WELCOME TO INVALUABLE
Be the first to know about
the latest online auctions.
Please enter a valid email address (name@host.com)
Sign Up »
PS: We value your privacy
Thank you!
 
 
Want to learn more
about online auctions?
Take a Quick Tour »
 
Invaluable cannot guarantee the accuracy of translations through Google Translate and disclaims any responsibility for inaccurate translations.
Show translation options
Auction Description for TimeLine Auctions: Antiquities: Day 3

Antiquities: Day 3 (647 Lots)

by TimeLine Auctions


647 lots | 646 with images

December 8, 2016

Live Auction

London, United Kingdom

Sort by:  
Lots with images first
Per page:  
Chinese Camel and Rider Statue

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD. A painted ceramic figure of a reclining camel with opened mouth, thick mane, large saddle with a seated figure of a foreigner with long dark curly beard and hair, wearing a knee-long robe and a conical hat. 10.87 kg, 54cm (21 1/4"). From the Cheuk family collection. Supplied with a copy of the item's positive Thermoluminescence analysis certificate number C116c53, undertaken by Oxford Authentication. Camels symbolised the prosperity of the Silk Route trade routes between China, Europe, and the Middle East because they were the main form of transportation in the caravans. A popular theme for Tang court painters and sculptors was that of foreign ambassadors submitting tribute to the emperor. Diplomatic missions and the concomitant opulent offerings were an important medium of international exchange. In the dynasty?s first decades, the Tang expanded control north and east to Goguryeo and Baekje in Manchuria and the Korean peninsula, north to the steppes of Mongolia, west to the deserts and oases of Central Asia, and south to parts of the present-day provinces of Guangxi, Yunnan, and northern Vietnam. These and other kingdoms sent staples and exotica: lions from Persia and rhinoceroses from the kingdom of Champa in south and central Vietnam, hawks from the Korean peninsula, ostriches sent by Western Turks, sandalwood from the Indonesian archipelago, cardamom from the coast of the Malay peninsula, indigo from Samarkand, and wool from Tibet.. As is evident in tomb paintings and figurines, international trade whetted a taste for striking and sumptuous fashions among the Tang elite. Leopard-skin hats and close-fitting sleeves, imitating the clothing of Central Asians and Persians to the west, were popular in the mid-eighth century. High boots, practical for riding, were worn by both men and women, as were short tunics.

Condition Report: Finely modeled.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Horse with Raised Leg

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD. A ceramic statuette of a standing horse with saddle and saddlecloth, head lowered to bite at the left foreleg, right foreleg raised; black, pink, yellow and cream pigment. 7 kg, 50cm (19 3/4"). From an important London collection, acquired in the 1990s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Caparisoned Horse

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Northern Wei Dynasty, 386-534 AD. A terracotta horse figurine on a lozengiform base; finely modelled harness, saddle and bridle with pendants and bells, plume to the mane; restrained red pigment to the horse's harness and mane; hollow to the underside. 2.4 kg, 35.5cm (14"). From an important London collection, acquired in the 1990s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Leaping Horse and Rider

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD. A ceramic figurine of a horse and rider on a flat base, the horse in leaping stance with rear legs flexed and front legs bent, head lowered; the rider in cap and riding coat with hands extended; hollow to the underside. 5.9 kg, 46cm (18"). From an important London collection, acquired in the 1990s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Foreigner and Horse Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-907 AD. A pair of painted ceramic figures of a standing horse with head turned up, a seated male with dark hair and bead, wearing a Persian cap and knee-length tunic. 4.57 kg total, 20.3-46cm (8 - 18"). From the Cheuk family collection.

Condition Report: Finely modelled.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Horse and Groom Statuette Group

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD, or later. A substantial pair of ceramic statuettes comprising: a horse advancing with straight legs, saddle and saddlecloth, painted bridle, harness and crupper, hollow to the underside; a groom in wrap-over riding coat, tunic and trousers with sash to the waist, hands at waist-height; painted in black, maroon, cream, pink and green pigment. 12.2 kg total, horse: 60cm, groom: 46cm (23 1/2, 18"). Private collection, London; acquired in the early 1990s. [2]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Massive Aristocratic Fat Lady

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-907 AD, or later. A hollow-formed ceramic statuette of a courtly lady in draped robe with neatly dressed hair, hands extended, slippers exposed from beneath the robe; subtle cream, green, black and coral-pink colouration. See Prodan, M. The Art of the Tang Potter, London, 1960. 14.5 kg, 82cm (32"). Ex Cheuk family collection. During the Tang Dynasty the feudal system flourished. Political power stabilised, as officials were elected through the Imperial examination system, a system that provided everyone an equal opportunity to become a court officer. Many innovations were made, such as woodblock printing, and Buddhism was first introduced to the Chinese culture. As the economy prospered, Ancient Chinese depictions of beautiful women also developed, as people began to value larger women.Contrary to the typical slender, pale woman, the new image of a beautiful woman that emerged in China at this time was plump and voluptuous. Artworks began to glorify women who valued self-indulgence. More fat on a woman?s body symbolised her wealth, a quality that became increasingly attractive during the Tang dynasty. As the society reached a cultural peak, art began to reflect the carefree, luxurious life of aristocratic women.

Condition Report: Finely modelled.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Painted Rabbit Figurine

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD, or later. A terracotta figurine of a rabbit modelled in the round with one forepaw raised, ears pricked; pigment detailing to the ears, nose and eyes, hole to the underside. 3.1 kg, 32cm (12 1/2"). From the Cheuk family collection; formed before 1970. The rabbit plays an important part in Chinese religion and was considered to be highly auspicious. It is one of the twelve animals that is represented in the Chinese zodiac and is more commonly associated with the moon. In this capacity it is known as the Jade Rabbit and lives on the moon with the goddess Chang'e. The goddess is the guardian of the elixir of life which the rabbit makes by pounding various herbs under a osmanthus tree; the goddess then gives the elixir to those that she favours.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Large Guanyin Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Qing Dynasty,1644-1912 AD. A large sandstone image of Guanyin seated, cross legged in meditation, wearing an elaborate crown with scrolling plant motif, and central image of Buddha standing on a lotus flower; elongated ears, eyes half closed; robes open at chest and with strings of necklaces across; hands resting in lap and holding the Triple Gem of Buddhism; base with cupped arches to four sides. 104 kg, 84cm (33"). From the Cheuk family collection. Guanyin is one of the most popular Buddhist goddesses in China, and Japan where she is known as Kannon, and seems to have developed from Avalokiteshvara. She is believed to be enthroned on a mountain or an island in the Eastern Seas, and bestows the blessing of children, helps all beings attain enlightenment and is in general the goddess of compassion. She is called to for help when people are in danger and also helps heal the sick. Her name means 'The One Who Perceives the Sounds of the World', and her common title is the Mother of Mercy. Some Buddhists believe that when one of their adherents departs from this world, they are placed by Guanyin in the heart of a lotus, and then sent to the western pure land of Sukhvati. Guanyin is often referred to as the most widely beloved Buddhist divinity with miraculous powers to assist all those who pray to her as listed in the Lotus Sutra and Karandavyuha Sutra. Several of the biggest temples in East Asia are dedicated to Guanyin including Shitennoji, Sensoji, Kiyomizu-dera and Sanjusangendo as well as Shaolin.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Polychrome Standing Horse

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD. A ceramic figurine of a horse standing on a rectangular base with docked tail, saddlecloth and bridle; hollow to the underside. 1.8 kg, 30cm (11 3/4"). Property of an Essex lady; acquired from Ancient Art, London, UK, in 1998; with original certificate of authenticity from Ancient Art.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Massive Pair of Foreign Grooms

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD. A pair of large ceramic figures of foreign grooms with pigment, one facing left, the other facing right; both in belted tunics with large lapels, and wearing trousers with boots; both with beards and wearing caps, the right facing groom similar to a Persian cap; both with arms bent and fists clenched; left facing figure with some restoration. 23.1 kg total, 73-76cm (28 3/4 - 30"). Acquired on the London art market prior to 1980. Supplied with a copy of the item's Thermoluminescence test result, undertaken by Oxford Authentication, certificate number C115f61. Known as mingqi, meaning Spirit utensils, these figures first became popular in the Han dynasty. Tang mingqi integrated the guardian figures and pack animals of the earlier Northern and Southern Dynasties, but also incorporated the many international influences that were popular during this time of stability and expansion. As in the Han dynasty, Tang mingqi frequently take the form of musicians, dancers, and servants in clay, but are ornamented with sancai (three-colour) glaze, an artistic influence that was transmitted from Central Asia along the Silk Road. Foreigners were also frequently depicted, reflecting a cosmopolitan society that embraced exchanges with other groups and cultures. As in the Han dynasty, Tang mingqi were part of a complex tomb program, often with stone statuary lining a spirit road. However, their function was firmly rooted in consolidating power in the earthly world. Important funerals were sponsored by the state and were a way for the imperial government to strengthen ties with influential Chinese families and even solidify loyalty with foreign emissaries and the governments they represented. As in the Han dynasty, Tang mingqi and the larger program of funerary practices reflected ties among the living. Mingqi worked in concert with other tomb objects and architecture to support a larger funerary agenda, the goal of which was to comfort and satisfy the deceased, who was believed to have two souls: the po, which resided underground with the body, and the hun. While the hun could ascend to the skies, funerary rituals sometimes sought to reunite it with the po in the safer realm of the tomb. Here, valuables such as bronzes, lacquers, and silks, frequently decorated with Daoist imagery, surrounded the coffin. Funerary objects such as mingqi worked in concert with other funerary objects, tomb architecture, shrines, and spirit-road sculptures to achieve a goal that exceeded the well-being of the family. According to Confucian doctrine, when every person performed their prescribed social role to perfection, the cosmos would achieve harmony. By ensuring the well-being of the dead, the living promoted accord in the celestial realm and in their own terrestrial existence.

Condition Report: Finely modelled.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Multi Coloured Qing Emperor Porcelain Figure Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 20th century AD. A group of two porcelain figures consisting: one in a maroon robe with green collar and hem, blue sleeve collars and central medallion with Imperial dragon, string of beads and holding fan in right hand; yellow conical cap decorated with dragons and double jewel finial to the top, smiling face with mouth open, long pigtail to the back; one in a dark blue robes with red collar and multicoloured hem to the base, central medallion with Imperial dragon, strings of beads and holding a sceptre in left hand; tiered hat with double jewel finial; smiling face with mouth open and goatee beard, long pig tail to the back. 1.56 kg total, 36.5cm (14.5"). [2, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Blue and White Qing Emperor Porcelain Figure Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 20th century AD. A pair of porcelain figures of Qing emprors with blue and white painted decoration, consisting: one with conical cap with double jewel to the top; smiling face with moustache, long pigtail to the back; robes with wide collars and split at the front, decorated with Imperial dragons and clouds, string of beads around neck; holding a Ruyi sceptre in right hand; one with tiered cap with double jewel to the top, smiling face with open mouth and goattee beard, long pigtail to the back; long robes with wide collar and decorated with Imperial dragons and clouds, string of beads around neck; calligraphy brush held in left hand; both with marks to base. 1.70 kg, 37cm (14 1/2"). From the Cheuk family collection; acquired before 1990. [2, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Large Hu with Painted Decoration

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A large greyware hu vessel with stepped base, piriform body and flared neck; bands of polychrome painted ornament. 3.7 kg, 37cm (14 1/2"). From the Cheuk family collection; formed before 1970.

Condition Report: Fine condition, surface accretion.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Thai Ban Chiang Jar with Bird

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 1st millennium BC. A red ceramic jar with bulbous body and flared neck with horizontal ribbing; black painted s-scrolls and crosses to the neck, linear bands and tendrils to the shoulder, crosses and a feeding bird with crest and hatched wing. 679 grams, 17cm (6 3/4"). Property of an Austrian collector; acquired in the 1970s. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Lidded Wine Cooler

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A bronze vessel with cylindrical body with two separate horizontal bands decorated with low relief gilt frieze of wheeled covered vehicles and retainers on horseback; tao-t'ieh masks with lose rings; supported on three legs in the shape of bears with carnelian turquoise inlays; to the lid a stylised mountain with ring with series of deer and birds below; frieze with mounted archers hunting deer; to the frieze three rats on hind legs. Accompanied by an Art Loss Register certificate. 2.1kg, 22cm (8 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. The zun is a type of ancient Chinese bronze or ceramic wine vessel with a round or square vase-like form, and sometimes in the shape of an animal. Used in religious ceremonies to hold wine, the zun has a wide lip to facilitate pouring.

Condition Report: Fine condition. Professionally cleaned and preserved by Colin Bowles Ltd.,with photographic records a copy of the original invoice for the work done.

View additional info and full condition report
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Repousse-Lidded Lion Box

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-906 AD. A parcel-gilt silvered lidded container with flared foot; the sidewall undulating with band of parcel-gilt lotus-petal foliage on a hatched field, similar band to the edge of the lid; to the upper face, two winged lions leaping amid tendrils and flowers on a textured field; foot with parcel-gilt rim, four columns of calligraphic text to the underside. Cf. similar vessel made for Emperor Yizong in Michaelson, C. Gilded Dragons: Buried Treasures from China's Golden Age, London, 1999, item 107. Accompanied by an Art Loss Register certificate. 875 grams, 17.5cm (6 3/4"). Property of a London collector; bought at Wichita auction, New York, December 2015.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Lidded Cosmetic Box

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Tang Dynasty, 618-907 AD. A bronze domed box with four petalled rim, edges decorated with scrolling cloud motif, both halves decorated on the top with a standing winged deer, right leg bent and with flower to the mouth with two long ribbons falling to the ground; bird to the back of the deer, and scrolling cloud motifs; to the edge further cloud motifs. 61 grams, 65mm (2 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. In Chinese mythology Wang Shu was the female driver of the moon and she is commonly depicted as a winged deer. The aerial journey, which was made like a royal procession with gods and spirits in attendance, seems to have been a regular feature of Chinese Shamanism. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Acrobats Set

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A group of five gilt bronze acrobats comprising: a male standing on hands, body arching forward; a chubby male with knees bent and arms outstretched, head turned to one side; a male crouching, knees bent with both arms bent, left palm facing upwards, right hand holding a vase; a male standing on one leg, knee bent, right leg held back and arching, sole of foot pointing up and with arms outstretched; a male kneeling on one leg, other bent at knee, left arm held back, bent at elbow and palm facing down, right arm held in front with palm facing; each wearing a belted tunic and trousers and with bun to the head. 559 grams total, 60-80mm (2 1/4 - 3 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. Historical records, carvings and mural paintings in tombs and grottoes, such as the brick carvings discovered in the Han Dynasty tomb of Chengdu, in the Szechuan province, date the origins of Chinese acrobatics more than two thousands years ago, during the Warring States period. They developed mostly during the Qin and Han Dynasties (221 B.C.-230 A.D.) and reached a remarkable level of quality and refinement during the Western Han Dynasty, evolving from a simple exhibition of skills into a performing art, with a rich and eclectic repertory including tumbling, balancing, plate spinning, pole balancing, rope dancing, etc. This acrobatic performance was known as The Show of One Hundred Skills. Performances were popular with all levels of society, with the emperor providing lavish entertainment for his court, but with performances also taking place at fairs and in the streets for the enjoyment of the people. Images such as these would have been intended to be placed in the tomb so that the deceased could continue to enjoy acrobatic entertainment through the spirits of the objects that would come to life for him in the next world. [5]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Lion

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A gilt bronze lion crouching down with legs splayed and head held forward; central band running from head, down the spine and tail, sides of back legs and cheeks of face inlaid with turquoise with carnelian roundels between the shoulders, base of the spine and ears. details of the face engraved and entire surface of body engraved with images of birds, wolves and scrolling plant motifs. 1.86 kg, 35cm (13 3/4"). Acquired on the London art market in the 1990s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Standing Phoenix Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt bronze figure of a standing phoenix, crest to the back of the head, wings folded against side of body and fan-shaped tail with seven lobes to the top; fine detailing to the feathers on wings and body. 77 grams, 62mm (2 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Lying Camel Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Yuan to early Ming Dynasty,13th-14th century AD. A gilt bronze figure of a reclining camel with head arching back to the centre of the body, mouth open; tail curled over side of the back leg; fine detailing to the mane on neck and fur on body; hollow to the underside. 213 grams, 72mm (2 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Crouching Camel Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Ming Dynasty, 1368-1644 AD. A gilt bronze figure of a camel lying down, neck turned to one side and head reaching to humps and with mouth open; detailing of fur to the mane and underside displaying bent legs. 157 grams, 49mm (2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Lying Camel Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt bronze figure of a reclining camel with legs tucked under the body, head tilted slightly back, detailing of fur to the mane. 160 grams, 55mm (2.5"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. The camel was arguably of far greater significance than the horse in the history of the Silk Road. Domesticated as long ago as the fourth millennium BC, by the first millennium BC camels were prominently depicted on Assyrian and Achaemenid Persian carved reliefs and figured in Biblical texts as indicators of wealth. In China awareness of the value of the camel was heightened by the interactions between the Han and the Xiongnu toward the end of the first millennium BC when camels were listed among the animals taken captive on military campaigns or sent as diplomatic gifts or objects of trade in exchange for Chinese silk. Campaigns of the Chinese army to the north and west against nomads invariably required support by large trains of camels to carry supplies.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Running Ram Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt bronze figure of a running ram with large curving horns and detailing to the face; forelegs held in front, back legs opposed, erect tail. 115 grams, 70mm (2 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Buffalo Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Early Ming Dynasty, 14th-15th century AD. A gilt bronze figure of a reclining buffalo, head upturned and with mouth open; decorated collar around neck and scrolling motif on either side of the body. 307 grams, 11cm (4 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Lying Ox Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt-bronze figure of a reclining ox, head held down and with horns curving into the centre of the head; legs folded under body and with short tail to the rear; hollow to the underside. 164 grams, 65mm (2 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Cat Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt bronze figure of a reclining cat, head held up and tilted to one side; legs extended forward and tail arched around back leg; star-shaped pattern to the fur on body; hollow to the underside. 166 grams, 80mm (3"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Bird Figure

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A large gilt bronze figure of a seated bird, possibly a phoenix, with crest to top of the head, long tapering neck, squat body and wings together and arching upwards over the back to the head; fine detailing of the feathers to the wings and body. 609 grams, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. In China the phoenix is known as Fenghuang, and is an immortal bird whose rare appearance is said to be an omen foretelling harmony at the ascent to the throne of a new emperor. Like the qilin (a unicorn-like creature), the fenghuang is often considered to signify both male and female elements, a yin-yang harmony. It is mentioned as early as the Shang dynasty in oracle-bone inscriptions, but it is during the Zhou dynasty it acquired its association with political prosperity and harmony. When paired with a dragon it symbolizes marital harmony. During the Han dynasty the phoenix came to be associated with the Imperial house and especially symbolizing the Empress, with the Emperor being represented by the dragon. The imagery of the phoenix and dragon continued in popularity throughout Chinese history and entered into mainstream culture, especially for weddings, where it remains an important and popular image.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Belt Hook

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A gilt bronze belt hook with arching body decorated at the foot with two dragon heads with collars and rosettes to the necks; along the body the heads of an owl, dragon and a fox; neck with three lobed collar and arching head of a dragon; scrolled circles to the body; to the underside a raised boss decorated with scrolled pelta pattern. See, Lawton, T. Chinese Art of the Warring States Period: Change and Continuity, 480-222 B.C, Washington, 1982. 273 grams, 22cm (8 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. For a period of two hundred and fifty years the Zhou dynasty was divided among eight states who were at constant war with one another to gain control. The phenomenon of intensive warfare, based on mass formations of infantry rather than the traditional chariots, was one major trend which led to the creation of strong central bureaucracies in each of the major states. Chinese polity developed a bias towards centralization and unity, which can be traced from this period. On the one hand, it was a time of rivalry between competing states. On the other, as states consolidated their rule, they annexed smaller dukedoms. Confucius had already established unity as an ideal, and the end of this period saw the ascendancy of the Qin dynasty and China as a single imperial state. The rise of the aristocratic feudal families in this period saw an increase in the use of elaborate court ceremonial that required clothing and accessories as a means of displaying wealth, power and the concept of established stability. As such the ruling families presented themselves as representing the mandate of heaven, which they believed legitimized their rule and the right to conquer their neighbours with whom they were at constant war.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Inlaid Belt Hook

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A bronze belt hook with tapering body inlaid with gold and silver swirling pattern; hook end in the form of a stylised dragon head; underside with raised boss decorated with inlaid silver scrolling triskele pattern. 89 grams, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Cicada Belt Hook

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A gilt bronze belt hook in the shape of a cicada, eyes and edge of back inlaid with turquoise beads; head, back and wings decorated with silver and gold scrolling patter; abdomen with silver and gold segments; to the front of the head an arching hook ending in a horse head with inlaid eyes; raised boss to the underside. 131 grams, 14cm (5 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. Since ancient times, the cicada has been seen as a symbol of resurrection, an association that owes to its fascinating life cycle. Newly hatched insects drop from branches to burrow into the ground, where they nourish themselves on tree roots for as long as seventeen years before emerging into the sunlight. Then, they climb high into the trees, and their outer skin splits open to allow the full-grown insects to appear.This process was seen as an analogy for the spirits of the dead rising on a path to eternal existence in a transcendent realm. In the Han dynasty, jade amulets shaped like cicadas were placed on the tongues of corpses, no doubt to symbolize a hope for rebirth and immortality. In general Chinese lore, cicadas are creatures of high status. They are considered pure because they subsist on dew and lofty because of their perch in high treetops. An ancient analogy in China suggests that a high-ranking official should resemble a cicada: residing high, eating a pure diet, and with sharp eyes.Also in antiquity, the headgear of rulers and nobles incorporated a golden image of a cicada with prominent eyes. The emblem signaled refinement, modesty, and a full awareness of one?s surroundings.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Tiger Belt Hook

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt bronze belt hook in the form of a crouching tiger with head turned back, tail looped over body and held in mouth; long tapering hook to the rear decorated with stylised dragon head; raised boss to the underside. 140 grams. 14cm (5 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Phoenix and Lion Belt Hook

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A substantial gilt and silvered bronze openwork belt hook in the form of a winged lion attacking a bird, possibly a phoenix or peacock; entire surface decorated with scrolling pattern to represent feathers and fur; hook in the form of a stylised dragon head; underside with raised boss decorated with scrolling swastika motif. 635 grams, 24cm (9 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Inlaid Belt Hook

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Warring States, 475-221 BC. A bronze belt hook with arched and tapering body decorated with inlaid silver pattern of lozenge-shaped panels and with scrolling motifs to the surface; stylised dragon head hook to one end; raised boss to the underside. 191 grams, 21cm (8 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Lion and Griffin Buckle Plate

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A bronze openwork buckle plate in the form of a lion and griffin attacking each other; head of lion bent forward biting foreleg of griffin; large swirls of plumage to the griffin and head bent forward biting the neck of lion; two loops to the back. 100 grams, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Bear Buckle Plate

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A bronze openwork buckle plate depicting a pair of bears attacking a horse or deer with elongated body; scrolling pattern to border ending in bird's heads. 137 grams, 11.5cm (4 1/2"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Ox Buckle Plate

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A gilt bronze openwork buckle plate depicting two ox confronting one another and with heads turned and facing forward; horns arching upwards and tufts of fur to the body; tail arching over the back of the body. 233 grams, 12.5cm (5"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. The Ordos culture shares many similarities to the Scythian, being a nomadic group of people in the far North of China, mainly Inner Mongolia, indeed they are thought to be the easternmost people of Scythian affinity to have settled here, just to the east of the better-known Yuezhi.. The horse was of central importance to these nomadic peoples, as was the herding of animals such as deer. The natural world played a important part in their culture, both economically and spiritually, as the Shamanic beliefs held by them saw the natural world as inhabited by animal spirits. Along with the Scythians they enjoyed an ostentatious display of jewellery and weapons and were buried in kurgan burial mounds along with their possessions.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Devouring Beast Buckle Plate

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A bronze openwork buckle plate in the form of a hybrid animal with leonine body, serpent tail and head with long jaws, devouring a smaller animal, possibly a deer; to the back a rivet hole in the form of a bird's head with arching beak; pelleted border to the base. 91 grams, 10cm (4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Horse Buckle Plate Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A pair of gilt bronze matched buckle plates decorated with two opposed horses lying on their backs and with back legs splayed; scrolling floral pattern to the top and rope border surround; two hooks to the underside. 100 grams total, 10.5cm (4 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. [2]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Oxen Buckle Plate Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A pair of matched bronze buckle plates in the form of a bull, head facing forward, forelegs bent under the body; detailing to the hump, face and legs, scrolled motif to the body. 221 grams total, 10cm (4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. [2]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Devouring Beast Plaque Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A bronze pair of matched openwork buckle plaques in the form of a leonine beast with striated decortication on the body to indicate fur; small figure of a stag in its mouth. 85 grams total, 70mm (2 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. [2, No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Hunter with Tiger Belt Plaque Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A pair of bronze openwork matched buckle plates decorated with a male figure with elaborate bun to the back of the head and wearing long robes, fighting a rearing tiger; rope pattern border. 374 grams total, 12cm (4 3/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. [2]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Ordos Large Harness Buckle Plate with Stand

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 6th-2nd century BC. A large bronze harness buckle in the shape of a quadruped beast, jaws open and grasping a deer in its mouth; raised relief eye and curling tail; to the back a stag with elaborate antlers running along the back; mounted on a custom-made stand. 1747 grams, 26cm including stand (10 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. The Ordos culture emerged in the Eurasian steppes north of the Great Wall of China, in the vast expanse of grasslands that stretches from Siberia into Central Europe. By the first millennium B.C., material prosperity among the nomads had brought about a flowering of creativity and the evolution of a new artistic vocabulary. The pastoral peoples left no written record, but the artefacts that remain provide a key to understanding their culture and beliefs. Beautifully crafted and highly sophisticated and abstract in design, these objects are visual representations of the natural and supernatural worlds that guided their lives. An equestrian people, the nomads produced many objects associated with horses and the paraphernalia of riding. These were embellished primarily with animal motifs. The figures that populate these small objects?ibex and hedgehogs, deer and camels, griffins and dragons?at time exhibit violence and aggression, at times an appealing charm, but always spirit and vitality. This animal style would remain a significant source of inspiration in the decorative arts of the Eurasian continent for centuries to come. The artistic exchange between the pastoral peoples and their settled Chinese neighbours through trade, migration, marriage alliances, and warfare contributed to the cultural development of both groups.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Archaic Ornamented Animal

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Early Warring States Period, 5th-4th century BC. A bronze lid or handle of a crouching animal with open mouth, single ear or horn, elongated body and curving tail; entire surface engraved with scrolling decoration, possibly later, with geometric patterns and stylised phoenix; hollow to the underside. Cf. So, J. and Bunker, E. Traders and Raiders: China's Northern Frontier, Washington, 1995, p. 174, no. 101. 281 grams, 16cm (6 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Serpent with Scale Decoration

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 1st millennium BC. A hollow-formed bronze looped serpent figure with scale detailing, open mouth with tongue protruding. 500 grams, 29cm (11 1/2"). Property of a North London gentleman; formerly with a Mayfair gallery in the 1980s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Lion Scroll Weight

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-220 AD. A gilt bronze scroll weight in the form of a lion with body curled tightly, head raised over paws, and resting in a stylised mountain border. 277 grams, 58mm (2 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Archaic Lion Weight with Ring

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Western Han Dynasty, 204 BC-24 AD. A bronze figure of a reclining lion front legs extending forward, back legs bent under body; head held up and mouth open with lolling tongue; collar around neck decorated with chevron pattern and ring to the back; tail curled around the back; hollow to the underside. Cf. Lin, J. The Search for Immortality: Tomb Treasures of Han China, p.141 fig. 36. 380 grams, 13.5cm (5 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s. [No Reserve]

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Gilt Lion Scroll Weight Pair

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: Han Dynasty, 206 BC-224 AD. A pair of matched gilt bronze scroll weights in the form of a lion with body curled tightly, head raised over paws, and resting in a stylised mountain border. 580 grams total, 59mm (2 1/4"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Very fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Chinese Dian Scenic Plaque

Estimate: Log in or create account to view price data

Description: 4th-2nd century BC. A bronze openwork plaque depicting a bull with rope around its neck being led to a large pole by five figure, one hanging from the bull's horns; behind the pole a large male figure leading a smaller figure by the head; below an interlaced serpent with horned head. 140 grams, 15.5cm (6"). Property of a London collector; by inheritance from his grandfather; acquired during travels in the Far East in the 1920s.

Condition Report: Fine condition.

View additional info
  Realized: Log in or create account to view price data
Sign in to continue
Email
Please enter your email.
Password
Please enter your password.
Forgot Your Password?
Enter Your Email
Please enter a valid email.
No user is registered with that email address.
Request Sent
Check to find your temporary password and password reset instructions.
Use your new password to Sign In.
 
Per page:
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
...
13