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Auction Description for Deutscher and Hackett: Australian & International + Aboriginal & Oceanic Fine Art
Viewing Notes:
Sydney Exhibition: Thursday 14 - Sunday 17 November 11.00am - 6.00pm 55 Oxford Street (cnr Pelican Street) SURRY HILLS NSW Melbourne Exhibition: Thursday 21- Tuesday 26 November 11.00am - 6.00pm 105 Commercial Road SOUTH YARRA VIC
Sale Notes:
www.invaluable.com/deutscherandhackett

Australian & International + Aboriginal & Oceanic Fine Art

by Deutscher and Hackett

Platinum House

217 lots with images

November 27, 2013

Live Auction

105 Commercial Road

South Yarra, 3141 Australia

Phone: +61 03 9865 6333

Fax: +61 03 9865 6344

Email: info@deutscherandhackett.com

217 Lots
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Ben Quilty 1973, VIRUS, 2006 oil and aerosol on canvas

Lot 1: Ben Quilty 1973, VIRUS, 2006 oil and aerosol on canvas

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Description: Ben Quilty 1973, VIRUS, 2006 oil and aerosol on canvasSIGNED:signed, dated and inscribed verso: Ben Quilty / 2006 / 'Virus'DIMENSIONS:160.0 x 150.0 cmEXHIBITED:Truth and Likeness, National Portrait Gallery, Canberra, 25 November 2006 - 8 April 2007 (label attached verso)PROVENANCE: GrantPirrie Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyESSAY:Acknowledged as one of the leading artists of his generation, Ben Quilty's approach to painting is unrelentingly honest, emerging from the solid foundation of personal experience. Throughout his career Quilty has presented an incredibly strong series of images, investigating notions of masculinity from an Australian perspective. In the catalogue essay accompanying Quilty's 2007 exhibition at GRANTPIRRIE, Sydney, in which portraits of the artist's six-month old baby son Joe were included, Michael Desmond offers an insightful view of the development of Quilty's work: 'Quilty's earlier work represents the apprenticeship of fast food and fast cars, drinking and drugs, graffiti and petty vandalism that typified the Australian male rites of passage in the 1980s. The "Joe" paintings, in contrast, speak of a manliness acquired through fatherhood - parental delight, pride and responsibility. Celebrating the emergence of a new life, the paintings counter the phallic cars, skulls and self destructive impulses of adolescence. When shown at the National Portrait Gallery in the Truth and Likeness exhibition, a female colleague reported that the paintings of baby Joe had to have been done by a man. A woman artist, I was assured, would be accused of soppiness and sentimentality but a man might paint his child as an expression of tenderness that could only emphasise an authentic masculinity ... (A similar reversal of the gender claims on subject matter occurred two decades earlier when male artists found it near impossible to depict the female nude without suggesting aggression but the same subject iterated feminine values in the hands of a woman). However, this is not to say that Quilty's paintings of his bubby are all fluffy and angelic or conventionally "feminine". Each endearing face is built from a welter of vigorous and robust brushstrokes. If these paintings were sculpture they would be carved with a chainsaw. The images of Joe, like all the portrait heads in the exhibition, possess an imposing aspect that both disturbs and challenges viewers' preconceptions, an effect derived from their monumental scale and the dialogue between paint and what is painted.'1 1. Desmond, M., Ben Quilty: God's Middle Children, catalogue essay accompanying the exhibition, Ben Quilty: Pride and Patriotism, GRANTPIRRIE, Sydney, 2007

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James Morrison 1959, THE FIRST MAN AND THE LAST MAN, ARNHEM LAND, 2006 oil on ten canvas panels plus additional canvas panel and wood attachment

Lot 2: James Morrison 1959, THE FIRST MAN AND THE LAST MAN, ARNHEM LAND, 2006 oil on ten canvas panels plus additional canvas panel and wood attachment

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Description: James Morrison 1959, THE FIRST MAN AND THE LAST MAN, ARNHEM LAND, 2006 oil on ten canvas panels plus additional canvas panel and wood attachmentDIMENSIONS: 41.0 x 50.0 cm each; 69.5 x 500.0 cm overall (with attachment)EXHIBITED:Darren Knight Gallery at The Armoury Show, International Fair Of New Art, New York, United States of America, 2006PROVENANCE: Darren Knight Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyRELATED WORKS: The great Tasmanian wars, 2004, oil on canvas, 30.5 x 1677.5 cm, collection of the TarraWarra Museum of Art, Victoria, acquired 2005 THE FIRST MAN AND THE LAST MAN, ARNHEM LAND, 2006 JAMES MORRISON ESSAY:When it comes to technical virtuosity and vivid imagination James Morrison is peerless amongst his generation of artists. Spanning five metres in length, The First Man and the Last Man, Arnhem Land, 2006 stands as a major work in the artist's oeuvre and was first exhibited in the Armoury Show as part of the New York Art Fair in 2006. With one foot in the camp of colonial painter John Glover, with whom the artist shares a fascination with flora, and the other foot planted somewhere between surrealist James Gleeson and the naïve artist Sam Byrne, the artist's meandering narratives unfurl along the length of the work. Morrison's narratives are seductive because of his mesmerising brushwork. They can also be profoundly unsettling as the characters, both human and animal, look directly at the viewer intently pondering our fascination with them. Morrison initially trained as a florist before going onto study art and brings to his work a thorough understanding of the many varieties of flowers that feature in his work. His childhood spent in Papua New Guinea has also given him an appreciation for the extremes of landscape and exotic vegetation, and the human relationship to them. Humans, flora and fauna populate the works equally. They seem in relative harmony, however there is an uneasy feeling that all is not right in Morrison's wonderland. A bikinied beauty is clad in what appears to be chain mail and carries a machine gun, and a Neanderthal man considers space travel as the world becomes populated by mutant beetles who seem intent on righting the wrongs, and turning back the clock on the extinction of species, while wreaking revenge for all the travesties against nature. The artist uses high and often-iridescent colour, which amplifies the intensity of the natural colour in the more conventional passages of paint. These contrasts serve the ensembles or arrangements that populate the work well, as they arrest the viewer's focus long enough to consider the juxtapositions and relationships they depict. As Amanda Rowell put it in Art and Australia, 'Morrison's utopias are often punctuated by disaster, sometimes comic, sometimes grave. Such emotional disjunctures give his work some of its complexity. Lost pasts and anxious futures weave narrative tendrils around independent stories of creation and evolution: for the kingdoms of plants and animals have their own histories, oblivious to what matters to us. Morrison instinctively pieces together the evidence of all of this, identifying patterns in nature's big picture.'1 In recent years the artist has also made forays into the world of sculpture, with some sculptures finding homes in important collections including the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney. Meanwhile Morrison's painting will remain compelling and mesmerising to future generations of collectors and admirers, and act as a reminder that the world really is an amazing place. 1. Rowell, A., 'James Morrison: A Contemporary Epic of Natural History', Art And Australia, vol. 13, no. 1, 2005, p. 86 HENRY MULHOLLAND

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Michael Zavros 1974, BLACK SUIT, 2007 oil on canvas

Lot 3: Michael Zavros 1974, BLACK SUIT, 2007 oil on canvas

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Description: Michael Zavros 1974, BLACK SUIT, 2007 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed with initials and dated lower right: MZ07DIMENSIONS: 110.0 x 150.0 cmPROVENANCE: Lorraine Pilgrim, Southport, QueenslandPrivate collection, PerthESSAY:'Zavros is an aesthete: he paints beautiful things beautifully. His subject include fairytale palaces, gardens and follies: upmarket men's fashion, luxury cars and jewellery; Lipizzaner dressage horses, Japanese pedigree onagadori chickens and pretty boys. Zavros's subjects seem interchangeable; they are analogous to one another. For instance, his businessmen in bespoke suits and shiny shoes echo his over bred chickens with their extravagant, impractical tails. His subject's quality and classiness is also mirrored in his impeccable, refined, photo-realistic rendering of them. It is often said that Zavros's subject is beauty itself, but it is, more generally, symbols of status. His canon of beauty is aspirational - keyed to notions of privilege, tradition and the faux-aristocratic taste of luxury brands. Zavros's work speaks to a desire for status, and therefore also to our fear of not having it - what television-philosopher Alain de Botton famously called "status anxiety". Consequently, Zavros has become a shibboleth. People either love him or loathe him, admire him or resent him. Those who love him think his work epitomises precisely what art should be (which is what they have or want, like and are); those who loathe him think it is everything art should not be (class, ideology). The strength and clarity of Zavros's project lies precisely in his ability to polarise his audience. By picking subjects that seem prime candidates for deconstruction and critique but not deconstructing or critiquing them, Zavros foregrounds and flaunts his lack of criticality.'1 1. Leonard, R., 'Charm Offensive', Art and Australia, vol. 49, no. 1, Spring, 2011, pp. 100-109

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Sam Leach 1973, ASSETS, 2008 oil and resin on wood

Lot 4: Sam Leach 1973, ASSETS, 2008 oil and resin on wood

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Description: Sam Leach 1973, ASSETS, 2008 oil and resin on woodSIGNED: signed and dated verso: Sam Leach / 2008-09DIMENSIONS: 25.0 x 19.0 cmPROVENANCE: Nellie Castan Gallery, MelbournePrivate collection, Sydney

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Michael Zavros 1974, WHITE ONAGADORI, 2007 charcoal on paper

Lot 5: Michael Zavros 1974, WHITE ONAGADORI, 2007 charcoal on paper

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Description: Michael Zavros 1974, WHITE ONAGADORI, 2007 charcoal on paperDIMENSIONS: 82.0 x 88.0 cmEXHIBITED: The Good Son - Michael Zavros Works on Paper, Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland, 11 July - 23 August 2009, (illus. in exhibition catalogue)PROVENANCE: Johnston Gallery, PerthPrivate collection, SydneyESSAY:This reflection on the manipulation of genetics appears ... most powerfully in a work such as White onagadori, which depicts the extraordinary bird bred from mutations of long tail Japanese breeds for the sole purpose of achieving a beautiful but hopelessly impractical long train of tail feathers. Technique and subject mirror each other as Zavros' drawing strips away contextual detail, for that is not what lovers of this ornamental bird wish to see, and plays instead with the positive and negative decorative qualities of white on black, the languidly curling lines reminiscent of the decadent Art Nouveau style. Led out only for display, the onagadori exists to give tangible worldly form to the Phoenix, that mythical creature of the imagination. In reality this flightless bird must be confined permanently in a cage to protect the trailing feathers, its chain and its glory.1 1. Rigney, V., The Good Son - Michael Zavros, Gold Coast City Art Gallery, Queensland, 2009, p. 5

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Lionel Bawden 1974, THE MONSTERS (LIFE IN SLOW MOTION), 2005 coloured Staedtler pencils, epoxy, pale boiled linseed oil

Lot 6: Lionel Bawden 1974, THE MONSTERS (LIFE IN SLOW MOTION), 2005 coloured Staedtler pencils, epoxy, pale boiled linseed oil

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Description: Lionel Bawden 1974, THE MONSTERS (LIFE IN SLOW MOTION), 2005 coloured Staedtler pencils, epoxy, pale boiled linseed oilDIMENSIONS: 40.0 x 84.0 x 55.0 cmPROVENANCE: Grantpirrie, SydneyPrivate collection, Sydney

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Jon Cattapan 1956, SALT LINE, 2003 oil on linen

Lot 7: Jon Cattapan 1956, SALT LINE, 2003 oil on linen

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Description: Jon Cattapan 1956, SALT LINE, 2003 oil on linenSIGNED: signed and dated verso: Cattapan 2003inscribed verso: JOHN CATTAPAN / SALTLINEDIMENSIONS: 160.0 x 180.0 cmPROVENANCE: Kaliman Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, Sydney

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Gareth Sansom 1939, MY MOTHER'S HOUSE, 2006 oil and enamel on linen

Lot 8: Gareth Sansom 1939, MY MOTHER'S HOUSE, 2006 oil and enamel on linen

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Description: Gareth Sansom 1939, MY MOTHER'S HOUSE, 2006 oil and enamel on linenSIGNED: signed and dated verso: SANSOM '06dated and inscribed on stretcher verso: My Mother's House 2006DIMENSIONS: 122.0 x 122.0 cmPROVENANCE: John Buckley Gallery, MelbournePrivate collection, Sydney

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Bill Henson 1955, UNTITLED 1992/93, 1992-93 type C photograph

Lot 9: Bill Henson 1955, UNTITLED 1992/93, 1992-93 type C photograph

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Description: Bill Henson 1955, UNTITLED 1992/93, 1992-93 type C photographSIGNED: signed, dated and inscribed below imageedition of 5DIMENSIONS: 166.0 x 108.5 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection, Melbourne

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Stephen Bush 1955, UNTITLED IN GREEN AND GOLD, 1987 oil on linen

Lot 10: Stephen Bush 1955, UNTITLED IN GREEN AND GOLD, 1987 oil on linen

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Description: Stephen Bush 1955, UNTITLED IN GREEN AND GOLD, 1987 oil on linen SIGNED: signed, dated and inscribed verso on stretcher: "UNTITLED IN GREEN AND GOLD" Stephen Bush 13/11/87 - 27/11/87DIMENSIONS: 122.0 x 142.5 cmEXHIBITED: Claiming: An Installation of Paintings by Stephen Bush, The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut, September 1991 - January 1992PROVENANCE: Powell Street Gallery, Melbourne (label attached verso)The John L. Stewart Collection, New YorkESSAY:'It's a bicentennial picture, a bit like a joke. It's a theatre diorama with curtains on both sides. A fake architectural setting with a view opening out on to a Western District landscape. In the diorama there are three kangaroos standing, one of which is a fighting kangaroo. It looks a bit like something you might find on a bank note as a crest. It's playing with the idea of "Australiana". It depicts something which is supposedly 'uniquely' Australian - but they're stuffed - standing on a carpet square.'1 Abounding with theatricality, Untitled in Green and Gold is a tongue in cheek satire of the nationalistic themes and romantic agricultural myths that permeated journalism, photography and landscape painting throughout Australia and America during the 19th century. Stilted and overly dramatic, there is a tangible awkwardness to this picture, falling short of grandeur. The stuffed kangaroos are carefully positioned on a stage with gilded curtains, separated from the natural landscape behind them. In an otherwise monochromatic painting, Bush employs two characteristically Australian colours - green and gold - further emphasising the ridiculousness of this patriotic scene. 'The dioramas are something I've been led into by looking at those photographs where historical figures stand in front of representations of reality. I am really playing up the fact - that the pictures aren't "real" - by emphasising the awkwardness.'2 Born in a small rural town outside Colac, Victoria, Stephen Bush has gone on to achieve significant acclaim throughout Australia and America, dividing his time between these two countries. Bush has exhibited prolifically in major public galleries and art fairs, including VOLTA Art Fair, New York, Australian Centre for Contemporary Art, Melbourne, The National Gallery of Victoria, Art Gallery of New South Wales, The Gallery of Modern Art, Brisbane, and the Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, USA. He has received numerous awards including the Arthur Guy Memorial Painting Prize, Bendigo Art Gallery 2007, and in 2012 he was the recipient of the Australia Council's New York Green Street Residency. Bush's work is represented in major public collections including Art Gallery of New South Wales, National Gallery of Australia, and National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, in addition to multiple private collections throughout Australia, Europe and the United States of America. 1. Stephen Bush, cited in Cripps, P., Stephen Bush and Janet Burchill, exhibition catalogue, The Lewers Bequest and Penrith Regional Art Gallery, Emu Plains, New South Wales, p. 8 2. Ibid. LEAH CROSSMAN

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Stephen Bush 1955, THE PROMISE, THE INEVITABLE DISAPPOINTMENT, 1989 oil on linen

Lot 11: Stephen Bush 1955, THE PROMISE, THE INEVITABLE DISAPPOINTMENT, 1989 oil on linen

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Description: Stephen Bush 1955, THE PROMISE, THE INEVITABLE DISAPPOINTMENT, 1989 oil on linenSIGNED: signed, dated and inscribed verso on stretcher: Stephen Bush 21/3/89 - 14/4/89 The Promise - the inevitable disappointmentDIMENSIONS: 182.5 x 182.5 cmEXHIBITED: Claiming: An Installation of Paintings by Stephen Bush, Australian Centre of Contemporary Art, Melbourne, February - March 1991; Contemporary Art Centre of South Australia, Adelaide, April 1991; The Aldrich Museum of Contemporary Art, Ridgefield, Connecticut, September 1991 - January 1992, cat. 6LITERATURE: Cass, N., Claiming: An Installation of Paintings by Stephen Bush, Australian Centre of Contemporary Art, Melbourne, 1991, p. 11 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Powell Street Gallery, Melbourne (label attached verso)The John L. Stewart Collection, New YorkESSAY:Among the artist's earliest work, The Promise, the Inevitable Disappointment, 1989 engages one of Bush's favourite artistic tropes. Employing monochromatic colour and figurative realism, Bush indicates to his audience that this painting draws directly from history and illustration. In the artist's words: 'When I paint pictures in colour there are all these other things to consider. You end up involving yourself in the mechanics of the picture. The monochrome pictures were inspired by looking at old illustrations in catalogues where you just get a graphic impression. This relates to black and white photography and television - where you just look at the image. You are not concerned with 'beauty' or colour. You look at the image but at the same time your mind is telling you that the sea is blue, not grey.'1 In this ambiguous visual narrative, Bush alludes to several celebrated characters in the history of Australia's colonisation. Set in inimitably Australian bushland, we encounter two eccentric figures, both seemingly at odds with their surroundings. Balancing on a large rock, a navigator immaculately dressed in modern attire surveys the foreign landscape. In the foreground a bare-footed man painted in black-face - donning an elaborate European costume that recalls a uniform donated to Aboriginal explorer and entertainer Bungaree - bows forward with his hat, welcoming us to his land. As is common for the artist, he paints himself seamlessly into the composition, here in the form of the native protagonist. The Coolibah tree in the background is carved with the initials 'ROB', for Robert O'Hara Burke - referencing numerous depictions of Australian explorers Burke and Wills who set off in 1860 full of optimism with the intention to navigate Australia, and ended up starving to death in the harsh desert landscape after refusing the help of the local Indigenous people. The tree in Bush's painting is in fact a real landmark turned tourist destination on the banks of the Diamantina River in Queensland which was purportedly engraved by the explorers as they passed through the region. The Bungaree character in the foreground of our painting may well be a reference to John King, the only member of the Burke and Wills party to survive after he made friends with an Indigenous community and took guidance from them in hunting and other imperative survival skills. In our image Bush alludes to the idea of historical accuracy through black and white documentation, but this facade belies the wry absurdity of the image. When we look closely, we see a joke that sums up so much 19th century historical painting and journalism: the heroic explorer whose journey promised great riches and rewards, yet in reality delivered only tragedy and disappointment. 1. Stephen Bush, cited in Cripps, P., Stephen Bush and Janet Burchill, exhibition catalogue, The Lewers Bequest and Penrith Regional Art Gallery, Emu Plains, New South Wales, p. 7 LEAH CROSSMAN

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John Brack 1920 - 1999, STUDY FOR 'STANDING NUDE', 1970 conté on paper

Lot 12: John Brack 1920 - 1999, STUDY FOR 'STANDING NUDE', 1970 conté on paper

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Description: John Brack 1920 - 1999, STUDY FOR 'STANDING NUDE', 1970 conté on paper SIGNED: signed and dated lower right: John Brack 70titled on distressed paper label verso: [ST]UDY FOR STANDING / NUDEDIMENSIONS: 68.5 x 49.5 cmEXHIBITED: John Brack, Rudy Komon Gallery, Sydney, April 1971 (label attached verso)John Brack, Crossley Gallery, Melbourne, July 1972John Brack Drawings, 1945-79, Monash University Gallery, Melbourne, 9 June - 10 July 1981LITERATURE: Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, vol. II, cat. p146, pp. 58 and 216 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Laurence Course, Melbourne, a gift from the artistThence by descentPrivate collection, MelbourneRELATED WORKS: Standing Nude, 1970, oil on canvas, 129.5 x 96.5 cm, private collection, illus. in Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, vol. II, cat. o183, pp. 25 and 142ESSAY:'In the winter of 1970 Brack made eight conté drawings of the nude from the model and the following summer, working from these drawings, executed a series of eight oil paintings. It was his normal working procedure to use the model for the drawings and then, without the model, take the drawings as his point of departure for the paintings. A comparison between the drawing, frequently preceded by a number of sketches, and the related painting indicates the considerable gulf separating the two. For example, in the conté Study for 'Standing nude', 1970, formal problems of the tradition of artistic convention have been posed and some aspects of the compositional arrangement have been suggested. In the oil painting, Standing nude, 1970, these suggestions are taken only as a starting point; the proportions, the compositional structure and the colour scheme, in short, the whole internal life of the painting is rethought, and worked out on the canvas itself.'1 1. Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, vol. I, p. 117

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John Brack 1920 - 1999, STUDY FOR 'THE MERTZ NUDE', 1965 conté on paper

Lot 13: John Brack 1920 - 1999, STUDY FOR 'THE MERTZ NUDE', 1965 conté on paper

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Description: John Brack 1920 - 1999, STUDY FOR 'THE MERTZ NUDE', 1965 conté on paper SIGNED: signed and dated lower left: John Brack 65DIMENSIONS: 48.5 x 65.0 cmPROVENANCE: Laurence Course, Melbourne, a gift from the artistThence by descentPrivate collection, MelbourneRELATED WORKS: The Mertz Nude, 1965, oil on canvas, 96.3 x 129.4 cm, Commissioned by the Mertz Collection of Australian Art, illus. in Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, vol. II, cat. o150, pp. 21 and 132 ESSAY:According to John Brack's work records, the painting Nude in Red Room, 1965 was commissioned by Harold Mertz, the New York businessman who was advised by Kym Bonython. Brack's first use of the Persian carpet appeared in 1965 in his Portrait of Hal Hattam, the Melbourne gynaecologist, followed by the Mertz commission. 'In general the setting is intended to reflect the present real world, i.e. it is a corner of my own studio, with only a Persian rug, apart from the subject to link it to the past, and to provide a contrasting note of opulence, if not a particularly strong one ...'1 The subject of this drawing relates closely to the later painting Reclining Nude, 1970. 'The new series of nudes, when compared with the two series that preceded it, has a startling complexity, sophistication and subtlety. The conceptual elements remain relatively constant. The nude, who in her pose frequently echoes an artistic convention, generally refers to the past and to tradition; the bare studio with its naked walls and plain receding floorboards, refers to reality and the present situation; where the oriental carpet - the carpet paradigm - as if separating the two worlds nevertheless forms a strange physical bridge between them. The Reclining nude, 1970, was one of the most successful paintings of the series. The pose of this somewhat heavy-bodied model with her hands folded behind her head is derived from the Odalisque of Ingres, an icon of languorous sexuality, but the world in which Brack's model is placed totally lacks Ingres's sense of repose and stability, and instead of the measured grid of verticals and horizontals the principal compositional lines are oblique.'2 1. John Brack, letter to Ian North, 30 May 1972, quoted in Grishin, S., The Art of John Brack, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1990, vol. I, p. 118 2. Grishin, ibid.

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Ian Fairweather 1891 - 1974, PORTRAIT, 1939 oil and gouache on cardboard on plywood

Lot 14: Ian Fairweather 1891 - 1974, PORTRAIT, 1939 oil and gouache on cardboard on plywood

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Description: Ian Fairweather 1891 - 1974, PORTRAIT, 1939 oil and gouache on cardboard on plywoodSIGNED: signed lower left: IFairweatherDIMENSIONS: 39.5 x 43.0 cmEXHIBITED: Fairweather: a Retrospective Exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 3 June - 4 July 1965; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 21 July - 22 August 1965; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 9 September - 10 October 1965; National Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 26 October - 21 November 1965; Western Australian Art Gallery, Perth, 9 December 1965 - 16 January 1966; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 10 February - 13 March 1966, cat. 75 (label attached verso)Ian Fairweather 1891-1974, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 25 September - 6 November 1991 (as 'Portrait (Young Boy)', label attached verso)LITERATURE: Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Sydney, 1981, cat. 53, p. 68, fig. 23 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Collection of Lina Bryans, MelbourneThence by descentPrivate collection, MelbourneESSAY:Painted in Cairns, where Ian Fairweather had moved in 1939, Portrait is one of a small group of works in which his empathy for the people among whom he was living is paramount. Others include Lads Boxing, 1939, likewise capturing the physical attraction of the young people, and the masterly Landlady and Daughter, Cairns, 1942, sold earlier this year. Among the Malays, Aborigines and Islanders in Malay Town on the Alligator Creek, Fairweather felt at one with his environment and its people, a harmony that pervades these special paintings. Murray Bail, in his study of Fairweather, tells us that he felt so at home that he turned to painting almost immediately.1 Within a month four paintings had been sent to William Frater in Melbourne - two versions of Alligator Creek at Cairns, Lads Boxing and our painting, Portrait. They were, Bail informs us, Fairweather's last oil paintings, from July 1939 adopting gouache instead.2 As a subject, Ian Fairweather's portrait of the young boy has an innocence and introspection that is captivating. Indirect in look, the figure has an inner quietude and self-possession while all around him forms of paint move with gusto. Through the movement of brush and appealing colour, the artist's response to what he saw and felt can still be shared today. Fairweather's combined use of gouache and oil gave him that extra freedom of execution enabling him to achieve such engagement of informality. Aesthetically, the painting is even more compelling. An overall mural flatness, contrasted with form detailed in the shadows cast, is worked back, through the lively brush strokes, into a patterning of colour and shape. It recalls the visual excitement found in an Oriental rug with all its complexities harmonised into one, but equally enjoyable through each detail. In Portrait, as in other works, this is further enriched by the play between figuration and abstraction; verisimilitude relevant only in so much as it is an integral part of the whole. In 1965, Laurie Thomas, director of the Queensland Art gallery, organised a retrospective exhibition of eighty-eight paintings and drawings as homage to Fairweather. It toured the State galleries to great applause. An indication of the regard in which Portrait has been held is given by its inclusion in that memorable show. Whatever the labours, Portrait and its fellow three paintings of 1939 have that sense of ease of achievement which is the hallmark of remarkable talent. 1. Bail, M., Ian Fairweather, Bay Books, Sydney, 1981, pp. 65, 68 2. Ibid., p. 68 DAVID THOMAS

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Ian Fairweather 1891 - 1974, SKETCH HEAD, 1941 gouache and pencil on paper on board

Lot 15: Ian Fairweather 1891 - 1974, SKETCH HEAD, 1941 gouache and pencil on paper on board

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Description: Ian Fairweather 1891 - 1974, SKETCH HEAD, 1941 gouache and pencil on paper on boardSIGNED: signed lower right: IFairweatherDIMENSIONS: 24.5 x 20.5 cmEXHIBITED: Fairweather: a Retrospective Exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 3 June - 4 July 1965; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 21 July - 22 August 1965; National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 9 September - 10 October 1965; National Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, 26 October - 21 November 1965; Western Australian Art Gallery, Perth, 9 December 1965 - 16 January 1966; Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart, 10 February - 13 March 1966, cat. 83 (label attached verso)Ian Fairweather 1891-1974, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 25 September - 6 November 1991 (label attached verso)The Drawings of Ian Fairweather, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 21 June - 24 August 1997; Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 17 October - 7 December 1997; Queensland Art Gallery, 7 February - 29 March 1998 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Fisher, T., The Drawings of Ian Fairweather, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1997, p. 22 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Collection of Lina Bryans, MelbourneThence by descentPrivate collection, MelbourneESSAY:Ian Fairweather's drawings are so highly thought of that, in 1997, Canberra's National Gallery of Australia devoted an entire exhibition to them. Sketch Head, 1941, with its wonderful freedom of line and overall visual excitement, was among them. The exhibition's curator, Tim Fisher, thought so highly of Sketch Head that he singled it out as one of 'four of the most beautiful works in the exhibition'.1 Painted in Calcutta, India, this exceptional group of works includes Landlady and Daughter, 1941 (Deutscher and Hackett April 2013 lot 13), and the Chinese landscapes, Lake Hangchow, 1941 (National Gallery of Australia), and Bridge in Soochow (Sussan Corporation Collection, Melbourne). All were recollections of his recent and more distant past, Sketch Head and Landlady and Daughter being of the time he spent at Alligator Creek, Cairns in 1939 sharing a boathouse with the Aboriginal family. The liveliness of Sketch Head is in contrast with its reflective genesis, the whole realised in remarkable brevity of line and economy of colour. This is achieved as much through the line as the brushwork, as Fairweather married his London training with Chinese art. As Fisher put it, 'The quick, arabesque muscle lines of the Slade School undergo a radical transformation: they become a discursive, wandering outline', adding an admiration of 'the light flickering dance of a calligrapher's brush'.2 He employed such an economy of means that even the paper support showing though was used to develop form or create highlights as integral parts of the composition. The unpainted has become part of the very image itself, furthering the liveliness of the picture surface and its twodimensional design. And then the light, quickness of touch is anchored by the depth of the few colours employed. This disarming directness and seeming simplicity of statement conversely reveals a depth of perception in his lifelong interest in people. As curator Robert Smith said in his catalogue introduction to the 1965 retrospective exhibition, 'In his paintings Ian Fairweather has always been concerned with people - not as individuals, not as types, but as people: part of the vast unfolding tapestry of life.'3 While there is a strong emphasis on formal values in Sketch Head, this in no way detracts from the nobility and affection shown, of Fairweather's quite remarkable feeling for children. 1. Fisher, T., The Drawings of Ian Fairweather, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1997, pp. 11-12 2. Ibid., p. 7 3. Smith, R, 'Introduction', Fairweather: A Retrospective Exhibition, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 1965 DAVID THOMAS

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Charles Blackman 1928, THE BLUE DRESS, 1954 enamel on compressed cardboard

Lot 16: Charles Blackman 1928, THE BLUE DRESS, 1954 enamel on compressed cardboard

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Description: Charles Blackman 1928, THE BLUE DRESS, 1954 enamel on compressed cardboardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: CHARLES BLACKMAN / 1954DIMENSIONS: 61.5 x 75.0 cmLITERATURE: Shapcott, T., The Art of Charles Blackman, Deutsch, London, 1989, pl. 37 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Niagara Galleries MelbournePrivate collection, SydneyESSAY: The 1950s were a time of intense creativity for Blackman during which he developed his distinctive visual style and motifs, including the Schoolgirl and Alice in Wonderland series. The artist's paintings during this period are characterized by two recurring themes: childhood and blindness. The Blue Dress is a fine, early example of Blackman's oeuvre; an intimate and tender portrait of a reclining young woman depicting imagery that Blackman was to explore throughout his long and eminent career. Charles Blackman married Barbara Patterson in 1950 and she was to have a profound and lasting effect on his art. Her low vision and eventual blindness allowed Blackman to enter the realm of the imaginary. Furthermore, Blackman's need to describe the world to Barbara heightened his observations and refined his senses. 'Charles Blackman emerged during the 1950s as an artist whose pictures achieved a rare and extraordinary degree of poetic reality.'1 The fusion of the poetic world with everyday reality in Blackman's pictures parallels the relationship that Blackman shared with his wife. 'The rapid evolution of Blackman's pictorial ideas was clearly enriched by Barbara's knowledge of psychology, especially her feeling for Jung.'2 Blackman often read aloud to Barbara. They preferred modern French literature by authors such as Colette, Gide and Alain-Fournier, with an emphasis on novels of adolescent eroticism. The influence of poet Arthur Rimbaud is evident in Blackman's preoccupation with childhood memories and the state of adolescence. In The Blue Dress, a young girl, dressed in blue, lies on her side with her arm awkwardly outstretched. A vase of flowers sits on the table in front of her, partly obscuring her face. Deep in reflection, her eyes downcast, the girl offers no challenge to the viewer who is left free to contemplate the world of Blackman's creation. Shapcott observes that The Blue Dress 'may initially be seen as a cool exercise in now familiar Blackman patternings: sleeping woman, vase of awkward flowers, corners of furniture; the whole bathed in flat colours whose only surprise is that the petals of the flowers are a withered brown.'3 The Blue Dress is a work that mesmerizes not just because of its striking visual appeal and charming subject matter, but because it hints at something more meaningful below the surface. Blackman's masterful juxtaposition of a vase of flowers against the young girl's face disrupts the picture plane and crates a disquieting effect. We are drawn towards the solitary young girl through the everyday objects that surround her. 'The element of playfulness and the psychological probing of states of innocence and the experience are extremely rare in antipodean art. Blackman has become their master.'4 1. James Mollison, 'Director's Foreword', in St John Moore, F., Charles Black: Schoolgirls and Angels, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 1993 2. Ibid., p. 4 3. Shapcott, T., The Art of Charles Blackman, Deutsch, London, 1989, pp. 14-16 4. bid., p. xi FELICITY ST JOHN MOORE

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Fred Williams 1927 - 1982, ERODED HILL, 1977 gouache on paper

Lot 17: Fred Williams 1927 - 1982, ERODED HILL, 1977 gouache on paper

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Description: Fred Williams 1927 - 1982, ERODED HILL, 1977 gouache on paperSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: Fred WilliamsDIMENSIONS: 56.0 x 75.0 cmPROVENANCE: Rudy Komon Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyThence by decentPrivate collection, SydneyESSAY:Eroded Hill, 1977 is one of a series of gouaches which Fred Williams painted at Cavan during a visit he made in August of that year to the historic property owned by Rupert Murdoch. Located on the Murrumbidgee River near Yass in New South Wales, it offered Williams that characteristic monotony and hidden variety of detail in the Australian landscape which so appealed to him. While the rise of a hill or a weather-worn flat may attract the eye, the absence of focus led Williams to build it into the paint - dabs, swirls, and strokes of colour - enriched textures, broad washes nuanced with subtleties and creamy surfaces - all testimony to his great gifts as a colourist. The same is found in Cavan, 1977, another gouache of similar size in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, and an untitled landscape of Cavan gifted to Canberra's National Gallery of Australia in 2005 by Alcoa World Alumina Australia. Idiosyncratically individual in their presentation of the landscape, each follows the convention of earth below and sky above, with that two-dimensional feel engineered by emphasis on the picture plane, adding to the distinct edge of the horizon and sense of something beyond. Generating a mood of expectancy, it harmonises with the abiding sense of timelessness, of a land reaching back to the primordial - powerfully present and moving. In choosing the Australian landscape above all, Williams said in the year of his Cavan paintings, 'I must be inside looking out - not outside looking in'.1 Williams's gouaches, through the greater informality of the medium allow a more personally felt response to slip through. Gouache has always been an important medium for Williams, who held his first public gallery exhibition of 'watercolours' at the Newcastle Art Gallery in 1971. In 1977, the same year as our Eroded Hill, he held a solo show of gouaches at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. His reference to erosion in the title of our painting, places it in that tradition of Australian painting of natural disasters which are so tragic a part of our land - bushfires, floods, and the erosion that results from both. Williams painted a number of works on bushfires earlier in his career. When Sidney Nolan painted his drought series of 1953, the carcass of the dead beast was a metaphor for the bared bones of the landscape. Equally dramatic, in The Rabbiters, 1947 (National Gallery of Victoria), Russell Drysdale depicted the fallen tree reaching into the eroded landscape in the guise of a human forearm. In Williams's gouache, it is the emptiness which strikes one first - then one looks a little closer. 1. The artist, quoted in Hart, D., Fred Williams: Infinite Horizons, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 2011, p. 157 DAVID THOMAS

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Arthur Boyd 1920 - 1999, FIERY PULPIT ROCK, c1993 oil on canvas

Lot 18: Arthur Boyd 1920 - 1999, FIERY PULPIT ROCK, c1993 oil on canvas

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Description: Arthur Boyd 1920 - 1999, FIERY PULPIT ROCK, c1993 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Arthur BoydDIMENSIONS: 91.0 x 122.0 cmEXHIBITED: Warrah School Society Exhibition, Gallery Savah, Sydney, December 1993PROVENANCE: Gallery Savah, SydneyPrivate collection, Perth, acquired from the above in 1993ESSAY:Featuring the monolithic Pulpit Rock, seemingly set alight in the scorching midday, and towering above the lone figure adrift in a boat on the Shoalhaven River, Fiery Pulpit Rock, Shoalhaven offers a powerful meditation upon the immense physical presence of Nature. A central feature of the Shoalhaven paintings executed during the eighties, Pulpit Rock has been compared by critics to the Mont Saint-Victoire of Cezanne's compositions, and even the haystacks and cathedrals that occupy Monet's oeuvre. Indeed, elaborating upon the religious significance imbued in his repeated use of this motif, Hoff suggests '... in these paintings of Pulpit Rock set between sky and water in an ambience of luminous space, Boyd restates the theme of the cyclic element in nature that had occupied him in the forties.'1 Acknowledging that he is religious 'in the sense that I am overawed by the marvellous things in the world and overawed by the awful things',2 thus Boyd here celebrates the beauty and wonder of the natural world - all the while implying that unless steps are taken to preserve this wilderness for future generations, it will be destroyed: '... I'd like to feel that through my work there is a possibility of making a contribution to a social progression or enlightenment. It would be nice if the creative effort or impulse was connected with a conscious contribution to society, a sort of duty or service. I think you have to make something which does involve concepts and ideas.'3 1. Hoff, U., The Art of Arthur Boyd, Deutsch, London, p. 78 2. Boyd, cited in McKenzie, J., Arthur Boyd at Bundanon, Academy Editions, London, 1994, p. 43 3. Boyd, cited in Gunn, G., Arthur Boyd: Seven Persistent Images, National Gallery of Australia, Canberra, 1985, p. 73 VERONICA ANGELATOS

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Brett Whiteley 1939 - 1992, TO REPEAT WITHOUT REPEATING, 1973 oil on plywood with ink and seashell

Lot 19: Brett Whiteley 1939 - 1992, TO REPEAT WITHOUT REPEATING, 1973 oil on plywood with ink and seashell

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Description: Brett Whiteley 1939 - 1992, TO REPEAT WITHOUT REPEATING, 1973 oil on plywood with ink and seashellSIGNED: signed and dated verso: brett whiteley 73DIMENSIONS: 88.5 x 83.0 cmEXHIBITED: Waves: Brett Whiteley, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, 1-19 June 1973, cat. 7LITERATURE: McGrath, S., Brett Whiteley, Bay Books, Sydney, 1979, p. 155PROVENANCE: Australian Galleries, MelbourneCompany collection, SydneyDeutscher and Hackett, Melbourne, 9-10 May 2007, lot 2Private collection, SydneyESSAY:'...And then she said, "Please produce something beautiful and simple, so we don't have to think too much," and I said "Yes, it's time for purity. Do you have a theme?" She turned and tinglingly said, "Yes, The Sea." '1 When Brett Whiteley's muse thus suggested the sea as a new theme, both appreciated the need for him to restore and recharge his creative soul after the gruelling production of his monumental Alchemy panels earlier that year. Demanding a total turning inward 'to steal the Fire',2 the large-scale frenetic eruptions characterising the Alchemy series had been inspired by his tumultuous experience living in New York - the violence, drug culture and potential destructiveness of that city embodying for Whiteley the epitome of Western corruption and excess. Now, turning his attention outward to the far more gentle subject of nature, and specifically waves, he found a theme which was not only visually satisfying, but emotionally and intellectually less draining. Unveiled at Australian Galleries in 1973, the nine oils and seven large drawings comprising the 'Waves series' betray a number of influences salient throughout Whiteley's entire oeuvre. Whether drawn with an unbelievable sparseness or a surging cacophony of linear swirls, the calligraphic line of the waves both reveals the artist's formidable talent as a draughtsman and, moreover, references his interest in Asian art, paying homage in particular to the celebrated 'Wave' by Hokusai. Similarly, one may discern allusions to his spiritual and artistic mentor, Vincent van Gogh, in whose work Whiteley perceived 'a heightening of reality, in that everything I looked at took on an intensity - an expandingness'.3 With its elegance and inspired simplicity, the present To Repeat Without Repeating, 1973 evokes precisely this kind of intense, meditative response that Whiteley had so admired - the scale of the work and turbulent subject inviting the viewer into a lyrical contemplation of colour and line. Interestingly, if the association between Whiteley and the ultramarine blue of his sumptuous Lavender Bay views finds its genesis here, the swirling, highly emotive movement could not be further from the flat expanses of sheer colour that would follow. 1. Whiteley, B., 'Introduction' in Waves, exhibition catalogue, Australian Galleries, Melbourne, June 1973 (unpaginated) 2. McGrath, S., Brett Whiteley, Bay Books, Sydney, 1979, p. 152 3. Whiteley, op. cit. (unpaginated) VERONICA ANGELATOS

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Tony Tuckson 1921 - 1973, RED / BLACK / WHITE NO. 3, c1965 synthetic polymer paint on composition board

Lot 20: Tony Tuckson 1921 - 1973, RED / BLACK / WHITE NO. 3, c1965 synthetic polymer paint on composition board

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Description: Tony Tuckson 1921 - 1973, RED / BLACK / WHITE NO. 3, c1965 synthetic polymer paint on composition boardDIMENSIONS: 153.0 x 122.0 cmEXHIBITED: Tony Tuckson, Watters Gallery, Sydney, April - May 1982, cat. 3Tony Tuckson, Pinacotheca Gallery, Melbourne, October 1982, cat. 83Australian Paintings: Colonial/Contemporary, Deutscher Fine Art, Melbourne, 2-19 April 1984, cat. 58 (illus. in exhibition catalogue)LITERATURE: Tony Tuckson 1921-1973, Watters Gallery and Margaret Tuckson, Sydney, 1982, pp. 31, 46 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Pinacotheca Gallery, MelbourneDeutscher Fine Art, MelbourneMartin Browne Fine Art, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyESSAY:When Tony Tuckson died at the tragically early age of fifty-two, he left behind many monumental achievements. In the field of curatorship there is the outstanding collection of Australian Aboriginal and Melanesian art at the Art Gallery of New South Wales - for the first time presented as art and not artefacts of ethnography. Then followed the wonderful 1972 interiors of that same gallery - the result of the creative interaction between Tuckson and the gifted architect, Andrew Andersons. The professionalism and collegiality of the staff at the Sydney gallery is another of Tuckson's benefactions. Above all is his body of paintings and drawings, some of which had their public presentation during his lifetime in shows at Watters Gallery in 1970 and 1973. Tuckson brought to his art those same high qualities he showed in leadership, administration and as curator and Deputy Director of the Art Gallery of New South Wales. Drawing upon his rich experiences in the arts, some people have seen his art as an expression of Australia's multiculturalism. Loquacious in other areas, he seldom spoke and never wrote about his own art. Our knowledge is derived from conversations with friends and his writings on Aboriginal art, especially his contribution to the book, Australian Aboriginal Art published in 1964, close in time to our painting. His observations applied equally to his own painting. Art '... is subjective, symbolic, based on knowledge rather than visual appearances.'1 Stating that 'Content and form are fused by the intuitive processes of the artist', Tuckson cautioned that 'To appreciate fully any work of art, we must use the same sense of intuition as the artist, together with our own conscious knowledge of other works of art, in order to judge quality.'2 Tuckson's red, black and white series of paintings of the early to mid sixties are among his best works. They are innovative, dramatic, and aggressive. In reflection, Sandra McGrath wrote of their '... sense of inner tension that is checked and restrained. They are turgid and moody and represent some of the toughest but most difficult work of his career. Much too complete to be called transitional - they nevertheless exude a sense of unexploded energy and passion.'3 In his tribute to Tuckson, Daniel Thomas described him as 'an Abstract Expressionist of world quality', and 'one of Australia's best painters'.4 1. Tuckson, J. A., 'Aboriginal Art and the Western World', Australian Aboriginal Art, Ure Smith, Sydney, 1964, p. 64, quoted in McGrath, S., 'Tony Tuckson', Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 12, no. 2, October - December 1974, p. 164 2. ibid, quoted in Thomas, D. R., 'An Introduction to Tony Tuckson, 1921 - 1973', in Thomas, D., Free, R., and Legge, G., Tony Tuckson, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1989, p. 28 3. McGrath, op. cit., p. 165 4. Thomas, D. R., 'Tony Tuckson - an appreciation ', Art and Australia, Sydney, vol. 11, no. 3, January - March 1974, p. 236c DAVID THOMAS

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Rosalie Gascoigne 1917 - 1999, ROSE RED CITY 4, 1991-93 painted and sawn timber on composition board

Lot 21: Rosalie Gascoigne 1917 - 1999, ROSE RED CITY 4, 1991-93 painted and sawn timber on composition board

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Description: Rosalie Gascoigne 1917 - 1999, ROSE RED CITY 4, 1991-93 painted and sawn timber on composition boardSIGNED: panel one: signed, dated and inscribed verso: Rose Red City / Rosalie Gascoigne / 1991-93panel two: signed, dated and inscribed verso: Rose Red City / Rosalie Gascoigne / 1993DIMENSIONS: diptych: 123.5 x 179.5 cm (overall)EXHIBITED: Rosalie Gascoigne, Pinacotheca Gallery, Melbourne, 5-22 May 1993Roslyn Oxley9, 20 July - ? 1995, Rose Red City 2-6, 8-10, no. 7 omitted20th Century Australian and New Zealand Paintings, Martin Browne Fine Art, Sydney, 1995, cat. 47Australian Art: The 60s 'til Now, Kaliman Gallery, Sydney, 2001LITERATURE: Macdonald, V., Rosalie Gascoigne, Regaro, Sydney, 1998, p. 106PROVENANCE: Pinacotheca Gallery, MelbourneMartin Browne Fine Art, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyKaliman Gallery, SydneyCorporate collection, SydneyDeutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, August 2002, lot 26Private Collection, SydneyESSAY:Rose Red City 4, first exhibited in 1993 at her solo exhibition at Pinacotheca in Melbourne, was inspired by the artist's memories of a visit to the ancient Roman city of Petra, in Jordan. Although Gascoigne's work often conjures immediate recognition of an Australian sense of place, as this work does through its materiality of palings weathered by the harsh local climate, in major works such as Rose Red City 4 we also recognise the inherent qualities of her assemblages evoke a more universal sense of truth and beauty. 'This was my Rose Red City, half as old as time ... Petra. It's got a sort of presence when you see it ... it is a good red.'1 A simple, harmonious arrangement of wood, paint and nails with its orderly grid of elements is visually ignited by the disorderly 'pattern' of the weathered paint surface; its title offers an interpretation of the ancient city carved into a wall of red stone. But, like much of Gascoigne's landscape based art, the simple tension within the assemblage opens the work to more general dialogues of structure and nature, of creation, decay and resurrection. 'There is also a paradoxical aspect because Gascoigne brings the landscape alive with a tremendous sense of immediacy without depicting anything in particular. Her preferred media are often profoundly unnatural - rusty corrugated iron, fragments of reflector road signs, old soft-drink crates, the refuse of an industrial society. Gascoigne recycles those materials designed to keep nature at bay; materials that intervene in the landscape, putting an orderly frame over the natural world, rendering it fit for human habitation.'2 Widely regarded as one of the most significant Australian artists of the twentieth century, it is remarkable that Gascoigne did not hold her first exhibition until the age of 57. Attracting immediate interest from collectors, curators and critics, after only five years she was offered a major survey exhibition at the National Gallery of Victoria and in 1982 represented Australia at the Venice Biennale (with Peter Booth), the first Australian woman to receive this honour. Her work is included in all major museum collections in Australian and New Zealand as well as the Museum of Modern Art, New York. 1. MacDonald V., Rosalie Gascoigne, Regaro Publishing, Sydney, 1998, p. 92 2. McDonald, J., 'Introduction', in MacDonald V., op. cit., p. 7

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William Robinson 1936, BIRKDALE FARM, 1980 oil on canvas

Lot 22: William Robinson 1936, BIRKDALE FARM, 1980 oil on canvas

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Description: William Robinson 1936, BIRKDALE FARM, 1980 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: William RobinsonDIMENSIONS: 131.0 x 193.0 cmPROVENANCE: Ray Hughes Gallery, BrisbanePrivate collectionChristie's, Melbourne, 1 May 2000, lot 126Galleries Schubert, Queensland (label attached verso)Deutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 4 June 2003, lot 24Private collection, QueenslandESSAY:Robinson farmyards, as they are commonly known, are extremely important in the development of his work. Not simply because they belong to a fascinating and interesting period in themselves, but because these paintings are central to Robinson's reconfiguring of the Australian landscape. Robinson's early domestic interiors, with their backdrop of daily family life, provided glimpses of the outdoors through windows or open doors. These domestic works were painted in homage to Pierre Bonnard and allowed Robinson to hone his skill as a colourist. As Robinson's painting developed, his attention moved out of the interior, paused for a short period on the Queensland veranda and then made its way through the garden and into Bill and Shirley's hobby farm. Populated by cows, goats and poultry that were probably closer to family pets than anything else, they became Robinson's subject. In his own words, Robinson's depictions give '... some feeling of the relationship of man to domestic animals and also the relationship that exists within the world of these animals. It reveals something of the individuality with which a farmer treats each animal. Each has a name and a personality and the picture gives a series of portraits.'1 It was here that Robinson began to experiment with space in a structural manner - rather than through colour, as he had done previously through the prism of his admiration for Bonnard. So the results are fascinating because the developments in Robinson's work are disguised by the whimsical nature of his subject. In Birkdale Farm, 1980 for example there is no horizon, the whole scene tilted upwards as with Cezanne's table top. Indeed if you look at the cows, which in a nod to cubism are probably the same cow, named Josephine, you notice that there is no perspective either, as the cow further away appears to be the larger of the two. Up until this point Robinson had been a reasonably conventional painter, but by now he is 44 years of age and challenging the very conventions he himself has taught for two decades. The poultry in Birkdale Farm are in a fluster, the rooster poses and postures unsure of what is going on and the ducks race around not knowing quite where they should be. In short, the scene is anarchic. This anarchy in the farmyard gave way to some of the most profoundly beautiful paintings and one of the most interesting painters that Australia has produced. 1. William Robinson in conversation to the Gold Coast City Art Gallery, 1998, quoted in Walsh, J., 'Goats, Cows and Chooks: The Painters Farmyard', in Seear, L. (ed.), Darkness and Light: The Art of William Robinson, Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane, 2001, p. 72 HENRY MULHOLLAND

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William Robinson 1936, THE SHELL BEACH, KINGSCLIFF, 1994 oil on canvas

Lot 23: William Robinson 1936, THE SHELL BEACH, KINGSCLIFF, 1994 oil on canvas

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Description: William Robinson 1936, THE SHELL BEACH, KINGSCLIFF, 1994 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: William Robinson 94DIMENSIONS: 137.0 x 182.5 cmEXHIBITED: William Robinson, Ray Hughes Gallery, Brisbane, 16 July 1994William Robinson New Work, Ray Hughes Gallery, Sydney, 3-28 September 1994, cat. 14London to Sydney, Agnew's Gallery at Rex Irwin Art Dealer, Sydney, 8-19 November 2011, cat. 67 (illus. in exhibition catalogue)LITERATURE: Klepac, L., William Robinson: Paintings 1987-2000, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2001, p. 110 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Ray Hughes Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, BrisbaneESSAY:'The earliest of these seascapes was painted at Beechmont when we were going to Kingscliff only at weekends for short stays. The fleeting sensation of luminous sea, wet sand and darkening dry sand with the last of the disappearing people, produced real painting possibilities for me that have been used in a number of subsequent works.'1 The Shell Beach, Kingscliff and Dark Tide, Bogangar (Queensland Art Gallery, Brisbane), are two of Robinson's earliest coastal works. They were both first exhibited in an industrial warehouse in the Brisbane suburb of Woolloongabba. The importance of The Shell Beach, Kingscliff is its compositional originality and its style-changing role in Robinson's art. It is one of the seminal works at the beginning of the seascape phase. The composition depicts a scene that might be considered an actual moment in his discovery of the visual and spiritual allure of the seaside. 'At times inspiration came through a moment of illumination ... Robinson observed the way the wet sand took on the "total reflection of the sky". He then noticed the edge between the retreating water and dry sand. "It was an absolutely incandescent violet line".'2 That electric, blue line is the key compositional focus in The Shell Beach. Like Dark Tide, Bogangar there is a clear bisection in terms of the planes. Where Dark Tide depicts the division between sky and sea with the former dominating the later, a counter-balance exists in The Shell Beach, where the shore itself is the main mass of focus. There is also an important study in water ripples to the upper right (discussed below) and only a hint of the sky as the upper horizon. In the 1995 triptych, Creation landscape - earth and sea, the joining of the left and centre panel is achieved through a method whereby the ripples of the ocean (largely a feature of the centre panel), merge into the distant ridges of the mountains in the left panel. This actual coming together of land and sea is one of the most seamless and successful transitions between the elements in Australian landscape painting. Robinson's most famous work is probably his Self Portrait with Stunned Mullet, which won the 1995 Archibald prize. Important here, is the depiction of the water in which the raincoat-clad artist stands. In both these works the short but smooth undulating ripples of water are integral to the final compositional effect, a feature that was developed the previous year in The Shell Beach. Later seascape works have slightly more articulated areas of 'activity' than the moodier early works. Works like The Jellyfish Ring and The Sand Ziggurat, Kingscliff (both 1995) depict pronounced forms and features on largely defined foregrounds. These works are more literal than the earlier paintings and introduced actual seaside scenes where the marine life is more distinct and surfboards are visible in the arms of the populating figures. In The Shell Beach, those figures cluster anonymously, whilst a lone figure stands further to the left beside the gentle sea. The solitude of this figure is deeply poignant. In referring to the light in such a work, Hart references 'an eerie half-light meeting darkness ... imparting a reckoning with personal tragedy and the transformative, elemental forces of nature'.3 Though the personal tragedy that Robinson suffered in 1991- 92 with the loss of two daughters plays no explicit role in many of his works, there is a clear melancholy in The Shell Beach and the dramatic Dark Tide, which cannot be denied. There is however no emptiness in either work, but rather a rich texture of darkness, described in the water and ridges of the sand. Perhaps the most drawing feature of this painting, after the noticeably solitary figure on the shore, is the setting sun to the very top right. 1. Klepac, L., William Robinson: Paintings 1987-2000, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2001, p. 109 2. Hart, D., 'William Robinson's artistic development: An intimate and expansive journey', William Robinson The Transfigured Landscape, QUT Press, Brisbane, 2011, p. 35 3. Ibid., p. 36 EVAN HUGHES

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William Robinson 1936, MAN AND THE SPHERES, 1991 hand-painted and glazed ceramic

Lot 24: William Robinson 1936, MAN AND THE SPHERES, 1991 hand-painted and glazed ceramic

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Description: William Robinson 1936, MAN AND THE SPHERES, 1991 hand-painted and glazed ceramicSIGNED: signed at base: William RobinsonDIMENSIONS: 113.0 cm heightPROVENANCE: Ray Hughes Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyRELATED WORKS: Creation Series - Man and the Spheres, 1991, oil on canvas, triptych: 182.5 x 730.5 cm overall, collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, SydneyESSAY:The following excerpt is taken from the Art Gallery of New South Wales LOOK Magazine article by the then Senior Curator of Australian Art, Barry Pearce. 'The eminent Queensland artist and two-time Archibald Prize winner's major triptych has been transposed to this ceramic, created in collaboration with the Australian master potter, Errol Barnes. The three panels of "Man and the Spheres" convey the passing of time from afternoon through night to early morning as we scan them from left to right. In the centre panel is a symbolic portrait of the artist as a rock in the moonlit stream of a primeval forest. The stars, which evoke a sense of cosmic energy and growth, are reflected on the artist's head. In making himself a central part of his creation story, Robinson has enveloped himself in the richness of the world that he sees. The spiral movement of the whole composition relates to the roundness of the earth on one hand, and on the other to the great curving expansion of the universe: "I immerse myself in it and paint a multi-vision, as if I am going for a walk just as we are now - looking up into the trees, peering down into the creek, and across to that mountain, and still sensing the feeling of being back up on the ridge looking down at the light falling into that deep gorge. I'm not only observing what I see, but contemplating things remembered and anticipating others, so both sides of a mountain might be painted, and a starry sky might fall down to the bottom of the picture".'

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James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, REEF, 1983 oil on linen

Lot 25: James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, REEF, 1983 oil on linen

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Description: James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, REEF, 1983 oil on linenSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Gleeson '83signed, dated and inscribed verso: "REEF" 24.8.83 James GleesonDIMENSIONS: 101.5 x 172.5 cmEXHIBITED: James Gleeson Recent Paintings, Watters Gallery, Sydney, 7-24 November 1984, cat. 1James Gleeson Recent Paintings, Pinacotheca Gallery, Melbourne, 9-26 April 1986, cat. 1A Close Focus on an Extraordinary Vision, Maitland Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales, 23 March - 3 June 2012, p. 26 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Klepac, L., James Gleeson: Landscape out of Nature, Beagle Press, Sydney, 1987, fig. 73-74, pp. 103-104 (illus.)Klepac, L., James Gleeson: Beyond the Screen of Sight, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2004, fig. 18, p. 196 (illus.)Klepac, L., Peregian Codex: James Gleeson, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2008, p. 19 (illus.)Klepac, L., James Gleeson: Agapitos/Wilson Annual, Maitland Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales, 2012, p. 26 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Private collection, Sydney, acquired directly from the artist in 2006ESSAY:This work is accompanied by a deluxe edition copy of Klepac, L., Peregian Codex: James Gleeson, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2008, edition 90/100, signed by James Gleeson and includes a signed etching by James Gleeson titled, Storm Rods, 2007 Reef, 1983 is a seminal work in James Gleeson's oeuvre. At the end of 1982, having recently completed his monograph on Robert Klippel, Gleeson decided to retire from his public life as an art critic, which had restricted his own artistic output for many years, with the aim to begin a clear, new stage in his own artistic career and devote himself to an ambitious new series of major works. Gleeson and his partner Frank O'Keefe took their annual holiday to Peregian in Queensland where a great turning point occurred in the form of a body of work now called the Peregian Codex. This series of 22 collages created between December 1982 and January 1983, formed the basis of the new direction of spectacular large scale works. As curator and historian Lou Klepac explains, 'The late works are amazing but their number is even more staggering. From August 1983 to June 2007 Gleeson completed 474 large paintings. As the first of the great series of works which he began to produce after his 68th birthday, No.1 Reef has a special connection to Peregian because it was inspired by the rock pools which had always fascinated Gleeson. It was based on a drawing dated 28.12.82 made at Peregian. Renee Free, who produced a detailed catalogue raisonné of Gleeson's paintings to 1990, recorded the artist's comment on this particular work: ' "That takes me right back to my earliest memories as a child. We lived in North Gosford at that time - about seven miles to the coast at Terrigal. We used to go on Sunday picnics in a sulky and buggy out to Terrigal and it fascinated me because of the rocks that were jutting out into the sea there, filled with pools and in those pools I discovered marvellous things. It really awakened my interest in that whole coastal area. The shapes and colours were fantastic. I used to spend hours just peering into these small rock pools around the base of the Skillion and along that coast near Terrigal. Later on I went to other places where there were rocky forms and these magical pools with their treasures of shapes and colours and (to me) unidentifiable objects. It was from these earlier experiences that I've developed this really quite deep interest in that intertidal area of the coast. It has stayed with me. When we go north to Queensland, we do the same thing. Reef, the first of this series, began out of that fascination with forms based on the coast. I didn't start with that in mind but find it had that treasure of shape, colour and form that I did find on that coast, so I called the picture Reef - suggesting a reef exposed at low tide with all its gleaming treasures to be seen. I had no real first-hand experience of the actual Barrier Reef. The only time we went there we went to Great Keppel Island, the tip of the Reef, off Rockhampton. That wasn't really the reef. I don't know if there is a Jungian undercurrent - that we did as a species come from the sea. Perhaps that is reading things into it that aren't there. But this fascination with that area was in that picture and it has cropped up in a large number of paintings since then." The execution of Reef was a momentous step and Gleeson kept the painting for many years; in latter years it hung over his bed. It was only when a passionate collector of his work became particularly interested in it, that the painting finally left the artist's home.'1 1. Klepac, L., Peregian Codex: James Gleeson, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2008, pp. 18-23 (illus. p. 19)

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James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, THE WHARF AT THE END OF THE STREET, 1990 oil on canvas

Lot 26: James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, THE WHARF AT THE END OF THE STREET, 1990 oil on canvas

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Description: James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, THE WHARF AT THE END OF THE STREET, 1990 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: Gleeson 90signed and inscribed verso: "THE WHARF AT THE END OF THE STREET" / James GleesonDIMENSIONS: 179.0 x 154.0 cmPROVENANCE: Lauraine Diggins Fine Art, Melbourne (label attached verso)Private collection, MelbourneDeutscher~Menzies, Sydney, 7 December 2005, lot 63Private collection, QueenslandESSAY:'There is an unknown quality to these landscapes. The landscape is not ours, in the sense that Turner's was, and yet it is. Gleeson has come back to the early Greek elements - water, earth, air, fire ...'1 The familiar yet foreign landscapes that Gleeson creates are representations of dreams and subconscious thoughts that we have all experienced. Dark and devouring or light and harmonious, his landscapes are a manifestation of our subjective imagination and inner psyche. The Wharf at the End of the Street is such a composition, typical of Gleeson's Surrealist style. The top of the sky is bleak and ominous, while grotesque forms emerge from the ocean and clouds. While there are no distinctly human figures present in this composition, the presence of humanity is everywhere, capturing the fear of the unknown through to the ecstasy of intellectual curiosity. During the second period of Gleeson's career from 1983 until his death in 2008, Gleeson 'embarked on large imaginative landscapes which constitute his greatest and most original achievement'.2 As demonstrated in the picture on offer, the human figure takes on a more metaphorical form as opposed to the human figures that featured in his earlier works, reaching an allegorical state. 'I got to the point where the extreme (of the figure) almost came to be recognisable - then I felt no need to use the form at all as an entirety. It could be represented by an arm, a hand, an eye. I broadened it to be not only landscape but cosmic experience'.3 1. Klepac, L., James Gleeson: Beyond the Screen of Sight, The Beagle Press, Sydney, 2004, p. 60 2. Ibid., p. 13 3. Gleeson, cited in Free, R., James Gleeson: Images from the Shadows, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1993, p. 12 CASSI YOUNG

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Garry Shead 1942, THE REFLEXION (REMBRANDT), 2000 oil on plywood

Lot 27: Garry Shead 1942, THE REFLEXION (REMBRANDT), 2000 oil on plywood

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Description: Garry Shead 1942, THE REFLEXION (REMBRANDT), 2000 oil on plywoodSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Garry Shead / 2000signed, dated and inscribed verso: The Reflexion (Rembrandt) 2000 / Garry SheadDIMENSIONS: 89.0 x 121.0 cmPROVENANCE: Greenaway Art Gallery, Adelaide (label attached verso)Private collection, AdelaideDeutscher~Menzies, Sydney, 16 June 2004, lot 54Private collection, SydneyESSAY: The following excerpt is taken from Sasha Grishin's book, Garry Shead and the Erotic Muse: 'The "Artist and the Muse" series appears to grow almost seamlessly out of the "Dance Sequence" of paintings. Unlike the earlier series of paintings, which were akin to military campaigns where there were periods of secretive preparation, studies and research before the first paintings appeared, these new series, which appeared in the late 1990s, burst on to the canvas with a sense of great confidence and security. In Shead's work, tongue-in-cheek humour cannot be equated with complete frivolity, so that by painting Rembrandt, Goya or Velázquez with their Muse, it is not an exercise in satire, but an exploration into a rather complex labyrinth of ideas. Shead is an artist who in most instances has to enter the work by putting himself into the composition - whether he be Lawrence, Prince Philip, a dancer or, in this case, an artist. However, by entering a composition, this does not imply that he "owns" it, as painting grows through its own internal logic and momentum; he enters it to give it life and then participates in the delight and agony of its growth and development. On one level, these are strangely autobiographical paintings where, in a not too unkindly manner, we can note that we encounter the artist in period dress voyeuristically exploring the world of the Old Masters.'1 1. Grishin, S., Garry Shead and the Erotic Muse, Craftsman House, Sydney, 2001, pp. 170-174

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Garry Shead 1942, ENVOY I, 1992 (D.H. Lawrence Series) oil on composition board

Lot 28: Garry Shead 1942, ENVOY I, 1992 (D.H. Lawrence Series) oil on composition board

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Description: Garry Shead 1942, ENVOY I, 1992 (D.H. Lawrence Series) oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Garry Shead / 92inscribed verso with title: ENVOYDIMENSIONS: 91.0 x 122.0 cmEXHIBITED: Kangaroo: D.H. Lawrence at Thirroul, Wollongong City Gallery, New South Wales, July - September 1992D.H. Lawrence, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, December 1993 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Grishin, S., Garry Shead: The D.H. Lawrence Paintings, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1993, pl. 35, p. 88 (illus.)Grishin, S., Garry Shead and the Erotic Muse, Craftsman House, Sydney, 2001, p. 101 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the Wollongong City Gallery exhibition in 1992ESSAY: Envoy I belongs to a group of works, exhibited initially at the Wollongong City Gallery in late 1992, which are the first manifestation of Garry Shead's exploration of the D.H. Lawrence theme. Now considered to be amongst the artist's most important works, the theme of D.H. Lawrence and his time at Thirroul would prove to be enormously inspirational for Shead. In Lawrence, and the characters of his 1922 novel Kangaroo, we find an ambiguity of identity which Shead further explores in his paintings. The female protagonist here in Envoy I is both Harriet of the novel Kangaroo, Judith the artist's wife and a manifestation of the 'muse'. These interpretations offer the works an enduring resonance, described as 'a constantly changing fabric of ambiguity, with the blurring of identities and a complex pattern of inter-relationships is a feature of the paintings and cautions against an over-zealous literal interpretation. Not only are the central figures ambiguous in their identity, but so too is their main adversary, the Kangaroo. The Kangaroo, which appears in almost all of the paintings, is more of a presence than an identifiable character. The ubiquitous Kangaroo at times could be interpreted as Benjamin Cooley, whom Somers (of the novel) confesses to love because their souls are somewhere alike, but whom he does not want to love; at other times it seems to be the personification of the spirit of the place, a spirit which belongs to the land and which stalks these alien intruders.'1 This personification of place is a consistent thread through both Kangaroo and Shead's D.H. Lawrence paintings. Both painter and writer shared an affinity for the landscape as a mystical and alive place, the ocean a force which occurs as a theme of purification in both paintings and novel. Glimpsed from the side of the bungalow, the Pacific rises to the horizon, the burnt yellow grass of late summer covering the headland. In the final chapter of Kangaroo, the landscape eclipses the characters of Richard and Harriet as the subject of the novel, and so too in the D.H. Lawrence paintings. Beyond the scenes of human endeavour played out in the halfdark of the bungalow rooms, the coastal landscape floods in through the windows and balconies. 1. Grishin, S., Garry Shead: The D.H. Lawrence Paintings, Craftsman House, Sydney, 1993, p. 14

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Joseph Johnson 1848 - 1904, EUCHRE IN THE BUSH, c1870s oil on canvas on board

Lot 29: Joseph Johnson 1848 - 1904, EUCHRE IN THE BUSH, c1870s oil on canvas on board

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Description: Joseph Johnson 1848 - 1904, EUCHRE IN THE BUSH, c1870s oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: inscribed lower centre: "EUCHRE IN THE BUSH"DIMENSIONS: 42.0 x 52.0 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection, MelbourneRELATED WORKS: Euchre in the Bush, c1867, oil on canvas on board, 42.0 x 60.2 cm, collection of the Art Gallery of Ballarat, VictoriaESSAY:Joseph Colin Francis Johnson was born in King William Street, Adelaide, in February 1848. In the early fifties he moved with his family to Victoria and was educated at the Geelong National Grammar School. Returning to South Australia in 1868, he joined the literary staff of The Register, winning favourable comment for his articles on mining and viticulture. In 1880 he became proprietor and editor of Adelaide Punch, frequently contributing comic and satirical drawings during the several years that he conducted the paper. While holding this position, Johnson became prominently identified with gold mining and devoted his energies to promoting the mining interests of South Australia. He published many works on the subject including On the Wallaby, or Tales from the Men's Hut. In 1880 he rode to the Mount Browne Diggings and subsequently wrote accounts of his experiences in Moses and Me and To Mount Browne and Back. In London in 1895, he presented his collection of Australian nuggets to the British Museum, and a number of the most valuable and ornamental specimens to Queen Victoria who reciprocated with a large handsomely framed portrait of herself. In 1884 he entered parliament as the member for Onkaparinga and in 1887 accepted the portfolio of Minister of Education, remaining in office for a period of two years. Johnson's name was prominently associated with the arts. As dramatic critic of The Register from 1875 to 1880, he took a deep interest in theatre and was involved in the Shakespearean revival in the Adelaide Theatre Royal. He was also known as a keen judge of pictures and his own black and white sketches were highly regarded. While on a European tour he purchased the painting Golden Autumn by Charles Stuart and presented it to the South Australian National Gallery.

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Rupert Bunny 1864 - 1947, CHERRIES, c1908 oil on canvas

Lot 30: Rupert Bunny 1864 - 1947, CHERRIES, c1908 oil on canvas

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Description: Rupert Bunny 1864 - 1947, CHERRIES, c1908 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed lower right: Rupert C. W. BunnyDIMENSIONS: 79.5 x 52.0 cmEXHIBITED: Rupert Bunny, Athenaeum Art Gallery, Melbourne, 24 July - 14 August 1911, cat. 34LITERATURE: Thomas, D., Rupert Bunny 1864-1947, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1970, p. 55, cat. O106PROVENANCE: Athenaeum Art Gallery, MelbourneSir James McCay, Melbourne, acquired from the above, July 1911Thence by descentPrivate collection, MelbourneChristie's, Melbourne, 25 November 1997, lot 48Private collection, SydneyESSAY:In 1911, after twenty-seven years abroad, Rupert Bunny made a triumphal return to Australia, bringing with him one hundred paintings for exhibition in Melbourne and Sydney. Welcomed as a hero, his international awards were arrayed before an admiring public - first Australian artist to receive an honourable mention in the Société des Artistes Français; represented in the Musée du Luxembourg; exhibited in the leading Paris salons, London's Royal Academy, in Budapest, St Petersberg, Chicago and elsewhere. Hailed as 'perhaps the most eminent painter that Australia has yet produced', the exhibition was said to be 'the most interesting one-man show held in Melbourne for a long time'.1 Sales exceeded the amazing sum of £2,000.2 Endormies, at 500 guineas one of two most highly priced paintings, was acquired by the National Gallery of Victoria through the Felton Bequest. The Art Gallery of New South Wales sent two of their trustees plus director to Melbourne, choosing four paintings, while South Australia also added to its gallery's collection. When the exhibition moved to Sydney, the Art Gallery of New South Wales snapped up the extremely beautiful A Summer Morning, c1908. Priced at 400 guineas, it had arrived too late for showing in Melbourne.3 William Moore, writing on Bunny's paintings of beautiful women, described him as 'as one of the leading figure-painters of the day' in Europe and America.4 Private collectors in Melbourne and Sydney endorsed his opinion. They included prominent figures such as Hugo Meyer and his wife, who bought a number of works together with The Beautiful Morning, c1908. Dr Samuel Ewing purchased The New Step, c1908, and The Hon. Sir James McCay chose Cherries, c1908. While the exhibited paintings covered the previous ten years of Bunny's oeuvre, pictures of women within intimate interiors, on balconies, or out-of-doors enveloped in light had great appeal. The catalogue indicated the prestigious London and Paris exhibitions in which they had been shown. Cherries, The New Step and The Telegram were in Bunny's solo London exhibition at Baillie Gallery, and La Coiffure, c1908, purchased by the Art Gallery of South Australia, was enjoyed by Parisians at the Société International de Peinture et de Sculpture.5 As the writer for The Age observed, 'Every canvas is interesting in its treatment of some problem of lighting, but among the more completely satisfying in colour and arrangement may be mentioned ... A New Step, Catalogue of Fashions, Cherries ... to omit others of almost equal charm'.6 Bunny's beautiful wife Jeanne and her lady friend were the models for these captured moments of idle pleasure, eating cherries as the sunlight played across figure and fashion, seen again in Who Comes?, c1908 (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra) and Chatting, c1908 (National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne). 1. 'Art In Paris', Sydney Morning Herald, 19 September 1911, p. 9; 'Mr. Bunny's Exhibition. A Modern Art Show', Argus, 24 July 1911, p. 7 2. Table Talk, Melbourne, 28 September, 1911, p. 29 3. The gallery returned three of its Melbourne purchases, The Torn Flounce, The Caterpillar, and A Word of Advice in part payment 4. 'A Painter of Beautiful Women. The Remarkable Record of Rupert Bunny', Life, Melbourne, 1 September 1911, p. 249 5. Dr Ewing gave The New Step to The University of Melbourne in 1938 as part of the gift of his art collection. The Telegram is now in the collection of the McClelland Gallery + Sculpture Park, Langwarrin, Victoria, the gift of Mrs Jean Rowell and Mrs J. Ackland 6. 'Mr. Rupert Bunny's Exhibition of Pictures', The Age, Melbourne, 24 July 1911, p. 11 DAVID THOMAS

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Russell Drysdale 1912 - 1981, MEN MIXING CONCRETE, 1937 oil on composition board

Lot 31: Russell Drysdale 1912 - 1981, MEN MIXING CONCRETE, 1937 oil on composition board

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Description: Russell Drysdale 1912 - 1981, MEN MIXING CONCRETE, 1937 oil on composition board SIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Drysdale / 1937DIMENSIONS: 50.5 x 61.0 cmEXHIBITED: Russell Drysdale, Riddell's Galleries, Melbourne, 26 April - 7 May 1938, cat. 15Russell Drysdale Retrospective Exhibition 1937 - 1960, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 5 October - 6 November 1960, cat. 2, collection of the artistSpring Exhibition 1976: Recent Acquisitions, Joseph Brown Gallery, Melbourne, 18 - 29 October 1976, cat. 68, (illus. in exhibition catalogue)LITERATURE: Burdett, B., 'Australian Art Today', The Studio, London, vol. CXV, no. 538, January 1938 (illus.)Haefliger, P. (introduction), Russell Drysdale, a retrospective exhibition of paintings from 1937 to 1960, Ure Smith, for the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1960, cat. 2Smith, B., Australian Painting 1788 - 1966, Oxford University Press, Melbourne, 1962, p. 243Dutton, G., Russell Drysdale, Thames and Hudson, London, 1964, p. 106, pl. 2 (illus.)Eagle, M. and Minchin, J., The George Bell School: Students, Friends, Influences, Deutscher Art Publications, Melbourne, 1981, pp. 76, 96 (illus.)Klepac, L., The Life and Work of Russell Drysdale, Bay Books, Sydney, 1983, p. 33PROVENANCE: Joseph Brown Gallery, MelbournePrivate collection, MelbourneDeutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 3 September 2003, lot 45The Hicks Family Collection, MelbourneESSAY:The dignity of manual labour has long been part of our national iconography, exemplified by Tom Roberts' Shearing the Rams, ennobling the wool industry and those who worked in it. Russell Drysdale extended this to include sport, another form of physical prowess, in his The Cricketers 1948, elevating the informal cricket knock up against the wall of an outback pub to that of a national symbol. Men Mixing Concrete 1937 is another fine example in this same tradition, a brilliant, early product of its time showing Drysdale's youthful interest in figure subjects and physical labour. At George Bell's School, Melbourne, where Drysdale developed his rich talents during the years 1936 to 1938, the study of the human figure was of central importance. This is clearly apparent in Men Mixing Concrete, distinguished by its masterly drawing and giving his art its underlying strength. The same can be said of other early paintings from 1937 such as Study for a Mural and Sketch for 'Tempera Composition'. In addition, each shows an interest in mural painting and a striking classicism, with the emphasis on flat pictorial surfaces, bold simplification of forms, direct narrative, and a static composition through the ordered emphasis of verticals and horizontals. In Men Mixing Concrete the whole tone of the work is set by the nobly posed figure to the right, pictorially and thematically central to the artist's aims and ideas. While the dry texture of the paint is in keeping with its chalky colours, the limited palette is enlivened by the subtlety of the paint application. Moreover, Men Mixing Concrete and the similarly mural-inclined paintings show a particular appreciation of the great fresco painters of the Italian Quattrocento. It is by such means that Drysdale elevated the ordinary task of mixing concrete on a street corner into something touching on the heroic. These paintings of Drysdale's student years rightly show an interest in the work of artists as widely different as Picasso, Ingres, Tonks, Matisse, Rouault, Modigliani and Braque, Drysdale experimenting with eclectic ease in the forging of his own individual style. Chief influences at the Bell school were Cézanne, Fairweather and Bell himself. When Men Mixing Concrete was shown in Drysdale's first solo exhibition the year after it was painted, he was enthusiastically hailed by the critics as an artist of much promise. The Melbourne Herald trumpeted 'Young Painter Shows Brilliant Promise' and its respected critic Basil Burdett summarised the show with 'I have seldom seen a more promising exhibition by a young painter anywhere.'1 'Works Indicate Brilliance' claimed The Sun News Pictorial, rightly predicting 'a brilliant future'.2 1. Burdett, B., 'Young Painter Shows Brilliant Promise', Herald, Melbourne, 26 April 1938, p. 10 2. Sun News-Pictorial, Melbourne, 27 April 1938, quoted in Klepac, op. cit., p. 34 DAVID THOMAS

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Eric Wilson 1911 - 1947, THE INMATE, 1944 oil on board

Lot 32: Eric Wilson 1911 - 1947, THE INMATE, 1944 oil on board

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Description: Eric Wilson 1911 - 1947, THE INMATE, 1944 oil on boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: Eric Wilson / 44DIMENSIONS: 47.0 x 31.0 cmPROVENANCE: Artarmon Galleries (Artlovers), Sydney (label attached verso)Sotheby's, Sydney, 13 October 1983, lot 27Holmes à Court Collection, PerthDeutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 20 August 2001, lot 35The Hicks Family Collection, MelbourneRELATED WORKS: The Inmates, 1944, oil on composition board, 50.2 x 38.1 cm, collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, SydneyStudies of Old Men, 1942, six pencil drawings on ruled paper, 10.5 x 12.5 cm (approx.) each, collection of the Art Gallery of New South Wales, SydneyESSAY:Exaggeration is as much a part of great art as idealisation. Look at the idealised works of the Italian Renaissance masters or the elongated figures of El Greco. Rembrandt and Goya employed distortion to plumb the depths of humanity, and Vincent van Gogh gave his paintings emotional impact through the impassioned manipulation of paint and colour. Distortion is part of creativity. In Australia this achieved a new height in 1944 with William Dobell's masterpiece, Portrait of an Artist (Joshua Smith), the most famous painting in the country at the time, furthered by the daily drama of the unsuccessful court case which tried to deny it the Archibald Prize. Eric Wilson's The Inmate belongs to this same genre and period. Painted in the same year as his friend Dobell's portrait of Joshua Smith kept the nation agog, Wilson employed distortion for arresting effect in the expression of his deeply felt, humane concern. Wilson worked as a ward attendant in the Lidcombe State Hospital from 1942 to 1944. Grossly overcrowded, the conditions in this geriatric hospital were appalling. Patients were afflicted with terminal diseases or advanced senility. Food, clothing and lighting were inadequate, the 1943 inquiry labelling sections 27 and 28 'horror wards'. Another Wilson painting, The Inmates, was based on the notorious ward 27, and The Inmate most surely represents one of its relics of humanity. In these paintings Wilson emphasised the frailty and decrepit state of the old men, calling upon a number of studies he made of the tragic inhabitants. He deliberately chose this Mannerist style in order to communicate all the more powerfully the horrors witnessed, the pathos and tragedy that surrounds the forgotten at life's end. As in Dobell's portrait of Joshua Smith, Wilson employed distortion and elongation to give his painting its disturbing psychological and physical impact. The cadaverous bones pressing through the thin clothing speak of approaching death. Stupefaction, incomprehension flickers across the face through the asymmetry of its features. The transfixed stare and skeletal hands add to its spectral presence, the sense of isolation furthered by the haunting light and limited colour scheme. Wilson was a highly gifted artist, working in both a realist and cubist style, as seen in those portraits of his mother in the collections of the National Gallery of Victoria and the Newcastle Region Art Gallery. In The Inmate he chose the Mannerist mode in plumbing the depths of his social conscience to create this uncompromising and poignant confrontation. DAVID THOMAS

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Roland Wakelin 1887 - 1971, MANLY, 1964 oil on canvas on board

Lot 33: Roland Wakelin 1887 - 1971, MANLY, 1964 oil on canvas on board

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Description: Roland Wakelin 1887 - 1971, MANLY, 1964 oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: R. Wakelin / '64DIMENSIONS: 102.0 x 86.5 cmEXHIBITED: Society of Artists Annual Exhibition, Art Gallery, Department of Education, Sydney, 30 October - 13 November 1964, cat. 30 (as 'Manly Scene')Roland Wakelin: Master of Colour, Newcastle Region Art Gallery, New South Wales, 18 January - 9 March 2003, and touring to Macquarie Art Gallery and Muswellbrook Regional Art Gallery, New South Wales, May - December 2003LITERATURE: Roland Wakelin: Master of Colour, Newcastle Region Art Gallery, New South Wales, 2003, pp. 40, 55, cat. 29 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Private collection, MelbourneESSAY:Throughout his long creative life, Roland Wakelin loved to paint Sydney, its busy harbour and surrounding suburbs, Manly, 1964 being a particularly interesting example. The scene was set early by three major paintings, The Fruit Seller of Farm Cove, 1915 (National Gallery of Australia, Canberra), Down the Hills to Berry's Bay, 1916 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney), and Boat Sheds, 1918 (Newcastle Region Art Gallery, New South Wales), in which he explored Post-Impressionist concepts of form and colour. Even his brilliant experiments with Roy de Maistre on the relationship of colour and music were based on Sydney subjects. There was a brief period when he fell under the influence of Max Meldrum's tonalism, but form and colour were his chief interests. Wakelin did not limit himself to Sydney, exploring the rich coastal scenery at Terrigal, the geometric forms of the old convict bridge at Richmond in Tasmania, or Melbourne's city skyline from across the Yarra; but it was Sydney that inspired him most - its buildings, people and absorbing landscape. As with many artists of his time, the Harbour Bridge featured in landscapes of the thirties. The stately buildings of Sydney University, the Showground Tower, and the modernist, glass-fronted Qantas House all attracted his brush, invariably peopled with Sydneysiders going about their various activities. Manly, 1964 has a two-fold interest for today's collector. First, it provides an historic view of Manly in the sixties, looking from the East Esplanade of Manly Beach across to the West Esplanade. The Hotel Manly is no longer standing, the style of the time being captured in the clothing the people wear, the big, flash car, and in the yellow-green of the Sydney bus. Manly is, of course, one of Australia's most popular surf beaches. The first World Surfboard Titles were held there in 1964, the same year this work was painted. Secondly, there are the formal interests and aesthetic appeal of the painting, of form analysed and built up in rich reds, pinks, yellows and blues. As in the central figure group, the focal point of the painting, Wakelin begins with the observed mother and child, and transforms them into a harmony of primary colours. It is by such gifted means that Wakelin translates a transcript of the everyday into an engaging work of art, for he was essentially a formalist, concerned with the structure of his paintings, the monumentality of the buildings in this painting being achieved by investing them with a masterly feeling of volume and weight. Manly received its name from Captain Arthur Phillip of the First Fleet, taken from his reference to the 'manly behaviour' of its indigenous people. This apt description lived on, as seen in Wakelin's view of the sixties. DAVID THOMAS

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William Kentridge 1955, WALKING MAN, 2000 linocut on paper

Lot 34: William Kentridge 1955, WALKING MAN, 2000 linocut on paper

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Description: William Kentridge 1955, WALKING MAN, 2000 linocut on paperSIGNED: signed and numbered below imageedition: 11/25DIMENSIONS: 251.0 x 101.0 cmEXHIBITED: Impressions from South Africa 1965 to Now, The Museum of Modern Art, New York, 23 March - 29 August 2011 (another example)LITERATURE: Hecker, J., William Kentridge - Trace: Prints from the Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2010, pl. 13 (illus., another example)Hecker, J., Impressions from South Africa: 1965 to Now, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2011, p. 28, (illus., another example)Krauss, R., Malbert, R., and McCrickard, K., A Universal Archive: Kentridge as Printmaker, Hayward Gallery, London, 2012, p. 65 (illus., another example)McCrickard, K., William Kentridge, Tate Publishing, London, 2012PROVENANCE: Annandale Galleries, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyESSAY:One of the most sought after international artists working today is South African artist and theatre director, William Kentridge. His survey exhibitions are highlights of the exhibition calendars in major museums around the world and are a tour de force of artistic expression. His 2004 survey exhibition held at the MCA in Sydney was one of the most popular and widely acclaimed exhibitions held there to date and he was also the star of the 2008 Biennale of Sydney. Born in South Africa in 1955, Kentridge grew up during the apartheid regime. Both his parents were lawyers who were active in the antiapartheid movement, so it is not surprising that events of that period underpin much of Kentridge's ideas and work. Once restrictions on freedom of expression in South Africa were lifted in 1994, he let fly with both barrels. In 2009, he declared: 'Everything is provisional in my art: there are no absolutes, no answers. I'm just trying to say: "Wake up and look what is going on around you". From political oppression to democracy, South Africa has provided me with an important lens through which to understand the world ... but every society is unbalanced and in need of redress. We should never take our place in the world for granted.'1 Film, stage production, opera, animation, sculpture, printmaking and particularly drawing are all part of Kentridge's armoury. It is rare for an artist's work to span such a range of artistic disciplines with the strident confidence that Kentridge's work achieves. After his beginnings working in theatre, the stage was set for a career that is staggering in its breadth and complexity. As an artist, Kentridge trusts his intuition. In a recent film documentary for PBS television series Arts21, Kentridge stated that as an artist he cannot always be sure where a work will take him, but that if he follows it, and trusts that there is some intellectual power at play, that will draw out the image. 'In collaboration with a specialised printmaking workshop, Kentridge created this monumental linocut using a large panel of linoleum flooring. Because it is inexpensive and easy to print, linoleum is widely used in community-based printmaking workshops in South Africa. Expressive black-and-white printing is characteristic of the medium.'2 This major work was part of a landmark series in multiple mediums created between 1989 and 2002 under the umbrella title of 'Ubu and the Procession'. These works explored the impact of South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission hearings. 'The procession - a stream of figures weighed down by possessions - is a recurring motif in Kentridge's work, appearing in animated films, drawings, collages, prints and a book. Informed by archival material and the artist's own creative process, this motif relates to conditions in South Africa and evokes more generally the many states of migration and displacement around the world.'3 William Kentridge has firmly established himself as one of the most diverse and important international contemporary artists. 1. William Kentridge, Universal Archive (Parts 7-23), Annandale Galleries, Sydney, 2012, p. 69 2. MOMA, New York, Exhibition Website: William Kentridge Five Themes 2010 - Occasional and Residual Hope: Ubu and the Procession 1989-2002 (http://www.moma.org/interactives/ exhibitions/2010/williamkentridge/flash/) 3. Ibid. HENRY MULHOLLAND

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Lucian Freud 1922 - 2011 British, GIRL SITTING, 1987 etching

Lot 35: Lucian Freud 1922 - 2011 British, GIRL SITTING, 1987 etching

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Description: Lucian Freud 1922 - 2011, GIRL SITTING, 1987 etchingSIGNED: signed with initials and numbered below imageProofed and printed by Marc Balakjian at Studio Prints, LondonPublished by James Kirkman, London and Brooke Alexander, New Yorkedition: 27/50DIMENSIONS: 52.5 x 70.0 cmEXHIBITED: This work has been exhibited widely throughout the world, includingLucian Freud, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1 February - 14 March 1993, cat. 63 (another example)Whistler to Freud: Etching in Great Britain, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 24 August - 11 November, 2001, cat. 30 (another example) Lucian Freud: the Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2007, 16 December 2007 - 10 March 2008, cat. 36 (another example)LITERATURE: The British Council, Lucian Freud, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 1992, cat. 63, p. 81 (illus., another example)Hartley, C., The Etchings of Lucian Freud: A Catalogue Raisonné, 1946-1995, Marlborough Graphics and Ceribelli, London, 1995, cat. 33 (illus., another example) Bond, A., and Tunnicliffe, W., Art Gallery of New South Wales Contemporary Collection, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 2006, p. 128 (illus., another example)PROVENANCE: Dover Street Gallery, London (label attached verso)Michael Nagy Fine Art, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyRELATED WORKS: Other examples of this etching are held in the collections of the Museum of Modern Art, New York and the Art Gallery of New South Wales, SydneyESSAY:The following excerpts are from Figura, S., Lucian Freud: The Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2007, pp. 23-24 Freud's Naked Portraits are his most disturbing and subversive works. His figures are shown reclining on a bed or sofa, often either asleep or in a state of introspection or reverie, in strange, unflattering poses that are nevertheless often natural to the way they sleep or relax by themselves. Commonly viewed from an unusual vantage point, the angular limbs, foreshortened faces, and tortured body language rebuke the tradition of the ideal nude. Indeed, by deliberately referring to his depictions as 'Naked Portraits', Freud consciously distinguishes his works from venerable 'nudes' and emphasises the rawness that is central to his vision. The location is always Freud's studio - a reference to the artist's own world rather than any mythical or symbolic setting. 'I am only interested in painting the actual person; in doing a painting of them, not in using them to some ulterior end of art', he has stated. 'For me, to use someone doing something not native to them would be wrong.' Ignoring whatever taboos regarding the body that may persist today, Freud means for his works to 'astonish, disturb, seduce, convince.' Their strangeness comes, as Robert Hughes has written, 'in large part from their making: they bypass decorum while fiercely preserving respect'. Freud made his first Naked Portrait etchings in 1985; two of women and two of men, these were also his first prints on large plates... Freud made three more Naked Portraits of women between 1987 and 1992, each one representing a body and pose that also appear in a specific painting but, again, cropped, rotated or isolated in ways that confound our expectations and upset our equilibrium. In Girl Sitting, Freud has cropped the image through the top of the figure's head, while at the same time leaving an incongruously generous amount of empty space at the bottom of the picture. In fact, the etching plate originally included the full head (which is how it appears in the related painting completed slightly later), but after the image was finished Freud decided to revitalize the composition by cutting down the plate across the top. Girl Sitting is devoid of any narrative setting, although there is a hint of spatial definition in the background line that seems to demarcate the edge of a bed or the floor. An ambiguous shadow behind the figure strengthens this effect and also serves to push the figure forward, closer to us. It is an unusual element in Freud's prints, and one that injects a note of anxiety somewhat reminiscent of the looming darkness behind the adolescent figure in Edvard Munch's At Night (Puberty), 1902.

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Lucian Freud 1922 - 2011 British, IB, 1984 etching on paper

Lot 36: Lucian Freud 1922 - 2011 British, IB, 1984 etching on paper

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Description: Lucian Freud 1922 - 2011 British, IB, 1984 etching on paperSIGNED: signed with initials and numbered below imageprinted by Terry Wilson at Palm Tree Studios, Londonpublished by James Kirkman, London and Brooke Alexander, New Yorkedition: 31/50DIMENSIONS: 57.0 x 53.0 cm (sheet); 29.5 x 29.5 cm (image)EXHIBITED: This work has been exhibited widely throughout the world includingLucian Freud, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 31 October 1992 - 10 January 1993; Art Gallery of Western Australia, 1 February - 14 March 1993, cat. 55 (another example)Lucian Freud: the Painter's Etchings, Museum of Modern Art, New York, 2007, 16 December 2007 - 10 March 2008, cat. XXX (another example)PROVENANCE: Bernard Jacobson Gallery, London (label attached verso)Private collectionDover Street Gallery, London (label attached verso)Michael Nagy Fine Art, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyESSAY:'There have been few limits on the range of bodies or on the kinds of intimacy to which Freud has been willing - indeed avid - to respond. Interest in the person depicted has been the only prerequisite. In most cases, the stronger the interest, the better. "I paint people, not because of what they are like, not exactly in spite of what they are like, but how they happen to be." He has painted lovers and close friends, children and grandchildren, business men and fellow artists, writers and royalty, the notorious and the anonymous. "I don't think there's any kind of feeling that you have to leave out," he has said. And yet he is ruthless about omitting the exaggerated or false kind.'1 The person in this powerful image, Ib, is the artist's daughter, Isobel Boyt. It is an example of the quintessential Freud 'portrait head', imbued with a psychological dimension only possible from a deep familiarity, but with that a tension only achievable from Freud's piercing scrutiny. Creating his first etchings in Paris in 1946, Freud produced just a handful of images (of portrait heads) at the time, but did not return to the medium until twenty four years had passed. Although from 1982 the etching medium became integral to Freud's working methods, interestingly this turning point came about as a result of a casual request by Lawrence Gowing to produce 100 etchings to be inserted into a limited edition of the monograph he was producing on Freud's work.2 The first of the new etchings picked up where the artist has left off with small scale close up images of portrait heads. This work, created some two years later, is in a larger format than the 1982 portraits and clearly shows the artist's development of the medium and his now characteristically fine lines and cross hatched modelling of the form. This gentle portrait of the artist's daughter, her eyes not quite closed, her head not quite at rest, is arresting as it captures our gaze and takes us from feature to feature offering a realism quite distinct from the purely representational. 1. Smee, S., Lucian Freud: Beholding the Animal, Taschen, Cologne, 2011, p. 7 2. Gowing, L., Lucian Freud, a limited edition of 100 copies, Thames and Hudson, London, 1982

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Lloyd Rees 1895 - 1988, THE HILLSIDE, 1953 oil on canvas on board

Lot 37: Lloyd Rees 1895 - 1988, THE HILLSIDE, 1953 oil on canvas on board

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Description: Lloyd Rees 1895 - 1988, THE HILLSIDE, 1953 oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: L REES 53inscribed verso: NO 8 THE HILLSIDEDIMENSIONS: 31.5 x 39.5 cmEXHIBITED: Lloyd Rees, Macquarie Galleries, Sydney, 17-29 March 1954, cat. 8LITERATURE: Free, R., Lloyd Rees, Lansdowne Press, Melbourne, 1972, cat. O169PROVENANCE: Mrs Margaret BradshawArtarmon Galleries (Artlovers), Sydney (label attached verso)Private collectionChristie's, Melbourne, 1 May 2000, lot 140Private collection, MelbourneSotheby's, Melbourne, 27 August 2007, lot 323Private collection, MelbourneBonhams & Goodman, Melbourne, 25 August 2009, lot 49Private collection, Sydney

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Lloyd Rees 1895 - 1988, EVENING NO. 1, 1982/83 oil on canvas on board

Lot 38: Lloyd Rees 1895 - 1988, EVENING NO. 1, 1982/83 oil on canvas on board

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Description: Lloyd Rees 1895 - 1988, EVENING NO. 1, 1982/83 oil on canvas on boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: L. REES / 83DIMENSIONS: 50.0 x 60.0 cmEXHIBITED: Lloyd Rees, Von Bertouch Galleries, Newcastle, 1-24 July 1983 (label attached verso)PROVENANCE: Von Bertouch Galleries, NewcastlePrivate collection, Sydney

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James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, IMPROMPTU NO. 3 - SUMMER, 1996 oil on canvas

Lot 39: James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, IMPROMPTU NO. 3 - SUMMER, 1996 oil on canvas

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Description: James Gleeson 1915 - 2008, IMPROMPTU NO. 3 - SUMMER, 1996 oil on canvasSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: Gleeson '96inscribed verso: Impromptu No 3 SUMMERDIMENSIONS: 64.5 x 81.0 cmPROVENANCE: Watters Gallery, Sydney (label attached verso)Private collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 1996

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Garry Shead 1942, ON THE SOUTH COAST, 1995 (D.H. Lawrence Series) oil on canvas-board

Lot 40: Garry Shead 1942, ON THE SOUTH COAST, 1995 (D.H. Lawrence Series) oil on canvas-board

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Description: Garry Shead 1942, ON THE SOUTH COAST, 1995 (D.H. Lawrence Series) oil on canvas-board SIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Garry Shead 95inscribed verso: ... / "ON THE SOUTH COAST" / DH LAWRENCE / SERIESDIMENSIONS: 50.5 x 61.0 cmPROVENANCE: Private collectionSavill Galleries, Sydney (label atached verso)Private collection, SydneyPrivate collection, Sydney

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Clement Meadmore 1929 - 2005, SCRONCH, 1994 bronze

Lot 41: Clement Meadmore 1929 - 2005, SCRONCH, 1994 bronze

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Description: Clement Meadmore 1929 - 2005, SCRONCH, 1994 bronzeSIGNED: signed, dated and numbered at base: Meadmore 94, 2/8edition: 2/8DIMENSIONS: 23.0 x 28.0 x 28.0 cmPROVENANCE: Anna Schwartz Gallery, MelbournePrivate collection, Melbourne

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Clement Meadmore 1929 - 2005, RUNE, 1995 bronze

Lot 42: Clement Meadmore 1929 - 2005, RUNE, 1995 bronze

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Description: Clement Meadmore 1929 - 2005, RUNE, 1995 bronzeSIGNED: signed, dated and numbered at base: Meadmore 1995 7/8signed, numbered and inscribed on base: Rune 7/8 / A.R.T.edition: 7/8DIMENSIONS: 20.0 x 34.0 x 19.5 cmPROVENANCE: Robin Gibson Gallery, SydneyPrivate collection, Melbourne

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Oliffe Richmond 1919 - 1977, MOTHER AND CHILD, c1949 serpentine marble on a stone base

Lot 43: Oliffe Richmond 1919 - 1977, MOTHER AND CHILD, c1949 serpentine marble on a stone base

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Description: Oliffe Richmond 1919 - 1977, MOTHER AND CHILD, c1949 serpentine marble on a stone baseDIMENSIONS: 19.5 cm height (including base)EXHIBITED: Oliffe Richmond 1919-1977: Sculpture, Drawings and Prints, Watters Gallery, Sydney, 29 January - 23 February 2002, cat. 1 (illus. p. 2 in exhibition catalogue)PROVENANCE: Collection of Lex Aitken and Alfredo (Bouret) Gonzalez, Sydney

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Arthur Murch 1902 - 1989, RECLINING NUDE oil on composition board

Lot 44: Arthur Murch 1902 - 1989, RECLINING NUDE oil on composition board

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Description: Arthur Murch 1902 - 1989, RECLINING NUDE oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed lower left: MURCHDIMENSIONS: 59.0 x 92.0 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection, Melbourne

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Yvonne Audette 1930, SUMMER MORNING, 1975-76 oil on composition board

Lot 45: Yvonne Audette 1930, SUMMER MORNING, 1975-76 oil on composition board

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Description: Yvonne Audette 1930, SUMMER MORNING, 1975-76 oil on composition boardSIGNED: signed and dated lower right: Audette / 1976signed, dated and inscribed verso: Y. Audette / Summer Morning / 1975/76 / A174DIMENSIONS: 76.0 x 63.0 cmPROVENANCE: Private collection, MelbourneJoel Fine Art, Melbourne, 30 October 2007, lot 32Private collection, Sydney

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Norman Lindsay 1879 - 1969, THE CHALLENGE, watercolour and graphite on paper

Lot 46: Norman Lindsay 1879 - 1969, THE CHALLENGE, watercolour and graphite on paper

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Description: Norman Lindsay 1879 - 1969, THE CHALLENGE, watercolour and graphite on paperSIGNED: signed lower right: NORMAN LINDSAYcertificate of authenticity verso signed by Jane LindsayDIMENSIONS: 58.0 x 46.0 cmEXHIBITED: Bloomfeld Galleries, Sydney, August 1978PROVENANCE: Bloomfeld Galleries, SydneyPrivate collection, SydneyChristes, Melbourne, 22 November 2005, lot 7Private collection, Melbourne

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Norman Lindsay 1879 - 1969, THE DREAM, 1923 watercolour on paper

Lot 47: Norman Lindsay 1879 - 1969, THE DREAM, 1923 watercolour on paper

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Description: Norman Lindsay 1879 - 1969, THE DREAM, 1923 watercolour on paperSIGNED: signed and dated lower left: NORMAN LINDSAY / 1923DIMENSIONS: 46.5 x 48.5 cmPROVENANCE: Sotheby's, Sydney, 29 October 1987, lot 309Private collection, Sydney

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Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, COTTAGE, PORT WILLUNGA, c1935 oil on canvas-board

Lot 48: Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, COTTAGE, PORT WILLUNGA, c1935 oil on canvas-board

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Description: Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, COTTAGE, PORT WILLUNGA, c1935 oil on canvas-boardSIGNED: signed and inscribed lower right: FROM TRENERRYinscribed lower left: [illeg.] WillungaDIMENSIONS: 24.5 x 29.0 cmEXHIBITED: A Fleurieu Heritage: Kathleen Sauerbier and Horace Trenerry, Chapel Hill Winery, McLaren Vale, South Australia, 6-29 November, 1998, cat. 27LITERATURE: Snowden, B., A Fleurieu Heritage: Kathleen Sauerbier and Horace Trenerry, Fleurieu Art Foundation, South Australia, 1988, cat. 27 (illus., frontispiece)PROVENANCE: Deutscher~Menzies, Melbourne, 2 September 2003, lot 55Theodore Bruce Auctions, Adelaide, 4 April 2011, lot 67Private collection, SydneyESSAY:'... during the Christmas of 1932 he had gone to Port Willunga with a group of painters and friends, led by Kathleen Sauerbier who had discovered the pictorial possibilities of the area. Trenerry had already painted some views there and the prospect seemed attractive. He sold some of his belongings to pay what outstanding debts there were, paid the rent in arrears with pictures and went to Port Willunga. Here he established himself in a deserted two-storey building which was locally known as the Residential Café. He had practically no furniture, but his talent to convert the most humble place and make it into a pleasant and comfortable interior helped him greatly ... His lonely existence became quite an idyllic one. He could wander along the beaches, the cliffs overlooking the sea, and go over and beyond the characteristic hills of the area; or look back at the small township of Aldinga and the little church on the main road, and beyond to the Willunga hills. His paintings of the period are more introvert, and reflect a more mature outlook.'1 1. Klepac, L., Horace Trenerry, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2009, p. 16

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Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, LANDSCAPE WITH SEA (COORONG), c1928 oil on canvas

Lot 49: Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, LANDSCAPE WITH SEA (COORONG), c1928 oil on canvas

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Description: Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, LANDSCAPE WITH SEA (COORONG), c1928 oil on canvasDIMENSIONS: 26.5 x 37.0 cmEXHIBITED: The late landscape paintings of Horace Trenerry, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 29 November 2008 - 15 March 2009Horace Trenerry Retrospective, Carrick Hill, Adelaide, 11 March - 27 June 2010, cat. 53 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Klepac, L., Horace Trenerry, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2009, p. 55 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Lauraine Diggins Fine Art, MelbournePrivate collection, Sydney, acquired from the above in 2007ESSAY:The Coorong, of national park and especially saltwater lagoons, is one of the natural treasures of South Australia, stretching from the mouth of the Murray River eastwards, protected from the great Southern Ocean by sweeping sand dunes. Rich in bird life, it is populated with ducks, swans, pelicans, cormorants and many migratory species. Having long drawn artists to its wetlands, Colin Thiele's 1964 book Storm Boy, and the subsequent film, are among those inspired by the area. During the summer of 1927 into 1928, Horace Trenerry spent six weeks at the Coorong with a friend, Archie Ritchie, who had rented a shack used for duck shooting.1 The '28' inscribed on the painting indicates that Trenerry painted Landscape with Sea (Coorong) in the heat of a January summer's day when he was coming to terms with the strong, bright light and colours of South Australia's southern coast. Trenerry found his inspiration in nature, chilblains and sunstroke being part of the landscape painter's lot. In his 2009 book on Trenerry, Lou Klepac quotes the artist in an article printed in the Adelaide Advertiser of 16 July 1927. '... for to paint nature you must be afield early and late. The frost soon melts and the sun moves on and no place ever looks quite the same again. This is why there is an endless freshness in landscape work.' 2 It is this freshness which so often distinguishes Trenerry's work from others; a painter whose work deserves to be better known as Port Willunga Landscape and Winter Landscape, 1940 in the collection of the Art Gallery of South Australia, Adelaide, and Untitled Willunga Landscape, c1945 in the Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney readily show. For Landscape with Sea (Coorong), Trenerry worked within a more conventional approach, cradling the blue waters within the curve of the sand hills and greenery, the nigh encompassing curve adding to the mood of calm and relaxation. Figures within the sand hills and the two small boats on the sea, as mere touches of paint, provide incidental interest and scale within the long, low scene. Brightness of the light is captured in the yellow-blue sky as it reflects off the sea and sand alike, the impact of the latter being achieved by the thickness of the yellow paint, freely brushed over. This liveliness of paint surface gives the painting a special vivacity. Here, as in so many of his works, Trenerry created a wonderful interplay between the formal elements of the painting and the illusion of the landscape. 1. Klepac, L., Horace Trenerry, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2009, p. 133 2. Ibid., p. 13 DAVID THOMAS

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Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, NORTHERN LANDSCAPE (FLINDERS RANGES LANDSCAPE WITH RAIN APPROACHING), c1930 oil on canvas-board

Lot 50: Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, NORTHERN LANDSCAPE (FLINDERS RANGES LANDSCAPE WITH RAIN APPROACHING), c1930 oil on canvas-board

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Description: Horace Trenerry 1899 - 1958, NORTHERN LANDSCAPE (FLINDERS RANGES LANDSCAPE WITH RAIN APPROACHING), c1930 oil on canvas-boardSIGNED: signed lower left under mount: H. TrenerryDIMENSIONS: 22.0 x 29.5 cmEXHIBITED: The late landscape paintings of Horace Trenerry, Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney, 29 November 2008 - 15 March 2009Horace Trenerry Retrospective, Carrick Hill, Adelaide, 11 March - 27 June 2010, cat. 55 (label attached verso)LITERATURE: Klepac, L., Horace Trenerry, Beagle Press, Sydney, 2009, p. 73 (illus.)PROVENANCE: Major Art Auction Incorporating Pro Hart Retrospective, Theodore Bruce Auctions, Adelaide, 26 June 2006, lot 224 (as 'Flinders Ranges Landscape with Rain Approaching')Private collection, Sydney

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