model mark 2940, repairer's number, painter's numberHeight: 25 cmGood restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figural group is in good condition, consistent with age. The left hand as well as some leaves are restored. Some leaves of the bouquet are missing. The height measures 25 cm. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Figure, Dancing Shepherd, 1965

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Description: Porcelain, polychrom and gold paintedMeissen, 1965Porcelain Manufactory MeissenModel: Carl Christoph Punct (died 1765), c. 1750/63Underglaze blue swords mark, model number 1305, repairer's number and date markHeight: 26 cmVery good condition Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The porcelain figure is in very good condition. The inspection under UV light reveals some restorations at the leaves and scattered minimal restorations at the figure. The height of 26 cm. Carl Christoph Punct (died 1765)Between 1761 and 1765 Carl Christoph Punct was a modeler in the Porcelain Manufactory Meissen. Superficial he collaborates with Johann Joachim Kaendler. He created numerous and often two-figured children groups, which are characterized of a long face and a high forehead.Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (tm) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 'Sheperd with Sheet of Music', Early 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, early 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model mark 5, repairer's number, painter's numberHeight: 26 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: Both hands with sheet of music, some areas of the garment and the hat as well as oak leaves are restored. The figure is in visually appealing condition. The height measures 26 cm. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Large Group 'Sheperds at Fountain', 2nd Half 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, 2nd half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), c. 1750Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model mark 1290, repairer's number Height: 27 cmGood conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figural group is in good condition. Some leaves, the ear of one sheep and the bagpipe are restored professionaly. The gilded décor is minimal rubbed in places. Some minor manufacture flaws. The height measures 27 cm. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 2 Figures  'Shepherd' and 'Shepherdess with Lamb'

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, after 1934Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), circa 1750Underglaze blue crossed swords marks on the back of the base, incised model mark 1331 and 1332, repairer's numbers, painter's marksHeights: 29.5 cm and 29 cmGood restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figures are in good professionaly restored condition. The gilt decor of the socket is minor rubbed in places. The height of the shepherd measures 29.5 cm, the shepherdess height of 29 cm.  Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a priest and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a brilliant creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Figure, Shepherdess with Lamb, 1924-34

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Description: Porcelain, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, 1924-34Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue sword mark with dot in between the blades, model number ‘2977’ as well as with impressed mark and painter’s signetHeight: 21 cmVery good conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figurine is in very good condition with minor signs of age and wear. Some professional restorations in the area of foliage and flower bouquet. The height measures 21 cm. One leaf is broken off, one leaf is missing. (nlu) Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 'Shepherdess with Jumping Lamp', After 1934

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, after 1934Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, incised model number 1322, repairer's numberHeight: 22 cm  Very good restored conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in very good. Some branch leaves as well as the lamp's left legg and the women's right arm have been restored professionally. The base with scattered fine firing cracks. The height measures 22 cm.   Carl Christoph Punct (unbekannt - 1765)Punct was active as modeller at the manufactory Meissen from 1761-1765. He was a colleague of Johann Joachim Kaendler and created countless groups with children, often with two figures, with long faces and hight foreheads. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Figure, Shepherdess with Lamb & Bar, 1961

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome painting, parcel-giltMeissen, 1961Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), around 1750Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, model number ‘1306’,  repairer’s number and year markHeight: 25 cmVery good conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in very good condition. The boquet and the oak leaves are restored professionaly. The bar is supplemented. The height of 25 cm. Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 'Shephert Couple with Lamb and Dog', late 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, late 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), 1779-81Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, impressed model number G 20, impressed numbersHeight: c. 19 cmVery good conditionA shepherd couple with dog in front of an antique column fragment feeding a lamp with hayObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figural group is in very good condition. The hay tuft in the sheperdees' hand is minimally chipped. The gold paining of the socket is minimally rubbed. The height measures 12 cm. Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799) Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Shepherdess with Flute & Lamb, Model J.J.Kaendler,1965

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, 1965Porcelain Manufactory MeissenModel: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), c. 1750Underglaze blue swords mark, model no. 132, repair's number and date markHeight: 24.5 cmVery good conditionObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in very good condition. The inspection under UV light reveals some restorations in the area of face and the neck, at the mouth piece of the flute and the tips of the leaves. The height of 24.5 cm. Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) Kaendler was born to a clergy man and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a genial creator of European porcelain figures. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (tm) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Figure 'Sheperdess with Flute', Early 20th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, early 20th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Underglaze blue crossed sword mark, incised model number 3, former's numberHeight: 24 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in visually appealing condition. Both arms with flute, one legg of the sheep as well as oak leaves are restored. The height measures 24 cm. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Figural Group 'Children's Roundel', 2nd Half 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, 2nd half 19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), c. 1760Underglaze blue crossed swords mark, incised model mark 2728, former's number Two elegantly dressed Boys and two Girls dancing around an oak treeHeight: 31 cmGood, restoredObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The porcelain group is good condition. The oak foliage is restored. The gold décor is scattered rubbed minimal to slightly. The height of 31 cm. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Figurine ‘Columbine mit Drehleier’, 2nd H. 18th C.

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Description: Porcelain, glazed, painted polychrome and goldMeissen, 2nd half of the 18th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775), 1736Painted later out of the manufactoryHeight: 12.2 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition: The figure is in age-related condition and has restored. A part of the hurdy-gurdy is missing. Partially small manufacture flaws. The height measures 12.2 cm. Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) Kaendler was born to a priest and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a brilliant creator of European porcelain figures. Porcelain Manufactory Meissen Porcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, 2 Figures From The ‘Monkey Orchestra’, 18th/19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome overglaze painting, parcel-giltMeissen, 18th/19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Model: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) and Peter Reinicke (1711-1768), from the year 1753/65Different impressed marksHeight of the singer: 12.2 cm, height of the bassoon player: 13.5 cmThe singer and the bassoon player from the series of the ‘monkey orchestra’ – one of the most favoured collector’s series of Meissen. The illustration of human behaviours in form of animals was very popular in the time of the baroque.Object is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figures are in age-related, restored condition. The gilded decor and the painting are partial rubbed heavily. The bassoon was complemented. The height of the singer measures 12.2 cm. The height of the bassoon player is 13.5 cm.Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775)Kaendler was born to a priest and received a classical education. He began his education as a sculptor in Dresden with Johann Benjamin Thomae (1682–1751), where his talents were soon recognized. He joined Meissen in 1731, where he first worked as a model master and later as the head of the plastic department. He was especially honored in 1749, when he was named ‘Court Commissioner’. He first began creating naturalistic animal figures, later courtly and pastoral scenes, and is mostly known for his famous swan service. He is worldwide acknowledged as a brilliant creator of European porcelain figures.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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