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Auction Description for University Archives: Incredible Selection of Autographs, Manuscripts, Books and Historical Relics
TERMS & CONDITIONS:
By submitting your bid, you agree that:

You have read and agree with the Auction Terms and Conditions below and the Invaluable Terms of Use Agreement.

You agree to pay a Buyer's premium of a total of 20%(we charge 15% and Invaluable, eBay and AuctionZip charge an additional 5%) plus any applicable taxes, shipping and administration fees. This amount will be included in your invoice issued by University Archives after the conclusion of the auction. We accept credit cards for payment for any winning online bidders at all sales. We require credit card information to bid, and may use it for payment if you are the winning bidder. Lots purchased will come with a printed Auction Certificate and a description of the item. A color, fraud-proof Certificate, hand signed by John Reznikoff, is available for an extra charge, at the discounted rate of $125 each.
PAYMENT:
Payment in full is due within seven (7) calendar days of the invoice date.
We accept credit cards for payment for any winning online bidders at all sales. We require credit card information to bid, and may use it for payment if you are the winning bidder. A total of a 20% buyer's premium will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots sold in live Auctions (we charge 15% and Invaluable, eBay and AuctionZip charge an additional 5%) plus any applicable taxes(University Archives is required to charge the appropriate sales tax for items won if you reside in the following states: (CT, CA), shipping and administration fees. Delivery of purchased items will not be made unless and until full payment has been received by University Archives, i.e., Paypal, check or credit card funds have fully cleared. If paying using a credit card on file with WePay, please note that we reserve the right to charge your credit card for your purchases if we have not heard from you or you have not made payment within 4 days post auction. If paying via Paypal please submit payment using University Archives email as follows: ebay.sales.team@universityarchives.com
BUYER'S PREMIUM:
A total of a 20% buyer's premium will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots sold in live Auctions (we charge 15% and Invaluable, eBay and AuctionZip charge an additional 5%).
Full Terms & Conditions of Sale:
University Archives Terms and Conditions of Sale

ANYONE EITHER REGISTERING TO BID OR PLACING A BID ("BIDDER") ACCEPTS THESE CONDITIONS OF SALE AND ENTERS INTO A LEGALLY, BINDING, ENFORCEABLE AGREEMENT WITH THE UNIVERSITY STAMP COMPANY, INC., HEREINAFTER KNOWN AS "UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES" TOGETHER WITH BIDDER, THE "PARTIES"

The following terms and conditions ("Conditions of Sale") constitute the sole terms and conditions under which University Archives will offer for sale and sell the property described in the catalog of items for auction (the "Catalog"). These Conditions of Sale constitute a binding agreement between the Parties with respect to the auction in which the Bidder participates (the "Auction"). By bidding at the Auction, whether in person, through an agent or representative, by telephone, online, absentee bid, or by any other form of bid or by any other means, Bidder acknowledges the thorough reading and understanding of all of these Conditions of Sale, all descriptions of items in the Catalog, and all matters incorporated herein by reference, and agrees to be fully bound thereby. This acknowledgement is a material term of these Conditions of Sale and of the consideration under which University Archives agrees to these terms.


This Auction is presented by University Archives. Internet site ("Invaluable.com" and "Universityarchives.com"). The Auction is conducted under these Conditions of Sale.

The Bidder. Bidder shall mean the original Bidder on the property offered for sale by University Archives and not any subsequent owner or other person who may acquire or have acquired an interest therein. If Bidder is an agent, the agency must be disclosed in writing to University Archives prior to the time of sale, otherwise the benefits of the warranty shall be limited to the agent and not transferable to the undisclosed principal.

The rights granted to Bidder under these Conditions of Sale are personal and may not be assigned or transferred to any other person or entity, whether by operation of law or otherwise without the express written assent of University Archives. Bidder may not transfer, assign, or otherwise convey these Conditions of Sale or any of the rights herein, and such purported transfer, assignment, or conveyance shall be null and void. No third party may rely on any benefit or right conferred on any Bidder by these Conditions of Sale, and no third party is intended as a beneficiary of these Conditions of Sale.

Bids will not be accepted from minor persons under eighteen (18) years of age without a parent's written consent containing an acknowledgment of the Conditions of Sale herein and indicating their agreement to be bound thereby on behalf of the Bidder.

All Bidders must meet University Archives' qualifications to bid. Any Bidder who is not a client in good standing of University Archives may be disqualified at University Archives' sole option and will not be awarded lots. Such determination may be made by University Archives in its sole and unlimited discretion, at any time prior to, during, or even after the close of the Auction. University Archives reserves the right to exclude any person from the Auction.

If an entity places a bid, then the person executing the bid on behalf of the entity agrees to personally guarantee payment for any successful bid.
By accepting the Conditions of Sale, Bidder personally and unconditionally guarantees payment.



Bidding. Each Bidder's determination of its bid should be based upon its own examination of the item(s) online. In any purchase or sale, the value of the item(s) is determined by the price. THE BIDDER HEREBY ASSUMES ALL RISKS OF VALUATION CONCERNING ANY AND ALL PURCHASES. UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ERRORS IN BIDDING. A Bidder should make certain to bid on the correct lot and that the bid is the maximum (plus the Buyer's Premium) that the Bidder is willing and able to pay. Since other Bidders online will be present, and since a re-offering could damage the momentum of the sale, once the hammer has fallen and University Archives has announced the winning Bidder, such Bidder is unconditionally bound to pay for the lot, even if the Bidder has made an error.

Title to any lot remains with Consignor, any secured party of the Consignor, or assignee of Consignor, as the case may be, until the lot is paid for in full by Bidder. University Archives reserves the right to require payment in full before delivering any lot to the successful Bidder.

It is the Bidder's responsibility and obligation to have the lots fully insured while in their possession. Bidder assumes any and all RISK OF LOSS once the lot(s) is in Bidder's possession.

Bidder grants to University Archives or its assigns the right to offset any sums due, or found to be due by University Archives, and to make such offset from any past, subsequent or future consignment, or items acquired by Bidder in possession or control of University Archives or from any sums due to Bidder by University Archives. Bidder further grants University Archives a purchase money security interest in such sums or items to the extent applicable, and agrees to execute such documents as may be reasonably necessary to grant University Archives such security interest. Bidder agrees that University Archives and its assigns shall be a secured party with respect to items bought by Bidder and in the possession of University Archives, to the extent of the maximum indebtedness, plus all accrued expenses, until the indebtedness is paid.

By bidding in this sale, Bidder personally and unconditionally guarantees payment.

In the event of a successful challenge to the title to any goods purchased pursuant to these Conditions of Sale and the exclusive remedies provided herein, University Archives agrees to reimburse any Bidder in an amount equal to the successful bid price actually paid by Bidder at auction plus any Buyer's Premium actually paid, in full and complete satisfaction of all claims, which once tendered by University Archives, relieves and releases University Archives from any responsibility whatsoever to the Bidder, even if the instrument is not cashed or is returned.

Because invaluble.com acts only as an agent, all bids submitted directly to the house are always given preference in the event of a tie. Absentee bids submitted via internet bidding services (e.g. invaluable.com) are not known to the auctioneer until the lot is opened on the day of the Auction.

In all Auctions, bids on an item must raise the current high bid according to University Archives bidding increments specified under Auction Terms, on a per-Auction basis. Bids will be accepted in whole dollar amounts only. No "buy" or "unlimited" bids will be accepted. In a live sale, bids on an item can change at the discretion of University Archives.

University Archives will record the paddle number of the Bidder. If Bidder's absentee bid is successful, Bidder will be notified after the sale by mailed or emailed invoice.


University Archives reserves the right to accept or decline any bid. Bids must be for an entire lot and each lot constitutes a separate sale. All bids are per lot unless otherwise announced. Live auction lots will be sold in their numbered sequence unless University Archives directs otherwise. It is unlawful and illegal for Bidders to collude, pool, or agree with another Bidder to pay less than the fair value for lot(s). For live auctions, University Archives will have final discretion in the event that any dispute should arise between Bidders. University Archives will determine the successful Bidder, cancel the sale, or re-offer and resell the lot or lots in dispute. University Archives will have final discretion to resolve any disputes arising after the online auction. If any dispute arises, University Archives' sale record is conclusive.

University Archives shall determine opening bids and bidding increments. University Archives has the right in its absolute discretion to reject any bid in the event of dispute between Bidders or if University Archives has doubt as to the validity of any bid, to advance the bidding at its absolute discretion and to determine the successful Bidder in the event of a dispute between Bidders, to continue the bidding or to reoffer and resell the lot in question. In the event of a dispute after the sale, University Archives' record of final sale shall be conclusive. University Archives also may reject any bid if University Archives decides either that any bid is below the reserve of the lot or article or that an advance is insufficient. Unless otherwise announced by University Archives at the time of sale, no lots may be divided for the purpose of sale.

Bidder may open, monitor, and/or raise bids at any time before the close of a lot through www.invaluable.com or www.universityarchives.com. To ensure proper registration, those Bidders intending to bid via the Internet must visit www.invaluable.com and register accordingly at least one full day prior to the actual auction. Winning bidders will be notified by University Archives. University Archives is not responsible or liable for any problems, delays, or any other issues or problems resulting out of use of the Internet generally or specifically, including but not limited to transmission, execution or processing of bids.

Property is auctioned in consecutive numerical order, as it appears in the online auction catalog. The auctioneer will accept bids from absentee bidders participating by internet or by written bid left with University Archives in advance of the auction. The auctioneer may also execute a bid on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve, either by entering a bid in response to absentee bids. Under no circumstances will the auctioneer place any bid on behalf of the consignor above the reserve. The auctioneer will not specifically identify bids placed on behalf of the consignor to protect the reserve.
University Archives is not responsible or liable for any problems, delays, or any other issues or problems resulting out of use of the Internet generally or specifically, including but not limited to transmission, execution or processing of bids.

To maximize Bidder's chance of winning, University Archives strongly encourages the use of maximum bids. University Archives will then bid for Bidder until the lot reaches Bidder's specified maximum. Maximum bids are strictly confidential.

Absentee bidding (advance written bids submitted prior to start of the auction) are offered solely as a convenience and permitted only prior to the start of the online auction, with University Archives' approval which shall be exercised at University Archives' sole discretion. Neither University Archives nor its agents or employees shall be held liable for the failure to execute bids or for errors relating to any transmission or execution thereof. In order to be considered for advance bidding in any manner, Bidders must comply with all of these Conditions of Sale and the terms contained on the Registration Form.


Buyer's Premium. The Bidder acknowledges and agrees that a total of a 20% Buyer's premium(we charge 15% and Invaluable, eBay and AuctionZip charge an additional 5%) will be added to the hammer price on all individual lots sold in live Auctions (the "Buyer's Live Premium"). Delivery of purchased items will not be made unless and until full payment has been received by University Archives, i.e., Paypal, check or credit card funds have fully cleared. Unless otherwise agreed in writing, signed by University Archives, payment in full is due within seven (7) calendar days of the invoice date. All purchases delivered to Connecticut are subject to applicable Connecticut sales tax unless the purchaser possesses a Connecticut sales tax exemption number. University Archives' Buyer's Premium does not include any fees assessed by third-party internet bidding platforms. Please refer to the internet bidding platform's terms and conditions for any additional premium charged.


Payment. Subject to fulfillment of all of the Conditions of Sale set forth herein, upon the sooner of (1) the passing of title to the offered lot pursuant to these Conditions of Sale, or (2) possession of the offered lot by the Bidder, Bidder thereupon (a) assumes full risk and responsibility (including without limitation, liability for or damage to frames or glass covering prints, paintings, photos, or other works), and (b) will immediately pay the full purchase price or such part as University Archives may require.

Payment is due upon presentment of an invoice, following the end of auction. University Archives reserves the right to void an invoice if payment in full is not received within seven (7) calendar days of the of the invoice date. In cases of nonpayment, University Archives' election to void a sale does not relieve the Bidder from their obligation to pay University Archives its fees (seller's and Buyer's Premium) on the lot and any other damages pertaining to the lot.

We accept credit cards for payment for any winning online bidders at all sales. We require credit card information to bid, and may use it for payment if you are the winning bidder.

All payments for sales are strictly in U.S. dollars via Paypal, credit cards, personal checks, cashier checks, bank money orders and wire transfers, and are subject to all reporting requirements.

All deliveries are subject to good funds; funds being received in University Archives' account before delivery of the Purchases; and all payments are subject to a clearing period. University Archives reserves the right to determine if a check constitutes "good funds": checks drawn on a U.S. bank are subject to a ten (10) calendar day hold, and ten (10) business days when drawn on an international bank.

In the event that a Bidder's payment is dishonored upon presentment(s), Bidder shall pay the maximum statutory processing fee set by applicable state law. If Bidder attempts to pay via check and the financial institution denies the transfer from Bidder's bank account, or the payment cannot be completed using the selected funding source, Bidder agrees to complete payment.

If University Archives refers any invoice to an attorney for collection, the Bidder agrees to pay attorney's fees, court costs, and other collection costs incurred by University Archives. If University Archives assigns collection to its house counsel, such attorney's time expended on the matter shall be compensated at a rate comparable to the hourly rate of independent attorneys.

University Archives shall have a lien against the merchandise purchased by the Bidder to secure payment of the Auction invoice. University Archives is further granted a lien and the right to retain possession of any other property of the Bidder then held by University Archives or its affiliates to secure payment of any Auction invoice or any other amounts due University Archives or affiliates from the Bidder. With respect to these lien rights, University Archives shall have all the rights of a secured creditor, including but not limited to the right of sale. In addition, with respect to payment of the Auction invoice(s), the Bidder waives any and all rights of offset he might otherwise have against University Archives and the consignor of the merchandise included on the invoice (the "Consignor"). If a Bidder owes University Archives or its affiliates on any account, University Archives and its affiliates shall have the right to offset such unpaid account by any credit balance due Bidder, and it may secure by possessory lien any unpaid amount by any of the Bidder's property in their possession.

All checks, cashiers checks, bank checks, or money orders are payable to University Archives.

Title shall not pass to the successful Bidder until all invoices are paid in full. It is the responsibility of the Bidder to provide adequate insurance coverage for the items once they have been delivered to a third-party shipper.



Shipping. Bidder is liable for shipping and handling. University Archives is unable to combine purchases from other auctions or affiliates into one package for shipping purposes. Lots won will be shipped in a commercially reasonable time after payment in good funds for the merchandise and the shipping fees is received, except when third-party shipment occurs. Bidder agrees that service and handling charges related to shipping items which are not pre-paid may be charged to a credit card on file with University Archives.

Successful international Bidders shall provide written shipping instructions, including specified Customs declarations, to University Archives for any lots to be delivered outside of the United States. NOTE: Declaration value shall be the item'(s) hammer price and University Archives shall use the correct harmonized code for the lot. Domestic Bidders on lots designated for third-party shipment must designate the common carrier, accept risk of loss, and prepay shipping costs.

University Archives assumes no and disclaims all responsibility and liability for acts or omissions in such packing or shipping by University Archives or other packers and carriers, whether or not recommended by University Archives. University Archives assumes no and disclaims all responsibility and liability for damage to frames, glass or other breakable items. Where University Archives arranges and bills for such services via invoice, University Archives will include an administration charge.



Withdrawal of Lots and Postponement of Auction. University Archives reserves the right to withdraw any lot before or at the time of the Auction, and/or to postpone the Auction of all or any lots or parts thereof, for any reason. University Archives shall not be liable to any Bidder in the event of such withdrawal or postponement under any circumstances. University Archives reserves the right to refuse to accept bids from anyone.

University Archives reserves the right to postpone the Auction or any session thereof for a reasonable period of time for any reason whatsoever, and no Bidder or prospective Bidder shall have any claim as a result thereof, including consequential damages.

Reserves. Lots may be subject to a reserve which is the confidential minimum price below which the lot will not be sold. Consignors may not bid on their own lots or property, unless they pay both a buyer's and seller's commission. University Archives may also execute bids on behalf of a consignor or the house account, but never above the low estimate. If a lot does not reach the reserve, it is bought-in. In other words, it remains unsold and is returned to the Consignor. University Archives has the right to sell certain unsold items after the close of the Auction. Such lots shall be considered sold during the Auction and all these Terms and Conditions shall apply to such sales including but not limited to the Buyer's Premium, return rights, and disclaimers.


Estimates. In addition to descriptive information, each item in the Catalog sometimes includes a price range which reflects opinion as to the price expected at auction (the "Estimate Prices"). In other instances, Estimate Prices can be obtained by calling University Archives at (203) 454-0111. The Estimate Prices are based upon various factors including prices recently paid at auction for comparable property, condition, rarity, quality, history and provenance. Estimate Prices are prepared well in advance of the sale and subject to revision. Estimates do not include the Buyer's Premium or sales tax (see under separate heading).

Consigned Property. University Archives offers lots owned by the house as well as consigned items.


Failure to comply with Terms and Conditions. Failure of the Bidder to comply with any of these Conditions of Sale or the terms of the Registration Form is an event of default. In such event, University Archives may, in addition to any other available remedies specifically including the right to hold the defaulting Bidder liable for the Purchase Price or to charge and collect from the defaulting Bidder's credit or debit accounts as provided for elsewhere herein: (a) cancel the sale, retaining any payment made by the Bidder as damages (the Bidder understands and acknowledges that University Archives will be substantially damaged should such default occur, and that damages under sub-part (a) are necessary to compensate University Archives for such damages); (b) resell the property without reserve at public auction or privately; (c) charge the Bidder interest on the Purchase Price at the rate of one and one-half percent (1.5%) per month or the highest allowable interest rate; (d) take any other action that University Archives, in its sole discretion, deems necessary or appropriate to preserve and protect University Archives' rights and remedies. Should University Archives resell the property, the original defaulting Bidder shall be liable for the payment of any deficiency in the purchase price and all costs and expenses associated there with, including but not limited to warehousing, sales-related expenses, reasonable attorney fees and court costs, commissions, incidental damages and any other charges due hereunder which were not collected or collectable. In the event that such Bidder is the successful Bidder on more than one lot and pays less than the purchase price for the total lots purchased, University Archives shall apply the payment received to such lot or lots that University Archives, in its sole discretion, deems appropriate. If University Archives does not exercise such discretion, the lots to which the payment shall be applied will be in descending order from the highest purchase price to the lowest. Any Bidder failing to comply with these Conditions of Sale shall be deemed to have granted University Archives a security interest in, and University Archives may retain as collateral such security for such Bidder's obligations to University Archives, any property in University Archives' possession owned by such Bidder. University Archives shall have the benefit of all rights of a secured party under the Uniform Commercial Code (U.C.C.) as adopted by the State of Connecticut.

Warranties. University Archives does not provide any warranties to Bidders, whether expressed or implied, beyond those expressly provided in these Conditions of Sale. All property and lots are sold "as is" and "where is". By way of illustration rather than limitation, neither University Archives nor the Consignor makes any representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to merchantability or fitness for intended use, condition of the property (including any condition report), correctness of description, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, importance, exhibition, relevance, attribution, source, provenance, date, authorship, condition, culture, genuineness, value, or period of the property. Additionally, neither University Archives nor the Consignor makes any representation or warranty, expressed or implied, as to whether the Bidder acquires rights in copyright or other intellectual property (including exhibition or reproduction rights) or whether the property is subject to any limitations or other rights. University Archives does not make any representation or warranty as to title.

All descriptions, photographs, illustrations, and terminology including but not limited to words describing condition (including any condition reports requested by Bidder, see also Terminology), authorship, period, culture, source, origin, measurement, quality, rarity, provenance, importance, exhibition, and relevance, used in the online Auction Catalog, bill of sale, invoice, or anywhere else, represent a good faith effort made by University Archives to fairly represent the lots and property offered for sale as to origin, date, condition, and other information contained therein; they are statements of opinion only. They are not representations or warranties and Bidder agrees and acknowledges that he or she shall not rely on them in determining whether or not to bid or for what price. Price estimates (which are determined well in advance of the Auction and are therefore subject to revision) and condition reports are provided solely as a convenience to Bidders and are not intended nor shall they be relied on by Bidders as statements, representations or warranties of actual value or predictions of final bid prices.

Headings are for convenience only and shall not be used to interpret the substantive sections to which they refer.


Bidders are accorded the opportunity to inspect the lots and to otherwise satisfy themselves as to the nature and sufficiency of each lot prior to bidding, and University Archives urges Bidders to avail themselves accordingly. Bidder is encouraged to examine lots thoroughly online. Bidder may also request condition reports.


All lots sold by University Archives are guaranteed authentic. This guarantee is valid from date of the Auction in which Bidder was awarded the lot (the "Auction Date") until one (1) year after the Auction Date, without exception. We encourage the bidder to seek third party opinions on authenticity within the one year period.

Lots purchased will come with a printed Auction Certificate and a description of the item. A color, fraud-proof Certificate, hand signed by John Reznikoff, is available for an extra charge, at the discounted rate of $125 each for any lots purchased.

In the event that University Archives is prevented for any reason from delivering any property to Bidder, or Bidder is otherwise dissatisfied with the performance of University Archives, the liability, if any, of University Archives, shall be limited to, and shall not exceed, the amount actually paid for the property by Bidder. In no event shall University Archives be liable for incidental, special, indirect, exemplary or consequential damages of any kind, including but not limited to loss of profits, value of investment or opportunity cost.




Sale of Firearms. University Archives complies with all Federal and State rules and regulations relating to the purchasing, registration and shipping of firearms. A Bidder is required to provide appropriate documents and the payment of associated fees, if any. Bidder is responsible for providing a shipping address that is suitable for the receipt of a firearm.



Remedies Under no circumstance will University Archives incur liability to a Bidder in excess of the purchase price actually paid. This section sets forth the sole and exclusive remedies of Bidder in conformity with the Warranties and Limitation of Damages provisions of these Conditions of Sale, and is expressly in lieu of any other rights or remedies which might be available to Bidder by law. The Bidder hereby accepts the benefit of the Consignor's warranty of title and any other representations and warranties made by the Consignor for the Bidder's benefit. In the event that Bidder demonstrates in writing, in the sole discretion of University Archives, that there was a breach of the Consignor's warranty of title concerning a lot purchased by Bidder, University Archives shall make demand upon the Consignor to pay to Bidder the Purchase Price (including any premiums, taxes, or other amounts paid or due to University Archives). Should the Consignor not pay the Purchase Price to Bidder within thirty days after such demand, University Archives shall disclose the identity of the Consignor to Bidder and assign to Bidder all of University Archives' rights against the Consignor with respect to such lot or property. Upon such disclosure and assignment, all responsibility and liability, if any, of University Archives with respect to said lot or property shall automatically terminate. University Archives shall be entitled to retain the premiums and other amounts paid to University Archives - this remedy is as to the Consignor only. The rights and remedies provided herein are for the original Bidder only and they may not be assigned or relied upon by any transferee or assignee under any circumstances.

If Bidder wishes to challenge the the authenticity of any item, Bidder must present written evidence that the lot is not authentic as determined by two disinterested, known experts in the field, agreeable to us, within a period of one year from the auction date. If University Archives agrees that the lot is not as represented, Bidder's sole and exclusive remedy shall be a refund of their purchase price, with no other costs, liabilities or amounts recoverable. If University Archives does not agree with the claim by Bidder, then the Parties shall follow the dispute resolution procedures of these Conditions of Sale.

Any such challenge concerning authenticity must, without any exception, be brought within one (1) year of Bidder's notice to University Archives of Bidder's contention that the lot was not authentic.

If the description of any lot in the Catalog is materially incorrect (e.g., gross cataloging error), the lot is returnable if returned within five (5) calendar days of receipt, and received by University Archives no later than twenty-one (21) calendar days after the Auction Date. This paragraph shall constitute Bidder's sole right with respect to the return of items, and no refunds shall be given for any items not returned to and received by University Archives. All guarantees are applicable only to original purchaser. No returns will be accepted other than on the grounds of authenticity for any item that is described as having major flaws or restoration.

NO RETURN OR REFUND OF ANY AUCTION LOT WILL BE CONSIDERED EXCEPT AS PROVIDED IN THESE CONDITIONS OF SALE.

These Conditions of Sale constitute the entire agreement between the parties together with the terms and conditions contained in the Registration Form. They may not be amended, modified or superseded except in a signed writing executed by all parties. No oral or written statement by anyone employed by University Archives or acting as agent or representative of University Archives may amend, modify, waive or supersede the terms herein unless such amendment, waiver or modification is contained in a writing signed by all parties.

If any section of these Conditions of Sale or any term or provision of any section is held to be invalid, void, or unenforceable by any court of competent jurisdiction, the remaining sections or terms and provisions of a section shall continue in full force and effect without being impaired or invalidated in any way.

The Parties agree that any agreements between the Parties including but not limited to these Conditions of Sale are entered into in Westport, Connecticut, no matter where Bidder is situated and no matter by what means or where Bidder was informed of the Auction and regardless of whether catalogs, materials, or other communications were received by Bidder in another location.

The Parties agree that these Conditions of Sale, and any other related agreement(s) are governed by the laws of the State of Connecticut, without regard for its conflict of laws principles. The Parties agree that any dispute related to or arising out of these Conditions of Sale, or related to or arising out of any other related agreement(s) shall be submitted to confidential binding arbitration (the "Arbitration") before a single Arbitrator of the American Arbitration Association (the "AAA"). The Parties agree that the Arbitration shall be conducted pursuant to the commercial rules of the AAA. In the event that the Parties cannot agree on the selection of the Arbitrator, then the Arbitrator shall be selected by the AAA. The prevailing Party in the Arbitration shall be entitled to recover all of its related costs, whether before or after the formal institution of the Arbitration, including but not limited to its reasonable attorneys' fees and, if University Archives prevails, the Buyer's Premium as defined in these Conditions of Sale. The Parties agree that Bidder shall have no right to recover consequential or indirect damages, or lost profits damages.

The Parties consent to the enforcement of the decision in the Arbitration pursuant to the Federal Arbitration Act in either the courts of the State of Connecticut or the United States District Court for the District Westport.

Except as provided in Bidder's Remedies with regard to the Certification of Authenticity, any dispute, claim, cause of action related to or arising out of these Conditions of Sale or any other agreement(s) between the Parties must be brought within one (1) year of the acts, omissions or circumstances giving rise to the alleged claim, without exceptions. This provision is intended as a full, complete and absolute release of any claims after one (1) year of such acts, omissions or circumstances. The Parties agree further that these waiver provisions are intended to be binding on all parties in the event of any dispute, specifically including but not limited to third party claims and cross-actions brought by either University Archives or Bidder. These provisions are consideration for the execution of these Conditions of Sale.

The Bidder hereby agrees that University Archives shall be entitled to present these Conditions of Sale to a court in any jurisdiction other than set forth in this paragraph as conclusive evidence of the Parties' agreement, and the Parties further agree that the court shall immediately dismiss any action filed in such jurisdiction.

Notwithstanding the foregoing, University Archives may, in its sole discretion, enforce its rights pursuant to these Conditions of Sale in the courts of the State of Connecticut or the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut rather than in an Arbitration related to or arising out of any Auction of an item sold for less than $10,000. This right shall relate to the individual item price, such that University Archives may, in its sole discretion, enforce its rights pursuant to these Conditions of Sale in the courts of the State of Connecticut or the United States District Court for the District of Connecticut rather than in an Arbitration for items that in the aggregate exceed $10,000. The prevailing Party in such a proceeding shall be entitled to recover all of its related costs, whether before or after the formal institution of the proceeding, including but not limited to its reasonable attorneys' fees and, if University Archives prevails, the Buyer's Premium as defined in these Conditions of Sale. This right of enforcement is unique to University Archives, and these Conditions of Sale are a waiver by the Bidder of any right to enforcement or adjudication outside of an Arbitration.


Under no circumstances is any employee, agent or representative of University Archives authorized by University Archives to modify, amend, waive or contradict any of these Conditions of Sale, any term or condition set forth on a registration form, any warranty or limitation or exclusion of warranty, any term or condition in either the Registration Form or these Terms and Conditions regarding payment requirements, including but not limited to due date, manner of payment, and what constitutes payment in full, or any other term or condition contained in any documents issued by University Archives unless such modification, amendment, waiver or contradiction is contained in a writing signed by all parties. Any statements, oral or written, made by employees, agents or representatives of University Archives to Bidder, including statements regarding specific lots, even if such employee, agent or representative represents that such statement is authorized, unless reduced to a writing signed by all parties, are statements of personal opinion only and are not binding on University Archives, and under no circumstances shall be relied upon by Bidder as a statement, representation or warranty of University Archives.




Agreements. Agreements between Bidders and Consignors to effectuate a non-sale of an item at Auction, inhibit bidding on a consigned item to enter into a private sale agreement for said item, or to utilize University Archives' Auction to obtain sales for non-selling consigned items subsequent to the Auction, are strictly prohibited. If a subsequent sale of a previously consigned item occurs in violation of this provision, University Archives reserves the right to charge Bidder the applicable Buyer's Premium and Consignor a Seller's Commission as determined for each auction venue and by the terms of the seller's agreement.

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Incredible Selection of Autographs, Manuscripts, Books and Historical Relics (207 Lots)

by University Archives

February 28, 2017, 10:30 AM EST

Live Auction

Westport, CT, USA

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Abigail Adams pens a compassionate letter about her horse

Estimate: $5,000 - $6,000

Description: Adams Abigail 1744 - 1818 Abigail Adams pens a compassionate letter about her horse "Hobby", while at her farm in Quincy. Pristine! An ALS scripted on the first page on bi-fold stationary stock, 7.75" x 9.75", remaining pages left blank with the docket on the verso of the last leaf. Dated "Quincy July 15, 1817", and signed by Abigail Adams as "A Adams". The main fold has been reinforced with a thin strip of matching paper. Wax seal remnants and accompanying staining present to first page. Slight toning to paper with a small 1/2" chip on second blank leaf not affecting text. Expected folds.A wonderful , compassionate ALS written by Abigail Adams, during her later years while living at Peacefield, the family farm in Quincy. Both Abigail and her husband John Adams were "farmers" at heart, with both longing to move back to their family farm, Peacefield upon John's retirement from politics. As one reads her letter one realizes just how much they must have embraced their later years in Quincy. By 1800 Abigail who lived in the White House during John's presidency was known to have said that she was " Sick, sick, sick of public life." In a November 13, 1800 letter to her son, she reflected: " The consequence to us, personally, is, that we retire from public life. For myself‰Û_I have few regrets. At my age, and with my bodily infirmities, I shall be happier at Quincy. Neither my habits, nor my education, or inclinations have led me to an expensive style of living, so that on that score I have little to mourn over. If I did not rise with dignity, I can at least fall with ease, which is the more difficult task‰Û_I feel not any resentment against those who are coming into power‰Û_ " And yet earlier in 1794 John Adams was known to have said "I begin now to think all the time lost that is not employed in farming, innocent, healthy, gay, elegant amusement! Enchanting employment! How my imagination roves over my rocky mountains, and through my brushy meadows." Abigail and John were finally able to enter the phase of their life in their "element", going back to their roots of farming as their life at Peacefield once again centered about ploughing fields, and taking in crops. A period of having come full circle, as when John and Abigail first met and married, they both shared the farming of their property for sustenance, while John also practiced law in the nearby city of Boston.In this heart warming letter written just a year before her death, Abigail writes to Ward Nicolas Boylston, a family and business friend, about her beloved work horse, "Hobby" who the Adams were considering to sell.Most of the content of the letter expressively focuses on her wishes to ensure that "Hobby" would find a "good master" . Abigail used to ride Hobby and would describe him as a "very powerful animal" and was "perfectly sound, and good tempered" and only occasionally "spirits". Her compassion for Hobby made it difficult for her to part with him but noted to Boylston that if Hobby would "suit" him it was her preference to have the horse be with a "kind master".A revealing ALS from this important first lady showing her love and compassion for her horse, which reads in full:"Dear Sir, Quincy July 15, 1817It was not untill yesterday that your letter to my son reached us. I am authorized to say to you that you may make trial of Hobby who has been worked rather hard and has not had grain, so that you see him in his worst state, but when he has had a few days rest and a good master, you will find him a very powerful animal- If he should suit you, you may take him at the price we have been offered for him, one hundred and sixty dollars. We did hold him at 80 but as we know he will have a kind master, we the more readily part with him, he has not any (illegible), never starts, is perfectly sound and good tempered. I sometimes ride with him & drive myself, but when he spirits he is too powerful for me-We hope to see you, and Mrs. Boylston here before you depart for Princetown - a visit from you never fails to give pleasure to your friend and relativeA Adams"

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Current bid: $1,600 (2 bids)

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Ansel Adams signed invitation for Gold Medal for Distinction in Natural Hist Art

Estimate: $100 - $150

Description: Adams Ansel 1902 - 1984 Invitation to the awarding of the Academy of Natural Sciences' Gold Medal for Distinction in Natural History Art to Ansel Adams - signed by Adams Invitation Signed "Ansel Adams," 6.25" x 4.5" card gilt embossed at top center with seal of the Academy of Natural Sciences. Philadelphia, November 21 [1981]. Mounting remnants on verso. Fine condition.In full, "The President, the Board of Trustees and the Women's Committee / of the Academy of Natural Sciences / request the pleasure of your company / for a special film tribute and presentation of the Academy's / Gold Medal for Distinction in Natural History Art / to / Ansel Adams / on Saturday, November 21st / at 7:30 p.m. / R.s.v.p. Reservations limited."

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Current bid: $100 (5 bids)

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ALS signed by Charles Addams, creator of the show The Addams Family

Estimate: $100 - $150

Description: Addams Charles 1912 - 1988 The creator of the humorously macabre Addams Family, Charles Addams on his reading as a teen "Mark Twain ‰Û_ Conan Doyle ‰Û_ Treasure Island with the wonderful Wyeth illustrations‰Û_" Autograph Letter Signed "Chas Addams," 2p, 4.5" x 7", separate sheets of "The New Yorker" stationery, New York, July 15, 1966. To Miss Byrne. With original "New Yorker" envelope hand addressed by Addams to "Miss Evelyn B. Byrne / Elizabeth Barrett Browning Sch. / 183rd St and Ryer Ave / New York NY 10458." Fine condition.In full, "I was so pleased to find myself on your list. Looking back I think my favorites were Life on the Mississippi by Mark Twain - The White Company by Conan Doyle (also Sir Nigel by the same author) and some of that interest still remains in the form of a small armor collection. ‰Û÷Treasure Island with the wonderful Wyeth illustrations and of course the Sherlock Holmes books."From 1966 to 1970, Evelyn Byrne ran a program at New York City's Elizabeth Barrett Browning Junior High School where she asked major literary and artistic figures of the time to write back with their recollections of what books inspired them while they were teenagers. An assortment of their responses were published in the book Attacks of Taste, printed in 1971 by Gotham Book Mart.

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Current bid: $60 (2 bids)

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Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400

Description: Andersen Hans 1805 - 1875 "Hans Christian Anderson," in English, signed envelope to the English Translator of his infamous stories Autographed envelope, 5.75" x 4.75". Addressed and signed entirely in the hand of Hans Christian Anderson, as "Horace E. Scudder, Esq. / paid / New - York / Riverside-Cambridge, Mass / from Hans Christian Anderson".Envelope contains multiple postmarks, including one on the verso from "Kiel Hamburg", and two located on the front one of which is "New York". Overall slightly grubby, creased and toned with stray colored pencil marks, lacking the original stamps. Small tear to upper right edge, not affecting the postmark nor the autograph.A wonderful piece of Hans Christian Anderson memorabilia being scarce in his anglicized autograph. Anderson was writing to Horace Scudder, an American author, editor and eventually the translator of Anderson's works. He was responsible for the largest publishing project of Andersen's works in English. At the time Scudder was not fluent in Scandinavian however the two developed an incredible rapport. Scudder was known to have expressed gratitude to Anderson telling him "I am pleased you are satisfied with the translation of your stories. I have put them into an exact English version and then go over them myself with great care, endeavoring to give those touches and quaint turns of expression with a long study of your writings has made me acquainted." And with Anderson expressing back "I could not wish for a better translator than a man who is spiritually akin to me"Scudder's approach to his translating Anderson's stories was "I try to think aloud in English to correspond with your Danish thinking‰Û_I aim to say over what you say as I think you would have said it if you had been English or American". Hans Christian Anderson's works are very fond of puns and wordplay and he loves to make up words and strange sounds, so locating a translator who felt emphatic intuition with him was extraordinarily difficult.A lovely example of Anderson's desirable anglicized autograph written to his personal English translator.

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Current bid: $1,300 (11 bids)

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Stunning Steel engraving of Major John André, Revolutionary War spy

Estimate: $500 - $600

Description: AndrŽé John 1750 - 1780 Stunning Steel engraving of Major John André, Revolutionary War spy A lovely full size steel engraving 9" x 13.75" depicting Major "John André / Late Adjutant General to the British army in North America", along with a circular note to the top of "engraved for Raymond's / History of England". May be a separate stand alone printing. "Raymond's History of England, probably printed mid 1800's. A very detailed engraving, with overall light foxing, more prominent to the outside margins. Slight creasing to outer edges.John Andre was a British Army officer hanged as a spy by the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary Ware for assisting Benedict Arnold's attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British.A handsome piece, which would present well framed.

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Starting bid: $200 (0 bids)

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Gorgeous hand-painted Steel engraving of Revolutionary War spy, John André

Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000

Description: AndrŽé John 1750 - 1780 Gorgeous hand painted Steel engraving of Major John André, Revolutionary War spy A spectacular full color hand painted steel engraving 9.5" x 13.75" depicting "The Unfortunate Death Of Major John André"/Adjutant General to the English Army/ at Head Quarters in New York‰..." Undated, but probably circa late 1800's. A highly detailed engraving, with overall toning and a touch of grubbiness. Outer left edge has two small 1/2" tears well outside of margins, faint soft corner creasing. John Andre was a British Army officer hanged as a spy by the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War for assisting Benedict Arnold's attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York to the British. This stunning, ornate engraving depicts this fateful event. A very handsome piece, and quite scarce hand painted. Although steel engravings can be located, this was the first we have seen hand painted. Would present well framed.

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Starting bid: $500 (0 bids)

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Outstanding Apollo XI content Buzz Aldrin letter with a piece of the Kapton foil

Estimate: $400 - $500

Description: Apollo XI - Outstanding Apollo XI content Buzz Aldrin letter printed on attractive embossed personal letterhead with an original piece of the Kapton foil from the command module that was flown to the moon Typed Letter Signed, "Buzz Aldrin", as Lunar Module Pilot - Apollo XI, 1 page, 8.5" x 11", to which has been affixed a small fragment of the original Kapton foil that lined the command module. Very fine condition.The letter is titled "APOLLO 11 'KAPTON' FOIL" and reads in full: "On July 20, 1969, mankind's eternal dream of standing on another world was realized as Neil Armstrong and I became the first two human beings in history to walk on the Moon, during the historic voyage of Apollo XI. The spacecraft which carried Neil and me to the Moon was known at the 'Command Module' and bore the symbolic name Columbia. To protect our fragile craft from the extreme environment of deep space, a thin layer of material known as Kapton Foil gold-colored on the front and with a silver backing, was attached to the outside skin of the Columbia. This delicate foil played a critical role by reflecting the sun's intense heat off the ship, helping us to maintain comfortable temperatures within. Because the foil was attached to the outside skin of the Columbia, its gold-colored side was directly exposed to deep space. Due to the extremely fragile nature of the foil, most of it burned off the ship during our fiery 25,000 mph re-entry into the Earth's atmosphere on July 24, 1969. However, a small portion of it survived, salvaged by the North American Rockwell Recovery Team on board the aircraft carrier Hornet, and carefully preserved for posterity. When reflecting on the epochal voyage of Apollo XI, I often think of the plaque left behind on the moon at Tranquility Base. It bears the inscription HERE MEN FROM THE PLANET EARTH FIRST SET FOOT UPON THE MOON. WE CAME IN PEACE FOR ALL MANKIND. JULY 1969 AD. The voyage of Apollo XI was a defining moment in human evolution, when mankind lifted itself from its Earthly cradle, and began its long journey into the universe."

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Current bid: $200 (1 bid)

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Exceedingly Rare Color Photograph Signed by all three Apollo XI crew members!

Estimate: $7,500 - $10,000

Description: Apollo XI Astronauts - Inscribed "with best wishes from Tranquility Base" by Neil Armstrong, signed by all three Apollo astronauts on the first lunar landing mission - Man's first message from the Moon, spoken by Armstrong, was "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed." Exceedingly Rare Color Photograph Signed "To Collins Bird - / With Sincere Best Wishes / from Tranquility Base / Neil Armstrong," "Buzz Aldrin," and "M. Collins." Color, 7.25" x 7" (visible), matted and framed to 12.5" x 12.5". Fine condition.Official NASA photographs taken on the Moon, especially those taken on the day of the landing, signed by all three Apollo XI crewmembers, are extremely rare and desirable, as compared to lithographic prints or even the common Apollo XI posed crew photograph.This photograph, titled "Flag of the U.S. deployed on surface of the Moon," was taken from inside the lunar module on July 20, 1969. Captioned by NASA on its website: "The flag of the United States, deployed on the surface of the Moon, dominates this photograph taken from inside the Lunar Module. The footprints of Astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. stand out clearly. In the far background is the deployed black and white lunar surface television camera which televised the Apollo 11 lunar surface extravehicular activity." NASA's Photo ID is AS11-37-5545, "Date Taken: 1969-07-20."Collins Bird was the owner of the Georgetown Inn on Wisconsin Avenue in Washington, D.C. When astronauts and NASA officials were in the nation's capital, they stayed at Bird's hotel. Apollo astronaut James Lovell and Jeffrey Kluger wrote in "Lost Moon: The Perilous Voyage of Apollo 13" (New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1994), "Ever since 1962, when Wally Schirra came to town for a medal and a handshake from President Kennedy following his successful nine-hour Mercury flight, the inn had served as unofficial host to many a NASA dignitary. The place was out-of-the-way enough to offer the privacy the country's space pioneers craved, and new enough to offer the poshness they had come to enjoy. Collins Bird, the hotel's first and only owner, had his inn done up in a subdued colonial style‰Û_"

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Starting bid: $3,000 (0 bids)

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Signature cut of John Jacob Astor, the wealthiest man in the early 1800's

Estimate: $200 - $300

Description: Astor John 1763 - 1848 John Jacob Astor, signature cut of the wealthiest man in the early 1800's Signature cut 4" x 1.25" of John Jacob Astor, clipped from a document, and backed with additional paper for strength. Signed in pen "John Jacob Astor" with a large flourish under the signature. Near fine with light handling marksThe rise of John Jacob Astor, the wealthiest man in the country by the time of his death in 1848 is entrenched in the "American dream" - that of coming to America, the land of opportunity to make your fortune. At his death, his fortune was estimated to be about $20 million (estimated between 2.5 and 3 billion in today's dollars). Driven to succeed, John Jacob Astor built a family and a fortune that became a part of American history.His story has simple beginnings, growing up in a family that struggled financially. He left for America after the death of his mother and subsequent remarriage by his father. He worked his way down the Rhine River saving enough money to pay for passage to London and ultimately for passage to the new United States and set for passage by ship across the Atlantic Ocean. Astor was not one to pass up opportunities, even in mid-ocean; on the passage he met another German emigrant who had been to North America before, and who had dealt successfully in the fur trade. He questioned the man extensively, and by the time the ice had melted from the bay, Astor was sure the fur trade was for him.By 1786 he married, opened a store on Water Street where he sold musical instruments and bought furs. The Astors tended strictly to business, living frugally, and devoting themselves almost exclusively to making money. Astor himself often left the shop in his wife's care while he went off to the frontier. Within a few years he knew the fur trade well and had established connections, not only throughout the American Northwest territories, but also in Montreal, which was the heart of the trade. He gained a great advantage over his competitors in 1796 when Jay's Treaty, between the United States and Great Britain, was put into force and by 1800, Astor was recognized as the leading American merchant in the fur trade and was thought to be worth a quarter of a million dollars. He was still only beginning. As he expanded his reach and interest, including venturing into trade with China, he placed a part of his profit into the purchase of real estate in New York City, property that later proved to be the real basis of the Astor fortune.Perhaps the most interesting note about the process of this mans life is that during the financial Panic of 1837, while investors throughout the city were losing their proverbial shirts, John Jacob Astor, the founder of the Astor dynasty, was prospering. In the midst of a freefall in property values, Astor snapped up $224,000 in Manhattan real estate. Later, when interest rates climbed to 7 percent and property owners could no longer make payments on the mortgages he controlled, Astor promptly foreclosed on scores of them, he would acquire vacant plots of land from the city and leave them undeveloped or unmaintained. In some cases, Astor was buying properties for such low prices that the now-defunct Court of Chancery made him pay more money for some of the lots. In one case he picked up an entire city block in Harlem, which was estimated to be worth $1 million, for $2,000.Astor's had an expansive interest for New York real estate. On his deathbed in 1848, he is said to have exclaimed, "Could I begin life again, knowing what I now know, and had money to invest, I would buy every foot of land on the island of Manhattan... a thought that is hard to imagine based on what New York looked like in the early 1800'sAlthough we can think of many proverbs while understanding the story of Astor, perhaps one of the most salient thoughts while reflecting on Astor's life is that sometimes the most obvious is right in front of you, you just need the right lens.

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Starting bid: $50 (0 bids)

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P.T. Barnum extolls the merits of his newly rebuilt

Estimate: $800 - $1,000

Description: Barnum Phineas 1810 - 1891 P.T. Barnum, the greatest promoter in history, extolls the merits of his newly rebuilt "Hippodrome" ‰ÛÓ the predecessor to the first Madison Square Garden ‰ÛÓ following its destruction by fire in December 1873. Fine content Autograph Letter Signed, "P. T. Barnum," 2 pages, 4.25" x 6.75" (visible) on his personal monogramed letterhead, Bridgeport, Connecticut, June 13, 1874 to "My dear Cuyler." Expected mailing folds, else very fine. Matted and framed with a portrait of Barnum at center. Not examined out of frame. Barnum writes, in full: "I have just returned from Vermont and find your welcome letter. Hope I am not too late to do you good. My Hippodrome is well worth your family seeing. It is much more interesting at night than day on account of good light and more people being present, but just the same exhibitions are given day as evening. Please show enclosed [not present] to Mr [Samuel Henry] Hurd my son in law & he will fix you out all right[.] Kindest Regards to your family. I wish you could call on me and see the most pleasant location & the nicest residence on the footstool[?]." After a large fire destroyed his first Hippodrome, located on Fourteenth Street in New York in December 1873 (which incidentally is where he first staged what would become his famous circus), Barnum resolved to build a larger (and fire retardant) structure on the site of the recently-abandoned terminal for Cornelius Vanderbilt's New York Central Railroad (which had just been moved to is present location at 42nd Street). The open-air venue, was located adjacent to Madison Square Park 26th and 27th streets and Madison and Fourth Avenue (present-day Park Avenue South). Barnum continued to operate at the site until 1879 when the Vanderbilts regained control of the property and erected Madison Square Garden, the first of four structures that would carry the name. Barnum's daughter Helen (1840-1915) married Samuel Henry Hurd (d. 1898) in On October 20 1857. At the time Hurd part of the firm Morrison, Hurd & Co., makers of safes (New York Times, October 21, 1857, p. 5; New York Business Directory, 1859). Hurd also served as the treasurer of Barnum's Hippodrome.

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Current bid: $600 (4 bids)

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Ornately printed doc signed by Menachem Begin, Aharon Propes & Yosef Klarman

Estimate: $100 - $150

Description: Begin Menachem 1913 - 1992 Ornate Certificate awarded to a Guard of Honor at Ze'ev Jabotinsky's reinterment on Mount Herzl - signed by Begin, Propes, and Klarman Ornately Printed Document Signed "M. Begin," "Aharon Propes," and "Yosef Klarman" in Hebrew, 1 page, 8.75" x 12.25". Tel-Aviv, 25 Tamuz 5724 (July 5, 1964) and Jerusalem, 29 Tamuz 5724 (July 9, 1964). Filled out in Manuscript. In Hebrew, fully translated. Light stain at top center, lower left corner worn. Fine condition.In calligraphy. Headlined "Ze'ev Jabotinsky is Coming Home / As was decided by the Government of Israel / In compliance with his Last Will and Testament." In full, "This is to certify / that Zinbal Tsvi / is honored to be / standing as a Guard of Honor / at the Side of the Coffins of / Ze'ev Jabotinsky / and his wife Johanna, may their memories live on / on the day of their return to Homeland."Vladimir "Ze'ev" Jabotinsjky (1880-1940) was a Revisionist Zionist leader, author, poet, orator, soldier, founder of the Jewish Self-Defense Organization in Odessa and co-founder of the Jewish Legion of the British Army in World War I. He later established several Jewish organizations, including the Irgun and Beitar which was founded in 1923 at a meeting of Jewish youth in Riga, Latvia, arranged by Aharon Propes. Yosef Klarman was the leader of the Zionist-Revisionist Party at the time he signed this certificate. Jabotinsky's Will stipulated that he be buried in Eretz, Israel only at the express order of the Hebrew Government of the future Jewish State. In 1964, Jabotinsky's remains and those of his wife were reinterred on Mount Herzl in Jerusalem.

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Current bid: $80 (3 bids)

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Ben-Gurion expresses gratitude for suggestions in soybean cultivation

Estimate: $400 - $500

Description: Ben-Gurion David 1886 - 1973 Ben-Gurion expresses Israel's "gratitude and admiration" to Hannah Logasa for her suggestions in soybean cultivation. Autograph Letter Signed "D. Ben-Gurion" in English, one page, 4.5" x 8.5". Sdeh-Boker, May 19, 1964. To Hannah Logasa. On lightweight lined paper removed from a writing pad, "38" stamped in the upper blank margin. Fine condition.In full, "I was glad to have your letter of April 27th. It is not a honour which was confered on you but some expression of our gratitude and admiration we all feel for you. If you could only come again and see the little progress which my young Kibbutz here has made last year! Do you feel you can make this journey? We all would be happy to have you among us even for a few days. Are there many women or man like you anywhere in the States or in any other country?"Oliver B. Pollak writes, in "Jewish Life in Omaha and Lincoln: A Photographic History (Mount Pleasant, SC: Arcadia Publishing, 2001), "Hannah Logasa (1879-1967) worked at the Omaha Public Library from 1900 to 1913, and then went to the University of Chicago Library where she pioneered in the field of school librarianship for junior and senior high schools. She published several reference books starting in 1924, and by the 1960s her ‰Û÷Historical Fiction' was in its 10th edition."In an article in "The Jewish Press," Volume LXXXII, Issue 18, January 3, 2003, Pollak wrote that "in 1967, shortly before her death at the age of 88, [Hannah Logasa's] juvenile book, Science for Youth, appeared. Logasa's library and book knowledge and had a practical political impact. Robert McMorris, a long time columnist for the Omaha World-Herald, wrote in 1967, that Hannah Logasa, a shy, five foot tall 80-pound women, who lived in retirement in an efficiency apartment in the Commodore Hotel, had a unique friendship with former Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion and his wife, Paula. Hannah apparently had given the Israeli government good suggestions on castor bean and soy bean cultivation. A website about significant women librarians credits Hannah with an outstanding accomplishment: ‰Û÷It is safe to say that librarianship in the United States would not be the same without her. This self-educated daughter of a Russian immigrant has instrumental in bringing books to students and teachers across the world, and in making the school library an integral part of the education process ‰Û_ [In her will] she was generous to her nieces and nephews and the State of Israel. Several smaller bequests spoke loudly about her gratitude and debt to literacy. She left money to Omaha Public Library, Hadassah Study Group, the University of Chicago, the American Friends of the Hebrew University, and Mu Sigma Study Group, an Omaha woman's reading club founded in 1893."Jessica Steinberg wrote in "The New York Times" on April 20, 2004, "Soy food, for some Israeli kibbutzniks, is the modern equivalent of biblical manna, the food that appeared miraculously to the Israelites in the wilderness. In fact, for two kibbutzim - the farming collectives that were central to early Israeli statehood - the soy business has been a savior of sorts, steering them from their socialist roots to capitalism, and providing financial security in the process. One kibbutz, Lohamei Hagetaot, or the Ghetto Fighters, founded by Holocaust survivors in 1949, has found financial security in Tivall, a factory that turns out soy meals in partnership with Osem, an Israeli food group controlled by NestlÌ©. Another kibbutz, Hatzor, owns Solbar Industries, one of the world's largest producers of soy food ingredients, which recently raised $30 million in an initial offering on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange‰Û_"

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Current bid: $140 (1 bid)

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Large Archive of letters & signed photo re: David Ben-Gurion 1920s-1972

Estimate: $25,000 - $30,000

Description: Ben-Gurion David 1886 - 1973 A Life in Letters: a signed photograph, 9 Autograph Letters Signed, 18 Typed Letters Signed, all with exceptional content, signed 1920s Histadrut Teachers' Union Membership Registrar, and 1948 Independence issues of "Ha'aretz" and "The Palestine Post." Comprises:1. Photograph Signed in English. B&w 7.75" x 9.75" 2. A teacher's Histadrut Membership Registrar signed in the 1920s by BG as Secretary General of Histadrut.3. "Today you join the company of good teachers ‰Û_ establish generations of achievers, people of ideals and action, who in their hands is the fate of the State and its future‰Û_" nd4. "There are no secrets and the members of the Knesset know as much as members of the committee‰Û_" nd5. "meeting regarding the Arab situation in Eretz [Israel]‰Û_" (October 21, 1929)6. "Understanding the joint responsibility of all now ‰Û_ we accept the willingness to lend a hand to any action..." (September 12, 1939)7. "loan of machines for central industry in Tel-Aviv, and specifically a direct current electric generator with a diesel engine and the equipment associated with such a plant‰Û_" (February 5, 1948)8. Original four-page issue of Hebrew-language newspaper "Ha'aretz," 17" x 23", May 16, 1948, picturing BG on the first page9. Original four-page issue of English-language newspaper "The Palestine Post," 16" x 23", May 16, 1948, picturing BG on the first page. Third & fourth pages blank.10. On rare "Interim Government" stationery concerning the shortage of manpower making it difficult to do certain things (January 7, 1949)11. letter mourning a soldier who died on January 7, 1949 in the War of Independence12. Sending a letter of condolence to a mother who has lost her son, , reminiscing about a voyage both she and BG had to Israel (October 26, 1949)13. To Rabbi Zorach Warhaftig, also a Signer of the Israeli Declaration of Independence, asking for "the name of the man in Haifa - to make our investigation easier‰Û_" (February 1, 1950)14. To "Jerusalem Post" editor Gershon Agron reacting to his publishing the erroneous statement that he has agreed to the demands of the opposing General Zionists Party and had nominated two of their members to ministries (September 26, 1951)15. To poet Anda Amir-Pinkerfeld. "We cannot truly know what happened in the days of yore ‰Û_ whatever we do have that is written in our history books as miracles that transpired we cannot guarantee is the whole truth ‰Û_Man must hear the voice of God talking to him and to his heart‰Û_" (November 3, 1953)16. To the Chief Rabbi of Petach Tikva. "There is room in Israel fir varying opinions and perspectives, but it is the love of Israel that binds us together‰Û_" (January 14, 1954)17. To Y. Palmon, Advisir for Arab Affairs. "[The Druze] were revealed to me as excellent fighters, disciplined and loyal ‰Û_ I hope that this tribe will cast in its lot with our people and will find complete freedom and equality in the State of Israel‰Û_" (April 19, 1954)18. To the parents of a newlywed: "May they have a happy life full of love. May they build a blessed home in Israel. Mazel Tov." (November 29, 1954)19. To MP Meir Yaari of the Mapam Party. "Maybe the Party you belong to has no disagreements ‰Û_ The Party I have a privilege of being attached to us not of that sort ‰Û_ but I do not know of another Party in Israel that is more loyal to the state, the Israeli people, and the vision of Jewish and human redemption‰Û_" (March 14, 1955)20. To MP Seif E-Din E-Zoubi of Nazareth. "Following the coup d'etat which was carried out by the present heads of Egypt, the Government which I headed welcomed the rebels against King Farouk, and I expressed my hope that the revolution would ‰Û_ pave a new road of peace for itself. It is regrettable that the heads of Egypt have disappointed our hope‰Û_" (May 14, 1955)21. To a Communist MP of the Knesset. "You can't ignore what's going on in Asia with Egyptian rulers & murderous group the Fadayin who attack all Israeli citizens ‰Û_ [Nasser] told the ‰Û÷New York Post' that he is not fighting only Israel, but the Jewish nation & Jewish fortune. The tone is reminiscent of ‰Û÷Mein Kampf'‰Û_" (July 7, 1955)22. "We must act with renewed efforts and in every legitimate way, to bring about the day when the Jews of the Soviet Union will also be permitted to participate in the rebirth of their homeland‰Û_" (July 22, 1955)23. To Foreign Minister Moshe Sharet, with carbon copy to Moshe Dayan. "I have no doubts in regards to General Haim Laskov's credentials, ability, and suitability for the position of deputy Chief of Staff ‰Û_ his vast experience as a commander of British units and the Hebrew brigade will make him a great asset to the IDF‰Û_" (December 24, 1955)24. To the Editor of "Ha'aretz". "Every nation under attack and especially us, is obligated to protect itself, self-defense is a holy responsibility, it is so inscribed in the Charter of the United Nations‰Û_" (March 31, 1956)25. To author S.Y. Agnon (later Nobel laureate). "Some seventy million Arabs live across our borders, and they extend to the Atlantic ‰Û_ Israel has a serious security problem with only two solutions: military preparedness and constant striving for peace, for war is a bankruptcy of diplomacy‰Û_" (April 10, 1956)26. To architect Richard Kaufman: "Your plans seem to me fundamental. I will find out from the Minister of Development the fate of Eilat." (July 31, 1957)27. "Your vote in the Knesset against the Government will not diminish the promise you were given about the schools, or any other matter. When I offered you what I offered on the political level - I did not associate it in any way with a financial reward‰Û_" (January 9, 1958)28. "I do not know which of the two bodies is responsible for the arrangement that was made yesterday in the Knesset in remembrance of Herzl's century anniversary ‰Û_ I see it my moral and public duty to express my deep disappointment of the arrangements made for the Memorial Day which did not add honor neither to the Knesset nor the memory of the seer of the Jewish State‰Û_" (May 10, 1960)29. "The State will establish society solely and exclusively on the foundations of truth and justice and moral values. I will fight for disclosure of the truth. In this matter, I have no fear, even if they expel me from the Party, and I will fight with all of the means at my disposal‰Û_" (November 2, 1964)30. "I was not ‰Û÷forced to' resign - not because of misunderstanding with those around me - but for my own personal reasons - in which no other motivation, person, or external event had any role. It is correct that the Prime Minister of Burma attempted, at my request, to speak with Nasser - but like all other attempts with Nasser - it was unsuccessful‰Û_" (May 13, 1968)31. "I always was in favor of changing the election system and my party accepted my suggestion ‰Û_ but later they reconsidered this decision. Now I'm not a member of any party and I'm not dealing with these matters anymore bit I haven't changed my opinion‰Û_" (February 25, 1972)32. Informal photographs of David Ben-Gurion, 127 photographs (approximately 1å_" x 1 inch) on four sheets of proofs of photographs depicting Ben-Gurion, June 10-13, 1969Many extras included.Housed in an 11.5" X 12" album with slipcase.

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Current bid: $10,000 (1 bid)

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Bock's Car crew members sign First Day Cover comm 100th anniv of Einstein's bday

Estimate: $300 - $400

Description: Bock's Car - Bock's Car crew members sign First Day Cover commemorating the 100th anniversary of Einstein's birth. Philatelic Envelope with Einstein Portrait Image and E=Mcå_ cachet Signed by Bock's Car Crew Members: "C.Don Albury--Pilot," "Charles Sweeney Pilot," "Kermit K Beahan / Bombardier 2nd atomic bomb WW II / Nagasaki Japan 9 Aug 1945", "Jacob Beser," "Sgt. Ray Gallagher / Atomic Bombing Missions Aug. 6&9, 1945." One page, 6.5" x 3.75", postmarked March 4, 1979, Princeton, NJ / First Day Of Issue. Minor corner wear. Fine condition.Bock's Car or Bockscar, a modified B-29 bomber, dropped the world's second and last atomic bomb used in World War II on Nagasaki, Japan, August 9, 1945, hastening the end of the war. Japan announced its surrender six days later and officially surrendered September 2, 1945, V-J Day. Charles Sweeney was the only pilot to observe from the cockpit both nuclear blasts that devastated the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

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Current bid: $140 (2 bids)

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Document signed by Simon Bolivar promoting Col. Leon Galindo to General

Estimate: $2,400 - $2,600

Description: Bolivar Simon 1783 - 1830 As Liberator President of the Republic of Colombia, Simon Bolivar promotes Col. Leon Galindo to General Partly Printed Document Signed "Simon Bolivar" as Libertador Presidente de la Republica de Colombia, 1p, 8.25" x 12". Bogota, October 2, 1827. In Spanish, not translated. Countersigned, endorsements on verso and on integral leaf. Watermarked laid paper. Soiled from waterstains in upper portions of leaves. Blind embossed 1.5"-diameter paper seal, with clear impression, affixed on 6" x 7.5" paper (folded) at lower left. Good condition.Bolivar appoints Colonel Leon Galindo as General. Joseph Leon Galindo Camacho (1795-1865) arrived in upper Peru (today, Bolivia) with Simon Bolivar. On December 9, 1824, in the Battle of Ayacucho, Galindo was the victorious Commander of the Bogota Battalion of the 2nd Colombian Division under Commander-in-Chief Antonio Jos̩ de Sucre. Ayacucho was the battle that secured the independence of Peru and ensured independence for the rest of South America.

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Starting bid: $800 (0 bids)

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Mobster Joseph Bonanno signed check, PSA/DNA slabbed NM 7

Estimate: $200 - $300

Description: Bonanno Joe 1905 - 2002 Mobster Joseph Bonanno signed check, PSA/DNA slabbed NM 7 Signed check, 6" x 2.75" on beige paper drawn from The Arizona Bank at Tucson, AZ. Signed and dated by Joseph Bonanno "4/12, 1973", "Joe Bonanno", and made out to "The Travelers Insurance Co." for the amount of "Fifty-nine and 15/xx". PSA/DNA slabbed and graded NM7.A wonderful signed check by Joseph Bonanno, AKA Joe Bananas, who led one of the top New York crime families in New York from the 1930's to the 1960's. Bonanno eventually went to work for Salvatore Maranzano as an enforcer. Maranzano's operations included bootlegging and bookmaking rackets among other criminal pursuits. Taking the young Bonanno under his wing, Maranzano served an underworld mentor to the up-and-coming mobster. Bonanno also provided Maranzano with invaluable advice and support during his clash with fellow Sicilian crime figure Joseph Masseria (in what has been called the Castellammarese War). The war ended with Masseria's death in April 1931.

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Current bid: $90 (2 bids)

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Napoleon's refusal to Minister of War's request of salary compensation

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400

Description: Bonaparte Napoleon 1769 - 1821 On the day Napoleon and his army reached the gates of Vienna, his Minister of War forwards a request to the Emperor from a General, interim commandant of a militia, who asked to be paid the Major General's salary for the period he commanded the division - Napoleon refused! Autograph Endorsement Signed "RefusÌ© / Np" as Emperor on Manuscript Document Signed "C. de Hunebourg" as Minister of War, 1 page, 8.75" x 12.75". No place, May 10, 1809. On watermarked laid paper. In French, partially translated. Minor flaws. Fine condition.Headed "Report to His Majesty the Emperor and King." This report is summarized in Volume III (1809-1810) of "Correspondence of Napoleon I." From page 53: "The Minister reports to the Emperor that he has authorised that General Poncet, interim commandant of the 19th military division, receive extra pay on the basis of 12,000 francs per year, attributed to the Major General whose function he performed. The Minister begs His Majesty to confirm this measure. Refused."In part, "The General of the Brigade Poncet charged in the interim of the command of the 19th military division asks for the extraordinary treatment of 12000 francs from your Majesty 1 April 1808 to the General of the Division in which he filled the function ‰Û_"On the day Napoleon reached the gates of Vienna, on May 10,1809, his Minister of War, Henri-Jacques-Guillaume Clarke, 1st Count of Hunebourg, 1st Duke of Feltre (1765-1818), wrote this report to him. Installed at Schoenbrunn Palace on May 11th, Napoleon accepted the surrender of Vienna on the morning of May 13, 1809.

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Current bid: $600 (2 bids)

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Lizzie Borden signed a copy of

Estimate: $2,000 - $2,400

Description: Borden Lizzie 1860 - 1927 Published three years before she "took an axe," Lizzie Borden has signed her name in her copy of "The Index Guide to Travel and Art-Study in Europe." It is annotated in her hand with over 20 words. Book Signed "L. A. Borden" on the blank page following the front free-endpaper. Her copy of The Index Guide to Travel and Art-Study in Europe by Lafayette C. Loomis, 573 pages plus 10 pages of advertisements, 4.5" x 6.75". New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1889. Alphabetized. Full black calf with gilt lettering. Frontispiece, numerous maps, floor plans and illustrations. Marbled endpapers and page edges. Half of the spine is missing or damaged. Covers worn at edges, bumped. Very good condition.On the blank page preceding the back free-endpaper, Lizzie Borden has penciled five lines, in part, "checked red cushion ‰Û_ prettiest picture of kind ever saw. Blue A.M. glory growing up on one side." She's also penciled "Miss S.W. Fox / 99 Irving St. / Cambridge / Mass." Miss Sarah Winslow Fox (1840-1911) was a teacher in Somerville High School from 1868-1906. From 1882-1883, she travelled and studied in Europe. There are numerous "x" and other marks next to some of the entries. Next to "Luxembourg, The Palace of," Miss Lizzie Borden has penciled "did not visit." She may have discussed this book with Miss Fox.Of course, Lizzie is better known from this most familiar rhyme recited at the time of her 1892 murder trial (and afterwards after she was acquitted): "Lizzie Borden took an axe / And gave her mother forty whacks. / When she saw what she had done, / She gave her father forty-one.Anything signed by Lizzie Borden is extremely rare. In 2003, a signed copy of a book owned by her sold for $6000. Only three ALsS signed by her have sold at auction in the last 25 years, the latest bringing over $8000.

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Starting bid: $1,000 (0 bids)

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Newspaper comments on the disorder in Boston following the Boston Massacre

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,500

Description: Boston Massacre 1770 - In the wake of the Boston Massacre, a Boston paper publishes Arthur Lee's letter foreshadowing same. Letters leading to the Tea Party are also included. The 14 May 1770 edition of The Boston Evening Post (Printed by T. & J. Fleet), 4pp, 9.75" x 15.5". Light marginal wear, usual folds, ownership signature at top left corner. The front page bears a transcript of one of Lee's many political essays written under the pseudonym, "JUNIUS AMERICANUS," one of more than 170 political essays he authored during his time in London serving as an agent for Massachusetts in London in the late 1760s and early 1770s. His essays criticizing British imperial policy, while published in Britain, were intended for audiences on both sides of the Atlantic, and they were reprinted in over 30 colonial American newspapers and did much to galvanize public opinion to support resistance to imperial revenue measures. Written only days after the Boston Massacre, Lee comments on the disorder in Boston created by the presence of regular British troops in the town, in an address to Massachusetts governor Francis Bernard (who unbeknownst to Lee at the time had left office): "...What still heightens the misfortune is, that our gracious Sovereign and his Ministers have formed such an idea of the present state of the town, as to induce a necessity of this navel and military force, for the aid of the civil Magistrate, in the preservation of its peace and good order. Your Excellency can witness for the town, that no such aid is necessary. Loyalty to the Sovereign, and an inflexible zeal for the support of his Majesty's authority, and the happy constitution, is its just character: and we may appeal to the impartial world, that peace and order were better maintained in the town, before it was even rumoured that his Majesty's troops were to be quartered among us, than it has been since..." Little did Lee know that things had come to a head in Boston only days before when a company of regulars fired on a mob that had been harassing the soldiers and pelting them with ice balls. The incident did much to inflame passions against the quartered troops and became a cause cÌ©l̬bre among American Whigs. The issue also includes letters promoting the continuing non-importation agreements against British imports: "We have the pleasure of informing the public, that 360 persons ‰Û_ have already signed the Agreement voted by the Town [Salem, Massachusetts] last Tuesday, against drinking Tea, &c." More fine content.

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Starting bid: $400 (0 bids)

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Parts of Zeppelin along with large print signed by Margaret Bourke White

Estimate: $3,500 - $4,000

Description: Bourke-White Margaret 1906 - 1971 Spectacular and very large silver gelatin print of the Zeppelin Airship Akronbeing eased from its hangar on its maiden launch, signed in the lower right corner by photographer Margaret Bourke-White, framed in original bolted "Duralumin," the same material used in the girder construction of theAkronby the Goodyear Zeppelin Corporation Margaret Bourke-White Signed Photograph, Zeppelin Airship Akron. No place: 1931. Large folio, 23" x 17.5", original silver gelatin print, original "Duralumin" frame; entire piece measures 26" x 20". A few small smudges and discolorations to print, particularly along lower edge, just touching signature but not affecting overall appearance of image; original frame fine. A handsome piece.Called "one of the world's great artists" by Alfred Stieglitz, Margaret Bourke-White "epitomized the dynamic spirit of her age‰Û_ covering the most important events of the mid-century" (McDarrah, 52). A photographer at Fortune and Time, Bourke-White was "one of the first photojournalists who told a news story in pictures and also wrote the text" (New York Times), and as a Life staff photographer, she became "of the most successful women in America" (Parr & Badger I:140). During the early years of the Depression, Goodyear was one of Bourke-White's most important clients. She made this image of the airship Akron when it was removed from its hangar for the first time.The Akron was a helium-filled airship of the U.S. Navy which operated between September 1931 and April 1933. She was the world's first flying aircraft carrier, carrying F9C Sparrowhawk fighter planes which could be launched from and recovered by the airship while in flight. The Akron still holds the world record for largest helium-filled airship (the slightly larger Hindenburg and Graf Zeppelin II were filled with hydrogen). The April 4, 1933 crash of the Akron into the sea during heavy weather, which resulted in the loss of 73 crew and passengers (only three men survived)‰ÛÓthe largest loss of life in any airship crash‰ÛÓspelled the end of the rigid airship program in the U.S. Navy, especially since one of the leading proponents of the airship program, Rear Admiral William Moffett, was aboard and died in the accident. The engraved inscription on the original frame reads: "Winner/ C. Poley/ Third Annual Goodyear Dealers Zeppelin Race July-August 1931. This frame is made of Duralumin used in girder construction of the United States Airship 'Akron' built by the Goodyear Zeppelin Corporation." Duralumin was the trade name of a very lightweight aluminum-copper alloy.

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Starting bid: $1,500 (0 bids)

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Letter from nephew of photographer Charles D. Fredricks to Mathew Brady

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400

Description: Brady Mathew 1823 - 1896 Docketed by Brady, a letter from the nephew of photographer Charles D. Fredricks to Brady concerning financial and other matters Docket "E L Cook / Dec 6/64" by Mathew B. Brady on fourth page of an Autograph Letter Signed "E.L. Cook," 4p, 5" x 8", two conjoined sheets, front & verso. Tear at joint expertly mended. New York, December 6 [1864]. Elijah L. Cook was photographer C.D. Fredricks' nephew. To Brady. Light stains at lower corner of second sheet. Fine condition.As the Civil War was drawing to a close, the interest in battlefield photographs waned and Brady suffered a number of financial setbacks. Underlined words in the first sentence in purple ink probably by Brady; other underlined words by Cook. In part, "Yours just recd draft for $200 came all right. The note was made on the 30th of Augst so there is 3 mos. due on it. I will send myself tonight the cigars to Blauvelt. I have raised the devil with Betts who says it is all the fault of ‰Û÷his man.' I saw your wife in a stage the other day She was well and looking as handsome as ever - says she goes on to see you tomorrow. I was much provoked at Betts way of doing things. Liquors were offered me by a dozen different parties, but as he was an old chum thought he would do better. I concur in all your remarks respecting papers &c they were drawn up by a friend of mine who is a lawyer and brot in at the last minute so that I just skimed over them but as he said it ‰Û÷was all right' ‰Û_ You are right I do owe 3 parties in W. [Washington] but Van Hooks is the largest and only $200 If I can only get what is owing me I could laugh at such things and slap ‰Û÷a full pocket ‰Û_ As far as managing ‰Û÷the Gym' or even ‰Û÷advising' you is concerned, all I can say is I should not know how to do either or even desire to. All the advice I have to give is go ahead and make money as fast as possible. Is this sound? The advice part was originated in the fertile brain of the lawyer it was no idea of mine I assure you‰Û_"Docketed on fourth page by Mathew B. Brady "E L Cook / Dec 6/64" across Cook's writing, with adequate contrast.From 1855-1875, the studio of Elijah L. Cook's uncle, Charles D. Fredricks (1823-1894), at 585-587 Broadway operated as Fredricks Photographic Temple of Art, the largest and most stylish photographic gallery in New York City. In 1859, Fredricks introduced cartes de visite photographs to the United States and became the American agent of French photographer F.R. Grumel, inventor of the photograph album. Fredricks brought suits against anyone who infringed upon Grumel's patent. He also supplied photographic templates for the illustrations in "Frank Leslie's Illustrated," the first periodical that made pictures its selling point. When his studio was destroyed by fire in 1875, Fredricks relocated to 770 Broadway.

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Starting bid: $400 (0 bids)

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Decorative 16th Century Printed Military Decree

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400

Description: Broadside - Decorative 16th Century Printed Military Decree Decorative 16th Century Printed Decree, in Latin, one page, 11" x 16", January 13, 1587, with three coats-of arms at the top. The initial "I" of the text bears an engraving of Icarus descending. Partially and roughly translated: "Decreed Over All Military Branches...D. Henricus Card[inal] Caetanus of Good qualities Appoints a Deputy...to lead out colonists... to be classed among , and elected upon...Especially according to the order...". With a lengthy untranslated manuscript addition on the verso. Minor wear and soiling as expected. About fine.

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Starting bid: $400 (0 bids)

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Whitey Bulger  signs a photograph of inmate Walter Mollett

Estimate: $400 - $500

Description: Bulger James "Whitey" 1929 - Whitey Bulger, convicted murderer and organized crime boss in Boston, signs a photograph of inmate Walter Mollett who was beaten and choked to death by another inmate - with a lengthy description Photograph Signed "James Whitey Bulger 1428 AZ " on verso with lengthy Autograph Note on verso. Black and white, 4" x 6". Alcatraz mug shot of inmate Walter Mollett who was killed by inmate Jack Twining on February 12, 1959. Bulger served at Alcatraz from November 16, 1959 to 1962; his Alcatraz prison number was 1428. Fine condition.In part, "Mollet - 'Sexual Predator.' targeted wrong convict 'Jack Twining' Twining saved notes M. wrote & threw in his cell - Threats etc - Twining saved them as evidence of Why he had to kill this animal in self defence. Then Jack killed M. in laundry - hit him chop to throat, choked him unconcious a few times then told him 'Now you Die' he backed his brains out on a cut off pipe and ripped his eyes out Then leaped up and down on M.s body ‰Û_ FBI agents investigated Jack had many defense witnesses - no witness for Prosecution‰Û_"

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Starting bid: $200 (0 bids)

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Captain Eleazir Robbins' copy of important news just after the Battle of Bunker

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400

Description: Bunker Hill Battle of 1775 - Captain Eleazir Robbins' copy of important news just after the Battle of Bunker Hill, including England's promise to "...finish the War at once by reducing with a military force the provinces of New England to obedience." Robbins commanded one of nine companies that left Stoughton, Massachusetts on April 19, 1775, in response to the call to arms after the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Newspaper, 4 pages, 10" x 15", printed at Harvard College for the period September 14 - September 21, 1775. Volume VIII, Number 373, belonging to Captain Eleazir Robbins and very likely signed by him on the first page above the headline. There is much content naming many of the important generals of the war, and activities in London, Lexington and Concord, Boston, Philadelphia, and at Fort Ticonderoga. Small loss at folds and two tears repaired with archival tape, else toned and lightly soiled. Just about very good condition.According to Jack Authelet, author of Foxborough: gem of Norfolk County, "Paul Revere and William Dawes spread the alarm. The British were marching to seize the stores of powder held at Lexington and Concord. Word spread quickly through the territory, and the Minute Men marched in response to the alarm. Captains Josiah Pratt and Eleazer (sic) Robbins of Stoughton (which included the present East Foxborough) commanded two of the nine companies that left Stoughton on April 19, 1775, in response to the call to arms...These officers were leading more than militia companies. They were leading friends, the sons of their neighbors, other family members, and people they saw every Sunday at worship, giving them a heightened sense of responsibility for their troops."

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Starting bid: $400 (0 bids)

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Unique memorabilia signed by George Bush as President

Estimate: $100 - $140

Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 Uniquememorabilia signed by George Bush as President George Bush signed photo/memorabilia which includes a small photo of George Bush, an image of the Presidential seal, and an abbreviated quote of when a President is sworn into office. On 8.5' x 11" glossy paper, boldly signed and inscribed in black felt tip by George Bush as "to the Wades/Thanks!/ George Bush"A most unique piece of presidential memorabilia, we have never seen anything like it! Boldly signed by President Bush. From the spectacular, unprecedented collection of Ronald Ellis Wade, with the piece specifically being inscribed to him.Below is an interesting interview from TheHill.com, about Ron Wade and his collection of Presidential memorabilia:Step into Ronald Wade's office and it's easy to see why he's listed in "Guinness World Records 2015" for the largest collection of U.S. presidential memorabilia - it's really a replica of the Oval Office. "Actually, they quit counting," Wade says of his immense collection of White House and presidential campaign items, "because I probably have closer to 20,000 or 30,000 items, if not closer to 100,000 - that's with duplication." The official count from the folks behind the famed book puts Wade's collection in chief at 6,960 pieces as of last year. The lifelong Republican has been racking up "practically anything that has to do with American politics" since he was 10 years old. "My first memory in life is wearing an 'I Like Ike' button, and I was probably 4 years old. So I've always been interested in politics," Wade, 64, tells ITK.

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Current bid: $160 (6 bids)

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George Bush signs a letter of appreciation & recognition for the Panama support

Estimate: $100 - $140

Description: Bush George W. 1946 - 0 George Bush, as President, signs a TLS of appreciation and recognition for the Panama support A crisp TLS, 6.25" x 4.25" card, on Presidential letterhead and raised gilt seal. Dated "January 29, 1990" and signed by George Bush, as "George Bush". Fine conditionA lovely card showing President Bush's appreciation for Ron Wade's "supportive words on Panama". Boldly signed.

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Current bid: $100 (3 bids)

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Rare broadside re: taxes & duties for export of merchandise fr Spain to America

Estimate: $400 - $500

Description: Carlos III of Spain King 1715 - Decorative and extremely rare original broadside concerning taxes and duties for the export of merchandise from Spain to America Printed broadside, one page, 16" X 24", Lima, Peru, February 11, 1783. Likely signed by or on behalf of a local magistrate. The proclamation reads in part: "...Don Jorge Escobedo y Alarcon, Knight of Royal and distinguished order of Carlos III, from Council of his majesty in the Royal and Supreme of Indias, General Visitor of Justice Courts and Royal Public Funds of this Kingdom, General Superintendent of them, Intendent of Army, and subdelegate of tobacco rent...Wishing the King of our Lord to foment the commerce and obtain the greater lightening of his vassals, I command the following thing..." . Tape repair on verso at center fold, piece of left margin missing not affecting legibility, otherwise very good condition.

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Starting bid: $200 (0 bids)

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Document relating to the burial expenses and sale of property of Butch Cassidy

Estimate: $1,500 - $2,000

Description: Cassidy Butch 1866 - 1908 Remarkable document relating to the burial expenses and sale of property of Butch Cassidy and his "Wild Bunch" Document, County of Carbon letterhead, 1 page, 8.25" x 11"."For Burial Espencies of Joe Walker Butch Cassida (Elias) Roy Parker Tom Gilis. The following Property Sold on the 24th May 1898 at Price Utah."Over 20 items listed, with price and name of buyer, including pistols, a gun, boots, blankets, seven horses, saddle, spurs.On April 21, 1897, Butch Cassidy, Joe Walker, and Elza Lay robbed the payroll of the Pleasant Valley Coal Company at Castle Gate, Utah, just west of Price, Utah. Hearing that Walker had been seen in the area, on May 8, 1898, a posse consisting of Carbon County, Utah, Sheriff C.W. Allred, Pete Anderson, Jack Gentry, Jim Inglefield, Billy McGuire, J.W. Warf, Jack Watson, J. B. Whitmore, and George Whitmore, was formed. Early on the morning of May 13th, mistakenly thinking they had discovered the camp of Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, the posse shot and killed two men. They recognized one body as Joe Walker. They thought the other was Butch Cassidy.The headline in the Salt Lake Tribune on May 14, 1898 proclaimed "Butch is dead." A coroner's inquest ruled that Walker and Cassidy were indeed the two bodies. Sheriff John Ward, of Evanston, Wyoming, who once had Cassidy in his jail for three months, was asked to come and confirm the identity of the second outlaw. He arrived a day after the burial; the bodies were exhumed. The May 17th edition of the Salt Lake Herald headlined "Butch Cassidy is Still Alive," reporting that Ward had identified the second body as that of Bob Culp, a notorious cattle thief. Photocopy of the article is present. There are reports that Butch Cassidy, hiding under a haystack in a wagon, watched his own funeral on May 15th.

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Current bid: $700 (2 bids)

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Castro writes battle content letter about last major push of the Revolutionaries

Estimate: $10,000 - $12,000

Description: Castro Fidel 1927 - 2016 Fidel Castro, holed up in the Cuban mountains, writes a battle content letter about the last major push of the Revolutionaries: "A lot of bullets are going to be needed."Among the finest letters extant of the recently deceased leader. Six page letter, 4" x 5.5", on thin note paper consisting of three sheets written on recto and verso. Penned entirely in Castro's hand, with each page numbered at the top. Dated "Sierra Maestro/Sep 29, '58", and signed "!Buena suerte! /Fidel Castro". One 2mm intact tear to the top edge of one sheet outside of margins, expected center folds, paper lightly toned. Near fine condition.A profound and revealing letter, penned by Fidel Castro just months before his "Movement" of armed Cuban rebels ousted the authoritarian government of then President Batista. Writing while stationed deep within the Sierra Maestra, Castro emphatically reports the outcome of the latest raid to his head of the Revolutionary Air Force, Pedro Luis, (aka Pedro Luis DÌ_az Lanz), one of his key personal responsible for smuggling weapons and ammunition from Costa Rica and Florida into Cuba. To put the importance of Pedro in perspective, in 1959 Time magazine reported Pedro Luis as "One of the authentic heroes of the Castro rebellion (who) was a beardless, unostentatious young flyer named Pedro Luis Diaz Lanz. He flew weapons from the U.S. to Fidel Castro, took Manuel Urrutia, the man who later became Cuba's President, into the Sierra Maestra, and served after the rebellion as Castro's personal pilot." This stunning letter is written during the short period just after Castro's imprisonment when he was pardoned by Batista's government in 1955 ( the bizarre outcome of being considered no longer a political threat to Batista--needless to say a poor choice on Batista's part), and up to the period leading to Castro's overthrow of the Bastisa regime. This is during the period when Castro fled to the Sierra Maestramountain range and built an army with his brother Ra̼l Castro and Juan 'Almeida" Bosque to wage guerrilla warfare. The letter, written in Spanish is translated as follows with a prenote, quite possibly written in code, quoting a message from Zoilo. The letter also makes a direct reference to requiring Pedro to fly in more weapons and "bullets": "Pedro Luis: Zoilo sent the following message: "We try operation tuesday to thursday. Arrival seven thirty to nine night. Airplane same destroy. Mark direction landing field entrance. The rest condition to exaggeration same agree for operation cancel. Confirm urgest this code. Zoilo This arrived a little delayed where I am. They responded in the plant to come. I send you the paper right now at night, so you have time to prepare everything. Hopefully this time we have a little bit of luck. There is much need for your trips. There is a lot of fighting and the month of october will be of extraordinary activity. The combat at Cerro was heavy (Cerro is a borough of Havana). The two 87 mortars work with extraordinary precision. The encampment; tents, the command post, were direct targets of our mortar shots They defended themselves with cannons, machine guns 50, mortars and other weapons. The object of the attack was to impede the removal of troops from here to Camaguey and other parts. Although we could not make them surrender, the strategic purpose was accomplished and they were defeated - no great number of casualties. Our troop suffered five casualties. All were mortal wounds. The people all performed very well and were valiant. I am sorry you didn't get to see that. Almeida inflicted a defeat to the enemy causing them 25 casualties, occupying 10 weapons and 55 prisoners, among them the Lieutenant Colonel Nelson Carrasco Artiles, wounded and prisoner. A lot of bullets are going to be needed, Pedro Luis. You all can not rest in the coming weeks. Good Luck! Fidel Castro" A fantastic letter written by Castro. The reader can literally feel like they are holed up in the mountains discussing guerrilla strategy to overthrow a government. The sheer complexity and duration of this 'movement' for the 'people' had been brewing for years going back to a time to when Castro was still a young attorney and first attempted to evoke change from authoritarian rule using his legal background and hoping the pen would be mightier than the sword. At the time, Batista antagonized the Cuban population by forming lucrative links to organized crime, becoming as brutal and vicious as any dictator in modern history and was completely indifferent to popular concerns. In early 1952, via a more peaceful attempt, Castro had first legally petitioned for the overthrow of Batista, whom he had accused of corruption and tyranny. However, his constitutional arguments were rejected by the Cuban courts. Castro was known to have remarked " I am convinced more than ever of the dictatorship's intention, masked in many ways, to remain in power for twenty years, ruling as now by the use of terror and crime and ignoring the patience of the Cuban people, which has its limits". After deciding that the Cuban regime could not be replaced through legal means, Castro resolved to launch an armed revolution; and with the support of the begrudged masses the path to change was forged.

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Charles I is forced to recall Parliament to requ funds for war against Scotland

Estimate: $1,200 - $1,400

Description: Charles I of England King 1600 - 1649 After ruling without a Parliament for 12 years, Charles I is forced to recall Parliament to request funds for war against Scotland: "I must tell you yet of my Subjects of Scotland did finde out such shift...it was not possible for us to end this Treaty's power..." Contemporaneous Faircopy of a speech by King Charles I in Parliament in November of 1640. Manuscript, Contemporaneous Faircopy folio, 2p, November 5, 1640 Whitehall, London, England. The transcription of the speech reads, in part: "I doo expect that you will make a effort relation to the house of commons of what I said this last daie to comend to your care those great affaires for which I have called you hither & to express what wish I have imposed in them having freely put my self on their love & affections at this time & that you maie‰Û_know my intentions. I will now explain one point that I spoke of last daie I told you that the Nobles were to be put out of this kingdom. I must‰Û_them soo, soo long as they have an Army to invade us. Although because of this Treaty under the great Seale I call them onlie my Subjects & they are too. Now you and‰Û_want to doo it by force or by fair means but the last is that I wish & hope may be effected. Therefore, that you maie not‰Û_that I have exported or brought you a War‰Û_those words might seem to import, I will‰Û_show you‰Û_State of my affaires as they stand at this present. First therefore I must tell you that when I did call my‰Û_at my great counsell to Yorke & there did disband this Parliament. I did expect to have met you at that time only to have given you a gracious answer to all your ‰Û_ for I was in good hope by your lords wisdom & ‰Û_ to have made an end of our New Year trouble. But I must tell you yet my subjects of Scotland did finde out such shift & delaies as it was not possible for us to end this Treatys power and in this I can not‰Û_blame my lords who went to Rippon, but on the contrary I must thank them as being wise of‰Û_wanting time to doo more. It was thought fit to‰Û_cessation of drums & so to transform the Treatie from Rippon to London whence I shall conclude nothing without your knowledge & I doubt not but likewise‰Û_your approbation & likewise I desire you all my actions of ‰Û_to be cleerly understood (as having not bin done in a‰Û_)I shall in time leave upon unto you from the beginning all the heedings of this weighty business and how those great misunderstandings have grown between mee & my Scottish Subjects and I doubt not but in this treatie with your assistance that I shall make from either know their justice by submitting to what is reason, or if they shall still persist in their rebellious humour by your powerful advise to make your returns ‰Û_"

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Wonderful 1652 King Charles I period booklet

Estimate: $800 - $1,000

Description: Charles I of England King 1600 - 1649 Wonderful 1652 Charles I period booklet on "The Exposing to Sale, Hereditaments belonging to the King, Queen of Prince of England" An Act For The Exposing to Sale divers Castles, Houses, Parks, Lands and Hereditaments belonging to the King, Queen or Prince, London. Printed by John Field, Printer to the Parliament of England, 1652. 6.25" x 10", Stitched binding, 10 pages with front soft wrap. Overall toned and faintly grubby with light handling marks. Professional paper strengthening and repair to outer page edges in the margins, not affecting text. Provenance: Ex-Sotheby's 1964, to Samuel Moss. Then by descent to Kathryn Moss.This booklet was printed just a few years after the beheading of King Charles I, at the climax of the English Civil War. Parliament of Scotland proclaimed Charles II King on February 5, 1649, with England being declared a Commonwealth in 1649 and ruled as a de facto republic. Cromwell had defeated Charles II at the Battle of Worcester in 1651, and Charles fled to mainland Europe. Cromwell became virtual dictator of England, Scotland and Ireland, and Charles spent the next nine years in exile in France. This booklet was printed the following year and determined An Act for The Exposing to Sale divers Castles, Houses, Parks, Lands and Hereditaments belonging the King, Queen of Prince excepted from Sale by a former Act.Scarce. Beautifully printed and in overall great condition.

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Cesar Chavez signed National Farm Workers membership card

Estimate: $200 - $300

Description: Chavez Cesar 1927 - 1993 Cesar Chavez signed National Farm Workers membership card, origin of the United Farmworkers Union Small card 3.5" x 2.5", for the Professors Academic Membership 1966 NATIONAL FARM WORKERS ASSOCIATION / Delano, California. Small red insignia to upper left and signed by Director Cesar Chavez as "Cesar Chavez". Fine condition.A wonderful piece of agricultural history, the National Farm Workers Association was founded in 1962 by Cesar Chavez, a migrant farm laborer. It originated from the merger of two workers' rights organizations, the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee (AWOC) led by organizer Larry Itliong, and the National Farm Workers Association (NFWA) led by Cesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta. They became allied and transformed from workers' rights organizations into a union as a result of a series of strikes in 1965, when the mostly Filipino farmworkers of the AWOC in Delano California initiated a grape strike, and the NFWA went on strike in support. As a result of the commonality in goals and methods, the NFWA and the AWOC formed the United Farm Workers Organizing Committee on August 22, 1966. (This organization was later accepted into the AFL-CIO in 1972 and changed its name to the United Farmworkers Union)The NFWA originated as a grassroots organization on the premise that farm workers can be organized by providing services that transform their day to day lives. Functioning somewhat like a co-op, the intent was to unify the farming communities common needs which would lower costs, save time and allow for higher quality of services. Some of the features including a discount store for tires and oil, a staff for job grievances, a newspaper, a life insurance program, a parts store and service station for the equipment where families can bring their cards to fix under the direction and supervision of a master mechanic. And ultimately even a pharmacy. The NFWA was also appealing to the assistance of the academic community with the belief that farm workers themselves were not able to raise all the capital necessary to provide these services, the intent was to solicit support from professors who would understand the need for a democratic society to eradicate social injustice. At the time Farm Workers were making only about $2000 to $3000 a year, an equivalent in todays terms of about $15,000, an absurd amount for a family to live on. This NFWA card signed by Cesar Chavez, requested a donation of $10 as a contribution to an academic membership to bring a measure of social justice in California agriculture "one step closer". A great piece of history of the grass roots beginning of the United Farmworkers Union.

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Current bid: $80 (1 bid)

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Winston Churchill files income taxes for 1951-1952, incl income fr History WWII

Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200

Description: Churchill Winston 1874 - 1965 Winston Churchill files his income taxes for 1951-1952, including income from his multi-volume history of the Second World War. Partly printed Document Signed, "W S Churchill," 2 pages, front and verso, 7" x 9.25", Chartwell, Westerham, Kent, February 19, 1953, being a portion of his tax return for the tax year ending on APRIL 5, 1952. Offered together with a two page printed instruction sheet issued to the "Rt. Hon Winston L.S. Churchill Chartwell Manor, Westerham, Kent" and dated April 7, 1952. Usual folds, trimmed along right margin with minor loss at top right affecting a few lines of printed text, a few minor marginal tears, else very good condition. On the recto, Churchill lists his income and expenses for the year, totaling å£18,800, 7-3 in income and å£17,688, 19-1 in "CHARGES," leaving a taxable balance of å£1,111, 8-2. Within three months of the end of hostilities in Europe, Winston Churchill found himself forced out of power with the Conservative defeat at the July polls. When his physician bemoaned the 'ingratitude' of the British public, Churchill countered, saying "I wouldn't call it that. They have had a very hard time." Indeed, many voters who voted against the Conservatives in that election still loved Churchill and hoped he would still remain Prime Minister‰ÛÓthough this was constitutionally impossible (Martin.Winston S. Churchill: Never Despair: 1945-1965.1988, pp. 57, 107-09). As leader of the opposition in Parliament for the next six years, Churchill found time to author his epic six-volume history of the Second World War, which began appearing in print in 1948. Indeed for much of his political career, despite his patrician background, Churchill had supported his extravagant lifestyle by writing books and articles for magazines. (Until 1946, Ministers of Parliament received only a nominal salary, and prior to 1911, nothing at all). In 1953, his work earned him the Nobel Prize in Literature. Needless to say, Churchill, like most of us, was no fan of taxes. In 1905 he commented that "We conå_tend that for a nation to try to tax itself into proså_perå_ity is like a man standå_ing in a bucket and tryå_ing to lift himå_self up by the hanå_dle." ("Why I am a Free Trader," W. T. Stead, ed., Coming Men on Coming Questions, 1905, p. 11). Provenance: Steve Forbes collection. A similar tax document signed by Churchill sold at a New York auction for a hammer price of $3,000 twenty years ago (R. M. Smythe, New York, June 8, 1995, lot 56).

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Current bid: $350 (2 bids)

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Lg archive re: editing/publishing of Churchill's Marlborough: His Life and Times

Estimate: $60,000 - $80,000

Description: Churchill Winston 1874 - 1965 An exceptional rarity: large archive of material relating to the editing and publishing of Churchill's Marlborough: His Life and Times, comprising 28 excellent content letters signed by Churchill, nearly all to his notorious proofreader, C.C. Wood, together with many other items accumulated in the creation of this masterpiece John Churchill, the first Duke of Marlborough, started his court service as a page during the reign of Charles II and ended it as Master-General of the Ordnance of the English army under George I. He served under five sovereigns, distinguished himself on the battlefield and as a diplomat, and was once even imprisoned in the Tower of London for treason. Handsome and charming‰ÛÓ Lord Chesterfield described him as "irresistible to either man or woman"‰ÛÓ Marlborough's military strategy led the Duke of Wellington to say that he could "conceive nothing greater than Marlborough at the head of an English army." Future prime minister Winston Churchill, who was named after Marlborough's father and was the nephew of the Eighth Duke of Marlborough, wrote this history of his famous ancestor to refute earlier criticisms of Marlborough by the historian Thomas Babington Macaulay. "Though it was a commissioned work, Churchill would not have invested nearly a million words and ten years had it not had special significance for him. For he wrote about a man who was not only his ancestor, an invincible general, the first of what became the Spencer-Churchill dukes of Marlborough, and a maker of modern Britain, but also a supreme example of heroism in the two vocations which mainly interested Churchill and in which ultimate triumph seemed to have eluded him‰ÛÓ politics and war making" (Wiedhorn, 110). "It may be his greatest book. To understand the Churchill of the Second World War, the majestic blending of his commanding English with historical precedent, one has to read Marlborough. Only in its pages can one glean an understanding of the root of the speeches which inspired Britain to stand when she had little to stand with" (Langworth, 164). "The scholarship seems formidable, as in no other of his works. Picking his way through conflicting testimony and evaluations, Churchill, while leaning on William Coxe's 1818 biography of the duke, carefully weighs each writer's reliability. Yet the tone is not as detached as might be expected from an academic historian‰Û_ Marlborough, with his broad European view and his apparent sense of Britain's imperial destiny, is the fulcrum, and all the other characters, parties, and issues take their places accordingly‰Û_ the literati hostile to Marlborough‰ÛÓ Pope, Swift, Thackeray, Macaulay‰ÛÓ are harshly expelled from the witness stand" (Wiedhorn, 113-114).This archive of correspondence highlights both Churchill's meticulousness as a writer and editor and his relationship with his editor Charles Wood. Although Charles Wood first worked with Churchill on his book Marlborough in the 1930's, he was hired full-time in 1948 to proofread Churchill's massive multi-volume work-in-progress, The Second World War, joining Churchill's literary staff of secretaries (who typed on silent typewriters as Churchill dictated), research assistants, and advisors. Wood became "an essential member of the team and no error escaped his eye" (Gilbert VIII: 344). "The main addition to Churchill's literary entourage in 1948 was Charles Wood‰ÛÓ a retired proofreader who had worked on Marlborough in the 1930s. Slight and small, Wood was the same age as Churchill but did not smoke or drink. His main virtue‰Û_ was ‰Û÷a ruthless eye for misprints and inconsistencies.‰Û_. A meticulous proofreader, Wood was pedantic and opinionated. This, as much as Churchill's habitual parsimony, probably explains the reluctance to bring him on board. Even then, Churchill issued firm instructions about reducing, not increasing, the number of commas, identifying inconsistencies without arguing their merits, and certainly not going through original documents. But Wood was soon exceeding his brief in typically abrasive style‰Û_.. [Churchill once called] Wood ‰Û÷indefatigable, interminable, intolerable‰ÛÓ but he was determined not to repeat the errors in The Gathering Storm. So‰Û_ [Wood] became a fixed if fractious member of Churchill's team‰Û_ [The work was] subjected to the green pen of Mr. Wood‰ÛÓ a process that became known as ‰Û÷Wooding" (Reynolds, In Command of History: Churchill Fighting and Writing the Second World War, 149-150, 153).Typed letters signed from Churchill to C. C. Wood, chief copy editor at George G. Harrap & Co. Ltd. relating to the publication of his monumental biography Marlborough: His Life and Times. Most letters addressed "Dear Mr. Wood" in Churchill's hand and all letters signed by Churchill in his hand unless otherwise noted. 1. April 18, 1933, one page: "I have sent you by Mr. Ashley the three last chapters for reprint. There will now come in quick succession all the chapters for final galley proof. I shall want twelve copies of all the reprints and you had better order any extra ones you may require yourselves. I am also send you the key to the new chaperisation‰ÛÓtwo copies so that you may send one to the printers." Several corrections in Woods' hand. "Dear Sir" and "Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand. Two ink spots, pencil markings and underlinings.2. April 30, 1933, one page: "I am most carefully considering of course the question of modernising the old letters and documents. Up to the present I am modernising Marlborough's letters and those of the Duchess where quoted, but I am not modernising old documents which are cited in the text for the purpose of creating atmosphere. It may be that a further revision will be necessary later on." With diagonal line across page in ink. "Yours very sincerely/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.3. May 9, 1933, one page: "What do you advise about the old style and new style printing? Our plan is to print in old style events clearly English in their preponderance, and in new style those that are clearly Continental. When a date affects both England and the Continent we print both styles i.e. 4‰ÛÓ14, 8‰ÛÓ18. How should this be printed? Should it be a 4 with a diagonal line, or 4 on top of the 14 like a fraction, or 4 with 14 in brackets as you have done in certain dual dates. The complications of the year also comes in. It is very tiresome to the reader and should be minimized. Pray state what typography you advise." Churchill has made two corrections in the text and inserted "sometimes" towards the end. In the left margin, in ink, he has shown three forms of the date. With diagonal line across page in ink. "Yours very sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.4. May 13, 1933, one page (small sheet): "Thank you for your letter. I am having the book carefully read by Mr. Marsh for his orthography, and will send him your instructions at the same time." With diagonal line across page in ink. "Dear Sir" and "Yours W S Churchill" in Churchill's hand.5. July 13, 1933, one and å_ page: "I send you herewith (1) a list of illustrations, (2) those photographs not already send you yesterday. From these two sets you can make up a complete series according to my table. The arrangement is provisional and the captions which require further study will be supplied later. In all there are 38 illustrations. As you mentioned 32, I have therefore marked 6 with red crosses which can if desired be omitted. Pray let me know promptly. I send you also 6 facsimiles, only one of which, the Camaret Bay Letter cannot be printed with the text. This letter requires special treatment. It never works to have a fold both ways i.e. with an angle in it. I have therefore been forced to cut the sheet so as to make two pages of equal length. This can be printed as simple fold-outs on the lines I have folded them which will be quite convenient to the reader and not get crumpled. A note will explain that the actual size of the document has thus been affected. This letter is vital to the text. The numerals which are provisional as regards order will be convenient for reference in our correspondence. You might decide on technical grounds whether N. 8 the Deed of Annuity and No. 25 Marlborough's letter to William of Orange should not be interleaved instead of being printed in the text. On the whole I should prefer them interleaved. In addition to all these there are 13 maps and plans 3 of which fold out, 2 of them in two colours. All the rest make up in the text." Two ink diagonal green lines across first page indicate it has been read. Light foxing and paper clip stain to left margin. "Dear Mr. Harrup" and "Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.6. July 18, 1933, one page: "Marlborough illustrations. Do not for the present proceed with (5) Arabella, (19) Prince George of Denmark or (26) William III. I have found better pictures which I will send to you shortly. Do not proceed also with (4) Winston and Arabella, (16) Dartmouth, (22) Sunderland, (23) Rochester. Nos. 32, 33 and 34, Fenwick, Ailesbury and Shrewsbury could be reproduced as vignettes on one page. I am awaiting your letter about the illustrations." Diagonal thin green line across page indicating it had been read. "Dear Sir" and "Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.7. August 21, 1934, one page: "I send you herewith Volume I with the corrigenda dealt with. You will see from the enclosed letters that there are one or two extra points which have been brought to my notice. I accept all the corrections which are found in this volume and I am very much surprised to find how few errors there are‰ÛÓnearly all of which are trivial. Kindly note the dedication, page 7, also pages 53, 130, 132 and 358. I have dealt with Professor Trevelyan's complaint. Do you not think there should be a short prefatory note to the new edition? If so I attach a draft." Some spotting and browning to lower edge. "Dear Mr. Wood," "month Index" and "Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.8. January 9, 1935, one page: "I am not expecting to publish Volume III of Marlborough till the spring of 1936, as there is so much political distraction at the present time." "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.9. May 21, 1935, one page: "Please see the enclosed letter from Colonel Pakenham-Walsh and the sketches illustrating Ramillies. You said that if instead of going to Swaines I would come to you, you could save me much expense for the drawings of Volume III. Could you let me know what you can do about them. These sketches of course are only in the rough, and I have to put my own comments upon them. Therefore kindly send them back after using them to explain to the draftsman the kind of work he would be expected to do‰Û_" With date correction in Churchill's hand. "Dear Mr. Wood" and "21st" and "Yours WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.10. May 28, 1935, one page: "Would there be any objection to my seeing if I can get a competitive offer from Swaine? He might be ready to come down in price himself, and it would be convenient to work with him as he knows my methods. If he is not prepared to come near to the new level, I shall certainly put myself in your hands." "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours very truly/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.11. August 6, 1935, one page: "I send you herewith chapters V and VI which have been completely reconstituted and a new chapter, VIII. For your convenience I append a list of the chapters; VII ‰Û÷The Year of Triumph' is nearly done. It may be possible to cut down the correspondence later. I also send you chapters I, II and III for second revise, leaving only ‰Û÷The Battle of Ramillies' which I will send in a few days. Pray let me have six copies of all these as they come through. I will send you very shortly a number of maps and I shall be glad if your man would draw them out and let me have them in draft. Please therefore make the arrangement you proposed with him. I will not worry about Swain's." With "for revise" in Churchill's hand. [Together with one page of typed list of chapters]. "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.12. October 10, 1935, one and å_ pages: "Many thanks for your letter. The aid I want is not researching but checking and verifying facts which have already been ascertained. I will dictate a section of a chapter from the many works of reference I have read. I will then mark the various points which require to be more precisely verified, for instance the actual words of a quotation, the exact reference in the footnotes, dates, names, chronology, etc. This is very similar to the work which your readers already do when they read the proofs only it would be rather more extended. At the same time as I send the section for checking I will mention the books where the references occur and give the closest indication I have as to where they can be found. This will enable me to get on a good deal more quickly. Let us anyhow make the experiment and see what trouble is involved for your staff." With notes "abouts in the books" and "Also I will send some of the books you may not have. W." in Churchill's hand. "Dear Mr. Wood" and "With many thanks/ Yours sincerely/ W S Churchill" in Churchill's hand. Rust stain from paper clip at upper left corner.13. October 14, 1935, one page: "I send you another chapter [in pencil in another hand, "Chapter XI, ‰Û÷Harley'"]. There are a good many queries in my mind about it, but it is maturing sufficiently to be printed straight away. I will then read it over and mark the points which require special attention. I am afraid there will now be a break in Marlborough of at least six weeks. But I hope you will have Oudenards before Christmas. The back is then broken." "Dear Mr. Wood" and Yours v(ery) t(ruly)/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.14. March 2, 1936, one page: "I now send you Chapter XVII (re-numbered) ‰Û÷The Winter Struggle' All the chapters after XI or XII require renumbering, as a new one has come in. I should be glad to have this chapter back in priority after the first and before the main block of reprints. Six reprints will be required in all cases. I see no advantage in spelling Wynendaele ‰Û÷Wynendale.' Marlborough always uses the shorter version, but we can discuss this later when the general question of names is considered. Meanwhile stet ‰Û÷dale.' I think the principle to adopt about modernising the letters is to print the new ones which first see the light in their old style and modernise the rest. At any rate do not worry about these changes at this stage in the work." Pen and ink notations in another hand. "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours sincerely/ WSC" in Churchill's hand.15. April 28th,1936, one page: "I send you herewith two chapters and also a number of documents which you have already printed. These documents should be inserted in the proofs where I have marked them. I presume they are still in type so will not have to be set up again. I have not modernised them at this stage as they have never yet been published. We shall have to consider later on whether these letters should go into an appendix. It will be easy to lift them from the text as they are in sold blocks. Of course I should very much like to have these chapters back again by Saturday afternoon. I fear however this will not be possible." Pencil and ink notations in another hand. "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours v(ery) t(ruly)/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.16. June 5, 1936, one page: "Yours of June 3: Will you kindly ask your brother for a list of all the plans on which he is working which have not been made into zinco blocks, and what state they are in and what is holding them up. I will then deal with each point." Diagonal green ink line across page."Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours v(ery) t(ruly)/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.17. June 16th, 1936, one page: "I have now reached a series of chapters beginning with The Seventh Campaign which have been so recently revised that they do not require immediate reprint. Before I send them in I am anxious to have the maps especially of Oudenarde and Lille. The Brigadier has sent me a list of maps in chronological order of which I send you a copy ticked showing their condition. Perhaps you would mark on this the ones already included in the proofs. Could you accelerate as much as possible the completion of the others which are passed finally in ink." "Yours sincerely/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand. Rust stain from paper clip to upper left corner.18. June 22nd, 1936, one page (small sheet): "Please note where I have said a new slip is to be taken, these pages have to be interleaved in several various chapters." "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours sincerely WSC" in Churchill's hand.19. July 8, 1936, one page: With regard to the letters quoted in the text, I will finally decide about any cuts in these when the final slip-proofs leave me. As I am having one more re-print, I do not alter them now, neither do I deal with all your queries, ‰Û÷spelling, capitals and punctuation'. I think the original letters now published for the first time had better be printed in their original form subject only to an occasional adjustment to make them read intelligently. All the other letters already published by various authors should be modernised upon a regular principle. Perhaps in sending me back this new re-print you will ask your readers to carry this out in pencil throughout." Lengthy notes in red ink by a copy editor in blank left margin and underlinings to text. "Yours very truly/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.20. July 17, 1936, one page: "Sketch 46. This does not give a good idea, as La Motte is obviously going to reach Wynendale before the convoy gets within miles of it. Actually La Motte should be further back where I have shown in red, and the convoy further forward. Sketch 42. Berwick ought to be in the same type as Vendome as he is a foe and not a friend. Can these alterations be made without redrawing and re-engraving? How long will it take, and how much will it cost?" [signed in secretarial hand]. Together with two printed maps, each 7.5 by 10 inches, with wide margins, one map bearing corrections in red ink by Churchill of troop movements of the French commander La Motte. Included is a photocopy of the map, captioned "Situation, Morning September 28" from Chapter XXVI "Wynendael," showing Churchill's red ink corrections specified in the letter. The other map, corrected as per Churchill's instructions, is in Chapter XXV "The Siege of Lille," captioned "August 27‰ÛÓSeptember 5, 1708." Signed in secretarial hand.21. July 18, 1936, one page: "I send you herewith a note for the ‰Û÷blurb' about which one of your colleagues wrote to me. You see I have wavered between the present and past tense. Pray take this as a contribution and let me see what you propose to write upon it." Pencil notations in another hand. "Dear Mr. Wood," "Also 3 more pictures" and "Yours very truly/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.22. August 1, 1936, one page: "You send me a new copy of the enclosed map. It is already in the text, and I commented on it on the proofs ‰Û÷Where is Villeroy?' Also Ghent and Bruges should (I think) be black as they were in Marlborough's hands. I am sending a duplicate of this letter to the Brigadier. It is of the utmost importance now to know where the remaining maps are. I will get on with the preface as soon as I have completed the chapters. I agree with what you said about the spelling of Wynendael. By all means continue the spelling as ‰Û÷dale.'" Attached on the upper left is a small printed map captioned in another hand "Flanders: July 1706/ Sketch 14 (slip 199)." Two green ink lines on page. "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours sincerely/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.23. August 1, 1936, one page: "I have altered the Ramillies text so as not to be dependent on the old map, which I cannot find. I must ask the Brigadier to make a folder of the Ramillies as well as the one of Oudenarde now under construction. There will have to be a general map of the Low Countries, but that can be repeated with a few more places in it from Volume II, also a general map of Europe and the theatres which can likewise be repeated. The Ramillies playing card was photographed by the King's librarian. It is very old, small and well-worn, and I doubt if any new photograph would be any better. There is no reason why you should not make a print of it slightly larger, and let us see how it looks. I return it to you herewith meanwhile. You have everything now, so far as illustrations and facsimiles are concerned. I shall keep you well supplied day by day with chapters." Green ink lines and underlinings, rust stain from paper clip on top of page. Signed "WSC" and with a few words in his hand ("with a few more places in it"). 24. August 3, 1936, two pages: "I send you now everything except the last chapters. Mr. Deakin will be with you tomorrow. There are a number of points for him from the ‰Û÷Jacobite Raid' chapter onwards, nor are Mr. Marsh's corrections in from that point. Some of these chapters are a good deal pulled about, and if you think fit you had better put them into slip again, keeping enough of the earlier chapters to go on continuously with the page proofing. Chapter 19 about Ghent and Bruges is split in two, altering the numbers thereafter. I do not feel like a lengthy preface, nor is it worth your while to await it. I will, however, do it next before I finish the last chapter, if you wish. What maps are still outstanding? Please discuss all these points with Mr. Deakin. Would you mind asking your proof readers to put down quite clearly their rule about hyphen words. I do not like Mr. Marsh's very full use of hyphens, but what rule do you follow? Macaulay frequently runs the words together with a hyphen, e. g. ‰Û÷panicstricken.' The great thing is to have a principle and stick to it. With regard to modernization of letters, here is the rule. All letters which have been printed before, unless specially marked by me, should be modernised as you have proposed. All original letters or letters inserted because of their archaic character should only be corrected here and there as I have done for punctuation and to make sense. Contrary to what is said in the preliminary note, all starred documents will have in addition a footnote, Blenheim mss or other source. All spellings of places must agree with the maps unless the maps are definitely wrong. With regard to numbers, I think the following will work: viz. When there is a computation of armies in battalions, squadrons, etc. numerals should be used. Where there are broken numbers, e. g. 7,500 ditto. When numerals are used in some old quoted letter ". Otherwise it is better to spell. In sending these proofs to the printers, please enforce this system. I find we are in practise spelling almost everything and I must say it runs better except as mentioned." Included are twelve edits in Churchill's hand including five words. Titles of seven chapters from Vol. III are penciled at top of first page in another hand. "I do not like the high punctuation‰Û_ Yours very truly/ Winston S. Churchill," "Dear Mr. Wood" and 12 ink edits including five words in Churchill's hand.25. November 28, 1937, two pages: "Illustrations. Kindly send me a list of the sixteen photographs and two prints which I sent you. With regard to your observations: 1. I never thought that Malplaquet and Bouchain should go on one page. On the contrary I contemplated a flap-out for Bouchain one. 2. I agree with you about Wolf; it must be cancelled. 3. Cancel also Godolphin, Shrewsbury, Burnet, Marlborough 11 and Marlborough 13. I must try to find another Marlborough for the frontispiece. Perhaps I can find a miniature. 4. Cancel also Nos. 14 and 16, Cadogan and George I are already used. 5. We must try to find better ones of Blenheim for 17 and 18. These two prints are cancelled. Out of the 16 photographs eight are rejected. This leaves us with eight. I now send you: (a) Lord Orrery (b) Duke of Argyll (c) Jonathan Swift (d) Craggs (the younger) (e) The Old Pretender (or alternatively 9e) 2, whichever is thought the better (f) Townshend (g) Cowper (h) Ormonde (i) Vanbrugh. These have been procured from the National Gallery by Mr. Deakin, and he has been asked to supply the captions for them. Thus I send you the nine, which with the other eight, makes a total of seventeen. It is increasingly difficult to find illustrations which have not been used in the previous volumes. I shall be very glad of any suggestions which you, or your proof readers, feel able to make. Good progress is being made with the maps. I fear we shall not be able to get the book finished by the end of the year; but I hope to have it finally off my hands by the end of February." Together with a sheet in another hand with more information about the portraits. Two words and "Yours very truly/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.26. December 14, 1937, one page: "This is an addition to the chapter called The New Regime. You could make the slips 200 A, B, C etc. I do not think it necessary to reprint Chapters XX to XXV at present, as their condition has very nearly reached its final form. I send you the latest Contents Table whch will enable you to keep track of the various changes which impose themselves at this stage. The five chapters following those you now have, namely XX to XXIV inclusive, do not require reprint at this stage, as there are not structural changes, and the minor revisions can be effected on the current proof." Accompanied by two carbon typed pages of the contents of Vol. IV. "Sincerely WSC" in Churchill's hand. Some foxing.27. January 1, 1938, one page: "I am very much obliged to you for the extraordinary expedition with which the whole of the eight chapters have been returned. I send you the enclosed letter to Mr. Harrap, which kindly read and deliver to him. Perhaps you will inform me upon the points mentioned. In my absence please keep in touch with Mr. Deakin. All letters to Chartwell will be forwarded to me." "My dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours v(er)y t(ruly)/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand. Rust stain from paper clip to top of page.28. January 4, 1938, two pages: "I send you herewith three chapters in which I have made heavy cuts, in order to see how the changes will look. We waste space in having a great many extracts of only five or six lines in small print; there are the short heads, there are the dates and the white lines attaching to each of them. It is much better in these small extracts to use the large type in inverted commas, and run straight through the paragraph with dots representing omissions where necessary. I have also run several letters together, separated by dots to make one continuous paragraph, although retained in small print. In this case there will be no quotation marks the necessary phrases such as ‰Û÷Marlborough wrote to so-and-so' or ‰Û÷so-and-so reported to Marlborough' should either go in a square bracket as you have sometimes done or merely protected by commas. You will see specimens of both these methods applied in the abridged text. I think there is more to be said for the square brackets but let me know your view. Please send two copies only of each of these chapters to me in three separate envelopes at the Chateau de l'Horizon, Cannes, as soon as possible. Have any of the diagrams to be inserted in the text yet been put on the stone? I have passed at least twenty. Please get in touch with the Brigadier and with your brother and have all I have passed put on the stone and struck off. There will be others still to come but let us get as many as we can. Will you write to me also about reducing the index to twenty pages. I hope you got the blurb all right. It was intended for a guide and you are at liberty to make additions to it as the responsibility for it rests with the firm. It would be well, however, to send me a proof if time permits. Pray write to me fully on these various points." Titles of the three chapters from Vol. IV are penciled at top of the first page in another hand, on letterhead of the British Embassy, Paris. "Yours very truly/ Winston S. Churchill" in Churchill's hand.29. October 29th, 1938, one page (small sheet): "I am aware of no correction which I desire to make, and I have not noticed any serious mistakes pointed out by the reviewers." On smaller sheet, with handwritten note by Churchill: "I enclose you a letter wh has reached me. Yours truly, W. S. Churchill." "Dear Mr. Wood" and "Yours very truly/ WS Churchill" in Churchill's hand.30. Together with: One large page of a gallery proof entitled "Marlborough‰ÛÓII Slip 241D," 10 by 14 inches. Tear at mid-horizontal fold in blank margin, not near writing, expertly repaired on verso. Edits in red and blue pencil with 22 words in Churchill's hand: "in the history of the Fall of the House of Stuart has bequeathed us a monumental work" and "Imperial commander Prince Louis of Badin" along with cross-outs and other editorial marks. 31. May 30, 1933, a Typed Letter Signed with Churchill's handwritten salutation and closing, yet signature excised.32. 12 letters dated between July of 1933 and April of 1938 with excellent content concerning the book, copious annotations (possibly some in Churchill's hand), and signed secretarially for Churchill.33. 14 pages of proof corrections, copiously annotated in multiple hands (possibly some by Churchill).34. 2 proof maps, one showing Minorca, the other Piedmont and Lombardy, giving troop positions and showing the positions of opposing armies and lines of circumvallation.35. 10 telegrams sent from Churchill to Wood, as well as several other miscellaneous notes. A much more detailed description is available upon request.

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A Virginia Confed soldier's mother writes about the looting of the family farm

Estimate: $300 - $400

Description: Civil War - A Virginia Confederate soldier's mother writes her son and offers a vivid description of the looting of the family farm, authorized by General John Pope:"you can form no idea what we suffered." Autograph Letter, 4 pages, 7.5" x 10", Rumford, [Virginia], September 8, 1862, in which a mother vividly describes the looting of the family farm by federal soldiers to her son, a Confederate soldier in the field. Expected folds, minor tear at bottom right, very minor soiling, else very good.On July 25, 1862, General John Pope, in command of the Army of Virginia ordered that "...no guards will be placed over private houses or private property of any description whatever." Charging the officer corps with maintaining discipline, Pope added that "Soldiers were called into the field to do battle against the enemy, and it is not expected that their force and energy shall be wanted in the protection of the private property of those most hostile to the government." The order was essentially a green light for soldiers to plunder the countryside‰ÛÓwhich is described in great detail below:"...from the time that [General John] Pope's orders were issued to give no Guards and to allow the soldiers to take what they pleased you can form no idea what we suffered. Gen [Marsena R.] Patrick did all he could to protect us he placed a Picket at the stable and another at the road gate but they were opposed to protecting property and were just as bad as the others they came down in droves, took all our vegetables all my Fowls milked the cows ... your Aunt Agnes and myself were compleat [sic]prisoners for we could not venture out into the yard but until Burnside came they did not comd into the House we had the Sheep put into the yard every night and they would come in by nine oclock and in the bright moon light drive them up in a corner a kill them this was done by the Pickets, we would see them distinctlly [sic] and when your Father called to them from the window they told him to put his head in or they would Blow him Burnside was occupied in Johns field so we were best, Jinnie was with us and I soon found it would never do for her to remain all night I would not exaggerate to say there were 200 men in the yard at a time I got John Parke to get the carriage and we picked an opportunity when there were not many in the Front yard to get her and Matt to the carriage and I felt as if a load was off my mind when they got out of the gate the next morning by sunrise they commenced coming and by ten oclock we saw that they were bent on mischief a Lieutenant Mitchel came into the yard and at first we thought he would protect us as he was a Scotchman Your Father unfortunately asked him into the house and gave him some spirit he said he would make all the men go back to camp with him but when he went out they cursed him to his face and he told your Father they would not be satisfied until they reached the house so he brought in three men and said they must have some spirit they then went through all the rooms and took he two old guns and some of them went with the Lieutenant but the crowd was constantly on the inside. Eliza told me if I would write a note she would take it herself to the Col I did so and she stole through the corn and gave it to Major Cartwright who was in command but before he got home they broke into the Entry closet and took every thing they could take off broke into the meat house and took all the meat that was in it, which was very little broke into the cellar took all the milk and at last pressed so upon your Father that he called to me to open the door and let him in as I drew back the bot they rushed in, your Father collared the first man he seized up a book which happened to be Irving's Life of Washington asked him how dared he to have such a book threw it at him and stuck him in the mouth while another ran at him with a bayonet it was useless to contend they helped themselves to hats caps and everything they fancied at last they opened the glass draw and found your father's watch which he had taken out of his Pocket for safety this seemed to satisfy them and they left the house Major Cartwright came galloping into the yard I wish you could have seen the running not a man was to be seen in two minutes he seemed to regret very much that he could not give us a guard said he would do al that he could to protect us by a strong Picket and Patrole soon after he left the Officer of the Day Capt Ryly from Boston came in he made your Father describe the watch and the man who had broken into the house said he thought he knew the man who had it and after dinner he came riding down through the hot sun with the watch it was an Irish Company 28th Massachusetts... he called them up and told them that the man who had the watch was to be shot and the only way to save his life was to give it to him and he would not tell[.] he made them bring back Elizas Hog too and later in the evening Major Cartwright came back and told us that he could not leave us without a guard and that at the risk of a Reprimand he had taken the responsibility of doing so he sent a corporal and two men with orders to walk around the house and stables all night and he kept the guard until they all left the next day if you ever meet either of those men in distress remember their kindness to us I do not believe I told you that they had taken both the carriage horses... and we have only two mules and Old Fancy and little Billy left as to the corn Mr Brower[?] had a very good crop but it is all gone... "The correspondent then describes the similar situations of various neighbors as well as the departures by family slaves. After the soldiers left, the remaining heads of livestock were driven south for safekeeping: "you never saw such a stampede.... [a neighbor] sent York and Jemm[?] to get [a horse and mule cart] back from the Creek unfortunately for us Ralph who had been as faithful as he could he was induced to go with them and none of them have been allowed to come back. Todoath[?], Fanny and herself[?] asked my leave to go to Washington as she could get a great deal more to do there I very reluctantly gave my consent and now she cannot get back through she has Burnsides pass to go and come... we have no men upon the Farm but Stephen Harry Frank. Alek has gone, and Hugh and Caroline Tom and his children have moved down to the vacant houses."Only four days after the date of this letter, General John Pope would be relieved of his command. Not only was Pope bent on allowing his army to plunder the countryside, he also proved indecisive on the battlefield and was routed by Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Second Manassas. "Major Cartwright," has been identified as George W. Cartwright. A printer from Boston, Cartwright joined the 28th Massachusetts as a major in October 1861. Only days before he appeared at the Rumsey, Virginia farm, he had been wounded at the Battle of Second Manassas. He would be wounded again at the Wilderness in May 1864 while commanding the 28th Massachusetts. In the summer of that year, Cartwright attained the rank of Colonel and remained in command of the 28th until he was mustered out in December 1864.

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Henry Clay lengthy legal brief with Kentucky content

Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200

Description: Clay Henry 1777 - 1852 Henry Clay lengthy legal brief with Kentucky content In part, the document reads, "Henry Clay of the President Director and Company of the Bank of Kentucky, a corporation duly created and established by the General Assembly of Kentucky, that whereas the said President Director and Company on the day of in the year of our Lord 182 at the Circuit aforesaid, were indebted to the said plaintiff in the sum of ten thousand one hundred and twenty six dollars 96 cents for so much money before that . . . had and received by the said defendants to and for the use of said plaintiff; and being so indebted afterwards to wit on the same day and year and at the Circuit aforesaid the said defendants assumed upon themselves and to the said pltf. faithfully promised that they would well and truly pay to the said plaintiff the said sum of money whenever after they should be thereunto required . . . Nevertheless the said defendant s in no wise regarding their several promises and assumptions in form aforesaid made but continuing and fraudulently intending the said plaintiff to deceive and defraud, the said pltf. have not paid, although to pay the same said defendants afterwards to wit on the same day and yr. af'd . . . . " Clay signs the brief.

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A great content Cleveland ALS about his

Estimate: $800 - $1,000

Description: Cleveland Grover 1837 - 1908 A great content Cleveland ALS about his "nomination to the Presidency" An autograph letter signed "Grover Cleveland", 4 1/2" x 6 3/4" 3pp, Gray Gables, Buzzards Bay Mass, August 12, 1892. In very fine condition.Written while running for President against Benjamin Harrison, Cleveland is writing to John F. Shafer to Albany, the once and future President penned: "I am very much touched by the contents of your letter of congratulation received first after my nomination to the Presidency. I sympathize with you fully in the incidents in which the event brings to your mind. I have not been able to understand at all times, the devotion of children to a political party or candidate. Its further from my...of self interests, and its freshness is exceedingly interesting. I am glad to have the picture of my standfast friend which you kindly sent me; and while I cannot thank you for your kind wishes I cannot stifle a regret that my candidacy should remind you of the...which you have suffered in the death of your son." It is accompanied by the original envelope. Cleveland lost the 1888 election to Benjamin Harrison in the Electoral College, even though he clearly won the popular vote. Cleveland temporarily retired to his summer home of Buzzards Bay and planned a political comeback in 1892. In that election, he soundly trounced Harrison in both the Electoral College and the popular vote, becoming the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms.

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Grover Cleveland signature cut with a handsome Pach Bros photo

Estimate: $300 - $400

Description: Cleveland Grover 1837 - 1908 Grover Cleveland signature cut with a handsome Pach Bros photograph Two piece lot consisting of a signature cut on cardstock with Executive Mansion letterhead, 4" x 2.75" signed as "Grover Cleveland". Clean signature on lightly toned card with additional browning to outer edge, small mounting remnants to verso. Accompanied by a handsome large black and white portrait of Grover Cleveland by Pach Bros. N.Y., with pencil marks on verso and tape remnants from what appears to be prior mounting. Tiny 1/4 inch intact tear to left border edge (hard to even see). The photo may be more valuable than the autograph.A wonderful collectible set. Grover Cleveland won the popular vote for three presidential elections - in 1884, 1888, and 1892 - and was one of two Democrats (with Woodrow Wilson) to be elected president during the era of Republican political domination dating from 1861 to 1933. He was also the first and to date only President in American history to serve two non-consecutive terms in office. Cleveland was the leader of the pro-business Bourbon Democrats who opposed high tariffs, Free Silver, inflation, imperialism,and subsidies to business, farmers, or veterans. His crusade for political reform and fiscal conservatism made him an icon for American conservatives of the eraA handsome set which would look stunning framed together.

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Current bid: $100 (1 bid)

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Amazing PSA Mint condition Buffalo Bill signed Wild West show ticket!

Estimate: $2,500 - $3,000

Description: Cody William 1846 - 1917 PSA Mint condition Buffalo Bill signed Wild West show ticket. Amazing! William Cody signs a"Buffalo Bill's Wild West and Congress of Rough Riders of the World" ticket, 4.75" x 2.25" dated "1899", and boldly signed in graphite by William Cody as "WF Cody". "The Rough Riders of the World" was the name of Cody's show beginning in 1893. The full ticket is PSA/DNA authenticated, graded and slabbed as a GEM MT 10 mint condition.Wild West shows were traveling vaudeville performances in the United States and Europe. The first and prototypical Wild West show was Buffalo Bill's formed in 1883 and lasting until 1913. Perhaps part of the popularity of Wild West shows can be attributed to the feeling of celebration and conquest they evoked. They celebrated the achievement of the frontier movement as being the most important accomplishment in American history. The shows were a winning combination of history, patriotism, and adventure which managed to create an enduring spirit of the "unsettled" west and capture audience's hearts throughout America and Europe.Wild West shows contained a lot of action. Wild animals, trick performances, theatrical reenactments, and all sorts of characters from the frontier were all incorporated into the show's program. Theatrical reenactments included those of battle scenes, "characteristic" western scenes, and even hunts. Shooting exhibitions were also in the line up with extensive shooting displays and trick shots. Competitions that came in the form of races between combinations of people or animals exhilarated and stimulated the audience. Equally exciting were rodeo events, involving rough and "dangerous" activities performed by cowboys with different animals. In short, Wild West shows began to include any type of "western" event that could in any way appeal to the audiences. Those watching the show would have been credulous and excited by the idea of a rough, wild frontier. They were enthralled by the west, and Wild West shows were the answer to popular demands. Wild West shows preserved the disappearing world of the "unsettled" and "untamed" west and brought it to life for audiences.Buffalo Bill grew up on the frontier and loved his way of life. As he got older, some of his titles he earned included buffalo hunter, U.S. Army scout and guide, and showman, as well as Pony Express Rider, Indian fighter, and even author. Whatever Cody's titles, he was destined for fame. His track of fame began as with his reputation as a master buffalo hunter. While hunting buffalo for pay to feed railroad workers, he shot and killed 11 out of 12 buffalo, earning him his nickname and show name "Buffalo Bill." At the turn of the twentieth century, William F. Cody was known as ‰Û÷the greatest showman on the face of the earth'". Cody had full domination of the Wild West show business.An wonderful example, and scarce in this condition. Provenance: The full ticket is PSA/DNA authenticated, graded and slabbed as a GEM MT 10 mint condition.

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Personalized large leather portfolio of important Vice President Schuyler Colfax

Estimate: $500 - $600

Description: Colfax Schuyler 1823 - 1885 Personalized large leather portfolio of important Vice President Schuyler Colfax Large brown leather portfolio,9.75" x 14.75", in gilt with "Schuyler Colfax/Vice President /of the/United States" to front. Embossed ruling to outer edge. Worn leather scratched and rubbed. Leather spine mostly no longer present. Large paper pocket affixed to the interior, several loose chipped blank sheets still present, each with surface tears and stains.Personalized leather portfolio owned by Colfax during his period as Vice President under Ulysses S. Grant. Schuyler was implicated in the Credit Mobilier affair and retired in dispute.

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Rarely seen group of fourteen 17th Century documents from Plymouth (Plimouth) MA

Estimate: $10,000 - $12,000

Description: Colonial Plymouth - A highly important and rarely seen group of fourteen 17th Century documents from Plymouth (Plimouth) Massachusetts. The growth of the New World! 1. - 1669 Town of Plimouth - Agreement Manuscript Document signed, 1p. 8-1/2"x12-1/4", "An agreement of Several of ye Neighbors living at and about Rockey Nooke in the Township of Plimouth respecting ye bounds of their lands..." being a copy of the original document of 1669 signed by Jacob Cooke, Edward Gray, and Francis Combes with their "x" mark. This is a signed 1703/4 scribal copy, "Saml Sprague Keeper of ye sd records." 2. - 1682 New Plymouth Division of Land Manuscript Document Signed, one page, folio, Plymouth, March 14, 1682, being a division of Edward Gray's land, including "little house by the watterside". Between Dorothy Gray and John Gray, for the land "from the seaside to the King's Road or Highway...northerly side of the Great Rock..." Signed twice each by Ephraim Morton and John Tomson. Nathaniel Morton docketing. Staining, some text loss at bottom of page, else Good. 3. - 1683 Plymouth -Edward Gray - Division of Land Manuscript Document Signed, one page, oblong octavo, Plimouth, March 29, 1683, being a division of Edward Gray's land. Signed by Dorothy Gray [widow] and John Gray [son]. Witnessed by Ephraim Morton, Ephraim Tinkham, with his "ET" mark, Isaac Cushman and John Bryant Junr. Split at vertical fold, else Good. 4. - 1684 Plimoth, Land of Edward Gray Manuscript Document Signed, one page, quarto, Plimouth, October 28, 1684, regarding land of Edward Gray at Shawamot. Signed by Nathaniel Morton, with a few additional lines in his hand. 5. - 1685 [Plymouth] Estate Recpt. Edward Gray Manuscript Document Signed, one page, octavo, [Plymouth] October 30, 1684, being a receipt pertaining to the estate of Edward Gray. Signed by Dorothy Gray, as Administrator. Witness signatures of Nathaniel Thomas and Stephen Sloss. 6. - 1686 New Plymouth Thomas Faunce Autograph Document Signed, Thomas Faunce, one page oblong quarto, being a 1686 transcript of 1666/7 record of bounds of Benjamin Eaton's land, formerly George Clark's and betwixt Francis Billington and the lots that were John Cooke's, near "the Swamps called Bradfords Marsh." Light staining, and fold separations, else VG. Thomas Faunce (c.1647-1745/46) Son of John Faunce who came to the Colony of the ship Anne, 1623. Plymouth Town Clerk, 1685-1723; Last ruling elder of the First Church of Plymouth. It was at teary eyed Elder Faunce, who in 1741 at the age of 95, identified the rock where the Pilgrims landed - known today as Plymouth Rock. 7. - 1686 Plimouth Thomas Faunce - Land of John Gray & Caleb Cooke Autograph Document Signed, "Thomas Faunce", one page, octavo, March 3, 1685/6, being a period transcript of the bounds between land of John Gray and Caleb Cook. VG. 8. - 1688/89 Plimouth - Quit Claim - Edward Gray to John Gray Autograph Document Signed, one page, folio, "Town of Plimouth", March 4, 1688/89, Quit Claim, Edward Gray to John Gray, pertaining to father Edward Gray's estate. Signed by Edward Gray with wax seal. Witnessed by Samuel Sprague and Ephraim Colle. Staining, else VG. Edward Gray (1629-1681) Arrived at Plymouth c. 1643. Merchant and one of the wealthiest colonists. Served as Deputy, 1676-79. In 1677 was a member of a committee respecting debts due the colony and to balance accounts between towns following King Philip's War. Married #1 Mary Winslow, niece of Governor Edward Winslow. Married #2 Dorothy Lettice. The headstones of Edward Gray and his wife, Mary, are the oldest still standing in Burial Hill, Plymouth, Massachusetts. 9. - 1689 [Plymouth Co.] Deed, Samuel Little & Wife Sarah Manuscript Document Signed, one page, 15"x12", "Marshfield, in the County of Plimouth", January 15, 1689, being a deed of Samuel Little and his wife Sarah to John Gray. Signed by the Littles with seals. Witnessed by John Barkor and Rachal Newcom. Also signed by Nathaniel Thomas who adds a few lines. Fold splitting, else Good to VG. Nathaniel Thomas (1643-1718) Born in Plymouth, the son of Captain Nathaniel Thomas (1606-1675) Served in King Philip's War as captain of a company of Light Horse troops. For 23 years, Judge of the County Court; 16 years, Judge of the Probate Court; Register of Probate, 1686-1693; and 6 years a Judge of the Superior Court of Plymouth 10. - 1693 Plymouth.Will of Ephraim Morton Manuscript Document Signed, 2-1/2 pp. folio, Plymouth, November 2, 1693, being a will of Ephraim Morton who "being weak of body through sickness yet of disposing memory & understanding...ordain these presents to be my last Will & Testament..." Docketed "A true copy examined by Nathl Thomas Register." Light staining, else VG. Ephraim Morton (1623-1693) Born on the ship Anne en route to Plymouth. Probably adopted by his uncle Governor William Bradford. Representative of the Plymouth General Court, 1657-1685. In 1671 became a member of the Council of War, including the time of King Philip's War. Served as Sergeant/Lieut. in a Plymouth Military Co. Magistrate of the Colony, 1683. A Deacon of Plymouth Church, 1669-1693. 11. - 1693 Plymouth Estate Inv. of Lt Ephraim Morton Manuscript Document, one page, folio, "An Inventory of the Estate of Lieut. Ephraim Morton late of Plymouth deceased taken & apprized the first day of November 1693.." Fascinating list of materials belonging to Morton's estate. Verso is docketed "A true copy examined by Nathl Thomas Register." Staining, else VG. 12. - 1694 Plimouth Deed Capt. Joseph Howland to John Gray Manuscript Document Signed, one page, oblong folio, Plimouth, July 17, 1694, being a deed between Captain Joseph Howland and John Gray "in consideration of the full & just sum of fifteen pounds...[land] off Rockey Nooke in Plimouth..." Signed by Joseph Howland. Witnessed by James Winslow, Joseph Southworth. Docketed by Samuel Sprague on verso. Complete clean fold split at vertical fold, some staining, else VG.13. - 1700 Township of Plimouth - Deed James Winslow Manuscript Document Signed, one page, large folio, "Town of Plimouth", September 5, 1700, being a deed between James Winslow and John Gray, for 2/3rds of an acre of land for forty shillings. Signed by James Winslow, with wax seal. Witnessed by John Colle, and Nathaniel Clark, also signed by William Bradford, Justice of the Peace, with a few additional lines in his hand. Docketed by Samuel Sprague. Light stains and fold separations, else VG. William Bradford (162-1703/4) Born in Plymouth, son of Governor William Bradford. Deputy Governor of Plymouth Colony 1682-6 and 1689-91. Member of Governor Andro's Council in 1687. Chief military officer of Plymouth Colony. Served as Major Commander-in-Chief of the Plymouth forces at the Great Swamp Fight, 1675, the bloodiest battle of King Philip's War.14. - 1700 Town of Plimouth Deed Benjamin Eaton Sr. & jr. Manuscript Document Signed, one page, large folio, "Town of Plimoth", December 17, 1700, in part: "Benjamin Eaton Senr & Benjamin Eaton Junr...in consideration of the sum of Ten Pounds in Currant money of New England to us or one of us in hand by John Gray of Plimouth...[purchase] ten acres ...between Francis Billington lott & The lott that was John Cooper..." Signed by Benjamin Eaton Sr., his mark "X", and Benjamin Eaton, Jr., both with their seals. Also signed by William Bradford, Justice of the Peace, with three lines in his hand, and docketed by Samuel Sprague. VG. Benjamin Eaton Sr. (1627-1711/12) Born in Plymouth, the son of Mayflower passenger, Francis Eaton (1596-1633)

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Samuel Colt signed historic gun patent documents

Estimate: $60,000 - $80,000

Description: Colt Samuel 1814 - 1862 "The Gun that Won the West" - "Abe Lincoln may have freed all men, but Sam Colt made them equal" Samuel Colt's three retained signed drafts of what he sent the Commissioner of Patents telling him of his "various improvements" in his 1836 patent for "revolving cylinder guns ‰Û_ being desirous of securing his rights until he can perfect them‰Û_" Samuel Colt of Hartford, Connecticut, was granted a patent for "revolving gun" on February 25, 1836. On March 5, 1836, he formed the Patent Arms Manufacturing Company in Paterson, New Jersey, to make the guns in quantity.Jeff Kinard in "Pistols: An Illustrated History of Their Impact -Weapons and Warfare (Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO, 2003) writes, "In 1837 the new factory produced its first product, the tiny, five-shot Pocket Model Paterson Revolver ‰Û_ Colt's factory also produced the larger, five-chambered, caliber .31 Colt Belt Model Paterson Revolvers No. 2 and No. 3. The most famous of all Colt's early production, however, was the Colt Holster Model Paterson Revolver No. 5, better known as the Texas Paterson ‰Û_ The Paterson No. 5 appeared on the market [in 1838] only two years after Texas won independence from Mexico and one of the greatest periods of western expansion by the United States. Those attempting to tame the new frontier found it a violent and hostile place where one lived and died by the gun. Texans, most notably the Texas Rangers, quickly recognized the advantages of Colt's big pistol ‰Û_ The Rangers, usually outnumbered in unequaled encounters with hostile Indians, Mexicans, and desperadoes, appreciated the extra firepower of the Colt's five shots ‰Û_ The Paterson No. 5 quickly attained legendary status, its name permanently associated with Texas and the frontier‰Û_" No longer would the Texas Rangers have to pause in battle to reload single-shot pistols and rifles while the Indians continued firing arrows.On August 29, 1839, Colt was granted a patent for "improvements in firearms and in the apparatus used therewith." His 1839 patent begins, "Be it known that I, Samuel Colt, of Paterson, in the county of Passaic and State of New Jersey, did obtain Letters Patent of the United States for an Improvement in Fire-Arms, which Letters Patent bear date on the 25th day of February, in the year 1836, and that I have made certain improvements in the construction of the said fire-arms, and also to the apparatus for loading and priming the same; and I do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description of my said improvements. My first improvements appertain to rifles, guns, and pistols; my second to the construction of a cap-primer for containing the percussion caps and placing the same upon the nipples, and my third to a flask and other apparatus for loading the rifle or gun. For the general construction of my fire-arms, as originally patented I refer to the Letters Patent first above named [1836], the same being necessary to a perfect understanding of the improvements hereon, which I am now about to describe‰Û_"On April 27, 1835, Henry L. Ellsworth, son of patriot Oliver Ellsworth, was sworn in as Mayor of Hartford, Connecticut. He resigned after serving for seven weeks, having been appointed the first Commissioner of the U.S. Patent Office. Ellsworth became interested in Colt's revolver, so he encouraged the 21-year-old Hartford inventor to file a patent. After receiving his 1836 patent, like a true inventor, he began working on improvements to his firearms. He had specific ideas, but he still had to perfect them.Colt wrote to Ellsworth, telling him that, while not ready to file another patent, he would like to file a caveat to prevent someone else from filing a patent based upon his ideas, before he files his own patent. Colt described in detail his improvements to his original 1836 patent.Here offered are Samuel Colt's undated retained drafts of the three documents sent to Commissioner of Patents Henry L. Ellsworth, each on watermarked laid paper, each signed by Colt. Ellipses marks (‰Û_) are used for omitted words, references to the drawing. Written in manuscript, there are additions and deletions in Colt's hand.The DocumentsDisplayed in a custom designed black leather 11" x 14" x 1.25" presentation case with a gold-stamped smoking revolver on the cover.(1) Manuscript Document Signed "Saml Colt," with four words added in his hand, half-page, 8" x 13". Fine condition.In full, "To H.L. Ellsworth. Com: of patents - The petition of Samuel Colt of Paterson New Jersey respectfully sets forth that your petitioner has made various improvements in his & other patent revolving cylinder guns and their appendages, and being desirous of securing his rights until he can perfect them, he prays that the accompanying description and drawing may be filed as a caveat in the confidential archives of the patent office agreeable to the act of congress in such case made and provided your petitioner having paid $20 into the treasury and complied with other provisions of the act."(2) Manuscript Document Signed "Samuel Colt," 2.5p, 8" x 13", front & verso on two conjoined sheets. With deletions and additions, 40 words in his hand. Fine condition.In part, "Samuel Colts caveat of improvements in various parts of fire arms and their appendages - First my improvement consists in rendering the charges, contained in the cylinder of my patent revolving cylinder gun safe by giving free passage for the escape of the fire which escapes latterly from the cylinder ‰Û_ My second improvement consists in making the touch hole in the nipple conical ‰Û_ having the base of the cone at the outside of the nipple, for the purpose of receiving a greater amount of heat and concentrating it when it reaches the load. My third improvement consists of a lever wherewith to force the balls into the chambers of the cylinder ‰Û_ It is obvious that there are various modes of making such a lever, but one mode is represented for the illustration of the principle. It can be made to apply to all kinds of fire arms that load at the britch or have revolving cylinder chambers such as cochrans and others - My fourth improvement is in the bullet mould ... After the bullet has been cast, the cutter D is pushed to one side which clips off the stem and leaves the bullet finished - My fifth improvement consists in the valves of the powder flask - Instead of one valve, as used in the common flask for measuring the quantity of powder, I make use of two, one at the mouth of the flask stem and the other inside. When one is shut the other is open, and vice versa ‰Û_ It is evident that all the parts above enumerated can be made and altered in various ways not necessary to enumerate; can but the object at present is to elucidate and secure the principle until they can be patented." Colt has handwritten: "The above principle is also applicable and has been applied by me to a flask having a number of tubes or chargers which expedite the loading of many chambered guns of all kinds." Colt has crossed out the short paragraph beginning "My sixth improvement is a military belt‰Û_"(3) Manuscript Document Signed "Samuel Colt," 1.5p, 8" x 13", front & verso. With deletions and additions, 12 words in his hand. Fine condition.In part, "My sixth improvement is in the bayonet = A (fig 1. Plate 2) represents a gun barrel with the bayonet B having a ferule C at its lower end made to slide up and [down] the barrel ‰Û_ The mortise or notch d. at the britch end of the barrel has its upper side dovetailed‰Û_" Cold has handwritten fig 3 is an end view of the barrel and bayonet. My seventh improvement is in a case for containing caps ‰Û_ This improvement differs from the common cap case in being double, and having an involute channel for the reception of the caps instead of an annular one, and also in having the follower slide upon its axes instead of being fixed ‰Û_ the cover is opened and the involute channel filled with caps, the catch h is then disengaged and the cover fastened ‰Û_ The operation is the same on each side but independent of each other, the central pin allowing the axes to work independent of each other.""The Colt revolver was known as ‰Û÷the gun that won the West' ‰Û_ A popular post-Civil War slogan said ‰Û÷Abe Lincoln may have freed all men, but Sam Colt made them equal,'" wrote reporter Stephen H. Wyman in his 1989 article about Colt Firearms in the "Washington Post."At the August 28, 1999, sale held by Early American History Auctions, these three documents in their presentation case was estimated at $100,000-up.

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Current bid: $20,000 (2 bids)

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Pres. Coolidge promotes Spanish Amer War veteran & career diplomat Fred Fisher

Estimate: $250 - $300

Description: Coolidge Calvin 1872 - 1933 President Coolidge promotes Spanish American War veteran and career diplomat Fred Fisher Partly Printed Document Signed "Calvin Coolidge" as President and "Charles E. Hughes"as Secretary of State, 1p, 23" x 17.5". Washington, December 20, 1924. Completed in calligraphy. Superb 3.5"-diameter blind embossed Seal of the United States affixed at lower left. Folds. Fine condition.President Coolidge appoints Fred D. Fisher of Oregon as "a Foreign Service Officer Class four‰Û_" Fred Douglas Fisher served in the U.S. Army during the Spanish-American War. He was U.S. Vice Consul in Nagasaki, Japan (1901-1904), U.S. Consul in Tamsui (1904-1906), Harbin (1906-1908), and Newchwang, China (1908-1910), Johannesburg, South Africa (1919-1921), Nantes, France (1924), Santos, Brazil (1926-1929), and Nassau, Bahamas (1932) and as U.S. Consul General in Mukden (1910-1914) and Tientsin, China (1916-1917).Charles Evans Hughes, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court (1910-1916), later served as Chief Justice of the Supreme Court (1930-1941).

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Current bid: $140 (2 bids)

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Fantastic Harvey Cushing inscribed book to CIA spy, Walter Pforzheimer

Estimate: $800 - $1,000

Description: Cushing Harvey 1869 - 1939 Fantastic Harvey Cushing inscribed book to CIA spy, Walter Pforzheimer "From A Surgeon's Journal", Third Printing, Little Brown and Company, Boston, 1936. Near fine book with a lightly chipped very good dust jacket. Inscribed and signed by Harvey Cushing as "Inscribed for Walter L Pforzheimer / Copyright Expert A++ / with the regards of Harry Cushing / Moreys / June 8, 1938".The book has navy blue boards with unfaded gilt titles to front and spine. The binding is tight and square. The internal pages are clean and flat, with the book appearing as unread. 6.5" x 9.25"An American neurosurgeon, and pioneer of brain surgery, Harvey Cushing was the first person to describe Cushing's disease. Together with Ernest Sachs, he is known as the "father of neurosurgery. During his time with Kocher, he first encountered the Cushing reflex which describes the relationship between blood pressure and intracranial pressure. The volume covers the period from March 1915, when Cushing first went to Europe to the Ambulance Americaine with a Harvard Unit, until November 14, 1918. Cushing inscribed the book to Walter L Pforzheimer, a Yale Law School graduate, intense bibliophile and CIA spy. Pforzheimer went to Yale in 1931, and soon after his graduation from Yale Law School, helped organize various OSS operations. He was asked to get money to a professor traveling abroad, and used his alma mater and the Yale Library Project‰ÛÓa program to buy publications‰ÛÓas a cover. In addition to his work for the OSS, Pforzheimer served with Army Air Force Intelligence. In Germany, he helped airmen decipher documents captured from the Luftwaffe. He earned a Bronze Star for his efforts. By 1956, Director of Central Intelligence Allen Dulles asked Pforzheimer to establish a Historical Intelligence Collection and act as its curator. With his love for intelligence and literature, he was the perfect choice for the job. The Collection was to educate intelligence professionals about the development of their tradecraft. Working until his retirement in 1974, Pforzheimer assembled the world's largest body of intelligence literature‰ÛÓover 22,000 volumes.A beautiful clean, crisp near fine example of this book, signed and inscribed by Harvey Cushing with a wonderful association.

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Current bid: $200 (1 bid)

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General George Custer addressed envelope to his wife in 1861

Estimate: $800 - $1,000

Description: Custer George 1839 - 1876 General George Custer addressed envelope to his wife in 1861, incorporating a bold signature "Gen. Custer" Golden yellow envelope, 5.5" x 3", with two post marked 3 cent stamps with crossroads cancels. Postmarked "Washington D.C", and boldly addressed by George Custer to his wife "Mrs. Gen. Custer / Care of Hon HB Payne / Cleveland Ohio". Soft pencil marks, slight smudge to ink, faint toning, envelope opened on verso, else near fine. Accompanied by a signed certificate of authenticity with raised embossed seal from The Philatelic Foundation.A vibrant example of an envelope in the hand of General George Custer, written shortly after his graduation from West Point and his participation in the first Civil War major engagement, the First Battle of Bull Run.

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Current bid: $300 (1 bid)

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Jefferson Davis signed document handwritten by his wife Varina re: Custis Lee

Estimate: $1,000 - $1,200

Description: Davis Jefferson 1807 - 1889 A Jefferson Davis signed document handwritten by his wife Varina, extolling the virtues of Custis Lee, son of Robert E. Lee Document Signed,"Jefferson Davis"written completely in the hand of his wife Varina, 4p, 6" x 9.5", front and verso, on two conjoined sheets, n.d., n.p., titled "Memo.", making reference to General Robert E. Lee as well as the outstanding character of Lee's son, Custis. "When the seat of Government of the Confederate States was removed to Richmond, I selected G.W.C. Lee as one of the top two Aids de Camp allowed for the President. In some of the visits made to the Armies in the field, he accompanied me & thus and otherwise I formed a high estimate of his capacity as a soldier... Genl. R. E. Lee once when in want of a chief engineer did indicate a wish to have Custis in that capacity to which I answered that though Custis was very useful in his present position, I would willingly give him up for a position in which he could be more useful, but would not consent to transfer him from my staff to that of his Father under whose shadow he would be dwarfed... ". Chipped and toned along outer margin affecting one or two letters of some words, yet completely legible.

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Current bid: $325 (3 bids)

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Free franked Jefferson Davis envelope as U.S. Senator with earlier two page ALS

Estimate: $700 - $800

Description: Davis Jefferson 1807 - 1889 Free franked Jefferson Davis envelope as U.S. Senator with earlier two page ALS of West Point chaplain and professor in three departments Rev. John W. French to Secretary of War Jefferson Davis after hearing a rumor that he may lose one of his positions Comprises:(1) Jefferson Davis free franked envelope, 5.5" x 3", franked in upper right "Jeffer..Davis / U.S.S" as U.S. Senator. Addressed by Davis to "Revd. J.W. French, / U.S. Mil. Academy / West Point, / N.Y.." Postmarked Washington City Free, MAR 1 1859 Mended tears at "ff" of signature into the address, else fine.Rev. John W. French (1808-1871) served as Chaplain of the House of Representatives in 1841, the first Episcopalian to hold that post. He was the founding priest of the Church of the Epiphany in Washington, D.C., serving from 1842 until 1856. On August 14, 1856, Secretary of War Jefferson Davis, West Point Class of 1828, wrote to President Franklin Pierce, "I have the honor to propose for you approbation the name of the Rev'd John W. French, of the District of Columbia, for the appointment of chaplain and professor of geography, history and ethics at the Military Academy at West Point." That same day, the President sent to the Senate his nomination for French's appointment "as proposed in the accompanying communication from the Secretary of War." On August 16, 1856, it was "Resolved, That the Senate advise and consent to the appointment‰Û_" Davis and French had become friends in Washington and became friends for life. This friendship caused some to question French's loyalty at the outbreak of the Civil War. French served at West Point until his death in 1871.(2) Autograph Letter Signed "J.W. French", 4p, 7.5" x 9.75", front & verso of two conjoined sheets. West Point, December 6, 1856. To Jefferson Davis, Secretary of War; three months later Davis left office as did President Pierce as James Buchanan was inaugurated on March 4, 1857. Fine condition.In part, "I will write as if I were to remain. I heard yesterday of a rumor that in your report you recommended some changes in the organization of this Academy. It may be that among the proposed changes is the separation of the duties of Chaplain from those of Professor. If so, I wished to suggest that the bill might be so drawn up as to leave for the present at the option of the incumbent, the two spheres as now under one head. The reason is that I have become so interested in my department; I have such materials; my plan for it appears so full of promise; that I should feel regret in transferring it to any other hand. I love the ministry and desire to be solely devoted to it. The labors from the union of two functions are most arduous. Still as I have borne the difficulty of the first grappling, I want the struggle and the achievement."If you divided the two perspectively and yet by leaving them for the present in one hand gave to one person the salary of both, this result might take place. 1. The clergyman might hire an assistant. 2. If there is no other way of preparing text books, and no appropriation can be got for Library, or ‰Û÷materials for instruction,' that money might be used. I only suggest this. I care nothing for the money. For a third person I should say it was but just that doing the work of both Prof & Chaplain, he should be paid for each. But in my case, I have no such thought‰Û_" Rev. French continues by suggesting his own reorganization of the Academy including the assigning of new West Point graduates to teach certain subjects.

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Current bid: $240 (2 bids)

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Jefferson Davis quotes Scottish poet, R. Burns,

Estimate: $600 - $800

Description: Davis Jefferson 1807 - 1889 Jefferson Davis quotes the Scottish poet, Robert Burns Autograph Quote Signed, "Jefferson Davis," in purple ink on a 3.75" x 1.75" card, Beauvoir, Mississippi, February 5, 1883, offering a two-line quote of Robert Burns' song, "Is There for Honest Poverty" Light soiling, mounting remnants on verso, else very good to fine condition. Davis writes in full: "'The rank is but the guinea's stamp The man's the gowd [sic] for a' that.' Jefferson Davis Beauvoir, Mipi. 5th Feby. 1883" Burns' 1795 song "Is There for Honest Poverty" is commonly known as "A Man's a Man for A' That." The song, which embodied the egalitarian ethos developing in the 18th century, was translated into numerous European languages. The German version, "Trotz alledem und alledem," was composed by Ferdinand Frelligrath and became a popular song during the Revolutions of 1848.

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Admission ticket for Brigadier and Mrs. Dayan to the funeral of King George VI

Estimate: $600 - $800

Description: Dayan Moshe 1915 - 1981 Admission ticket for Brigadier and Mrs. Dayan to the funeral of King George VI Partly Printed Admission Ticket to "The Funeral/of/His Late Majesty King George VI/15th February, 1952," 4.75" x 3.75". Lettered "B" in upper left, numbered "623" in upper right. Originally filled out for "Mme Salman Israeli Embassy" and "Mrs Seeve Finnish Delegation," it has been corrected to "Brigadier M. Dayan" and "[Mrs.] R. Dayan," his wife Ruth. As corrected, in full "Admit Brigadier M. Dayan and lady Mrs. R. Dayan to the Horse Guards Parade. Instructions as to time and method of access will be published in the Press. Uniform Indispensable."<.I> Fine condition. From the February 16, 1952 edition of "The Manchester Guardian," in part, "The great company that had been assembled to escort the body of the King on its last journey through the capital stretched from Westminster to the Mall before it began to move, but the greater part of the procession passed across Horse Guards Parade. Spectators who were stationed at the foot of the Guards' memorial and facing William Kent's building watched the troops, the gun carriage, the mourners, the statesmen, and civil powers emerging through the narrow archway on to the great stage of the parade ground, march slowly forward towards the park and then swing right up to the Mall. No finer setting for this movement could have been found..." Israeli Major General Moshe Dayan was spending the first three months of 1952 at the Senior Officers' School at Devizes, England, about 100 miles west of London. Among his instructors was British Field Marshal Montgomery of Alamein. Includes unrelated envelope addressed to Lieut-General Moshe Dayan postmarked October 5, 1958 from England.

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Princess Diana ALS written just one day before her separation announcement

Estimate: $1,000 - $1,800

Description: Diana of Wales Princess 1961 - 1997 Princess Diana ALS written just one day before her separation announcement from Prince Charles Boldly scripted ALS rendered in black felt tip on Kensington Palace stationary with Diana's crest, rimmed in a red border, 5.5" x 7", dated 'December 8th, 1992" and signed by Princess Diana as "Diana." Expected center fold, slight water staining of red border to left side of letter which bleeds through to the verso, not affecting the autograph. Else near fine.With their formal public separation announcement made just one day after this letter (their public announcement was December 9, 1992), Princess Diana still takes a moment to script a thank you letter to Eileen for a bottle of bath oil! Given the incredible pressure that she was under, it is hard to read this letter without imagining what was going through her mind with the Royale's separation announcement imminent just 24 hours later.England's Prime Minister John Major announced on 9th December 1992, "Buckingham Palace has made it known that the Prince and Princess of Wales will separate. Their Royale Highnesses are not seeking a divorce. Their position in the constitution remains the same. This decision has been agreed by both parties. The decision has been agreed by both parties, the care of the children will continue to be shared by both." They were only a few words, spoken quietly. But they were enough to set all the nation into shock. So it was now official, what every newspaper reader, every television viewer had long guessed. In spite of this the knowledge was still a shock. The romance of Diana and Charles existed no longer. With all this going on in the background, Diana yet composed this very gracious thank you note to her friend, Eileen, as shown in full below:"December 8th, 1992Dear Eileen, I did want you to know how really thrilled I was by the two bottles of bath oil you very kindly brought me today. It was lovely to see you & my apologies for making you rush!Lot's of love and special thoughts.From Diana X "A most thought provoking letter, written entirely in the hand of Princess Diana, from a highly published and distressing time in her life.

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