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Auction Description for Auctionata Paddle8 AG: 701: Collectibles & Rarities
Auction Description:
  This auction is characterized by diversity. An impressive collection of historical ‘dandy’ walking sticks, a selection of excellent first editions of famous books, combined with selected antiques and collectors' items create a wide and interesting offer. The cover picture, taken from the Latin edition of the ‘Stultifera navis’ – ‘Ship of Fools’ - by Sebastian Brant from 1497, is guaranteed to make the hearts of all bibliophiles leap. Just as impressive are a large ‘Tambour’ soldier figure by Auguste Poitevin and a large Nativity Scene with 31 figures. Also worth mentioning is a giant Parisian Boulle-marquetry clock with wall console. High-quality porcelain by Meissen and KPM as well as fine silverware harmoniously round off the varied selection. This auction is a wonderful opportunity for collectors as well as for lovers of antiques and curiosities, yet also offers a great occasion to immerse oneself in this world.
Viewing Notes:
A preview at Auctionata is only possible by prior appointment. Contact: Tel: +49 30 9832 0222, E-mail: preview@auctionata.com Auction Location: Havelstudios Havelchaussee 161, 14055 Berlin, Germany
Sale Notes:
This auction is characterized by diversity. An impressive collection of historical ‘dandy’ walking sticks, a selection of excellent first editions of famous books, combined with selected antiques and collectors' items create a wide and interesting offer. The cover picture, taken from the Latin edition of the ‘Stultifera navis’ – ‘Ship of Fools’ - by Sebastian Brant from 1497, is guaranteed to make the hearts of all bibliophiles leap. Just as impressive are a large ‘Tambour’ soldier figure by Auguste Poitevin and a large Nativity Scene with 31 figures. Also worth mentioning is a giant Parisian Boulle-marquetry clock with wall console. High-quality porcelain by Meissen and KPM as well as fine silverware harmoniously round off the varied selection. This auction is a wonderful opportunity for collectors as well as for lovers of antiques and curiosities, yet also offers a great occasion to immerse oneself in this world.

701: Collectibles & Rarities (226 Lots)

by Auctionata Paddle8 AG


226 lots with images

December 7, 2016

Live Auction

Berlin, Berlin, Germany

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Anton Puchegger, Lying Ice Bear, KPM Berlin, 1916

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Description: Porcelain, glazed, underglaze painted in black and greyKönigliche Porzellanmanufaktur Berlin (KPM, established in 1763), 1916Model: Anton Puchegger (1878 - 1917), 1910Underglaze blue scepter mark and imperial orb mark, embossed year cypher and underglaze painted numbering '140 / 331 / B.' as well as one paw with  'Puchegger'   Long outstretched lying, stylized ice bear in sparing painting Dimensions: c. 9 x 36 x 17 cm Literature:Irene von Treskow, Die Jugendstilporzellane der KPM Berlin, Munich 1971, p. 230-231, pict. no 222Condition:The ice bear is in age-related, visually appealing condition. The left paw has been restored professionally.Anton Puchegger (1878-1917)The works of the sculptor, who was born in 1878 in Lower Austria Payerbach, are distinguished by their extensive stylization of the animal body, which is however still based on an accurate observation of nature. His artistic training was facilitated by the Count of Wurmbrand-Stuppach, who offered financial support. Thus Puchegger first visited the woodcarving school in Bolzano from 1892 to 1896 and later the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. In 1900 he received a scholarship for the Academy of Fine Arts in Paris, where he completed his studies as an animal sculptor. In 1904 he moved to Berlin, where he worked as a freelance artist. The main focus of his work was the animal, which he was able to study in the Berlin Zoo. Since 1910 he regularly exhibited his works at the Great Berlin Art Exhibition, and increasingly gained recognition. Also characteristic of his animal sculptures are sharp ridges and edged volumes, which is dominated by the art of wood carving. Puchegger stood between the natural enthusiasm of Art Nouveau and the urge to abstraction of Expressionism. In 2012 the Bröhan Museum in Berlin first executed a monographic exhibition.Royal Porcelain Factory (KPM)The first porcelain manufactory at Berlin was founded on the suggestion of Frederick the Great by Wilhelm Caspar Wegely and J. Benckgraff in 1752, yet already 5 years later production was stopped because the king was not satisfied with the porcelain. With the invasion of Meissen by the Prussian army, many modelers and porcelain painters came to Berlin, where in 1761 the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky founded a new factory. This was finally bought in 1763 by Frederick the Great, who named it ‘Royal Porcelain Factory’ and introduced the cobalt blue scepter mark. During this time, the factory began producing exquisite tableware in a late Rococo style, which was painted with flowers, birds and scenes after Watteau Boucher and Dutch masters in vivid colors. Famous porcelain painters of the manufactory were K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme and K. J. C. Klipfel; master modelers were Friedrich Elias Meyer and his brother Wilhelm Christian. Typical Berlin porcelain patterns on tableware were moldings, scale-ground borders, landscapes, birds and animals, molded basketwork patterns and pierced rims. After Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß took over as artistic director in 1798, the tableware was decorated in underglaze painting with landscapes and cityscapes in delicate colors. In 1871 the factory was moved to its present location at the Tiergarten near the Spree, so that the raw materials and finished products were finally able to be transported by ship. In 1886 the painting of porcelain tiles was added as a new line of production under the direction of Professor Alexander Kips. After the destruction of the factory during WWII, KPM was taken over in 1988 by the state of Berlin and since 2006 has been in the possession of Berlin based private banker Jörg Woltmann. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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KPM Berlin, Elephant Figure, 20th C.  

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Description: Porcelain, white glazedRoyal Porcelain Factory Berlin (KPM, established in 1763), 20th centuryBlue, indistinct sceptre marksNaturalistic, modeled, striding elephant Dimensions: 35 x 56 x 17 cm Condition:One ear and both tusks have been professionally restored, apart from that the figure is in very good condition. Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur BerlinThe first porcelain manufactory at Berlin was founded on the suggestion of Frederick the Great by Wilhelm Caspar Wegely and J. Benckgraff in 1752, yet already 5 years later production was stopped because the king was not satisfied with the porcelain. With the invasion of Meissen by the Prussian army, many modelers and porcelain painters came to Berlin, where in 1761 the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky founded a new factory. This was finally bought in 1763 by Frederick the Great, who named it ‘Royal Porcelain Factory’ and introduced the cobalt blue scepter mark. During this time, the factory began producing exquisite tableware in a late Rococo style, which was painted with flowers, birds and scenes after Watteau Boucher and Dutch masters in vivid colors. Famous porcelain painters of the manufactory were K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme and K. J. C. Klipfel; master modelers were Friedrich Elias Meyer and his brother Wilhelm Christian. Typical Berlin porcelain patterns on tableware were moldings, scale-ground borders, landscapes, birds and animals, molded basketwork patterns and pierced rims. After Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß took over as artistic director in 1798, the tableware was decorated in underglaze painting with landscapes and cityscapes in delicate colors. In 1871 the factory was moved to its present location at the Tiergarten near the Spree, so that the raw materials and finished products were finally able to be transported by ship. In 1886 the painting of porcelain tiles was added as a new line of production under the direction of Professor Alexander Kips. After the destruction of the factory during WWII, KPM was taken over in 1988 by the state of Berlin and since 2006 has been in the possession of Berlin based private banker Jörg Woltmann. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Johann Baptist Pedrozzi, 'Magpie on a Trunk', KPM, 1923

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome paintedBerlin, 1923Royal Porcelain Manufactory (KPM), established in Berlin in 1763Model: Johann Baptist Pedrozzi (1710-1778), Swiss stuccoer and sculptor, 1765Underglaze blue scepter mark, imperial orb mark in iron red, pressed year cypher as well as further number and press markNaturalistic modeled and painted magpie on a stup with slightly forward bent head and opened billHeight: 26 cm Condition:Good conditon, consistent with age apart from an old repaired part to stump and bill.  Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur BerlinThe first porcelain manufactory at Berlin was founded on the suggestion of Frederick the Great by Wilhelm Caspar Wegely and J. Benckgraff in 1752, yet already 5 years later production was stopped because the king was not satisfied with the porcelain. With the invasion of Meissen by the Prussian army, many modelers and porcelain painters came to Berlin, where in 1761 the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky founded a new factory. This was finally bought in 1763 by Frederick the Great, who named it ‘Royal Porcelain Factory’ and introduced the cobalt blue scepter mark. During this time, the factory began producing exquisite tableware in a late Rococo style, which was painted with flowers, birds and scenes after Watteau Boucher and Dutch masters in vivid colors. Famous porcelain painters of the manufactory were K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme and K. J. C. Klipfel; master modelers were Friedrich Elias Meyer and his brother Wilhelm Christian. Typical Berlin porcelain patterns on tableware were moldings, scale-ground borders, landscapes, birds and animals, molded basketwork patterns and pierced rims. After Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß took over as artistic director in 1798, the tableware was decorated in underglaze painting with landscapes and cityscapes in delicate colors. In 1871 the factory was moved to its present location at the Tiergarten near the Spree, so that the raw materials and finished products were finally able to be transported by ship. In 1886 the painting of porcelain tiles was added as a new line of production under the direction of Professor Alexander Kips. After the destruction of the factory during WWII, KPM was taken over in 1988 by the state of Berlin and since 2006 has been in the possession of Berlin based private banker Jörg Woltmann. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Karl Himmelstoß, Westphalian with Donkey & Cart, KPM, 1916

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome paintedRoyal Porcelain Manufactory Berlin (established in 1763), 1916Model: Karl Himmelstoß (1878-1967) – German small sculptor, sculptor and modeler; from the year 1910Underglaze blue scepter mark, iron red orb mark, black war mark, model number ‘9545’, date letter, a further mark, and numberedDimensions: 20.6 x 27.2 x 9.6 cmA rare figure group by Karl Himmelstoß, which tells from the agricultural everyday life: The impassive farmwoman for milk, who is sitting on the cart, do not yet recognize the bristle donkey, who came with its right hind leg between the rein and the shaft of the cart Condition:The figure group is in very good condition. The lower left rein as well as both drawbars from the shaft of the cart with restorations. With cancellation mark.Königliche Porzellan-Manufaktur BerlinThe first porcelain manufactory at Berlin was founded on the suggestion of Frederick the Great by Wilhelm Caspar Wegely and J. Benckgraff in 1752, yet already 5 years later production was stopped because the king was not satisfied with the porcelain. With the invasion of Meissen by the Prussian army, many modelers and porcelain painters came to Berlin, where in 1761 the merchant Johann Ernst Gotzkowsky founded a new factory. This was finally bought in 1763 by Frederick the Great, who named it ‘Royal Porcelain Factory’ and introduced the cobalt blue scepter mark. During this time, the factory began producing exquisite tableware in a late Rococo style, which was painted with flowers, birds and scenes after Watteau Boucher and Dutch masters in vivid colors. Famous porcelain painters of the manufactory were K. W. Böhme, B. Böhme and K. J. C. Klipfel; master modelers were Friedrich Elias Meyer and his brother Wilhelm Christian. Typical Berlin porcelain patterns on tableware were moldings, scale-ground borders, landscapes, birds and animals, molded basketwork patterns and pierced rims. After Theodor Schmuz-Baudiß took over as artistic director in 1798, the tableware was decorated in underglaze painting with landscapes and cityscapes in delicate colors. In 1871 the factory was moved to its present location at the Tiergarten near the Spree, so that the raw materials and finished products were finally able to be transported by ship. In 1886 the painting of porcelain tiles was added as a new line of production under the direction of Professor Alexander Kips. After the destruction of the factory during WWII, KPM was taken over in 1988 by the state of Berlin and since 2006 has been in the possession of Berlin based private banker Jörg Woltmann. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Horse 'Maestoso', Böttger Stoneware, E. Oehme, 20th C

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Description: brown Böttger stonewareMeissen, Germany, second Half 20th CPorcelain manufactory Meissen, founded in 1710Model: Erich Oehme (1898-1970) - German Sculptor, 1949Base verso with incised crossed sword mark, artists signature and dating, bottom also with incised crossed sword mark, model number 'S. 206' another numbering as well as embossed 'BÖTTGER STEINZEUG'Sculptural and naturalistically worked depiction of a rising horse on an oval, stylized grass base Height: 53 cm Condition:The horse is in very good and age-related condition with slight traces of age and minimal scratch marks on the base. Sword Marks with one cancellation markErich Oehme (1898-1970)Erich Oehme was born in Berthelsdorf at Freiberg in 1998 and studied at the Dresden Academy. From 1912, he worked for the Meissen Porcelain Manufactory, after he had previously been working for the manufactory in Nymphenburg. In 1936, he was named artistic director of the Meissen Porcelain Manufactory. In addition, he also worked with Böttger stoneware and created designs for medals. In 1948, he changed his occupation and became artistic director of the ‘VVB Ceramics Erfurt’. The designs for his expressive porcelain figurines that made him famous, were produced by Meissen, Volkstedt and Lichte. Oehme died in 1970 in Meissen.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Pair of 'Sheep' Figures, Mid-19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, mid-19th centuryPorcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710Each with blue crossed sword mark and incised model number '1885' respectively '1878' and further impressed numbers on unglazed bottomTwo naturalistic modeled and painted sheep, each on an oval grass baseHeight: 9.5 and 10 cm Condition:The sheep are in very good condition with only one professionally restored ear. Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, Porcelain Group, Lady with Dog,19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedMeissen, 19th centuryAfter a model from the 18th centuryUnderglaze blue crossed swords mark, press number ‘100’, incised ’14 4 6’ and overlgaze black panited number ‘58’Depiction of a lady in an opulent, ornate dress, playing with a dog, sitting on a Baroque stool with flowersHeight: 18 cmObject is taxed regularly. 19% VAT is added to the purchase price for deliveries within the EU. Condition:The figure is in good condition with only slight signs of age and usage. Partly small chips, color and gold wear.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Pair of Gardener Figures, Porcelain, Late 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, white glazed, blue and gold paintedPorcelain Manufactory Meissen (established in 1710), late 19th centuryModel: Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799), from the years 1768-1770Each with blue crossed swords mark, model numbers ‘C 72’ and ‘C 73’, painter’s numbers, and repairer’s numbersHeight: 16.5 and 17 cm Condition:The figures are in good condition. The gold décor is minimal rubbed on both figures. The socket of the male figure was subsequently gold painted; the left hand and the flower basket with a restoration. The ribbon on the hat of the female figure as well as the ribbon on the left area of basket show losses.Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799)Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Meissen, A Pair Gardener Miniature Figures, 2nd Half 19th C.

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Description: Porcelain, polychrome and gold paintedExecution: Porcelain Manufactory Meissen, established in 1710, 2nd half 19th centuryModel: Johann Joachim Kaendler (1706-1775) – One of the most important modelers of the Meissen porcelain manufactory, from the year c. 1760Each with underglaze blue crossed swords mark, the model numbers ‘2748’ and ‘2869’, painter’s numbers, and one repairer’s numberTwo gardener miniature figures, thereof one female gardener with a spade and flowers in the hand and a male gardener with a bread bagHeight: 6 cmTwo rather rare gardener miniature figures by Johann Joachim Kaendler Condition:The figures are in good condition with partial restorations. The gilding and the painting are partial minimal rubbed. Two minimal chips on the socket and on the stem of the male gardener figure.Michel Victor Acier (1736-1799)Around 1764 the porcelain manufactory Meissen was looking for new modelers across the country’s borders. The French sculptor Michel Victor Acier, born 1736 in Versailles, seized the opportunity and moved from Paris to Dresden at the age of 30. From 1775 onwards, he was artistic director in Meissen and by the use of his new style, he became a pioneer of the Meissen Classicism. During his 15 working years he designed a variety of sculptures and other objects that mirror the transition from Baroque towards Classicism.Porcelain Manufactory MeissenPorcelain has been known in Europe since the 13th century, but always had to be imported from China. Thus it was mostly of lower quality – the Chinese rarely gave their best ware to the foreigners – and extremely expensive. As demand for porcelain became greater, European alchemists tried to discover the formula to create hard-paste porcelain. The production of the first European hard-paste porcelain was the result of a collaboration between the alchemist Johann Friedrich Böttger and the scientist Ehrenfried Walther Graf von Tschirnhaus at the court of Augustus the Strong, Elector of Saxony, in Dresden. As a matter of fact, it was finally achieved for the first time in Europe in 1708 to produce a white hard paste porcelain and in 1710 Augustus established Europe’s first hard-paste porcelain factory in the Albrechtsburg, a palace in Meissen. The so-called ‘Böttgerporzellan’ actually had more of a stoneware quality and it was not until the year 1713 that white porcelain was available for purchase. Initially unmarked, the motif of the ‘crossed swords’ was developed in the early 1720s and used from 1723 onwards. Since then, beautifully modelled and painted figures and table services were produced at Meissen, establishing its reputation as the pre-eminent porcelain factory in Europe. Outstanding potters, modelers and painters, e.g. Johann Joachim Kändler (1706-1775), Johann Gottlieb Klinger (1701-1781) and Count Camillo Marcolini (1739-1814), were employed at the factory, which dominated the 18th century style of porcelain, and Meissen wares and figurines were imitated by craftsmen at other porcelain factories throughout Europe. Meissen celebrated its 300 years of existence in 2008. Until today, Meissen porcelain is known for highest quality and originality and greatly appreciated. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 6 Walking Sticks, Horses and Dogs, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, partly ebonized, horn, 800 and 84 zolotink silverGermany and Russia, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the fineness, the national mark, the town mark and the assayer’s markPartly with inscriptionEach with a slight tapering shaftThe handles depict horses and dogsTotal length: from 89 - 92 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear and rubbing. The surface with small notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 3 Walking Sticks with Snakes and Mice, 1st H. 20

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Description: Wood, ebonized, bone, hornPresumably England, first half of the 20th centuryConical tapered shaftSculptural carved knobs in the shape of snakes and miceTotal length: from 90 - 93 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear, chips and rubbing. The surface with small scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 4 Walking Sticks with Animal Handles, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, partly ebonized, bone, horn, 800 silverPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the finenessEach with a slight tapering shaftThe handles depict two big cats, an eagle and wolves as well as a dog with its preyTotal length: from 87 - 92 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear and rubbing. The surface with small notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Collection of 5 Walking Canes with Figural Handles, 19th C

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Description: Horn / bone, carved, various woods, parcel-ebonizedEurope / Asia 19th centurySmooth, conical tapered shafts, parcel-ebonized, (presumably partially added later or repainted)Carved handles sculpted in the round featuring various heads, including a CyclopsLengths of knobs: 10.5 cm to 13 cmTotal lengths: 88.5 cm to 95 cmThe handles of the historic walking sticks are all rendered extremely detailed and elaborate; the diversity of the motifs additionally make this collection an especially interesting and collectable lot Condition:The walking sticks are altogether in very good condition, consistent with age and bearing usual signs of wear. The handles in places with surface abrasion and smaller tension cracks as well with further usual signs of tear and corrosion. Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Walking Stick with Asian Carving, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, ebonized, bonePresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centurySlight tapering shaftThe circular handle with two Asian faces, a building and a tree in reliefTotal length: 93 cm Condition:The cane is in good overall condition. The handle with small, usual traces of wear. Drying cracks, partly rubbing, slight losses, notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 7 Walking Sticks, China and Egypt, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, partly ebonized, bone, silver (800 and tested), syntheticPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the finenessEach with a slight tapering shaftThe different handles depict Chinese and Egypt motifsTotal length: from 85 - 97 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear, dents and rubbing. One handle with loss of material and fissures. The surface with small notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 5 Walking Sticks with Animal Handles, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, ebonized, bone, horn, white metalPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryEach with a slight tapering shaftThree handles with bird heads, and two handle with collection of animalsTotal length: from 89 - 96 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear. Drying cracks, notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp)? Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Walking Stick with a Bird of Paradise, Silver, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, 835 silverPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the fineness, monogram and makers markSlight tapering shaftThe handle with a bird of paradiseTotal length: 97 cm Condition:The cane is in good overall condition. The handle with small, usual traces of wear. The surface with notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 3 Walking Sticks with Skull Handles, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, ebonized, bone, bakelite, synthetic, 800 silverGermany, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the fineness One with inscriptionConical tapered shaftSculpturally carved knobs in the shape of skullsTotal length: from 89 - 93 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear. Repairs, notches, traces of glue and rubbing. One handle with traces of color.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 5 Walking Sticks, Africa Motifs, 1st H. 20 C.

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Description: Wood, ebonized, horn, bone, silver (800 and tested), white metalPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the fineness Two round, two tapering and one with a figural shaftTwo handles with faces, one handle with a monkey, scene with ships and camels and one in curved shapeTotal length: from 86 - 92 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear such as drying cracks, notches and scratch marks. The ebonized surface is partially rubbed.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 10 Walking Canes with Silver Handles, c. 1900 

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Description: Wood, partially ebonized, silverAsian and Europe, mostly England, circa 1900Silver hallmarked with the fineness and various, mostly English hallmarksSlender, partial slightly conical shaftsRound curved, angulated and knob-like handles, each bordered in silver with floral and ornamental décor in relief Total length: from 85 to 91 cm Condition:The walking canes are in age-related condition with usaul traces of usage. The wooden surfaces are partial slightly rubbed and scratched. The silver shows traces of oxidation consistent with age and is scratched and slightly bent in places.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 10 Walking Canes with Silver Handles, c. 1900

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Description: Wood, partially ebonized, silverAsian and Europe, circa 1900Silver mostly hallmarked with the fineness and various other marksSlender, partial slightly conical shaftsRound curved, angulated and knob-like handles, each bordered in silver with floral, ornamental or figural décor in relief Total length: from 84 to 91 cm Condition:The walking canes are in age-related condition with usual traces of usage. The wooden surfaces are partial slightly rubbed and scratched. The silver shows traces of oxidation consistent with age and is scratched and slightly bent in places.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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3 Walking Canes with Mythologic Ivory Heads

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Description: Ebonized wood, ivory, carved, partial silverEurope, late 19th centurySlender, slightly conical shaftsSculptural carved ivory handles with the head of a Cyclops, a bearded man with ram's horns as well as a mermaidTotal length: from 90 to 93 cm Condition:The walking canes are in age-related conditon with usual traces of age and usage. The ivory is partial slightly discolored and damaged. Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 11 Dandy Sticks, Silver Animal Handles, 19/20th C

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Description: Wood, ebonized, silver (925, 800 and tested)Germany, 19th/20th centuryHallmarked with the fineness, the silver standard mark, national mark and maker's monogramPartly with inscription and monogramConical tapered shaft11 Dandy sticks, each handle with an animal or figures, partly with a crestWith standTotal length: from 86 - 94 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of usage. Partly dents and notches. One animal with a breakage and slightly loose. The surface with small scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Dandy Stick with Figural Carved Handle, pres. France, 19th C

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Description: Silver (tested), various woods, partially ebonized and carved, horn, carvedPresumably France, 19th centurySmooth, conical tapered shaft (partially added later or repainted)Carved handle sculpted in the round displaying a wild cat in whose mouth a female figure appearsLength of handle: 13 cmTotal length: 92 cm Condition:The walking cane is in very good condition. Legs of the female figure with traces of corrosion.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 5 Walking Sticks with Female Motif, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, partly ebonized, bone, horn, 800 silverPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the finenessEach with a slight tapering shaftTwo handles depict erotic female depictions and each handle with a mermaid, a leg and a woman's face with blowing hairTotal length: from 89 - 94 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear and rubbing. The surface with small notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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3 Walking Canes with Erotic Motifs & Putto, Early 20th C. 

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Description: Wood, silver, porcelainGermany, France, early 20th centurySilver hallmarked with the fineness and partially with crescent & crownSlender, partial slightly conical shaftsAngulated, oblong handles, twice bordered in silver and once made of porcelain, with different motifs including erotic depiction of lolling women as well as a putto with binocularsTotal length: from 88 to 91 cm Condition:The walking canes are in very good condition, consistent with age and bearing minor usual signs of wear. The wooden surfaces and the porcelain are partially slightly rubbed. Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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17 Walking Canes with Ivory Heads as Handle, 19th C.

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Description: Various woods, partially ebonized, ivory, carved, partial silver, glassFrance, England, 19th centuryA collection of 17 rather short walking canes with slender, partial slightly conical shaftsIvory handles of sculptural carved dog heads as well as various human heads, including children and ancient heads, partial with inserted glass eyes, some with silver borderTotal length: 71-89 cm  Condition:The walking canes are in good condition with usual traces of age and usage. The wooden surfaces are partial slightly rubbed and scratched. Ivory with minor tension cracks and slightly discolored as well as partial minimally chipped. Some glass eyes are missing. Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 5 Walking Sticks with Animal Handles, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, ebonized, bone, horn, 800 silverPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the finenessEach with a slight tapering shaftThe handles depict an elephant, a pig, a wolf, a big cat with chamois and different animalsTotal length: from 84 - 97 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear. Drying cracks, notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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2 Walking Sticks with and Elephant and Horses, 1st H 20 C

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Description: Wood, ebonized, bone, silver (tested)Presumably East Europe, first half of the 20th centuryEach with inscriptionSlight tapering shaftOne handle depicts an elephant, the other a group of horsesTotal length: from 88 - 92 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear. Partly rubbed, with notches and scratch marks.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Collection of 6 Walking Sticks, Motif Dog, 1st H. 20 C

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Description: Wood, partially ebonized, bone, horn, 925 and 800 silver, alpaca, white metal, syntheticPresumably England and France, first half of the 20th centuryHallmarked with the fineness, partly with monogram, marker's marks and a nameFour round and two slight tapering shaftsFive handles with dog heads, a curved handle with a dog’s head on the sideTotal length: from 86 - 95 cm Condition:The canes are in good overall condition. The handles with small, usual traces of wear. Drying cracks, notches and scratch marks. The surface as well as the handles partly rubbed.Walking canesCanes were used, predominantly by men, as a means of support but considerably more as a walking accessory. The promenader grabbed the handle loosely and swung it in the rhythm of his walk.Walking sticks have existed since ancient times, when presumably they were merely suitable branches that were found on the ground or broken off trees. Starting in the Middle Ages, canes became more distributed, when their possible use as tools and weapons led to an increase in their popularity. Sophisticated society members and certain professionals had more elaborate canes. Especially during the 17th and 18 Century, walking canes functioned as a symbol of social status and were often quite luxuriously crafted. From the 19th Century, the accessory also became common and fashionable in the middle classes: a cane was chosen according to how it would match with the user’s clothing. After the Industrial Revolution in Europe, so-called system canes could conceal a variety of functions. These were often patented and examples include both swords and firearm weapons, cigarette lighters, small mirrors, snuff boxes, whiskey bottles and glasses, musical instruments, medical equipment and countless more. Since the mid-20th Century, walking sticks are less widely-used but, due to their extensive history and great variety, they have become a popular collector's item. (lvp) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Émile-Louis Truffot, Fox with Pheasant, Bronze, 20th C.

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Description: Patinated bronze, marbleFrance, 20th centuryÉmile-Louis Truffot (1843-1896) — French sculptor Inscribed on the base ‘E. Trufot’, foundry stamp ‘L’art Bronze / Qualité France’Mounted on a tired marble plinthDimensions (incl. plinth): 24 x 33.5 x 13.7 cm Condition:The bronze is in good condition. The patina is slightly rubbed in places. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Léon Bureau, A Lifesize Bronze Figure of a Pheasant, c. 1905

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Description: Cast bronze with brown patinaLéon Bureau (1866-1906) – French sculptorSigned in the cast ‘L. BUREAU’ and foundry mark of the ‘Société des Bronzes de Paris’ on the sides of the baseHeight: 55 cm; lenght: c. 73 cm This present animal bronze figure is typical of French bronzes manufactured around the turn of the century. This kind of figures features both the discovery of distant continents as well as a fine observation of the animals’ movements and postures.Condition:The bronze is in good condition, according to age, showing rubbing of the patina as well as malachite-colored oxidation marks in places. Léon Bureau (1866-1906)Born in Limoges, Léon Bureau studied at the École-des-Beaux-Arts in Paris and trained in the workshop of Alexandre Falguière. Starting in 1884, he exhibited at the ‘Salon des Artistes Français‘. He created mainly animal sculptures, genre figures and portrait busts. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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After Pierre-Jules Mêne, Bronze Group 'L’Accolade', c. 1900

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Description: Bronze, brown patinatedFrance, circa 1900After Pierre-Jules Mêne (1810-1879) – French sculptor Signed on the base ‘P. J. MÊNE’Naturalistic depiction of two horses on a rectangular nature base with stepped plinthDimensions (with base): 38 x 56 x 26 cm The ‘L’Accolade‘ (=embracement) of the both Arabian horses Tachiani and Nedjibe is regarded as one of the most famous works by Pierre-Jules Mêne Condition:The bronze group is in very good condition with usual minor traces of age and usage. Pierre-Jules Mêne (1810-1879)Pierre-Jules Mêne was born in 1810 in Paris. Being an autodidact, he concentrated on naturalistic depictions of animals and developed into a true pioneer of his time. Mêne became very famous for his hunting scenes and especially for his horses that suited the taste of his contemporaries a lot. During his lifetime, the artist made more than 150 models that were highly demanded and even continued to be produced after his death. His works can be found not only in the Louvre, but also in the museums of Marseille, Rouen, La Rochelle and Melbourne. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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John Willis Good, Saddled Horse, Bronze, England, c. 1870

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Description: Bronze, patinatedJohn Willis Good (1845-1879) – British sculptorSigned on the plinth ‘J. Willis Good’On an oval plinth standing an elegant and saddled horse, the right hind leg is ready to goDimensions: 38.2 x 48.5 x 15.5 cm Condition:The figure is in good condition with minimal traces of wear. The tail was new mounted. The bridle reins and the stirrups are missing. In the areas of the losses scattered abrasions and bumpings can be found.John Willis Good (1845-1879)John Willis Good was one of the foremost British sculptors of animal sculptures in the 19th century. Besides hunting and sport groups he was special famous for his equestrian bronze statuettes, which consists a narrative moment. Good was student of Sir Joseph Edgar Boehm in London, where he exhibited often in the Royal Academy in the 1870s. His bronzes were casted by Fa. Elkington, Mason & Co. and silvered and patinated with an electroplated procedure. Good also created terracotta figures, on which he had special interest in the colorfulness. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A. Titze, A Fisher Boy, Bronze Figure, Austria, c. 1920s

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Description: Bronze, marble, white metalA. Titze – Austrian artist of the late 19th / early 20th centuryVerso signed ‘Titze’Sculptural miniature figure of a fisher boy with fishing rodTotal height: 20.5 cm Condition:The figure is in good condition barely showing any signs of age and wear. The fishing rod bent and repaired in the upper part. The base is slightly bumped along edges and corners. Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Diana of Gabii, Bronze Figure, Gautier, France, 19th Century

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Description: Bronze, cast, patinated, black-red marbleFrance, 19th centuryPlinth sideways inscribed: 'Gautier Editeur'Sculptural worked female figure on a cylindric marble baseHeight with base: c. 47 cmStatue of a young Roman woman after the antique model of the Diana of Gabii, which was found in 1792 by Gavin Hamilton on the premises of the prince of Borghese near Rome and is now conserved in the Louvre Condition:The bronze figure is in good age-related condition with according traces of age and patina. Base with minor cracks. (kre)  Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Small Bronze Figure 'Praying Boy', Italy, Late 19th C. 

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Description: Bronze, cast, browny patinatedBase with guarantee stamp 'BRONZE GARANTI'Sculptural worked nude of a young man with upraised arms standing on a round profiled base Total height: c. 39 cmBronze statuette after the model of one of the most famous bronze statues of antiquity, created around 300 BC in the artistic tradition of the Greek sculptor Lysippus, nowadays kept in the Collection of Classical Antiquities of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin Condition:The bronze figure is in age-related condition with usual patina, minor scratch marks and traces of corrosion. The mounting is slight loose, the left upper arm shows a minimal crack, fig leaf is missing. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Small Bronze Figure 'Dying Gaul', 1st Half of 19th C. 

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Description: Bronze, green patinated, black marblePresumably Italy, 1 half of 19th centurySculptur of a dying Gaul prostrated beside his lowered weapons after an antique exampleGrand tour souvenieMounted on a flat ovale plinth of marbleOverall dimensions: 9.6 x 20 x 11 cmThe depiction goes back to a Roman copy of a bronze original in the Athena temple of Pergamon from 230/220 BC which was rediscovered during archaeological excavations and is nowadays preserved in the Capitoline Museums in Rome Condition:The bronze figure is in good condition consistent with age, the patination is slightly rubbed in the chest area. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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A Collection of 7 Antiquities, Apulia / Egypt / Cyprus, BC

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Description: Variously colored clay, painted, marble, wood, painted polychromeApulia, Egypt and CyprusA collection of 7 antiquities, comprising 5 vessels, 1 figure and 1 marble relief fragmentA pottery kyathos with broad, stylized strap handle featuring two pointed ends, 6th century BCAn Apulian red-figure pottery lidded lekanis, 4th century BCSmall, slender pottery jug with geometrical décor, 17th / 16th century BCAn Eastern Mediterranean pottery two-handled jar, probably early 1st millennium BCA red-figure askos with youth walking towards the right, 4th century BCA painted wooden Ushabti figure in the shape of a mummy with lion’s head and traces of an old coloration, mounted on modern wooden base, 2nd millennium BCA Greek style marble relief fragmentDimensions: see belowAll object come with sales receiptsProvenance: private property Flensburg The dimensions are as follows:Kyathos: 16 x 16.5 x 14 cmLekanis: 16.5 x 22 x 16.5 cmPottery jug height: 17 cmPottery jar: 12.5 x 22 x 20 cmAskos: 14.2 x 14.5 x 10 cmUshabti figure height (excl. base): 21 cmMarble relief fragment: 18 x 18 x 8 cmCondition:Apart from the repaired askos with several blemishes, all vessels altogether appear in a good condition and seem well preserved. The lekanis has been professionally restored. Some vessels bear smaller blemishes. The marble fragment has been restored and shows some cracks in places The paint of the Ushabti figure has only been preserved marginally, the surface is heavier rubbed and occasionally displays delicate tension cracks. (nlu) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Sebastian Brant, Stultifera Navis, Ship of Fools, Stuchs, 1497

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Description: Sebastian Brant (1457-1521) - German author of the humanismStultifera navis (Ship of fools), latin editionTranslated in Latin by Jacobus Locher Philomusus (1471-1528)Wrongly designated to 'Bergmann from Olpe, Basel, 1497'Pirated copy of Georg Stuchs, Nuremberg, 1497Complete edition with 148 sheets as well as one title woodcut and furthermore 116 woodcuts depicting fools szenes within textEmbossed high quality leather cover with four raised bands and gold embossed spine title, gilt edgeBound and signatured by Leon Gruel (1840) - French bookbinderEndpaper with ex libris; some faded handwritten notesMeasurings: 14.5 x 10 x 2 cmVery rare pirated copy of the famous late middle age moral satire which describes the shipping of 112 fools to the fictive destination 'Narragonia'; it enjoyably tells about their vices and foibles effecting to hold a mirror up to the reader in a critical and satire way  The ship of fools of Sebastian Brant was first printed in German language in 1494 by Johann Bergmann von Olpe in Basel. The work is regarded as the most successful German-language book of pre-Reformation. The late medieval morality satire illustrates the contemporary world with all its vices and peculiarities. The groundbreaking success of this popular literature moved both legitimate published parallel editions, and "pirated" by itself.The woodcuts of the present exemplar by Georg Fuchs are not originated by the young Albrecht Dürer like the other editions but have been especially produced for the pirated copies by an anonymus artist. They are a quite interesting alternative to the well known original woodcuts. Worldwide are only 31 exemplares of the "ship of fools" preseved in libraries, the most of them incomplete, among them also 4 entire books in German libraries. Condition:The book is in very good, age-related condition. The cover is minimally rubbed to the edges and the paper is slightly discolored consitent with age. A few sheet rims have been restored by a specialist respectively show minor loss of material. 3 sheets in facsimileSebastian Brant (1457-1521)Sebastian Brant was a German lawyer, professor of law at the University of Basel (1489-1500) and from 1502 to his death in 1521 City Counsel and Registrar of the free imperial city of Strasbourg. He was also one of the most prolific writers of Latin devotional poetry. His first published in 1494 in German Narrenschiff established his fame as a writer of German humanism. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Grimmelshausen, Simplicissimus, First Edition Nuremberg 1684

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Description: Hans Jakob Christoffel von Grimmelshausen (1621-1676) – German writerDer aus dem Grab wiedererstandene Simplicissimus; Dessen Abentheurlicher / und mit allerhand seltsamen / fast unerhörten Begebenheiten angefüllter Lebens-WandelJohann Jonathan Felsecker, Nuremberg, 1684Title page, 13 sheets, 927 pages, pedigree of the Simplicissimus and illustrative copper plates Modern calf leather binding with gold embossed spine titleRare!Dimensions: 18.4 x 11.3 x 6.4 cm Condition:The book is in good overall condition, consistent with age. The binding was renewed and shows partially signs of wear. The frontispice in facsimile. The paper is soiled in places and shows age-related discoloring. The edges and corners with some handling and occasionally repairs. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Les Oeuvres de Monsieur Molière, Le Jeune, Amsterdam, 1684

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Description: Jean-Baptiste Poquelin de Molière - French author OeuvresJaques Le Jeune, Amsterdam, 16846 volume French complete edition with numerous full page copper engraving illustrations as introduction to the single worksEach with quarter leather cover with six raused bands and gold embossed spine titles as well as marbled pasteboardsEach with ex librisMeasurings: c. 13 x 8 x 2.5 cm Condition: The books are in good age-related condition with usual traces of age and usage. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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G. Courtilz de Sandras, Memoires de D'Artagnan, FE, Rouen 1700

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Description: Gatien de Courtilz de SandrasMemoires de Mr. D´Artagnan [... ] Mousquetaires du RoiPiere Marteau, Rouen (A Cologne), 1700  Anonymously published, 3 volumes in French language, initial issue, first editionVol. 1: 1 sheet, tile page, 2 sheets, 440 pages; vol 2: 1 sheet, title page, 492 pages, 1 sheet; vol. 3: 1 sheet, title page, 492 pages, 1 sheetContemporary calf leather covers with six raised bands and gold embossed spine titlesMeasurings: each c. 16.5 x 10 x 3 cm Condition:The books are in age-related, strong bound condition with usual traces of age and usage. Covers with abrasion and slightly lost of material especially to the rims, the paper is age-related discolored, partially stained and slightly wavy. A few pages with handwritten notes. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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J H Wiedmann, James Cook, First Edition, Walther, Erlangen 1789

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Description: Johann Heinrich WiedmannLeben und Schicksale des Capitains James CookWolfgang Walther Verlag, Erlangen, 1789First edition, With frontispiece, 1 sheet dedication, 5 sheets preface, 384 pp.Original cardboard binding with a portrait print in the frontispieceInscribed backDimensions: 17.4 x 11.4 x 2.5 cm In the first volume of the biography of the famous Captain Cook Wiedmann describes the first and the second expedition. One year later in 1790 the second volume published, which reported about the third expedition and Cooks end on the island of Tahiti.Condition:The book is in good condition, consistent with age and with usual traces of wear. The book cover and the pages 112 and 113 with a spot. The areas of the corners of the front cover as well as the upper back are slight frayed. The inscription on the back is slight paled. Above of the inscription a loss can be found. (ala) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Lew Tolstoi, War and Peace, Moskow, 1868, 1st Edition in 3 Vol.

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Description: Lew Nikolajewitsch Tolstoi, ??? ?????????? ???????? (1828-1910) - Russian author????? ? ??? (Woina i mir) - War and PeaceMoskow, 1868, 1869Russion first edition of all 6 volumes bound in three books: vol 1 and 2, vol. 3 as well as vol. 4, 5 and 6; comes with an additional book of vol. 3 and 4Each with quarter leather covers with five raused bands and gold embossed spines titlesMeasurings: 23.3 x 17 x 3.5 cm; 22.8 x 15 x 5 cm; 23.5 x 16 x 5 cm; 22.5 x 16 x 3.5 cmVery rare first edition of "War and Peace" which is regarded as one of the major works by Tolstoi and is ranked as a classic among the ralistic novels  Condition:The books are in age-related, partial good condition with appropriate traces of usage. The edges of the covers are partially rubbed and the paper is slightly discolored and stained as usual. The paper of vol. 1-2 shows some spots by damp. The pages 127-147 of vol. 3 are intensely foxed. The additional volume is in damaged condition. (kre)  Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Jonathan Swift, Gullivers Travels, First Edition London, 1726

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Description: Jonathan Swift (1667-1745) - Anglo Irish writer and satiristThe travels into several remote nations of the world by Lemuel GulliverBenjamin Motte, London, 1726Two volumesVol. 1: Portrait of Captain Lemuel Gulliver, title page, 148 pages, 4 sheets, 164 pages; Vol. 2: title page, 3 sheets, 353 pages; 6 copper platesModern, calf leather binding with six raised bands and gold embossed spine titleMeasuring: 20.6 x 13.4 x 4/3.5 cm Condition:The books are in very good condition, consistent with age. The bindings were renewed and show only slight traces of wear. The paper is slightly discolored or slightly stained in places. Scattered slight handling creases. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Victor Hugo, Notre Dame De Paris, 2 Vol., First Edition, 1831

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Description: Victor Hugo (1802-1885) - Important French authorNotre Dame De Paris Charles Gosselin, Paris, 1831 First edition in French language, 2 volumes Vol 1: 1 sheet, title page, 2 sheets, 402 pages, 1 sheet; vol. 2: 1 sheet, title page, 533 pages, 1 sheetEach with gold embossed quarter leather cover with gold embossed spine title and marbled pasteboardsMeasuring: 20.4 x 13 x 3 cm and 20.4 x 13 x 3.8 cmAccording to the editor the first edition comprised altogether 1000 books which came out in tranches of each 250 samples and have been inscribed with first, second, third and fourth edition to suggest the fourth edition within one year  Condition:The books are in solid bound condition consistent with age. The covers are showing usual traces of usage to the edges, the paper is age-related discolored, partially slight stained and with minor handling creases. 4 pages with handwritten owner's marks. (kre) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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John Milton, Paradise Lost, London, 1692

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Description: John Milton (1608-1674) - English poet of the early enlightenment Paradise lost, a poem in twelve booksLondon, 1692Copper with portrait, title page, 1 sheet, 336 pages, 1 sheet, 66 pages, 57 pages, 12 full-page copper platesCalf leather cover with five raised bands and gold embossed spine titleMeasuring: 30.1 x 19.4 x 4 cm Condition:The book is in good condition, consistent with age. The binding shows some usual signs of wear. The paper is slightly discolored. The margins and the corners with some small handling creases. The copper plates are backend on paper. Page 66 of Paradise Regain'd shows a hole. (bde) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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William Carrick, Album with 44 Russian Photographs, 19th C. 

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Description: Album with 44 black and white photographs, laid on cardboardWilliam Carrick (1827-1878) - Scottish-Russian artist and photographer; representative of ‘ethnographic photography’Each photograph inscribed in English on the reverseThe photographs are accompanied by a handwritten legend in triple version in English with reference to 32 photographsDimensions of photographs: from c. 11.5 x 15.5 cm to c. 20.8 x 27.2 cm; cardboard size: 35.5 x 45.5 cmIn cardboard with fabric binding: 47 x 36.5 cmProvenance: Private collection, Spain William Carrick is considered an important chronicler of Russian life in the 19th century; his photographs are rare early documents and highly sought after by collectors. Carrick photographed not only in numerous cities, but also in the Russian and Moravian provinces. The present photographs include depictions of peasants, architectures and landscapes, including shots from Moscow, Sevastopol and Nizhny Novgorod. They are accompanied by a legend in English, possibly authored by Carrick himself.Condition:The cardboards are (in part irregularly) discolored, showing foxing and light-staining, some fingerprints, small creases and blemishes to the margins. The cardboard shows wear marks.William Carrick (1827-1878)William Carrick, born in Edinburgh, moved with his family to Kronstadt in the Gulf of Finland shortly after his birth. In 1844 the family settled in St. Petersburg. There, William studied at the Saint Petersburg Academy of Arts under Alexander Brullov. In 1853 he moved to Rome to study further. In 1856 he returned to St. Petersburg to become a photographer. In the same year, he opened a studio together with the technical photographer John MacGregor. Soon Carrick acquired renown with photographs from Russian life and became a pioneer of so-called ‘ethnographic photography’; he was supported by Grand Duke Konstantin Nikolaevich of Russia, among others. He also made numerous documentary photographs from artworks. In 1876 he became a photographer at the Academy of Arts. Carrick has exhibited his photographs In Moscow, London and Paris, among others. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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Boy-Ed/Koberstein: Peking / Tientsin & Umgebung, 2 Vol, 1906

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Description: 1) Karl Boy-Ed (1872-1930) - German diplomat, Marine officer and writer‘Peking und Umgebung. Mit 30 Photographien, …2 Karten und Einem…Chinesischen Stadtplan‘Published by the Brigade-Zeitung, Tientstin, 1906Printed by the Deutsche Besatzungs-Brigade in ChinaCopy ‘208‘ from an edition of 720 copies46 pages with 30 black and white photographsAccompanied by a plan of the embassy district in Beijing and a map in Chinese2) Friedrich Ernst Koberstein (1847-1933) - German officer and author‚Tientsin und Umgebung. Mit 21 Fotografien und einem Plan‘Published by the Brigade-Zeitung, Lee, Tientstin, 1906Printed by the Deutsche Besatzungs-Brigade in ChinaCopy ‘95’ from an edition of 800 copies41 pages with 21 black-and-white photographsAccompanied by a plan of the embassy districtEach in red linen cover: 30 x 24.5 cmProvenance: Private collection, Germany Condition:The bindings are worn, according to age, and the pages are somewhat discolored and partly stained, showing minor creases. The binding of one book is fixed with adhesive tape. (cko) Shipping costs excl. statutory VAT and plus 2,5% (+VAT) shipping insurance.

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