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HaGra Glosses to the Talmud and other important Judaica

by Kedem Public Auction House Ltd


25 lots with images

July 3, 2012

Live Auction

Hechal Shlomo Building

58 King George Street

Jerusalem, 91076 Israel

Phone: +972-77-5140223

Fax: +972-77-5140167

Email: kedem.ltd@gmail.com

25 Lots
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Lots with images first
Embroidered Tablecloth for Pesach and the Holidays - Germany, 1778-1779

Lot 1: Embroidered Tablecloth for Pesach and the Holidays - Germany, 1778-1779

Description: Embroidered tablecloth for Pesach and the holidays. Germany, 1778-1779.A large tablecloth with embroidered decorations portraying biblical scenes, symbols and customs related to the Shalosh Regalim (the three pilgrimages) and Rosh HaShanah, chapters of Pirkei Avot and prayers. The tablecloth is an example of the custom of German Jewry to use elaborate fabrics for special ceremonies celebrated during the Jewish Year. This is a rare tablecloth in respect to its size, condition and the abundance of decorations. For additional information, see Prof. Shalom Sabar's essay. 162X137 cm, in a 3.5 cm wide frame. Fair condition. Dark stains and tears. Damages to the embroidery.

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Decorated Brass Plaques - Middle East

Lot 2: Decorated Brass Plaques - Middle East

Description: Six decorated brass plaques, meant for hanging on walls. Middle East [Syria?], early 20th century.Large and solid plaques of hammered and engraved brass, placed on wooden backs, which were used for decoration as wall hangings. The six plaques are decorated with floral and vegetal motifs, Hebrew texts (citations from the Book of Exodus and Psalms) and various impressive decorations, as follows:1-2. A pair of plaques with vegetal, floral and palm tree decorations. On one plaque appears the text, "The Righteous will flourish like a palm tree" and the emblems of the tribes of Reuven, Shimon, Levy, Yehudah, Zevulun, and Issachar. The second plaque carries the text, "Will grow like the cedar in Lebanon" and the emblems of the tribes of Dan, Gad, Asher, Naftali, Yossef, and Binyamin. 72.5X44 cm. each.3-4. A pair of plaques with floral and vegetal decorations, one with the text, "I shall carry you on the wings" with the image of an eagle facing left; and on the other, "of eagles and shall lead you to me" with the image of an eagle facing right. 37.5X44 cm each.5. Plaque with floral and vegetal decorations. An image of a large Menorah supported by two lions appears in the center, and above the text, "You are the source of life and in your light we shall see light." 72.4X44 cm.6. Plaque with floral and vegetal decorations. The image of a large crown appears on the upper section, and in the center is an image of the Torah in a mantle, decorated with pomegranates and the Ten Commandments. 72.5X44 cm.The upper borders of some of the plaques carry engraved instructions for hanging, in Arabic, such as "right down," "left down" and the letters A and B. On the reverse of the two smaller plaques are four screws for hanging; these screws are missing from the four large plaques and part of the wooden backs are damaged. Generally in good condition, with some bowing and damage.

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Kiseh Eliyahu HaNavi - Orthodox Congregation of Békéscsaba, Hungary - Inscription From 1910

Lot 3: Kiseh Eliyahu HaNavi - Orthodox Congregation of Békéscsaba, Hungary - Inscription From 1910

Description: Kiseh Eliyahu HaNavi [The Chair of Elijah the Prophet]. Békéscsaba, Hungary, early 20th century. Upholstered wooden chair with fabric upholstery. On its back, a stylish wooden plaque decorated with gilded borders and two metal ornaments bearing the caption, "Kiseh Eliyahu HaNavi in commemoration of the religious congregation of Békéscsaba, donated by Menachem Karaleck and his wife Mrs. Mascha, 1910." The arms and side panels of the chair are upholstered in red velvet, and the seat and backrest are upholstered in dark red fabric. (The upholstery of the arms and side panels is original; the backrest and seat have been re-upholstered.) The chair stands on four tall (original) wooden legs. The chair is particularly wide and seats two. Unlike many communities in which the custom was to designate one chair for the "Sandak" and a separate chair for Eliyahu HaNavi, this chair is wide, in accordance with the custom of the Safed congregation and other congregations, where the Sandak sits to the left of Eliyahu HaNavi on the same chair (in accordance with the Halachic ruling that a disciple is prohibited from sitting to the right of his rabbi).The Jewish congregation of Békéscsaba dates back to the late 18th or early 19th century (the oldest tombstone in the local Jewish cemetery is dated 1810). In 1825, five Jews are known to have resided the city. In the 1840s, upon the revocation of the ban of movement of Jews, the city's Jewish population began to grow and by 1851 the number of Jews amounted to 110. The Békéscsaba congregation served as a communal center for all the Jews of the Békés District. Following the rift the occurred in the Hungarian congregations in 1869, the Békéscsaba congregation defined itself as Orthodox; however, in 1872 it became a "Status Quo" congregation. This change was not to the liking of the Orthodox Jews, who in response established a separate congregation, known as "Shomrei HaDat," in 1883. The first synagogue in Békéscsaba was built in 1850 and in 1894, the Orthodox-Hassidic community founded a separate synagogue of their own - and it is from this later synagogue that this Chair of Eliyahu HaNavi originated.Height: 122 cm. Width: 110 cm. Depth: 61 cm. In generally good condition. Some of the paint and writing has faded and been damaged over the years.

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Persian

Lot 4: Persian "Mizrach" Carpet with Illustrations of the Holy Places - After Shaul Hornstein of Vienna, early 20th century

Description: "Mizrach" carpet made by Eliyahu Haim Levy. Kashan, (Persia), (early 20th century).A "Mizrach" carpet designed after a "Mizrach" by Rabbi Shaul Ben Pinchas Hornstein (the latter a lithograph in color published in Vienna in 1888 by Em. Joachim). Rabbi Shaul Hornstein was the author of "Givat Shaul" (Vienna 1883), a book about the geography and history of Eretz Israel settlements and holy sites from biblical days to modern times.On the lower part of the carpet appears the inscription, "I researched and examined... here in Vienna, I... Shaul Hornstein... Creation of Eliyahu Haim Levy". This text merges the text of the Hornstein "Mizrach" from 1889 and the signature of the carpet artisan, who copied the Hornstein version word by word. The weaver also copied the inscription on the upper part of the Hornstein "Mizrach" marking the tally of years since the construction of the Temple and its destruction (equaling 1889).The carpet, woven in vivid colors, includes graphic descriptions of sites, graves and towns in Eretz Israel. At the top we see the Tomb of the kings of the Kingdom of David and the Tomb of Rabbi Meir Ba'al HaNess; In the center, a large image of the Western Wall and Jerusalem, below which appear sites on the Mediterranean seashore ("Yam HaGadol"): "Zo Ir HaKodesh Yaffo," (the Tomb of) "Elisha the Prophet (on) Mount Carmel," "Ir HaKodesh Haifa" and "Zo Ir HaKodesh Zidon." Along the right margins appear images of the Tomb of Yossef HaTzadik, the Cave of the Machpelah, Rachel's Tomb, the Tomb of Shamai HaZaken and the tombs of the Rambam and HaShla; on the left we see the Tomb of "Rabbi Yohanan (HaSandlar), the Tomb of Hoshe'a the Prophet, the Tomb of Rabbi Shimon Bar Yochay, the Tomb of the Prophet Samuel and the site of the Tiberias Hot Springs.The carpet is not mentioned in "Jewish Carpets - A History and Guide" by Anton Felton (England: Antique Collectors' Club, 1977).92.5X116 cm. Good condition. Non-original fringes. Minor damage at center, minor damages and tears at borders.

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Portraits of

Lot 5: Portraits of "HaNoda BeYehuda" Rabbi Yehezkel Landau and his Son Rabbi Shmuel Landau - Prague, mid 19th century

Description: 1. Portrait of Rabbi Yehezkel Landau. Etching by M. Klauber. Prague, [ca. 1840]. The caption below the portrait reads, "Ezechiel Landau, Oberrabbiner bey der Israelitengemeinde in Prag - ... for forty years he led the Jewish congregation as a shepherd...." About 36X30 cm, framed to a size of 64.5X54.5 cm. Not examined out of the frame. Good condition. Some creases and stains. Minor tears at the borders, restored. Literature: Rubens, Alfred. A Jewish Iconography. London: The Jewish Museum, 1954. No. 2103.2. Portrait of Rabbi Shmuel Landau. Lithographic print by M. Schmelkes. Prague, [mid 19th century].The caption below the portrait reads, "Rabbi Samuel Landau, Erster Oberjurist und Religions Vorsteher zu Prag - the Gaon Rabbi Shmuel Segal Landau, known for his responsa and glosses in the Noda BeYehuda book...". About 39X29 cm, framed to a size of 64.5X54.5 cm. Not examined out of the frame. Fair-good condition. Tears and damages to right side, restored. Stains.The Gaon Rabbi Yehezkel HaLevy (Segal) Landau (1713-1793), Prague's famous rabbi, was an influential authority in Halacha and a leading rabbinical figure. He was the author of the Responsa book "Noda BeYehuda," "Sefer Tziyun LeNefesh Chaya" and others. His son, the Gaon Rabbi Shmuel Landau (1740-1831), succeeded his father as rabbi of Prague, and was known as one of the leading religious figures of his generation. His Responsa and homiletics were printed in his father's books and in his own book "Shivat Zion."

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Illustrated, Large Format Megillat Esther - Contemporary Artistic Judaica

Lot 6: Illustrated, Large Format Megillat Esther - Contemporary Artistic Judaica

Description: Megillat Esther, accurate Stam script, with illustrations. Acrylic, gold and ink on parchment. [Israel, 2008.]The scroll consist of four large parchment sheets (height 44 cm) sewn together with tendons. The Stam script is accompanied by numerous color decorations and illustrations portraying scenes from the story of the Megillah. The text is in 16 columns; each two columns are separated by a decorated column and the margins are decorated with floral and vegetal motifs. On the lower section of eight of the columns appear illustrations. A particularly large drawing opens the Megillah. The final illustration portrays figures of six Jews in a synagogue. The artist's details (D.A. Epstein) appear in the illustration on the curtain covering the Holy Ark.338X44 cm. Illustrations: 19X11 cm to 20X40 cm. Very good condition. In a fine fabric pouch placed in a remarkable wooden box, 63 cm high.

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Valuable and Extensive Collection of Jewish Ex-Libris Bookplates

Lot 7: Valuable and Extensive Collection of Jewish Ex-Libris Bookplates

Description: An extensive, rare and valuable collection of approximately 1,280 Jewish Ex-Libris bookplates.The collection includes numerous bookplates designed by leading Jewish artists, including Hermann Struck, Joseph Budko, Ephraim Moshe Lilien, Arthur Szyk, Zeev Raban, Meir Gur-Aryeh, Jacob Starck, Miron Sima and others. Some are original etchings and prints, signed in pencil by the artist; amongst them is an original sketch.The collection encompasses a wide variety of bookplates designed by the above-mentioned artists. Many feature iconic creations by the artists, which over the years have become recognized symbols of their respective oeuvres. Also present are numerous bookplates designed for famous people.The main part of the collection consists of private bookplates, both Israeli and European, but it includes also dozens of Jewish institutional bookplates, including from research institutes, libraries and university collections.The collection, arranged in three albums, belonged to a private collector who assembled the bookplates tirelessly, one by one, for many years, succeeding thus in creating a rare collection in respect to its scope, scarcity and quality. (Some of the bookplates appear in multiple copies.)

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Collection of Photographs from Israel's War of Independence - The

Lot 8: Collection of Photographs from Israel's War of Independence - The "Haganah"'s Spy Photographer Amidst Arab Gangs

Description: Forty-three photographs taken by Israel Netach, a Jewish photographer who operated under disguise amidst Arab gangs during Israel's War of Independence, 1948.Israel Netach (Ben-Yitach) was born in Acre in 1918 and died in Ramat Gan in 2008. When he was two years old his family moved to Damascus. At the age of 13, he joined his cousin and the two collaborated on the smuggling of Syrian Jews from Damascus to Eretz Israel on behalf of the Jewish Agency. In 1953, he was recruited into the "Haganah." During the course of the Independence War, with the assistance of an Arab friend, a resident of Jaffa who was closely associated with senior members of the "Haganah," he disguised himself as an Arab photojournalist using a forged photographer's certificate and a forged identity card in the name of "Ibrahim Ibn Ibrahim Siyad." Together with his colleague, who was a cousin of Abd Al Qader Al-Husseini, leader of the Arab gangs and authorities in the Jerusalem region during the War of Independence, he documented the activity of the gangs and transferred photographs as well as extremely valuable intelligence information to the "Haganah" regarding the deployment of the Arab forces within Jerusalem and its surroundings - the Castel, Gush Etzion and area of Mt. Hebron. Netach's photographs depict the War of Independence from an unconventional perspective and serve as evidence of one of the most intriguing espionage affairs of the State of Israel. Some are rare photographs, which are not included in the standard photographic evidence of the War of Independence. The lot includes photographs showing the following events: An armored truck going up in flames after being attacked by Arab forces on its way from Atarot to Jerusalem (apparently, one of the two armored vehicles of the "Atarot Convoy," which was attacked on March 24, 1948 resulting in the death of 14 Jewish soldiers) (two photographs); a street in Jaffa, blockaded with barrels and stones; the funeral procession of Abd Al Qader Al-Husseini; a demonstration parade of members of Abd Al Qader Al-Husseini's gang in the Castel village (leading the marchers is Al-Husseini himself, wearing high boots); Al-Husseini and his fighters in an army base north of Ramallah, prior to the ascent to Gush Etzion (January 1948); Al-Husseini and his commanders studying maps (including his assistant Kasm Rimavi), escorted by bodyguards and warriors (this photograph was taken on the Castel on April 7, 1948 and is the last known photograph of Al-Husseini, who was killed on the Castel that same night); volunteer fighters of Al-Husseini in the area of Beit She'an on their way to conquer the Castel, April 1948; Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, commander of the Arab Liberation Army (a joint Arab, Iraqi, Syrian and Druze volunteer force established in Syria in order to aid the Arabs of Israel in their battles against the Jewish settlement during War of Independence) briefing his warriors in Al-Mansi village prior to the attack on Kibbutz Mishmar Ha'Emek, April 1948; corpses of soldiers of the famed Lamed Hey Convoy lying on the battlefield between the Arab villages of Jaba and Tzurif, January 1948; dead bodies of soldiers killed in the Gush Etzion battles; Arab volunteer forces training in Jerusalem area (some of these photographs were staged); the explosion of the Palestine Post building in Jerusalem, February, 1948; a car bomb explosion on Ben Yehuda Street in Jerusalem, February 1948 (this terrorist attack, planned by Al-Husseini, caused the demolition of three buildings on Ben Yehuda Street and the death of 58 people); additional photographs. Many of the photographs are dated in handwriting on the reverse.Total of forty-three photographs, thirty-two of which depict various aspect of Arab gangs (in training, leaders, and significant events), all taken from an Arab perspective, and eleven photographs showing the training of "Haganah" forces.The collection includes also dozens of family and group photographs, newspaper excerpts, articles on Netach and personal letters from various periods, including many letters he received from various Knesset members, ministers and public figures to whom he had sent a copy of his book "Israel Netach - Israeli Patriot" (Ramat Gan, 2005). These items include a handwritten letter from David Ben Gurion, photographs with Golda Meir, and more. The documents teach us also that Netach was a talented cyclist in the HaPo'el sports organization.From the articles and letters included in this lot it is apparent that for many years Netach kept his story secret, for fear of the life of his father, who continued to reside in Syria. After his father immigrated to Israel, Netach made his story public, via family members, in the press, and to his many clients, customers of his falafel stand in Jaffa. Size: 8X6.5 cm. to 10X7.5 cm. Fair-good condition. Most are torn, creased and stained. Remnants of glue and black cardboard on the reverse (evidence of the photographs having been removed from an album). Forty-three photographs taken by Israel Netach, a Jewish photographer who operated under disguise amidst Arab gangs during Israel's War of Independence, 1948.Israel Netach (Ben-Yitach) was born in Acre in 1918 and died in Ramat Gan in 2008. When he was two years old his family moved to Damascus. At the age of 13, he joined his cousin and the two collaborated on the smuggling of Syrian Jews from Damascus to Eretz Israel on behalf of the Jewish Agency. In 1953, he was recruited into the "Haganah." During the course of the Independence War, with the assistance of an Arab friend, a resident of Jaffa who was closely associated with senior members of the "Haganah," he disguised himself as an Arab photojournalist using a forged photographer's certificate and a forged identity card in the name of "Ibrahim Ibn Ibrahim Siyad." Together with his colleague, who was a cousin of Abd Al Qader Al-Husseini, leader of the Arab gangs and authorities in the Jerusalem region during the War of Independence, he documented the activity of the gangs and transferred photographs as well as extremely valuable intelligence information to the "Haganah" regarding the deployment of the Arab forces within Jerusalem and its surroundings - the Castel, Gush Etzion and area of Mt. Hebron. Netach's photographs depict the War of Independence from an unconventional perspective and serve as evidence of one of the most intriguing espionage affairs of the State of Israel. Some are rare photographs, which are not included in the standard photographic evidence of the War of Independence. The lot includes photographs showing the following events: An armored truck going up in flames after being attacked by Arab forces on its way from Atarot to Jerusalem (apparently, one of the two armored vehicles of the "Atarot Convoy," which was attacked on March 24, 1948 resulting in the death of 14 Jewish soldiers) (two photographs); a street in Jaffa, blockaded with barrels and stones; the funeral procession of Abd Al Qader Al-Husseini; a demonstration parade of members of Abd Al Qader Al-Husseini's gang in the Castel village (leading the marchers is Al-Husseini himself, wearing high boots); Al-Husseini and his fighters in an army base north of Ramallah, prior to the ascent to Gush Etzion (January 1948); Al-Husseini and his commanders studying maps (including his assistant Kasm Rimavi), escorted by bodyguards and warriors (this photograph was taken on the Castel on April 7, 1948 and is the last known photograph of Al-Husseini, who was killed on the Castel that same night); volunteer fighters of Al-Husseini in the area of Beit She'an on their way to conquer the Castel, April 1948; Fawzi Al-Qawuqji, commander of the Arab Liberation Army (a joint Arab, Iraqi, Syrian and Druze volunteer force established in Syria in order to aid the Arabs of Israel in their battles against the Jewish settlement during War of Independence) briefing his warriors in Al-Mansi village prior to the attack on Kibbutz Mishmar Ha'Emek, April 1948; corpses of soldiers of the famed Lamed Hey Convoy lying on the battlefield between the Arab villages of Jaba and Tzurif, January 1948; dead bodies of soldiers killed in the Gush Etzion battles; Arab volunteer forces training in Jerusalem area (some of these photographs were staged); the explosion of the Palestine Post building in Jerusalem, February, 1948; a car bomb explosion on Ben Yehuda Street in Jerusalem, February 1948 (this terrorist attack, planned by Al-Husseini, caused the demolition of three buildings on Ben Yehuda Street and the death of 58 people); additional photographs. Many of the photographs are dated in handwriting on the reverse.Total of forty-three photographs, thirty-two of which depict various aspect of Arab gangs (in training, leaders, and significant events), all taken from an Arab perspective, and eleven photographs showing the training of "Haganah" forces.The collection includes also dozens of family and group photographs, newspaper excerpts, articles on Netach and personal letters from various periods, including many letters he received from various Knesset members, ministers and public figures to whom he had sent a copy of his book "Israel Netach - Israeli Patriot" (Ramat Gan, 2005). These items include a handwritten letter from David Ben Gurion, photographs with Golda Meir, and more. The documents teach us also that Netach was a talented cyclist in the HaPo'el sports organization.From the articles and letters included in this lot it is apparent that for many years Netach kept his story secret, for fear of the life of his father, who continued to reside in Syria. After his father immigrated to Israel, Netach made his story public, via family members, in the press, and to his many clients, customers of his falafel stand in Jaffa. Size: 8X6.5 cm. to 10X7.5 cm. Fair-good condition. Most are torn, creased and stained. Remnants of glue and black cardboard on the reverse (evidence of the photographs having been removed from an album).

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Signatures of Ninety Members of the Constituent Assembly and the Chief Rabbis on the Occasion of the First Knesset Session, February 14, 1949

Lot 9: Signatures of Ninety Members of the Constituent Assembly and the Chief Rabbis on the Occasion of the First Knesset Session, February 14, 1949

Description: A sheet of paper bearing the signatures of ninety of the members of the First Knesset, and the Chief Rabbis, signed on the occasion of the first session of the Knesset in the National Institutes Building, Jerusalem, February 14, 1949.On Tu Bishvat, February 14, 1949, at 4:00pm, the Constituent Assembly held a festive assembly during which the "Transition Law" was adopted. This law stated that the Constituent Assembly would serve as the First Knesset of the State of Israel. The ceremony opened with the lighting of candles in memory of the Holocaust victims and the casualties of the War of Independence. The session was headed by Chaim Weizmann and attended by the IDF Chief of Staff, IDF Generals, the Chief Rabbis, judges and other dignitaries. Joseph Sprintzak was appointed Chairman of the Knesset after which the members swore allegiance. The headline of the Davar daily announced, "The first session of the Constituent Assembly opens today - people from all over the country are gathering in Jerusalem. The City of David is celebrating the historic event." In honor of the event, the poet Nathan Alterman published his poem "Im Knesset Rishona" in his column HaTur HaShvi'i.The document presented here is a unique item, being an independent and original initiative: Prior to the session, two young men appeared at the entrance to the hall with a sheet of paper resembling the Declaration of Independence. The handwritten text at the top of the document read, "On Monday, Tu Bishvat, five thousand seven hundred and nine years to the creation of the universe, at 4pm, the members of the Constituent Assembly gathered in the National Institutes Hall in Jerusalem, the capital of eternal Israel, to lay the foundations of justice, law and peace for the State of Israel till the end of eternity. Herewith are their signatures." Full of excitement and in recognition of the moment's significance, the members of the Constituent Assembly stood in line to sign the "Scroll." When the session opened, the Knesset members had to enter the hall; by then ninety of them had signed their names to the document, in four columns.Amongst the signatories: Yitzchak Ben-Zvi, David Ben-Gurion, Menachem Begin (with a greeting, "BeVirkat Achim"), Zerach Warhaftig, Joseph Sprintzak, Meir Vilner, Ben-Zion Dinaburg [Dinur], Uri Zvi Greenberg, Nathan Friedman-Yelin [Yelin-Mor], Dov Joseph, Zalman Aharonowitz [Aran], Ada Fishman [Mimon], Akiva Globman [Govrin], Aryeh Baheer, Pinchas Lubianiker [Lavon], Dr. Yochanan Bader, Shraga Goren (Gorochovsky), Zvi Yehudah [Zaltsman], Eliezer Liebenstein [Livneh], Heschel Frumkin, Hasia Drori, David HaCohen, Felix Rosenblitt [Pinchas Rosen], Shmuel Mikunis, Shmuel Dayan, Shoshana Persitz, Avraham Herzfeld, and many others (some signed twice). Many of the Knesset members signed their original, "pre-Hebraized" names (ie prior to their altering their original surnames to Hebrew ones). Several signatures are in Arabic.At the borders of the leaf, upside down, appear the signatures of the Sephardic and the Ashkenazi Chief Rabbis, Rabbi Ben-Zion Meir Hai Uziel and Rabbi Yitzchak Isaac Halevy Herzog, as well as the signatures of Rabbi Reuven Katz (rabbi of Petach-Tikva), Rabbi Isser Yehudah Untermann, Rabbi Ya'akov Moshe Toledano and Rabbi Ya'akov Henich [Hanoch] Sankevitch.Included is a sheet of paper identical in size, which served as a draft, on which the above-mentioned text appears. This draft was signed by Menachem Begin - who added the dedication "BeVirkat Achim on this holiday, Tu Bishvat" - and Uri Zvi Greenberg. 75.5X27.5 cm. Good condition. Folded into two. Several stains, tears at borders.To the best of our knowledge, this is a unique item and no similar item has ever been offered at auction.

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Calendar - Miniature Illustrated Manuscript - Ancona, 1811 - Napoleon Bonaparte

Lot 10: Calendar - Miniature Illustrated Manuscript - Ancona, 1811 - Napoleon Bonaparte

Description: Calendar, manuscript on paper, with illustrations in color. Ancona, 1811. Painter: Iacob Israel Montefiore.The title page with an illustration of the zodiac opens the calendar. Below the name of each month appear different digits (which appear also on the calendar's leaves) and the number of days in each month. In the center of the zodiac appear the painter's initials: IMF (Israel Montefiore). In the margins is written, "Ancona 1811."The calendar contains twelve leaves with the Gregorian months of the year. The name of the month is written, in Italian, on the upper part of each leaf, within an illustrated frame. The lower part shows the number of days in each month as well as several digits (the meaning of the latter is unclear; some digits appear more frequently than others, sometimes even more than once on a leaf). On the last leaf is the emblem of Napoleon Bonaparte, the center of which shows the painter's name: Iacob Israel M,fiori, and a star within which appears the letter "N."Iacov Israel Montefiore (b. 1748) was a descendant of the Montefiore family who lived in Ancona (the Italian branch of the family of the famous minister Moses Montefiore). The Jews of Ancona lived in a ghetto in appalling conditions until the arrival of Napoleon in 1797 and the subsequent conquest of the city, which led to the demolition of the ghetto walls. For the Jews of Ancona, Napoleon was a redeemer because of his contribution to their emancipation. This resulted in the creation of widespread folk art connected to Napoleon. The last leaf of this calendar represents Iacov Israel Montefiore's part in this phenomenon. The star seen in the final illustration is not part of Napoleon's official emblem but it is meant to symbolize "Napoleon's Star." In 1811, a huge comet that appeared in the skies above Europe' was observed for 260 days. This unusual occurrence was reflected in different areas of art, literature and science of the period, and astronomers in Europe conducted numerous calculations related to the comet. [Perhaps the unknown digits in this calendar are related to this.]. Napoleon was at his prime in that year and this is the reason the comet was named "Napoleon's Star." In this manner, Napoleon's success was associated with the heavens. This rare item is possibly connected to the comet event and maybe it shows Montefiore's calculations regarding "Napoleon's Star." However according to a professional opinion, Montefiore's time calculations are neither accurate nor scientific, and therefore it is possible that the digits are some kind of code.[14] leaves, 9 cm. Good condition, with some staining. Original binding, somewhat worn.

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Large Collection of Ancient Parchment Leaves

Lot 11: Large Collection of Ancient Parchment Leaves

Description: Large collection of parchment leaves. Includes especially ancient leaves [13th-14th? century]. Leaves from Taj Yemenite books from various periods, some very ancient. Includes pamphlets and passages from various books of the Bible, with upper vowelization. Listings of the Massorah added in the margins of some leaves. * Leaves from a Bible manuscript (sections from the Book of Ecclesiastes and the Book of Proverbs), written in two columns and ornamented with micrography in geometrical patterns. [Spain?]. * Six leaves from a Bible manuscript (sections of the Book of Leviticus and the Book of Numbers), written on two columns. Includes listings of the Massorah in the lower margins. [Spain?]. * Folded leaf of "Machbarot HaTijan" [Yemen], with graphic ornamentation of verses from the Book of Psalms.

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Decorated Manuscript on Parchment, Annual Siddur - Italy, 14th-15th century

Lot 12: Decorated Manuscript on Parchment, Annual Siddur - Italy, 14th-15th century

Description: Manuscript of a year-round Seder Tefilah. [Italy], [14th-15th century].Brown ink on thin parchment leaves (made of embryo leather), Italian-Ashkenazi script in medium writing, with vowelization.Includes prayers for weekdays and for Shabbat, according to the custom of Rome, with "Seder Hatavat Chalom," "Kidush Levanah," etc. Following these prayers appear additional sections related to the main prayers, and the "Amidah" prayers of all the other holidays: "Rosh Chodesh," the three pilgrimage festivals, Rosh HaShanah and Yom Kippur, Hanukkah and Purim. Includes numerous important liturgies: "Kedushah LeRosh HaShanah" ("Unetana Tokef"), "Mi Kamocha" for Shabbat Zechor ("Adon Hasdecha" by Rabbi Yehuda HaLevy), "Reshut LeShabbat HaGadol," Hosha'anot, etc. A version of "Kol Nedarim" was added to the Yom Kippur prayer.A remarkable manuscript in artistic-calligraphic script typical of the period, with instructions in miniature letters (not vowelized). Enlarged opening words, some decorated with floral and vegetal motifs, others encircled by decorated frames. More decorations appear at the end of some of the chapters. Above the word "Keter" in "Kedoshah" of the Shabbat prayer is an illustration of a crown. Most of the pages consist of 18-19 lines. "Shirat HaYam" is written in the form of "tile over brick," some sections (eg the Hosha'anot liturgies) are written in two columns. The "VeTodi'aynu" prayer is scripted in particularly large letters, for an unknown reason.The "Aleynu LeShabe'ach" prayer contains the sentence, "For they worship vanity and emptiness, and pray to a god who cannot save," which implies that this manuscript was not censored. No other version alterations have been examined.A number of leaves are lacking at the beginning of the manuscript and thus it starts with the section "LeOlam yihiye adam yehreh shamayim" that precedes the "Shacharit" prayer.Bound in an antique parchment binding.[88] parchment leaves. 13-14 cm. Varying condition of the leaves, mostly good-fair. Stains and wear, blurred ink, tears to some leaves.

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Manuscript: Rome Version Machzor for Yom Kippur- Italy, 1608 - Lattes Family Inscriptions

Lot 13: Manuscript: Rome Version Machzor for Yom Kippur- Italy, 1608 - Lattes Family Inscriptions

Description: Manuscript of the Machzor for Yom Kippur. [Italy], [1608].A complete manuscript in fine, medium, Italian script, on heavy paper. Contains all the prayers and liturgies for Yom Kippur according to the custom amongst Italian congregations (comparable in its composition to the "Machzor Roma," however version variations have not been examined). The manuscript opens with an illustrated title page with a verse spelling out the year (1608). Using fine, miniature penmanship, the author added handwritten comments and instructions ("...I wrote it here... This is how they pray in the province...").For several generations this manuscript belonged to the Lattes family, a famous Italian rabbinical family (the name is sometimes spelled Latis, D'Ltash or Di Lattes). On the blank leaves bound with the Machzor, numerous family members wrote dozens of notes about family births and deaths covering a period of 140 years, between 1609 and 1745. They also added some glosses to the Machzor.The first such writer was Rabbi Shlomo Ben Hezkiya Avigdor the doctor, son-in-law of Rabbi Yehoshua Lattes of Cuneo. He started inscribing text in the year 1609 (a year after the Machzor was composed). Concerning one of the births he writes, "My wife gave birth to a boy... On Friday evening during "Arvit"...," about another he comments, "My sister-in-law could not come here...."The documentation of births and deaths of other family members includes the following: Rabbi Moshe Eliya Ben Avigdor (whose inscriptions start in the year 1651), Rabbi Moshe Lattes (during the years 1660 to 1682), Rabbi Avraham Lattes (inscriptions during the period 1682 to 1697), and Rabbi Zemach David Ben Avraham Lattes (covering the years 1709 to 1714). Inscribing this information about the family's descendants provided abundant documentation about the Lattes family over the generations, together with additional related names and details about the period and the place. For example, Rabbi Avraham Lattes writes in 1714, "My wife gave birth to a boy and I named him Emmanuel Eliya... The Mohel was Yossef Sinai... And I was in prison...." To one of the pages two "Bakashot" were added regarding the two days of Rosh HaShanah "composed by Hezkiya Avigdor the doctor" (not listed in "Otzar HaShira VeHaPiyut" by Davidsohn).Various ownership signatures appear at the beginning of the manuscript, including "This is my Machzor Shmuel David Lattes" and "Israel Lattes di Torino," and the "Piyut" which is sung before "Kol Nidrei."A long and fascinating text by Rabbi Shmuel David Lattes dated 1733 was written on the final leaves: "I, Shmuel David Lattes, tell and make public the miracle... When in 1707, on the first evening of Hanukkah, I was on a boat from Torino to Cassali and we were three Jews on the boat and about 42 gentiles and after around 24 hours the boat capsized and 40 gentiles and one Jew named Shimshon of Torino and another Jew Avraham Yona drowned....And I brought a Torah to the synagogue and placed it in the ark...."[7], [103], [11] leaves. Ca. 16 cm. Good quality paper. Good condition with some stains and wear. Bound in an ancient leather binding (embossed in Italian, "Abram Lattes"), slightly damaged.

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Decorated Manuscript on Parchment - Arvit Prayer and Sfirat HaOmer - Moravia, 18th century

Lot 14: Decorated Manuscript on Parchment - Arvit Prayer and Sfirat HaOmer - Moravia, 18th century

Description: Manuscript on parchment, containing the "Arvit" prayer and "Seder Sfirat HaOmer" with "LaMenatze'ach" Menorah. Central or Eastern Europe [Moravia?], [17/18th century.]Nice, square scribe script, with vowelization. The first word of each paragraph is in a larger font, sometimes in colorful or gilded ink. In some places colorful decorations of leaves and flowers encircle the letters.The manuscript contains the complete "Arvit" prayer (Ashkenazi version), with several additions, most probably reflecting the praying customs of a West or Central European congregation. Most of the additions are written following "Aleynu LeShabe'ach", as follows: Three Psalms (chapters 24, 8, 29); five additional verses for the five weekdays (Sunday-Thursday; chapters 25, 32, 38, 51 and 86), said during the days when one prays "Tachanun" (with the instruction, "Ven man takhne zogt den zogt man mizmorim ayle"). "Seder Sfirat HaOmer," with the "Sfirot" according to the Kabbalah, for each day, with the psalm "LaMenatze'ach BaNeginot" in the shape of a Menorah; a whole page is dedicated to every two days of the Omer days! Following the Counting of the Omer appears a detailed "Seder Viduy" (including "Al Cheth"), and then the psalms "Shir HaMa'alot MiMa'amakim" and "LeDavid Hashem Ori." Psalms 1-2 and 4 - which are read by some before going to sleep appear on the first two leaves of the manuscript. (Possibly these leaves are out of place and were erroneously bound at the beginning of the manuscript.)In place of the "VeLaMalshinim" benediction, a piece of parchment is pasted, of a later date, with a different version of the benediction, correcting a shorter version that existed in the original manuscript.Adding Psalms after the "Arvit" prayer was a custom in some West European congregations (see attached material), but reciting the "Viduy" (confession) in synagogue during the "Arvit" prayer is known to have been customary only in very few communities in the East (see attached material). It is not clear whether the "Viduy" herein was written as part of "Arvit," but it proves that such a custom existed, maybe as a single custom in an Ashkenazi community. Alternatively, perhaps, it was written only for the sake of recitation according to the custom of the "Mekubalim" during "Kriyat Shma before going to sleep," which does not appear in the manuscript.This manuscript, in which appears the Counting of the Omer according to the Kabbalah together with the "LaMenatzeach" Menorah, is typical of the 1600s in the period following the influence of Ha'ari. During this period, the writing of "Kavanot" in the Siddur of the Mekubalim in Ashkenaz was common.Thirty-seven parchment leaves. 18 cm. Good-fair condition, with some staining, wear and creases. Damages to the text borders on some of the leaves. Tear and folds to first leaf.

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Sefer HaYashar by Rabeinu Tam - Constantinople, 1515-

Lot 15: Sefer HaYashar by Rabeinu Tam - Constantinople, 1515-

Description: Sefer HaYashar by Rabeinu Tam. [Constantinople, ca. 1515-1520]. Sefer Mussar, subdivided into 18 titles. Printed without a title page.According to the "Hida," this composition was erroneously attributed to Rabeinu Tam in view of the fact that his Novellae and Responsum book is also titled "Sefer HaYashar." Rabbi Menachem Di Lunzano attributed the book to Rabbi Zerachiya the Greek whereas others attributed it erroneously to Rabbi Zerachiya Halevy, author of "HaMa'or." Others still attribute it to Rabeinu Yona Girodni. (See: Shem HaGedolim, Ma'arechet Gedolim 7, 13-14; Ma'arechet Sefarim 10, 72; Ya'ari, The Jewish Print in Constantinople, p.80, no. 79; Bibliography Institute CD, listing no. 0154914.) This truly rare item appears in the Bibliography Institute Database according to a copy extant in the British Library. No copy has ever before been offered at auction. [40] leaves. 18 cm. Good-fair condition. Stains and some wear and tear to the edges. Adhesive tape stuck on the first leaf, no text omission. Untrimmed edges. Several glosses and inscriptions in a Yemenite hand, with an ownership inscription reading, "This book belongs to A. Netanel Ben Sa'id." Rebound.

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Sarah Schenirer - Collection of Letters

Lot 16: Sarah Schenirer - Collection of Letters

Description: Collection of letters by Sarah Schenirer, founder of Beit Ya'akov. Krakow, 1926-1933. Eleven handwritten letters by Sarah Schenirer (1883-1935), most of which were addressed to Yehudit Ross (Frankel), a native of Frankfurt (died 1992) and to directors of Beit Ya'akov in Slovakia and Romania.The letters contain abundant content regarding Sarah Schenirer's unique character and the development of the Beit Ya'akov movement during the last decade of her life. In the letters, Ms. Schenirer advises regarding the establishment of new institutions and provides spiritual guidance. The extraordinary love and warmth that she bestowed upon her students, to whom she refers as "my sisters" and "my pure daughters," is apparent.In one of the letters, Ms. Schenirer advises Ms. Ross against expending aggressive efforts to establish a branch of Beit Ya'akov in the city of Bardejov, Slovakia, and not to oppose the local rabbi (who apparently objected to the idea). She relates what happened in another city, Frishtach, where there too the rabbi objected to the establishment of a Beit Ya'akov, whereupon the local politicos organization wrote a letter to the Chofetz Chaim regarding this matter, and his response was published in one of the Beit Ya'akov pamphlets.In another letter, sent prior to Yom Kippur 1927, Ms Schenirer sends her wishes for a "Gmar Chatima Tova," and mentions a "Dvar Torah", in the name of the Sanzer Rabbi (referring thus to the author of the "Divrei Chaim" of Sanz) addressing the question as to why is it customary to wish in Yiddish "Gutten Gmar Chatima Tova," because as Gutten means good, the term is repetitive. Another letter is an especially lengthy message dedicated to the first Beit Ya'akov convention in Hungary, in which Ms. Schenirer delineates the fundamental guidelines of her movement, emphasizing in large letters the words "One entity to carry out the will of the Almighty, with a whole heart!" The letters are all written in Yiddish, except one in German. The end of one of the letters is missing. Eleven letters. Various sizes. Fair condition. Stains, tears, creases (taped). All the letters have been laminated. Partial summaries of the letters are included.

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Ruling Signed by Holy Ga'on Rabbi Ya'akov Abuhatzira - Morocco, 1832

Lot 17: Ruling Signed by Holy Ga'on Rabbi Ya'akov Abuhatzira - Morocco, 1832

Description: Ruling on matters of sale and transfer of ownership of land and homes, signed by Rabbi Shlomo Ben Sussan and Rabbi Yosef Ben Moshe Ben-Atiya. On the reverse is an approbation signed by Rabbi Yichye Yaloz and Rabbi Ya'akov Abuhatzira. [Tafilalet, Morocco], [1832]."The ruling authorizes that the mentioned sale is valid even if each party has not yet made use of his yard... And as evidence, we have signed our names on Monday, the 22nd of the month of Tevet... Signed Yichye Yaloz; Ya'akov Abuhatzira." Rabbi Ya'akov Abuhatzira (1806-1880) - Abir Ya'akov, acknowledged from youth as a holy Ga'on, exalted genius in Torah and Halachah, and divine Kabbalist. Rabbi and Av Beit Din of the Tafilalet congregation, the central congregation in the Emek Haziz region in Southern Morocco. By the time he was in his twenties, his opinion was considered definitive by most of the rabbis of the region. The approbation on this ruling was written when we was twenty-six years old. His co-signatory, Rabbi Yichye Yaloz, was the most prominent rabbi of the city. Rabbi Ya'akov Abuhatzira was considered one of the leading Halachic authorities of his generation and thus was involved in Halachic responsa with leading rabbis throughout northern Africa. He is considered a holy and divine miracle worker, with many miraculous stories attributed to him and he was credited with a revelation of Elijah the Prophet (see "Ma'aseh Nissim," Jerusalem 1968, based upon information and stories related to him by the "Baba Sali" and other rabbis of Abuhatzira family). He was also well known among the Moslem gentiles of the region, who referred to him respectfully as "Al Hazan Al Kabir" (great rabbi).Rabbi Abuhatzira passed away while on his way to immigrating to Eretz Israel. He was buried in Damanhur, Egypt. The epitaph on his tombstone reads, "Tombstone of... the great miraculous, divine Kabbalist, the holy Torah scholar Rabbi Ya'akov Abuhatzira...." His compositions include "Ginzei HaMelech," "Yagel Ya'akov," "Yoru Mishpatecha LeYa'akov" Responsa, "Pituchei Chotam," "Doresh Tov," "Bigdei HaSrad," "Machsof HaLavan" and many others. There exist dozens of poems composed in his honor and memory, some of which are still widespread among Moroccan Jews. The famous picture of him seated with his legs crossed holding a holy book, hangs in many homes in Morocco and in Israel to this day. His sons and grandsons were known for their holiness and vast knowledge of the Torah. The most famous are Rabbi Yisrael Abuhatzira, the "Baba Sali," and his brother Rabbi Yitzchak the "Baba Haki," Rabbi Meir Abuhatzira the "Baba Meir" and dozens of other prominent rabbis. Signatures in Rabbi Abuhatzira's holy handwriting from such an early period are rare. Of his known signatures, the majority are more recent and lack the calligraphic curls of the fine signature that appears here. 2-page leaf, 15 cm. Dark stains. Tears to the margins and to the center of leaf the (professionally restored), some extending into the text. Half-leather binding.

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Three Letters from the Gaon Rabbi Wolf Boskowitz, Author of

Lot 18: Three Letters from the Gaon Rabbi Wolf Boskowitz, Author of "Seder Mishnah"

Description: Handwritten and signed letters by the Gaon Rabbi Wolf Halevy Boskowitz, to his friend the Gaon Rabbi Mordechai Ber Kornfeld (disciple of the "Noda BeYehuda"), and an ordinance certificate of his disciple and son Rabbi Aharon Kornfeld. Kelin, 1808-1810.The renowned Gaon Rabbi Wolf Binyamin Boskowitz (1740-1818) was among the greatest rabbis of Hungary. He was the author of "Seder Mishnah" and son of Rabbi Shmuel HaLevi of Kelin, author of "Machatzit HaShekel." He served as the Rabbi of Assad from 1782 and as Rebbe of Prostejov from 1786, where he became very close to Rabbi Moshe Sofer (author of "Hatam Sofer," see "Ishim BeTeshuvot H"S"). Rabbi Boskowitz served as a rabbi and teacher in various towns (Pest, Kelin and Bonyhad). The letters presented here were written during the studies of his Yeshiva disciple in Kelin, Rabbi Aharon Kornfeld (1795-1882; Rebbe of Yenikoy, Bohemia and author of the book "Tziunim LeDivrei Kabbalah," Prague, 1865).Three letters. Sizes and conditions vary - one letter in good condition and the other two with tears at folds.

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Letter - Halachic Response from the Gaon Maharam Schick to the Author of

Lot 19: Letter - Halachic Response from the Gaon Maharam Schick to the Author of "Aruch LaNer"

Description: Halachic response letter from the Gaon Rabbi Moshe Schick, Rebbe of Yeregin, to Rabbi Ya'akov Ettlinger, Rebbe of Altona and author of "Aruch LaNer." Yeregin, 1848.This lengthy response was written for publication in the biblical anthology "Shomer Zion HaNe'eman," as a rebuttal to the writings of the author of "Aruch LaNer" who criticized the words of his teacher and rabbi, the "Chatam Sofer," concerning the growth of chametz.The response opens with a signed letter, "Moshe Schick of Rezawa". He writes to the "Well-known Gaon Ya'akov Ettlinger Rebbe of Altona... I am here to ask... to be given space between the leaves of "Shomer Zion"...".A handwritten inscription by Maharam Schick appears on the upper part of the leaves "I copied to Siman 208 Orach Chaim," and indeed this response was printed in Maharam Schick Responsum (Munkatch, 1880) in Orach Chaim, Siman 208. Presented here is the complete response in Maharam Schick's own handwriting, including the letter (which wasn't printed in the book).Rabbi Moshe (Maharam) Schick (1807-1979, Otzar HaRabbanim 15194), an outstanding Gaon, was amongst the greatest rabbis of his generation and one of the leaders of Hungarian Jewry. At the age of 14, he joined the yeshiva of the Chatam Sofer and within a short time became one of its most important students. He served as rabbi of the city of Yeregin near Pressburg for many years, afterwards serving as rabbi of Chust, where he established a yeshiva and taught renowned disciples until his death. He left a vast amount of Torah works including responsa, sermons, novellae on the Talmud, on the six-hundred and thirteen mitzvot, etc. He was amongst the fiercest rivals of the reformists.4 pp, 27.5 cm. Good-fair condition, restored damages at edges of leaves with minor text omissions. Leather binding.

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Signed Letter - Halachic Response by the Gaon Rabbi Yossef Mitrani - The Maharit

Lot 20: Signed Letter - Halachic Response by the Gaon Rabbi Yossef Mitrani - The Maharit

Description: Handwritten letter signed by the Gaon Rabbi Yossef Moshe Mitrani. [Constantinople, early 17th century].This response on the issue of libel rules, concerning "Reuven who publicly criticized the communities' treasures" regarding matters in Romania and the Sephardic community in one of the towns in Turkey, was printed in Maharit Responsum (Part B, Yoreh D'ea Siman 16).In his response, the Maharit rules that a joke as a matter of a verbal jest does not imply any disgrace. The Maharit tells two interesting stories about Rabi Itzchak Abuav (the Second) who was blind in one eye: "He was once walking in a field and sat on a rock, where two dignitaries were sitting, one on the right and one on the left, and one of his disciples was standing in front of them. The rabbi was telling jokes and turned to the disciple and said to him, "You speak now." The disciple said, "Let me sit." The rabbi said, "Sit." The disciple sat on the rock and said, "On one rock, seven eyes..." (a joke about four people with only seven eyes, referencing the verse in Zacharia 3:9). The Maharit continues and tells another story about the one eye of Rabbi Isaac Abuav: The King of Portugal said, "I have two eyes in my kingdom unlike any eyes in the world: The eye of the Portugal Bridge and the eye of the Rabbi." Rabbi Yossef Mitrani, the Maharit (1568-1639), son of Rabbi Moshe Mitrani, the Mabit, was born in Safed in the time of "Beit Yossef" and was one of its leading Torah scholars. In 1601, he departed for Constantinople where he taught many disciples including Rabbi Yehoshua Benbenishti, author of "Sde Yehoshua" on the Yerushalmi, his brother Rabbi Chaim Benbenishti, author of "Knesset HaGdola," Rabbi Aharon Lapfa, Rabbi Chaim Abulafia, and others. After 20 years service he was appointed head of Constantinople rabbis. His famous book "Maharit Responsum" (Maharimat) was printed by his sons after his death.Rabbi Yehonatan Eibeshitz and Rabbi Ya'akov Emden write that "He was the greatest of the 'Achronim' and an outstanding Torah authority" (see Kreiti U'Pleiti, Siman 110, Kuntress Beit H'Sefeikot; She'elat Ya'avetz Responsa, Yoreh D'ea, Siman 142).2 pp, 21 cm. Good-fair condition, stains, moth damage and wear to the borders (not harming the text). Leather binding.Attached is an expert confirmation concerning the comparison between this manuscript and other known Maharit signatures.

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Holy Manuscript of Rabbi Yishaya HaLevi Horowitz, Author of

Lot 21: Holy Manuscript of Rabbi Yishaya HaLevi Horowitz, Author of "HaShelah HaKadosh" - Signed Glosses From his Book "Bigdei Yesha" and A Lengthy Gloss by his Son Rabbi Sheftel HaLevi

Description: Manuscript leaf, in ancient, magnificent Ashkenazi writing. Leaf from book "Bigdei Yesha" on the "Mordechai" on tractate Shabbat, with additional handwritten glosses by the author, the holy Ga'on Rabbi Yishaya Horowitz, author of "Shnei Luchot HaBrit" (HaShelah HaKadosh), with the majority of the glosses also signed with his mark "Y" or "Yish" or "Yishaya". [Late 16th century]. The margins of the manuscript contain a lengthy gloss in the handwriting of his son, the righteous Ga'on Rabbi Sheftel HaLevi, author of "Vavei HaAmudim", in which he discusses his father's approach, and writes, "...And it occurred to my genius father, who responded at great length...". (The gloss was written during his father's lifetime)."Bigdei Yesha," which includes commentaries and glosses of the Shelah on the Mordechai, was first printed in Amsterdam in 1757 (the Vilna Shas edition contains the composition on the Mordechai); it is a "commentary on Rabbi Mordechai with Chiddushim on the Shas, Rif, Rambam, Tur and Beit Yosef on Seder Mo'ed" (wording of the title page). In his book of the Shelah, Rabbi Horowitz mentions the composition a number of times. His son, Rabbi Sheftel, mentions the composition in his book "Vavei HaAmudim," and he notes that the composition is "a work of immense inspiration".When comparing the contents of this manuscript with the printed book, it appears that the entire manuscript, both the original text and the handwritten glosses and additions in the margins of the manuscript, are quotes of Rabbi Horowitz from his essay "Bigdei Yesha". An expert examination of the manuscript clearly shows that the glosses were written in the typical handwriting of the Shelah, and it is quite possible that the entire text is in his handwriting. Rabbi Yishaya HaLevi Horowitz (1570-1630) was one of the Torah giants and greatest, righteous Kabbalists of his generation. He was a famous and righteous Hassid throughout the entire Diaspora, and a disciple of Rabbi Shlomo Leibush of Lublin, a disciple of Rabbi Yehoshua Falk Cohen (author of "Sefer Me'irat Einayim") and a disciple of the Maharam of Lublin. He served in the rabbinates of Dovna, Ostrog, Frankfurt am Main and Prague. In 1621, Rabbi Horowitz immigrated to Eretz Israel and served as first rabbi of the Ashkenazim in Jerusalem as well as "Nesi Eretz Israel." He is buried in Tiberias, in close proximity to the graves of the Rambam and Rabbi Yochanan Ben Zakkai. He is known by the name of his book "Shnei Luchot HaBrit," which covers ethics, Halacha and concealed wisdom, and is known as the "Shelah HaKadosh". The Shelah is one of the three luminaries referred to by the title "HaKadosh": HaAri HaKadosh, HaShelah HaKadosh and the Or HaChaim HaKadosh. His son, Rabbi Sheftel HaLevi Horowitz (1592-1660, Otzar HaRabbanim 18052), was too amongst the Torah giants of his generation and an exalted Hassid. He was famous for his vast knowledge and greatness in revealed and concealed facets of the Torah. He served as Chief Av Beit Din of Prague, and afterwards served in the rabbinates of the congregations of Fürth, Frankfurt am Main, Vienna and Posen. Leaf with script on both sides, 21 cm. Good condition. Stains. Professionally restored tears. (Restored) missing tear with slight damage to text. Thick and fancy leather binding with printed leaf of Tefilat HaShelah. For additional information related to this manuscript, see the "Yeshurun" Collection, volume 15, Nissan 2005, pp. 50-81.

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Chiddushei Tractate Beitzah in the Holy Handwriting of Rebbe Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech of Dinov, Author of

Lot 22: Chiddushei Tractate Beitzah in the Holy Handwriting of Rebbe Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech of Dinov, Author of "Bnei Yissaschar"

Description: Manuscript of Chiddushim and comments on Tractate Beitzah, in the holy handwriting of Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech of Dinov, author of "Bnei Yissaschar". [Early 19th century]. The Chiddushim contain many expressions typical of the unique style of Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech, for instance, "See the following and derive pleasure," "See what Rashi writes and you will gain understanding," "Once again I have observed," and "I, the humble, am astounded by the sayings." Page 2 ends with words, "Be precise and see that all is true with G-d's help." The holy Ga'on Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech Langsam-Shapiro (1783-1841) was a prominent disciple of Rabbi Mendel of Riminov and a disciple of the Seer of Lublin. He was also a disciple of the Rabbi of Apta and of the Maggid of Koznitz. From a young age he served in the rabbinates in various towns in Galicia, however was especially known for his service in the Rabbinate of Dinov, where he was coronated as Rebbe in 1815. He also served in the rabbinate of Munkacs, the capital of Carpathian Russia. Authored dozens of compositions in Halacha and Aggadah, Hassidism and Kabbalah. He was known for his holy book "Bnei Yissaschar" (his mentor, the Seer of Lublin, had revealed to him that he was descended from the tribe of Yissaschar). He was blessed with descendants forming a lineage of rabbis and rebbes, including Dinov, Munkacs, Bakavisk and others. The holy manuscripts of Rebbe Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech of Dinov were handed down from generation to generation - to his son the Rebbe Rabbi David of Dinov, author of "Tzemach David" (1804-1874), and from him to his son the Rebbe Rabbi Meir Yehudah Shapiro of Bakavisk, author of "Ohr LaMe'ir" (1850-1909), who specified in his will that a tenth of his assets shall be inherited by his orphaned granddaughter Leah (the daughter of his daughter Sheindel Rachel) who was raised in the home of her grandfather, the Rebbe. When he died, the manuscripts and books of their grandfather were divided into ten by his descendants, and this leaf is from the tenth portion allotted to Rabbanit Leah and her husband Rabbi Eliezer Shapiro of Beretch (who also was a descendant of Rabbi Tzvi Elimelech of Dinov). Rabbi Eliezer Shapiro survived the Holocaust and - based on the writings he inherited from his first wife - printed the book "Chiddushei Bnei Yissaschar" (New York, 1951). This is the first leaf from the holy manuscripts of the author of "Bnei Yissaschar" that were printed in the book "Chiddushei Bnei Yissaschar." It contains all the Chiddushim on Tractate Beitzah that were printed therein. (Two pages in the manuscript appear as four pages in the book, pp. 46-49, see attached photocopy).2 pages, 32 cm. Greenish paper. Pieces missing on the right and left margins, professionally restored, with loss at the beginning and end of lines. Leather binding.

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Regulations concerning Shchita, Handwritten and Signed by Rabbi Israel Avraham of Czarna-Ostrow, Son of Rabbi Zusha of Anipoli

Lot 23: Regulations concerning Shchita, Handwritten and Signed by Rabbi Israel Avraham of Czarna-Ostrow, Son of Rabbi Zusha of Anipoli

Description: A handwritten, signed manuscript containing regulations concerning shchitot and bedikot, determined by Rabbi Israel Avraham, Rebbe of Czarna-Ostrow in the town of Kytaihorod close to Czarna-Ostrow, 1806.In the regulations for the Kytaihorod congregation, he warns, "... That no-one should slaughter, not here in Kytaihorod nor in the villages in the vicinity, unless he was appointed by the congregation....".He continues that he declares unfit any slaughter by an uncertified person, and ends with the words, "Whoever will listen to me, will be blessed...." (See "Nezer Israel", 82, page 133, where it is told that the holy Rebbe see all that happens in the region of his town of Czarna-Ostrow, and that is how he knows what happens in Kytaihorod).The holy Rebbe Israel Avraham was born ca. 1772. His father, the holy well-known Rabbi Meshulam Zusha of Anipoli, said of him that he is the soul of Hizkiyahu the King of Judeah. He was the son-in-law of Rabbi Zeev Wolf of Czarna-Ostrow, a foremost disciple of the Maggid of Mezherichi and later one of the leaders of the Hasidic Yishuv in Tiberias. He was the rabbi of the Holy Rabbi "Ahavat Shalom" of Kasow.When his father-in-law immigrated to the Holy Land in 1798, Rabeinu was appointed Rebbe of Czarna-Ostrow in his stead. In his role of the Rebbe, he influenced the entire region, until his death at the young age of 42 in 1814. After his passing, his widow continued to lead the Hasidim and even their in-law Rabbi Mordechai of Chernobyl, when in town, came for Seudah Shlishit in the widow's house. The widow died in an earthquake in Tiberias in 1837 and is buried in Tiberias next to her father, the holy Rabbi Wolf of Czarna. His orphaned daughter was raised in the home of Rabbi Mordechai of Chernobyl and married the son of Rabbi David of Tulna. The rabbis of Tulna are her descendants.Rabbi Avraham also had four sons, one of whom was the son-in-law of Rabbi Moshe Shapira, Rebbe of Slawita, who printed in his printing press the book "Noam Elimelech" by his uncle Rabbi Elimelech of Lizhensk (Slavita, 1794). This edition bore the approbation of his father Rabi Zusha (whose approbation is missing from the first edition of "Noam Elimelech," printed in Lemberg).Remnants of his biography and his study were published by the "Nachlat Zvi" Institute in the book "Nezer Avraham VeTiferet Israel" (Bnei Brak, 1986). The letter being offered here and its photocopy appeared in "Siftei Zadikim," 1996.22 cm. leaf. Good condition. Some creases with minor damages to the text. Small tear, professionally restored. Attached is an expert's certificate confirming that to the best of his knowledge, this is the only signature in the Rabbi's own handwriting known today to exist.

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HaGra Glosses to the Talmud - Glosses in his own Handwriting on five Tractates of the Babylonian Talmud and one of the Jerusalem Talmud

Lot 24: HaGra Glosses to the Talmud - Glosses in his own Handwriting on five Tractates of the Babylonian Talmud and one of the Jerusalem Talmud

Description: Volume containing Babylonian Talmud Tractates Rosh HaShana, Ta'anit, Yoma, Sukkah and Megillah, as well as the Jerusalem Talmud, Tractate Shekalim. Berlin - Frankfurt am Oder, 1735. Written on the title page in an old handwritten script are the words, "With glosses by the Gra in his own handwriting". Inside the volume itself are numerous glosses handwritten by the Gaon Rabeinu Eliyahu of Vilna. (The script is typical of the early 18th and 19th centuries). Most of the glosses appear in "HaGra Glosses to the Talmud" (Vilna, 1880; this edition was known to be more accurate than previous editions). Some glosses found in this volume do not appear there. * Besides the script on the title page, which states that the glosses are in the Gra's own handwriting, it is also obvious that this is indeed his handwriting based on the style and method of the handwriting here, which is identical to other well-known manuscripts attributed to the Gra. In particular, a clear similarity exists between the glosses in the present volume and the Gra glosses in the Vilna printing of 1880-1886 (which was edited according to the original Gemarot with glosses in the Gra's own handwriting), thus proving without a doubt that this is indeed the volume that the Vilna printers used for the revised edition of HaGra glosses. The Gra studied from these Gemarot. Drops of melted wax appear on the Gemarot leaves. It is known that the Gra closed the shutters of the windows in his room and studied by candle light. See introduction by his disciple Rabbi Israel of Shklov to the book "Pe'at HaShulchan," where he writes about the Gra, "He would close the windows of his room, studying by candle light, so as not to be disturbed or distracted by people, and this was the manner in which he studied from his youth in his toil in Torah, and reviewed the Babylonian Talmud every month, all his life...".* Glosses of the Gra: Editions and the differences between themHaGra glosses to the Talmud were first printed partially and incorrectly by a gentile printer, Anton Schmidt, in Vienna in 1806. Schmidt purchased a copy of the glosses and the right to publish them from the Gra's heirs. Many mistakes appear in this edition, for two reasons. First, there were simple copying errors, and second, the glosses were misinterpreted. The glosses, which were worded in clues and hints, needed to be deciphered by scholars. Rabbi Israel of Shklov, the Gra's disciple, commented about Anton Schmidt's edition, "The Gra's glosses are the essence of Halacha, and were given to an uneducated gentile for printing." Moreover, the chief editor of the Vienna edition was Yehuda-Leib Ben-Ze'ev, a freethinking Jew belonging to the Enlightenment, who, according to the "Divrei Haim," was observed desecrating the Shabbat while working on the Talmud glosses. Rabbi Israel of Shklov edited the Gra's glosses on the Tractate Shekalim in his book "Tekalin Hadatin" (Minsk, 1812). These glosses were copied from the original source and sent to Rabbi Israel of Shklov who at the time was living in Eretz Israel. The copied glosses received by Rabbi Israel of Shklov were written in a copy of the Tractate Shekalim from the Slawita Talmud printed in 1802.There had been attempt to correct the errors of the Viennese edition in the Kopys edition of the Babylonian Talmud, however, these corrections were based on assumption, not on the original HaGra manuscript. * The Vilna Edition of 1880, printed from the Gra's original manuscriptThe Vilna edition of the Talmud, 1880-1886, is the crowning glory of HaGra glosses. The Romm publishers secured a team of scholars headed by Rabbi Avraham Aba Kleinermann to decipher the glosses of the Gra's original manuscripts. The team toiled for several years to complete this monumental undertaking.This Vilna edition, prepared by great Jewish scholars, contains corrections of many of the errors that appeared in the Viennese edition by Anton Schmidt. By using the original manuscript, the scholars were able to revise the glosses back to the original version. (eg, Ta'anit 28/a, was printed in Vienna as "ועיין רע"ב" while in the Vilna edition it was printed - as in the original manuscript offered here - "וערע"ב"). The sole advantage the Vienna edition had over the Vilna edition was that the censorship in Vienna was less stringent than in Vilna. See, for example, Megillah page 11a, where the Gra corrected the text twice to read "Roman" instead of "Persian." This correction appears in the Vienna edition and in the original manuscript, whereas it is missing from the Vilna edition. In the epilogue to the Vilna edition (end of the Tractate Niddah), the Vilna printers commented that they worked off the original copy of the Talmud that the Gaon studied and on which he added his glosses. This volume was in the possession of the Gaon Rabbi Yehuda Bachrach of Seini, author of "Nimukei HaGrib" and a grandson of the Vilna Gaon. Rabbi Yehuda was also referred to as "Gaon", like his grandfather. (Rabbi Ya'akov, grandson of Rabbi Yehuda Bachrach, writes in his book "MeHaIbur uMinyan HaShanim" (Warsaw, 1893) in regard to the glosses, "...In the four volumes of the Talmud which the Gra studied and in which he wrote glosses in his own handwriting... These belonged to the Gaon [Rabbi Bachrach], my father's father").* Evidence that the volume offered here is the Gemara from which "The Gra's Glosses" were printed in the Vilna printing press:A close examination of the copy offered here proves that this is the original manuscript. Much evidence is presented in the attached essay. Here are some examples: 1. All the additions and changes extant in the Vilna edition appear in the Gra's own handwriting presented here. 2. In some instances, the Vilna printers describe minute and specific details of the manuscript they saw in front of them and off which they worked. For example, Tractate Rosh Hashanah, page 23b, states in the Vilna edition, "This gloss does not appear in the original manuscript," and this is indeed so in the volume on offer here. In the Tractate Sukkah, page 7a, it states, "So it was heard from him [the Gaon] but it is not found in his handwriting..." and indeed such a gloss is not present in the manuscript. In Tractate Yoma, page 49b, the Vilna edition contains the words, "In the mean time are encircled" marking these words for deletion. In the original text, the words 'in the mean time' are encircled. 3. The words "With glosses from the Gra of Vilna, in his own handwriting" are scribbled in an old-style handwriting on the title page. These words were presumably written by Rabbi Yehuda Bachrach (see photocopy attached to enable comparison with his handwriting taken from "Nimukei HaGri"b").*The Gra's writing styleThe comments were written in the Gra's typical fashion, for example: (1.) Parentheses or a circle around letters or words to be deleted; (2.) A line drawn over the letters or words, to mark a deletion or change of version; (3.) Scratching printed letters for deletion; (4.) A symbol of three dots forming a triangle between or above words, to note a gloss or an addition of a new version; (5.) Marking words with the letters "Aleph" and "Bet", thus indicating a reversal of the order of the words in the text. The handwritten glosses of the Gaon vary, due to their being written over a span of many years (for example, use of clearer script when he was young and larger script when he was older). The change in his handwriting is particularly noticeable in the Tractate Shekalim, where he commented numerous times. Some of the comments, while being repetitious, are noticeably different in handwriting styles. Another particularly interesting gloss is the one written in two stages (proving beyond a doubt the originality of the glosses). This gloss is located in Tractate Megillah, page 13a: The Gemara writes about Moshe Rabbeinu, "Yered - this refers to Moshe and why was he called Yered? For he brought down manna to the people in his days". At first, the Gaon marked notes of deletion over the word "Manna," and wrote instead in the margin, "Torah." At a later time, the Gaon revised this first version. He crossed out the word "Torah," and marked parentheses to indicate the need to delete the whole section. He noted in the margin his new version, "Who brought down Torah to the people of Israel".It seems from the glosses offered here, that they were written by the Gra for his personal use only and that he did not intend to publicize them to teach others. For example, in Tractate Ta'anit, leaf 15b, the Gra commented on the word "VeTaku" by scratching the first letter in the printed text, thus leaving "Taku". This gloss is not easily discerned at first sight. (It exists only in the Vilna edition, from which, by the way, we can fathom how hard the Vilna printers had to work). If indeed the Gra had written his glosses in order to educate others, he would probably have implemented this deletion in ink, as in other places where he marked deletions using parentheses or with a line above the deleted letters. Hence, it appears that the glosses were meant for himself, for his own study.It is well known that the Vilna Ga'on did not elaborate unnecessarily in his speech and writings. His words were short and brief. It therefore requires much thought and knowledge to understand the depth of each of his writings and markings. In his glosses to the Babylonian and Jerusalem Talmud and Midrashim of our Sages (Safra, Sifri, Mehilta, and Zohar), the Gra transmitted to us entirely new understanding of the texts. Many scholars have studied and scrutinized every note of his glosses, many of which are understood only by the most advanced and brilliant minds. ConclusionAside from the immense importance of the autograph of the Vilna Gaon offered here, and apart from the tremendous significance of the new glosses that have not yet been printed, this volume is a significant source of information and knowledge to better understand his commentary. One can study the Gra's handwriting itself and discover new meaning and significance in the Gaon's words and insights. The above item description is based mainly on the opinion of Rabbi David Kamenetsky, a renowned expert in the research of the Gaon's writings. Rabbi Kamenetsky authored a 40-page essay about the very volume offered here (attached). In it, he compares in detail the differences between the written glosses and the printed ones, with tens of examples that were altered or omitted. Description of the Volume[1], 2-41 leaves; [1], 2-36 leaves; [1], 2-93 leaves; [1], 2-67 leaves; [1], 2-13 leaves; [1], 2-47 leaves. ca. 34 cm. Heavy, good quality paper. Good-fair condition. The volumes show signs of usage, including tears to some of the leaves, with adhesions. There is minor moth damage to several leaves. Some staining and drops of melted wax. The leather spine is damaged, no binding. (A detailed condition report can be provided upon request).

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Manuscript by Rabbi Avraham Ben HaGra

Lot 25: Manuscript by Rabbi Avraham Ben HaGra

Description: Handwritten manuscript leaf by Rabbi Avraham Ben HaGra, containing commentaries on verses from the Books of Kings. [Post 1798]. An inscription handwritten by his son Rabbi Ya'akov Moshe Slonim appears on the margins: "I printed this writing" (and indeed the texts appear in prints of Vilna and Horodna in 1820).The Gaon Rabbi Avraham of Vilna (1766-1809) was the youngest and most beloved son of Rabeinu Eliyahu of Vilna, a brilliant genius in the Seen and Unseen, son-in-law of Rabbi Noah Mindis, of the Vilna geniuses (author of "Nifla'ot Hadashot" and "Papera'ot LaChochma"). It is said that he did not remove his hand from his father's hand all his life and heard from him many of the secrets of the Torah.When his father passed away he headed the "HaGra Kloyz" in Vilna. He published his father's books and composed extensive introductions to HaGra's books. He added many commentaries to HaGra's books in the name of "Be'er Avraham" ("Aderet Eliyahu," etc.). He composed books about all sections of the Torah, commentaries on the Bible and the Book of Psalms, Tikunei Zohar and Legends of the Sages, and more. He refers to numerous writings of his father, the Vilna Gaon, in his books. His son was Rabbi Moshe Landau of Slonim-Jerusalem, who followed in his path and published books by HaGra and by his father, Rabbi Avraham.2 pp, ca. 31 cm. Good-fair condition, restored minor damages, in an elaborate leather binding. Included is an expert's report regarding the handwriting, the content and the time of writing (after his father, HaGra, had died, between the years 1798-1808).

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