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The Property of a Distinguished American Private Collector

by Profiles in History

Platinum House

298 lots with images

December 18, 2012

Live Auction

26901 Agoura Road

Suite 150

Calabasas Hills, CA, 91301 USA

Phone: 310-859-7701

Fax: 310-859-3842

Email: Info@profilesinhistory.com

298 Lots
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Washington, George. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages (9 5/8 x 7 7/8 in.; 244 x 200 mm.)

Lot 102: Washington, George. Autograph letter signed, 2 pages (9 5/8 x 7 7/8 in.; 244 x 200 mm.)

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Description: 102. Washington, George. Autograph letter signed (“Go: Washington”), 2 pages (9 5/8 x 7 7/8 in.; 244 x 200 mm.), “Mount Vernon,” 10 April 1797 to Colonel Timothy Pickering serving as Secretary of State with address overleaf addressed in Washington’s hand: Colo. Pickering, Secretary of State, Philadelphia and marked Free; splits to fold (one repaired), light soiling, address overleaf with seal tears. President George Washington leaves office as relations continue to deteriorate with France, soon leading to the XYZ Affair, after France refuses to recognize the U.S. Minister to France, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney: The conduct of the French Directory towards General Pinckney is, I believe, unexampled; of course it has baffled all calculation. Just one month after leaving office, Washington writes in full: Your favor of the 5th instt. with its enclosures, and also one of prior date forwarding (at the request of Doctr. Edwards) a Pamphlet from Sir John Sinclair, have come duly to hand.  For your kindness in sending these, and particularly for the information given in your letter of the 5th., I feel myself very much obliged. The conduct of the French Directory towards General [Charles Cotesworth] Pinckney [Minister to France] is, I believe, unexampled; of course it has baffled all calculation.  How far it has come up to, or exceeded the expectation of their partisans among us, remains to be developed, and the approaching Session of Congress will make the disclosure. The good humour, and present friendly disposition of the Dey of Algiers, are pleasing circumstances; and if of duration, would be very fortunate ones for the Commerce of the U. States.  My compliments, in which Mr. Washington unites, are offered to Mr. Pickering & the family; and with sincerity and truth I am always Your affectionate Go: Washington.” Relations with France steadily deteriorated after Jay’s Treaty, signed 19 November 1794, which, among other provisions, placed British trade with the U.S. in a more favored position.  The French began to interfere with American shipping and then refused to receive Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, the U.S. Minister to France, when he arrived in December, 1796.  It was President Washington who had urged him to take the post, succeeding Monroe, in July, 1796.  The French Directory, as Washington mentions, declined to recognize his official status.  He remained in Paris until February, 1797, when he was informed by the police that unless he secured a permit, he was liable to be arrested.  In a rage, he departed Paris for Amsterdam.  It was there that President John Adams, Washington’s successor, nominated Pinckney on 31 May 1797 to serve on a special mission to France with John Marshall and Elbridge Gerry. Their collective mission was to secure a treaty of commerce and amity with France after the declaration by the French Directory that all Americans serving on British vessels were to be considered pirates.  Soon thereafter, the XYZ Affair erupted - the revelations that three unofficial agents of the French foreign minister, Tallyrand, had demanded the following terms upon which negotiations would be undertaken by the French government: a sizable “loan” to France, a $ 250,000 “gratuity” for Tallyrand, and an apology for President Adams’ 16 May 1797 address to Congress.  The undeclared naval war with France was just around the corner. Provenance: From the family of Timothy Pickering.

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Washington, George. Highly important autograph letter signed, 2 pages (8 7/8 x 7 ¼ in.)

Lot 103: Washington, George. Highly important autograph letter signed, 2 pages (8 7/8 x 7 ¼ in.)

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Description: 103. Washington, George.   Highly important autograph letter signed, (“Go: Washington”), 2 pages (8 7/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 225 x 184 mm.), Mount Vernon, 27 March 1798 toJames McHenry, serving as Secretary of War under President John Adams. With the new nation on the brink of war with France, former President George Washington informs the Secretary of War of a treasonable plot- soon to be known as the XYZ Affair: . . . if founded, what punishment can be too great for the Actors in so diabolical a Drama. The period is big with events...It has always been my belief that Providence has not led us so in the path of Independence of one Nation to throw us into the arms of another.  Washington writes in full: Your favour of_ came safe, and in due time, for the information contained in it, I thank you; your request was immediately complied with, as every one of a similar nature shall be. A Report is circulated in Alexandria and its vicinity, transmitted (it is said) in private letters from Philadelphia, that a correspondence has been discovered, or more properly, letters have been intercepted from some M_.rs. of C_g_s to the D_ct_y of F__ of a treasonable nature - Containing, among other matters, advice not to receive our Envoys; on the contrary, to menace us with hostile appearances, and they might rely upon bringing the U. States to her terms.  The name of one person has been mentioned to me. Cruel must these Reports be if unfounded; - and if founded, what punishment can be too great for the Actors in so diabolical a Drama.  The period is big with events, but what it will produce is beyond the reach of humanken.  On this, and upon all other occasions, I hope the best.  It has always been my belief that Providence has not led us so in the path of Independence of one Nation to throw us into the arms of another.  And that the machinations of those who are attempting it, will, sooner of later, recoil upon their own heads.  Heaven grant it may happen soon, upon all those whose conduct deserve it.  After his Presidency, George Washington, maintaining a keen interest in the course of the country, kept up a regular correspondence with Secretary of War James McHenry, who briefed him on affairs of state.  In this extraordinary letter, Washington informs McHenry that he has learned the identity of one participant in a treasonable plot, the infamous “XYZ Affair,” not yet fully exposed to the public.  According to Washington’s understanding of the plot, members of Congress advised the Directory of France not to receive the United States’ envoys and to maintain a “hostile appearance” so that the United States would accede to France’s terms. Relations with France at the time of this letter were already strained.  One year earlier, on 15 May 1797, a special session of Congress had been called, but before it could be assembled, the news arrived that the French Directory had declared all Americans serving on British vessels to be pirates.  On 16 May, President John Adams delivered his first war message to Congress, but did not ask for a formal declaration of war.  Instead, he recommended the arming of merchant vessels, the enlargement of the naval force, and the reorganization of the militia.  Two weeks later he appointed commissioners to secure a treaty of commerce and amity with France. By March of 1798, it was clear that the mission to France was a failure.  On 19 March, President Adams reiterated the recommendations he had made in his earlier war message, and issued an executive order that authorized the arming of merchant vessels.   Meanwhile, the Republicans hoped to embarrass the administration by calling for the publication of dispatches from the commission to France to the House of Representatives, the very same correspondence Washington describes in the present letter to McHenry.  Though the Republicans reversed their position once they read the correspondence, the dispatches were printed and distributed on 3 April 1798.  In this famous “XYZ Affair”, it was revealed that three unofficial agents of the French foreign minister, Tallyrand, identified as X, Y, and Z, had asked for a sizable “loan” to France, a $250,000 “gratuity” for Tallyrand, and an apology for President Adams’ 16 May 1797 address.   The American nation was poised for war. Without officially declaring war, however, Congress declared the treaties with France null and void, increased the army, ordered the construction or purchase of new ships, and created a navy department.  On 28 May 1798, Congress authorized Adams to order the commanders of American naval warships to seize any French armed ships interfering with American commercial shipping. Congress also authorized Adams to raise a 10,000 man volunteer army for a period of three years. On 13 June 1798, Congress passed legislation suspending commerce with France and her dependencies.  In addition, President Adams signed four acts that came to be known as the Alien and Sedition Acts: the period of residence for full citizenship was lengthened from 5 to 14 years; all aliens regarded as dangerous to public peace and safety could be deported; enemy aliens in a time of war could be arrested, imprisoned, or banished; and fines and imprisonment were authorized for citizens or aliens who entered into combinations to oppose execution of national laws, foment insurrection, or to write, publish, or utter false or malicious statements about the chief executive, the legislature, or the government. Though Adams had brilliantly master-minded a plan that effectively prevented war with France, and had preserved the neutrality of the United States, it was the beginning of the end of the Federalist Party and his Presidential career. A remarkable autograph letter with superb content.

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Washington, George. Extraordinary autograph letter signed, 2 pages (10 x 8 in.)

Lot 104: Washington, George. Extraordinary autograph letter signed, 2 pages (10 x 8 in.)

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Description: 104. Washington, George. Extraordinary autograph letter signed (“G. Washington”), 2 pages (10 x 8 in.; 254 x 203 mm.),  “Mount Vernon,” 15 August 1798 to the Reverend Jonathan Boucher; integral blank; a small section of the bottom portion of the letter has been replaced and a few words & letters on each side have been expertly added including the “G” and the “W” of Washington’s signature, the area affected is approximately 1 x 2 inches. Even amid the undeclared naval war with France (after the XYZ Affair), Commander-in-Chief & former President George Washington can declare: Peace, with all the world is my sincere wish.  I am sure it is our true policy - and am persuaded it is the ardent desire of the Government. Washington writes in full: I know not how it has happened, but the fact is, that your favour of the 8th of Novr, last year, is but just received; and at a time when both public & private business pressed so hard upon me, as to afford no leisure to give the “View of the causes & consequences of the American Revolution” written by you, and which you had been pleased to send me, a perusal. For the honor of its Dedication, and for the friendly & favourable sentiments which are therein expressed, I pray you to accept my acknowledgment of thanks. Not having read the Book, it follows of course that I can express no opinion with respect to its Political contents; but I can venture to assert, beforehand, and with confidence, that there is no man in either country, more zealously devoted to Peace and a good understanding between the two Nations that I am - nor one who is more disposed to bury in oblivion all animosities which have subsisted between them & the Individuals of each. Peace, with all the world is my sincere wish.  I am sure it is our true policy.- and am persuaded it is the ardent desire of the Government.- But there is a nation whose inter-medling, & restless disposition, and attempts to divide, distract & influence the measures of other countries, that will not suffer us, I fear, to enjoy this blessing long, unless we will yield to them our rights, & submit to greater injuries and insults than we have already sustained, to avoid the calamities resulting from War” What will be the consequences of our Arming, for self defense, that Providence, who permits these doings in the Disturbers of Mankind; & who rules and Governs all things, alone can tell.  To its all powerful decrees we must submit, whilst we hope that the justice of our Cause if War must ensue will entitle us to its Protection.  The present letter is undoubtedly one of the finest autograph letters by George Washington letters in existence. The former President declares, Peace, with all the world is my sincere wish.  I am sure it is our true policy.- and am persuaded it is the ardent desire of the Government. Washington’s letter is his response to correspondence from an Anglican clergyman, The Reverend Jonathan Boucher, who had written View of the Causes & Consequences of the American Revolution (1797), containing thirteen of his discourses preached in America.  The book was dedicated to George Washington, a family acquaintance dating back to the days when Boucher had tutored Washington’s stepson John Parke “Jacky” Curtis in the early 1770s.  Jacky was one of Martha’s four children by her first husband, Daniel Parke Custis, who died in 1757.  The letter and book were delayed in reaching Washington, and though he did not have the time to examine the volume, Washington nonetheless thanks Boucher for the dedication, and states, “There is no man in either country, more zealously devoted to Peace and a good understanding between the two Nations than I am - nor one who is more disposed to bury in oblivion all animosities which have subsisted between them & the Individuals of each.” The first President left office after serving two terms, declining a third term.  He attended the inauguration of the second President, John Adams, on 4 March 1797, then departed from Philadelphia for Mount Vernon - to retire.  However, his pro-British policy during his term in office led to a gradual breakdown of relations with France; by 1797, relations with France had severely deteriorated.  Jay’s Treaty (19 November 1794) had already angered the French, as it placed Britain in a more favored position with America. As a result, the French interfered with American shipping and refused to receive the U.S. Minister to France, Charles Cotesworth Pinckney, when he arrived in December, 1796.  An attempt was made to secure a treaty of commerce and amity with France.  But the American peace commissioners failed.  During the negotiations, three agents of the French Foreign Minister, Talleyrand, suggested a large U.S. loan to France - and a bribe to Talleyrand.  Termed the XYZ Affair, the Americans responded by refusing to make concessions.  When the news of the affair was made public in April, 1798, American public opinion was greatly aroused.  On 2 July 1798, the former President, George Washington, was asked to return to the service of his country.  He was nominated Lieutenant General and Commander-in-Chief of the armies by Adams and he promptly accepted the commission on 13 July.  The reason for his appointment is clear: in the aftermath of the XYZ Affair, an undeclared naval war with France had resulted, which lasted from 1798-1800 and had to be closely monitored.  Adams favored a peaceful course of action, and sought to strengthen the nation’s defenses (the Department of the Navy was created at this time).  If war was to come, France would have to take the initiative.  Despite the international tensions, Washington, too, favored peace, as his heartfelt letter proclaims.  In fact, he has written the word Peace in lettering that is twice as large as any other word in his lengthy letter.  The legendary handwriting expert Charles Hamilton, upon examining this magnificent handwritten letter, was quick to assess its value, declaring it “. . . probably the most important Washington letter still in private hands.”

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Alcott, Louisa May. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 105: Alcott, Louisa May. Autograph letter signed ("L. M. Alcott"), 4 pages (5 ½ x 5 ¾ in.; 140 x 146 mm.)

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Description: 105. Alcott, Louisa May.Autograph letter signed (“L. M. Alcott”), 4 pages (5 ½ x 5 ¾ in.; 140 x 146 mm.), “Walpole, New Hampshire,” [13] September [no year], to Mrs. Fanny Barrow; with autograph envelope.   Alcott on copyright and women’s rights. In an attempt to guide her correspondent, Alcott shares her experiences with publishers and securing rights. Alcot writes: As I have not seen the article you mention & know nothing about the new start the old question has taken I cannot reply as you wish me to at present.  I certainly think something should be done to secure our rights as I know by sad experience what a helpless victim authors are when publishers fall a fighting over them & their books. Mr Reade is of such a peppery temper that much as I admire his stories I should be slow to follow him as a leader in any cause however righteous, for the dear man manages to keep in hot water all the time. I hope to be in New York next month, if on knowing more of the matter I find I can help I shall be happy to do so. On the subject of women’s rights, Alcott counters Henry Wadswoth Lonfellow and explains: I dont agree with Longfellow or believe that women will get anything this century, though their efforts will clear the way for those happier souls who come after them . . . . A fine letter with important content.

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Baum, L. Frank. Fine autograph letter signed (

Lot 106: Baum, L. Frank. Fine autograph letter signed ("Dad"), 3 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

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Description: 106. Baum, L. Frank. Fine autograph letter signed (“Dad”), 3 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), “2322 Toberman St., Los Angeles,” 1 August 1910 to his son Robert S. Baum; with autograph envelope, in fine condition. The great author of the “Oz” books, provides some sage advice for his son after completing his latest book, The Emerald City of Oz: My private opinion, evolved through considerable experience, is that the world is the theatre for various comedies, and whoever makes a tragedy of his play is looking at life crosseyed...The trouble is that some folks take the world too seriously.  It looks big and black and dangerous to them and gives them heart throbs.  Really the world is a hard nut to crack under such circumstances.  The wise ones won’t be bluffed...The new book “The Emerald City of Oz” is just out and is a beauty. Baum writes in full: My dear Boy:  I have been very much interested in your start in business life, as evidenced and exploited in your letters to your mother, which she has forwarded to me.  I doubt if any young fellow fully realizes what it means to be thrown upon his own resources ‘til the time comes; but then, if he can look at things with your cheery philosophy, the future can have no terrors for him. My private opinion, evolved through considerable experience, is that the world is the theatre for various comedies, and whoever makes a tragedy of his play is looking at life crosseyed.  You’ll notice the tragedies don’t draw, while the comedies do.  You can make yourself and others very unhappy over tragedies, but the crowd will move away and you’ll hate yourself in your loneliness.  But if you take a knockdown with a laugh and jump up smiling a thousand will laugh with you and pat you on the back.  The trouble is that some folks take the world too seriously.  It looks big and black and dangerous to them and gives them heart throbs.  Really the world is a hard nut to crack under such circumstances.  The wise ones won’t be bluffed; they see that the millionaire, the sod-carrier and the engineer are all the same clay, and no one has a corner on prosperity.  The other fellow, whether he rides in an automobile or a street car, has no advantage over me nor I over him, unless it be in mental calibre.  If I excell in this I can beat him to the goal, for my outlook is more calm, more comprehensive, more intelligent.  Therein lies the one point of superiority one entity may claim over another.  The whirl of the world may leave the rich man poor and the poor man rich; as old Bill of Avon says: `Each man in life plays many parts’, and they’re not all star parts, either.  The good actor takes what comes and smiles.  Did you ever see a ballet-dancer whirl on her toes till they must hurt her like the deuce, but face the audience with a dreamy (if set) smile?  She knows the smile is essential and perhaps saves her from hoots of derision.  I don’t care how much a fellow is down on his luck; if he is a cheerful cuss and good company, I like him.  If he’s gloomy, I shy. All of which means that I consider you well fitted to succeed in life.  You have three tools to work with: 1. - A keen sense of humor.  2. - An education as an engineer.  3. - A knack for winning friends.  No one with those can openers can fail to get at the devilled ham.  Take your time.  If all the good things came at once they’d swamp you.  The bitter and sweet will alternate, of course, but gradually the bitter will eliminate itself. The job at La Porte sounds good to me.  I’m a believer in Rumley and if you can become identified with his future there’s a plum in the pie for you.  Then I think Secor [?] is a big man in his prospect, and by rubbing shins with him you may catch some of his microbes.  Of course that $ 40 a month deal was a bad start, but I’m quite sure that misunderstanding will be fixed up to your satisfaction.  Anyhow, old man, I wish you luck. Some day perhaps you’ll gravitate this way.  California is on for a big boost during the next fifty years.  They’re putting some important engineering feats through here now, and the ball has only just started rolling.  With a few years Eastern experience you’ll be ripe for a broad field out here. I’m sorry I couldn’t see you this summer, but next fall or spring I shall surely go East, and if we locate here, as we want to, we shall always make one trip a year back there - your mother and I - and so keep in touch with you. I’m almost myself again, being only slightly bothered with a fistule and feeling quite strong and well.  But it’s the loneliest doggone place without your mother you ever heard of.  Ken eats breakfast with me, goes to work, comes home to dinner, reads an hour and goes to bed.  Frank doesn’t always come home but stays with his fraternity boys, in which case I see him in a couple of days.  Meantime I’m all alone in the house and write and typewrite till I hate it.  My wildest dissipation has been taking streetcar rides and working in the flower garden. Ken is crazy to buy a motorcycle.  He’s saved over 50.00 and wants to pay the balance $ 20. a month for 10 months.  He’s working very steadily and now getting $ 9 a week.  Frank J. is in a rut and can’t get more than $ 15. a week until he gets into some other business - then it’s a ? if he can make the $ 15.  Write me once in awhile and tell me how you get on.  I’m very much interested, as you know, and don’t want to get too far away from you.  I suppose your mother has supplied all the small gossip concerning our burlesque mishaps, so I needn’t write them.  Always your affectionate, Dad. The new book “The Emerald City of Oz” is just out and is a beauty.  Two other books - the one for boys and the new “Aunt June” - are now on the press and were written since I got here and during my sickness.” The first “Oz” book by L. Frank Baum (illustrated by W. W. Denslow; published originally by George M. Hill Co.) was The Wonderful Wizard of Oz (1900), which was later titled The New Wizard of Oz and The Wizard of Oz.  The book’s publication was followed by a hugely successful play production, produced in Chicago in 1901.  Baum went abroad for a few months - to write in Italy and Sicily - then returned and settled in Pasadena, California, where he built a home with a flower garden and became a grower of dahlias.  Later “Oz” books by L. Frank Baum (illustrated by John R. Neill; published originally by Reilly & Britton/Reilly & Lee) included: The Marvelous Land of Oz (1904), later known as The Land of Oz; Ozma of Oz (1907); Dorothy and the Wizard of Oz (1908); The Road to Oz (1909); The Emerald City of Oz (1910); The Patchwork Girl of Oz (1913); Tik-Tok of Oz (1914); The Scarecrow of Oz (1915); Rinkitink in Oz (1916); The Lost Princess of Oz (1917); The Tin Woodman of Oz (1918); The Magic of Oz (1919); and Glinda of Oz (1920).  Letters by Baum are rare and the content of the present letter is exceptional. Provenance: Sotheby’s New York, 7 December 1994, lot 21.

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Bradbury, Ray Douglas. Autograph letters signed with numerous caricatures in margins, 65 pages

Lot 107: Bradbury, Ray Douglas. Autograph letters signed with numerous caricatures in margins, 65 pages

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Description: 107. Bradbury, Ray Douglas.  Autograph letters signed (“Ray”) with numerous caricatures in margins, 65 pages, (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), Various locations, 1939-1941, to Ross Rocklynne; some browning and chipping of some letters. Rare, personal Ray Bradbury letters written to Ross Rocklynne (Ross Louis Rocklin) before beginning his successful career as a science fiction writer. A collection of highly informative letters written by Bradbury, an American fantasy and science fiction writer well known for his classic dystopian novels, Fahrenheit 451(1953)and The Martian Chronicles(1950), in 1939, the very beginning of his extraordinary writing career.  Bradbury writes, in part: But, to put it frankly, I’m stymied. I want to come back East this summer so bad it’s like taking a dose of Ex-LAX and running down Times Square trying to find an unoccupied out-house. You, with your years of experience can help me in one of two ways. You can give me ideas to inject in the yarn [story] and tell me how to rearrange it to be more saleable, or else you can take a hand in it yourself and split the income. The result of a sale from such a story would be the deciding factor in my coming East and, boy howdy, do I wanna come bad...It must be able, with revisions, to sell somewhere, somehow. I would like to sell my first story very much. It would be swell... Got a rejection from Esquire the other week. I sent the rejection back with the following notice: “Dear Mr. Arnold Gingrich: Thank you for allowing me to read your interesting rejection slip, but at the present time my stock is full. Your plot was dull and threadbare and your theme was scanty. Sorry. Try again. Bradbury”... Well here we are, the world in another mess. Know what the cause of it all is? Half a dozen reasons, all of them political. Know why we’ll get in, don’t you, to get rid of surplus food and iron and kill a million men so’s commodity sellers can profit. No other reason, pure and simple business, using Hitler as a hateful symbol...The war will come. Men will die. Employment will decrease When the war ends we’ll have all the machinery left and no room for men... Writing to his dear friend, Ross Rocklynne (Ross Louis Rocklin), a fellow science fiction author, Bradbury’s correspondence is warm and candid. Struggling to have his first works published, Bradbury only receives rejections. Truman Capote would soon pick Bradbury’s story, submitted to Mademoiselle magazine, where he worked as an editorial assistant.  Bradbury’s “Homecoming” was published in the magazine and won the O. Henry Prize Stories of 1947. The letters are a fascinating perspective into the mind of a brilliant writer, written in Bradbury’s witty and often bawdy pen. The letters chronicle Bradbury’s young adult life and span into the beginning of World War II, in which he vocalizes his political views that will eventually be integrated into his novels. Bradbury died on 5 June 2012.

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Chandler, Raymond. Typed letter signed, 3 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

Lot 108: Chandler, Raymond. Typed letter signed, 3 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

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Description: 108. Chandler, Raymond. Typed letter signed, 3 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), “La Jolla, California,” 15 January 1951. On his imprinted stationery, with the letterhead, date and correspondent’s address crossed out and two corrections in the text, “To the editor of The Author, in London”. Chandler scorns the Senator McCarthy hearings that attempted to discover Communists in America and prosecute them. Chandler writes in full: The statement by Mr. Woodrow Wyatt M.P. on the subject of the Hollywood Ten seemed to me at the time something less than crystal clear on the very important point that Communism was not an issue in the trial and conviction of these men. The letters you print in your winter issue would seem to confirm the impression. I agree with much in these letters, not all, but what troubles me is that your correspondents seem to take it for granted that the Hollywood Ten were convicted of an offense with which they were not charged, with which they could not be charged, because it was not a crime. They were indicted for contempt of a lawfully-constituted Congressional committee, in that before a hearing of that committee they in effect, although not categorically, refused to state whether they were or ever had been members of the Communist Party. They were charged with, tried for, and convicted of nothing else. It is quite true that after each of these recalcitrant witnesses was ejected from the witness chair on the orders of the Chairman of the Committee, certain evidence was read into the record which purported to show that the Ten had at one time been card-carrying Communists. This evidence has not been subjected to the kind of scrutiny it would get in a court of law. It may be erroneous, it may even be faked. We are at liberty to disregard it. We should disregard it. The right of cross-examination is fundamental to our legal system. A Congressional committee is not a court of law and is not compelled to give that right. Therefore the evidence it adduces can be no more than presumptive. Certain of the Ten may have been regular partly line Communists at the time of the hearings. Certain others may have been Communists in the past and have ceased to be Communists. So why did they not say so? That of course is the heart of the matter. The simple fact is that they were afraid to answer categorically or to refuse to answer categorically. So they tried to make speeches, to read prepared statements, to talk about the films they had worked on, to declare that they were ready and willing and even anxious to answer the questions of the committee, if allowed to do so in their own way. But they would not say yes or no, and they would not refuse to say yes or no. In the public mind there was only one conclusion, which was that they could have made only one answer. Obviously they acted on legal advice and in concert, because they all acted in the same way. I think they had bad legal advice, and that they made a very bad mistake at a very bad time and in a very bad place. But we should do them the justice of remembering that they were in a very tough spot. Not only were they ‘hostile witnesses’ before a committee which was investigating, or purporting to investigate, ‘subversive influences’ in Hollywood, but they were on trial before the motion picture industry which gave them their livelihood. If they admitted to being or to have once been Communists, then they convicted the motion picture industry of employing Communists and ex-Communists to write and direct its pictures. And this was exactly the sort of thing that the committee was after; its purpose, at least insofar as its Chairman controlled it (an ignorant mountebank who afterwards went to jail as a crook, in case you forget), was to smear the motion picture industry; that is, and always has been sure-fire publicity in this country. There were headlines in this activity, lots of headlines. Does anyone suppose that the motion picture industry would be friendly to any group of men who helped to promote those headlines--even in spite of themselves--even if they could not do otherwise? And does anyone really suppose that the crucifixion of ten writers and directors chosen at random from a long list was a blow struck in the defense of this Republic against Stalinism? What then could the Hollywood Ten have done? You may say that they could have denied being Communists or ex-Communists and let the committee prove it against them. But perhaps some of them were not even sure; the theory of guilt by association has gone pretty far in this country. This is not an age of reason or tolerance. And Hollywood would have discarded them in any case, because they would have been smeared, and Hollywood would have been smeared through them. I think they had only one chance, and they lacked the courage or the understanding to take it. It is easy to be wise now, but at the time I personally felt exactly the same: they could have refused categorically, and not by evasion, to answer the committee’s questions on the ground that the committee had no legal right to force them to answer such questions, They might still have lost -- granted; but they would have stated a case on which the courts had not then given a decision, a case which deserved honorable trial, which would have received honorable trial. More important to them personally, they would have taken some of the heat off Hollywood, and the American Civil Liberties Union might well have felt such a cause merited their intervention and assistance. And when the American Civil Liberties Union takes a case they fight it to the last ditch, and they fight it with consummate skill. In a certain grim sense let us admit that the Hollywood Ten got what was coming to them. In a critical moment they lacked the courage to stand up and be counted. Would the rest of us, faced with the problem, have a clearer courage? Let us have a little justice. These ten men were not convicted of being Communists; they were convicted, essentially, of not being heroes. But in Hollywood you don’t learn to be a hero. You learn to be expedient -- or you get the hell out. And the dilemma of the expedient man is that he can never be sure whose throat he is cutting. It may be his own. When he wrote this letter, Raymond Chandler had been living in La Jolla for four years. His life there with his wife, Cissy, was extremely isolated. He entertained few visitors and he rarely went out, choosing instead to maintain his contact with the outside world through his correspondence. Chandler’s letters touched upon a wide range of subjects, including politics, education, sports and international affairs. His opinions are blunt, skeptical and often a bit prejudiced. Politics especially puzzled him, for he could not understand why people were interested in the nonentities who governed them. He couldn’t imagine why American intellectuals tended to be left wing or Communist. Chandler lived through the era of Senator McCarthy and the House Committee on Un-American Activities, and he ridiculed them both.

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Chandler, Raymond. Typed letter signed, 1 page (9 x 7 in.; 229 x 178 mm.)

Lot 109: Chandler, Raymond. Typed letter signed, 1 page (9 x 7 in.; 229 x 178 mm.)

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Description: 109. Chandler, Raymond.  Typed letter signed, 1 page (9 x 7 in.; 229 x 178 mm.), “London,” 23 June 1958 to Julian Symons on Chandler’s imprinted stationery, with a carbon typescript by Chandler being a list of some of his favorite mystery novels, headed: (“For Julian Symons”) and annotated (some in shorthand) by Symons and with the verso of the second sheet filled with notes by Symons, possibly for a book. An extraordinary letter discussing detective stories and thrillers. Chandler provides a list of suggestions for a collection of detective stories at the request of Julian Symons, a detective fiction author, editor and critic. Chandler writes: Attached is a list of suggestions for your projected collection of detective stories or thrillers. Many of these you will already know, some you may not think worthwhile. I have deliberately omitted the very well known names and also books which I myself did not care for, although they might a peal very greatly to the people. There are two names with queries opposite them and no; that is because I can’t remember the titles, but Ben Benson has written a number of very well constructed detective stories, and Richard Wormser a long time ago-- wrote the only successful stream of consciousness detective story I have come across. Marc Brandel wrote an early book, about a man who decided to kill someone, but had no particular individual in mind; I forget the title of that also -- I thought it much better than The Time of the Fire. I have also omitted numerous gentlemen who have paid me the compliment of imitation.

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph manuscript of chapter 46 of A Tramp Abroad, 23 pages

Lot 110: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph manuscript of chapter 46 of A Tramp Abroad, 23 pages

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Description: 110. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph manuscript of chapter 46 of A Tramp Abroad, 23 pages written in black ink on the rectos only of sheets of machine-laid writing paper, (8 x 4 7/8 in.; 203 x 124 mm.),  [no place] ca. 1879; last two sheets laid down, the final one with marginal loss. Each leaf hinged to a larger sheet and bound, with a photogravure portrait of Clemens, in red morocco case, chemise. A manuscript portion of A Tramp Abroad. Published in 1880, A Tramp Abroad recounts Clemens’s European tour with the Reverend Joseph H. Twichell (named Harris in the book) and describes their adventures in Germany, Italy, and Switzerland, chiefly during a walking tour through the Black Forest and the Alps. The present chapter, originally numbered 57, is irregularly paginated 1964-1998, and is heavily emended with authorial corrections, additions and deletions. Most of the narrative details the visit of Clemens and Harris to Chamonix and their climb up an Alpine glacier. The chapter also contains a lengthy digression on the death rates of European and American cities, with Clemens blaming the higher rates of the former on the poison water, which he finds in Europe every where except in the mountains . . . flat & insipid beyond the power of words to describe. Provenance: Alfred Nathan (morocco label; AAA-Anderson, 27 November 1934, lot 73)--Estelle Doheny (Christie’s New York, 21 February 1989, lot 1779).

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed, 26 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ½ in.; 210 x 140 mm.)

Lot 111: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed, 26 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ½ in.; 210 x 140 mm.)

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Description: 111. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. Autograph letter signed (“Saml.”), 26 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ½ in.; 210 x 140 mm.), “The Players,” New York “Xmas,” 25 December 1893to his wife Livy in Paris; in ink on both sides of 13 sheets, with a few revisions; with original envelope addressed by Clemens; torn. The art of the deal.  Clemens enthusiastically describes his experiences negotiating a contract with one James W. Paige, inventor of a typesetting machine for which Clemens had formed a company to manufacture and market. An extraordinary letter, written on Christmas Day upon Clemens’s return from Chicago; he had travelled there with his new friend and financial benefactor, Henry Huttleston Rogers, to negotiate a new contract with James W. Paige, inventor of the typesetting machine for which Clemens had formed a company to manufacture and market. Rogers, a chief architect of the Standard Oil trust and one of the most rapacious businessmen of his day, had taken over the supervision of Clemens’s troubled business affairs. Clemens would later say of him: “He is not only the best friend I ever had, but is the best man I have ever known” (quoted in Justin Kaplan, Mr. Clemens and Mark Twain,page 321). To make up for “the 3 letterless days” on his Chicago trip during which he had not written to Livy, Clemens divides this 26-page letter into four “Letters” (sections really). In “Letter No. 1” (pages 1-4) Clemens is mainly concerned with Christmas and family news; in “Letters No. 2 and 3” (pages 5-23) he gives a detailed narration-with extensive dialogue-of the business meetings in Chicago; in “Letter No. 4” (pages 24-26) hemostly writes of the train journeys (in a private car with lavish accommodations) to and from Chicago. Clemens writes in part: Merry Xmas, my darling, & all my darlings! [Clemens begins “Letter No. 1”] I arrived from Chicago close upon midnight last night,  & wrote & sent down my Xmas cablegram before undressing: ‘Merry Xmas! Promising progress made in Chicago! . . . I was vaguely hoping, all the past week that my Xmas cablegram would be definite, & make you all jump with jubilation; but the thought always intruded itself, ‘You are not going out there to negotiate with a man, but with a louse.  This makes results uncertain (it would be more than a month before Paige would agree to the new terms and sign the final contract). I tell you it was interesting! [Clemens begins “Letter No. 2”] The Chicago campaign, I mean.  On the way out Mr. Rogers would plan-out the campaign while I walked the floor & smoked and assented. Then he would close it up with a snap & drop it & we would totally change the subject & take up the scenery, etc. Then a couple of hours before entering Chicago, he said: “Now we will review, & see if we exactly understand what we will do & will not do-that is to say, we will clarify our minds, & make them up finally.  Because in important negociations a body has got to change his mind: & how can he do that if he hasn’t got it made up, & doesn’t know what it is.”  A good idea, & sound.  Result-two or three details were selected & labeled (as one might say), “These are not to be yielded or modified, under any stress of argument, barter, or persuasion.”  There were a lot of other requirements - all perfectly fair ones, but not absolute requisites.  “These we will reluctantly abandon & trade off, one by one, concession by concession, in the interest of & for the preservation of those others - those essentials.”  That was clear & nice & easy to remember.  One could dally with minor matters in safety-one would always know where to draw the line... Clemens and Rogers met with Paige’s lawyer on the night they reached Chicago and convinced him of the fairness of their terms [Clemens narrates this, reporting key dialogue].  The next day Rogers would meet with Paige and his lawyer, Clemens not attending.  The Conference was for 9.30 a.m. [Clemens begins “Letter No. 3”]. We ordered ourselves called at 7.45, which gave us chance for leisurely bath & leisurely breakfast-that is, I had the leisurely bath, but it was so leisurely that Mr. Rogers didn’t get any; which caused him to observe that the Kingdom of heaven is for those who “look out for the details of life,” & he judged I would get there ... Clemens writes of this full-day meeting from Rogers’ report, again with dialogue, ending “Letter No. 3”: The waiting game has been my pet notion from the beginning.  I want it played till it breaks Paige’s heart.  As I reason: You[Clemens] can afford to wait 3 months... Mr. Rogers can wait indefinitely.  As far as I can see, Paige is the only one who can’t wait; to him Time is shod with lead, every day now adds to his gray hairs, & spoils his sleep.  I am full of pity & compassion for him & it is sincere. If he were drowning I would throw him an anvil... Despite Paige’s final agreement to the new contract, Clemens’s involvement in the typesetting machine was to be totally ill-fated.  At the end of 1894, after Paige’s machine did disastrously in a long test run with other typesetting machines, Clemens was advised by Rogers to give up any hopes for its commercial success.  The eventual winner in the typesetting derby was to be the Linotype; Clemens simply backed the wrong horse (at a cost of $200,000 and fifteen years of effort). Provenance: Christie’s New York, 9 June 1993, lot 27.

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Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

Lot 112: Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

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Description: 112. Clemens, Samuel Langhorne. The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. Hartford [etc.]: American Publishing Company, 1876 Octavo (8 3/8 x 6 ½ in.; 213 x 165 mm.), Frontispiece and 159 wood-engraved text illustrated by True Williams and others, half title, 4 pages of publisher’s advertisements at end; marbled paper hinges strengthened. Publisher’s half morocco; light wear, corners lightly bumped. First edition, first printing, one of 200 copies issued in this binding, beautifully preserved. References: BAL 3369; Grolier American 79; Johnson page 27; Peter Parley to Penrod 43; Clemens Letters to His Publishers 159-160.

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Conrad, Joseph. Typed letter signed, with several corrections, 10 pages

Lot 113: Conrad, Joseph. Typed letter signed, with several corrections, 10 pages

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Description: 113. Conrad, Joseph.  Typed letter signed, with several corrections and the concluding half-page paragraph and postscript in his hand, 10 pages, (9 x 7 in.; 229 x 178 mm.),  “Bishopsboume, Kentshire,” 22 January 1923, on his imprinted stationery, to his friend and biographer, Elbridge L. Adams. Together with: the typescript of the article entitled “Joseph Conrad--The Man,” extensively annotated and corrected in pencil by Conrad himself; mounting remnants at margin of second page of letter. Conrad corrects and annotates an article on himself by biographer and friend, Elbridge L. Adams, before its publication in The Outlook. Conrad writes in full: Your registered article arrived this morning and I put everything aside to welcome it with all the regard and care due to this proof of your solid friendship for us. I have just read it carefully once and am writing this to (first of all) give you my warm thanks for the pervading sympathy of this sketch of our personal relations. The man who would not be satisfied with it would have to be a very cantankerous, conceited, crooked-minded and objectionable brute. Seriously...I am touched by the genuineness of sentiment which informs this survey of our intercourse. I am not alluding here to facts, which are correct but which might have been expressed accurately in many other forms of words, but to that something intangible proceeding from the spirit which makes your form specially welcome to me. I have not yet touched the text so I can not allude here precisely to certain corrections which I am going to make. Some of them will bear mainly on the minor details of matters of fact; just a few words changed. One will deal with a whole paragraph. It is very short and relates to the remarks I made to you about Wells, Belloc and Chesterton. I think it could very well come out, as it is a very general statement, dealing mainly with Wells from a critical point of view, and certainly not expressing all my views of Wells, which, in many respects is quite appreciative. There is also the passage dealing more or less with my material position, which I should like to tone down, as what one says to a friend for whom one has a particular regard need not be repeated quite so openly to the world at large. You may think that I am too particular in that respect. It is, no doubt, a weakness of mine to cling to my prejudices in favour of privacy. If, in a sense, it may be a weakness, it is a harmless one. I assure you, I was extremely annoyed at this beginning of publicity started by Mr. Doubleday. On the other hand Morley’s article is perfectly charming and I can not but be grateful to him for striking the right note. What is most vexing is to think that after all the thing may not come off, as you know my health is very uncertain, and the month of March and April are a critical time for me in that respect. So the least said about it the better. I am hard at work at a novel and am feeling fairly well, but the uncertainty of which I have spoken prevents me indulging in hopes. Even my ‘good’ health is a very poor and precarious thing. What frightens me most is the fact that people on your side won’t be able to understand how the commonest social exertion may on any given day be too much for me, and take my shrinking for ungraciousness, or laziness, or lack of appreciation, or any other repulsive trait of character. I have just finished to annotate and modify -- as you have permitted me to do. You may think I have been too meticulous in the alterations suggested. My view is that this first personal sketch by a friend of mine will become an authority. People will refer to it in the future. This accounts for my care to get the shades of my meaning established in your recollections which are wonderfully accurate in the main. As to alterations on pp 20 & 21 I tried to tone down all references to my age. Must give no opportunity to seize on what may have been a pessimistic moment in our talk. The world is very stupid and one must be careful. I must finish here to catch the mail -- with and united love to you both and the chicks....” In a postscript, Conrad has added: Thanks for the press cuttings. The incident on board that ship was an extraordinary one. I have had a 50 foot spar on deck getting adrift in a gale and it was terrifying enough to tackle it in the dark. An extraordinary letter and typescript from Conrad all about Conrad.

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Cooper, James Fenimore. Autograph manuscript, being a portion of The Headsman, 3 pages various sizes

Lot 114: Cooper, James Fenimore. Autograph manuscript, being a portion of The Headsman, 3 pages various sizes

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Description: 114. Cooper, James Fenimore.  Autograph manuscript, being a portion of The Headsman, 3 pages various sizes, [1832]; some soiling and spotting, one leaf completely split at horizontal fold. This portion of the manuscript of The Headsman is a rare characteristic specimen of the great American novelist’s style and literary method. The present manuscript constitutes approximately 3000 words of Chapters IX and XXIX of his 1832, work The Headsman. Cooper writes in part: Signior, it matters not-continued El Maladetto, with a cool perseverance of manner and intention, that would seem to incite[ed] the [sp] [full aten] desolation-that had just been given his spirit - that of passing a hellish taint - “she loved him with a woman’s confidence and [she] with a woman’s ingenuity she ascribed his fall to [her] despair for her loss-- Oh Melchior - Melchior - This is fearfully true!” groaned the Doge. It is so true Signior, that it should be written on my mother’s tomb. We are [of] children of a fiery church [hot sun], and the passions blaze in our Italy, like the sun that glows upon us. When despair drove the disappointed lover to act, that rendered him an outlaw. The passage of revenge in the heart of a Genoese was short, your child was stolen, hid from your view, and cast upon the world, under circumstances, that left little doubt of his living in bitterness and dying [in misery] under the contempt if not the curses of his fellows. All this Signor Grimaldi is the fruit of your own wrong, for had you respected the affection of an innocent girl, the sad consequences to yourself might have been avoided. Is this man’s history to be believed Gaetano? demanded the baron when Nacro of his own accord ceased to speak. I do not, I cannot deny its though I never saw my own conduct in this criminal light. Maladetto laughed, and those around him thought this untimely merriment resembled the mockery of a demon. A rare manuscript fragment from Cooper, replete with his emendations.

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Cooper, James Fenimore. Autograph letter signed, 1 page

Lot 115: Cooper, James Fenimore. Autograph letter signed, 1 page

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Description: 115. Cooper, James Fenimore. Autograph letter signed (“J. Fenimore Cooper”), 1 page (10 x 8 in.; 254 x 203 mm.), “Cooper Hall, Cooperstown,” 29 April 1847 to James K. Polk, President of the United States. Included is an addressed envelope, endorsed and signed by President Polk with his initials (“J.K.P. May 6, 1847”). Cooper writes to President James K. Polk regarding the appointment of a distant relative of Cooper’s to a lieutenancy. Cooper writes in full: The late Dr. Lyman Fort, U.S. Army, who died last, at Port Lavecca, Texas, while on duty in that country, was married to one of my nieces. Dr. Fort lost his life as much on service as if he had been killed in battle, leaving but little fortune, a widow and seven children; the youngest yet an infant. His character was excellent, and his rank hat of the fifth surgeon in the army. Cooper spent his youth in Cooperstown, New York, a settlement founded by his father who was a wealthy landowner and Federalist politician. Young Cooper was expelled from Yale for a college prank and was sent to sea as a common sailor in 1806 in preparation for a career in the Navy.  Appointed a midshipman in 1808, he resigned in 1811 to marry Susan De Lancey, whose prominent New York family had been loyal to George III during the revolution. While reading aloud to his wife Cooper declared, “I could write you a better book than that myself,” and did. It was a terrible novel in the style of Jane Austen. His second book proved his skill in writing. It was The Spy (1821) and was translated into many languages launching Cooper’s career as America’s first internationally known author. The Pioneers(1823) introduced Cooper’s greatest fictional character “Natty Bumppo”. “Leather Stocking” and the five “Leather Stocking Tales” are Cooper’s best-known and on the whole his best works, the “Tales” include The Pioneers (1823), The Prairie (1827), The Deerslayer (1841), The Last of the Mohicans(1826) and The Pathfinder(1840). Cooper turned to sea tales and while on visit to Europe, wrote three European historical novels and a “descriptive eulogy of American life.” His excellent travel books were coolly received. A bitter quarrel with his Cooperstown neighbor led to a scathing satire on American manners and a precursor of Main Street and Babbitt, which was called Home as Found (1838). Later in life (1838-1851), Cooper was unfavorably reviewed and unpopular. In all, he wrote 32 novels and a dozen other books. Cooper was a slovenly writer and his plot construction is usually weak, but he did provide a shrewd, if eccentric and crotchety, observation of life in the newly formed republic.

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Dickinson, Emily. Rare and important autograph letter signed, in pencil, 3 pages (8 x 5 in.)

Lot 116: Dickinson, Emily. Rare and important autograph letter signed, in pencil, 3 pages (8 x 5 in.)

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Description: 116. Dickinson, Emily. Rare and important autograph letter signed (“Emily”), in pencil, 3 pages (8 x 5 in.; 203 x 127 mm.), [Amherst, Autumn 1884] to Mrs. Samuel E. Mack; in fine condition. Expressing joy over the visit of a friend, Dickinson quotes Emily Bronte. Mrs. Mack’s efforts to visit Dickinson proved successful, and the poet expresses her pleasure in the visit, quoting a poem of Emily Bronte, “Last Lines”, no doubt from memory. Dickinson writes in full: It was very dear to see Mrs. Mack. A friend is a solemnity and after the great intrusion of Death, each one that remains has a special pricelessness besides the mortal worth---I hope you may live while we live, and then with loving selfishness consent that you should go--- Said the Marvellous Emily Bronte Though Earth and Man were gone And suns and Universe ceased to be And thou wert left alone, Every Existence would Exist in thee-- Tenderly, Emily Letters by Dickinson are extremely rare. References: Published in letters, ed. T.H. Johnson, 940, noting that Dickinson quoted the same poem of Emily Bronte in a letter to another friend, Maria Whitney. Provenance: Christie’s New York, 15 December 1995, lot 16.

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Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages, (9 ¾ x 7 5/8 in.; 248 x 194 mm.)

Lot 117: Emerson, Ralph Waldo. Autograph letter signed, 4 pages, (9 ¾ x 7 5/8 in.; 248 x 194 mm.)

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Description: 117. Emerson, Ralph Waldo.  Autograph letter signed (“R.W. Emerson”),4 pages, (9 ¾ x 7 5/8 in.; 248 x 194 mm.),  “Concord, [Massachusetts],” 1 October 1841 to Christopher P. Cranch, Boston artist and poet, then at Fishkill Landing, New York. Emerson writes of his many literary endeavors with eloquence and warmly encourages his correspondent with his own literary and artistic travails. Emerson writes in full: With my hearty thanks for your wise wistful verses which I read with great pleasure not only for their tunefulness & particular merits but for what I admire still more their continuity of thought & unity of plan.  I hasten to write that an apology may reach you before the knowledge of the offence.  I sent them very soon to Miss Fuller who seizing them as editors seize such godsends found them a succor of Apollo for her closing pages.  The printer took them & Miss Fuller left town.  It now appears that there was not space enough in the number left to print the whole, &, Apollo & all gods having left the printer to his own madness, be printed the first half, the In-word, & left the Out-word out.  The proof which had been directed to be sent to me, only arrived this morning (Miss Fuller’s here,) with Mr. Metcalfs compliments, explaining that he could not wait for correction, as he had been foiled in opportunities of sending, & the  Dial would appear today.  Our only amends now possible in this great wrath of the muses & their diabolical coadjutors, is to declare to you that the piece shall appear whole in the next number with apology for the divorce in the last Let me now take breath to congratulate you on what is grateful to me in your letter; that you dwell in a beautiful country, that the beauty of natural forms will not let you rest, but you must serve & celebrate them with your pencil, and that at all hazards you must quit the pulpit as a profession, I learn without surprise yet with great interest and with the best hope.  The Idea that arises with more or less lustre on all our minds, that unites us all, will have its way & must be obeyed. We sympathize very strictly with each other, so much so that with great novelty of position & theory a considerable company of intelligent persons now seem quite transparent & monotonous to each other.  I have no doubt that whilst great sacrifices will need to be made by some to truth  & freedom -- by some at first, by all sooner or later, -great compensations will overpay their integrity, and fidelity to their own heart.  Indeed, each of these beautiful talents which add such splendor & grace to the most polished societies, have their basis at last in private & personal magnimities, in untold honesty & inviolable delicacy.  The multitude when they hear the song or see the picture do not suspect its profound origin.  But the great will know it, not by anecdote but by sympathy & divination.  May the richest success attend your pencil & your pen. I wish I had any good news to tell you.  You will like to know that Miss Fuller transfers the publications of the Dial, now that Mr. Ripley withdraws from all interest in the direction, from Jordan to Miss Peabody, an arrangement that promises to be greatly more satisfactory to Miss F. & so to all of us, than the former one.  Do not, I entreat you, cease to give us good will & good verses.  We shall need them more than ever in the time to come; and yet I hope the journal which seems to grow in grace with men, will by & by be able to make its acknowledgments at least to its younger contributors.  I remain your debtor for your kind & quite extravagant estimate of my poor pages.  I have a pamphlet in press which I call The Method of Nature, or oration delivered lately at Waterville, M[ain]e which I shall take the liberty to send to you as soon as it appears If I can learn in town that you are to remain at Fishkill.  I have heard lately from Harriet Martineau & Carlyle.  The former writes about the latter, that he is - fault of his nervous constitution -- the most miserable man she knows; but that lately he seems greatly better, & was happy at her house at Tynemouth for two whole days.  C. writes that he has left London & removed to Newington  Lodge, Arran, Scotland, but of his works or projects saith no word... A beautifully written letter in the hand of one of America’s most beloved poets.

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Fitzgerald, Scott F. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

Lot 118: Fitzgerald, Scott F. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

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Description: 118. Fitzgerald, Scott F.  Autograph letter signed, 1 page (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.),  “Lausanne, Switzerland,” 15 June 1931 to Paul Eldridge, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma on imprinted Grand Hotel De La Paix stationery; with envelope. Fitzgerald jokes that his wife wrote The Millionaire’s Girl and he simply used his name for its fame and makes mention of William Faulkner. Fitzgerald writes in full: Thank you for the open, pleasant tone of your letter.  Frankly the English have long been on my nerves (those were real people & the Post cut the best scene when they kept feeding hashish to the pekenese.)  I didn’t write The Millionaire’s Girl- not a line of it.  My wife did it. We used my name for the gold involved. Glad you liked The Jellybean & The Swimmers.  I’ve got a pretty good one in July 4th Post called A New Leaf.  However, I’m rather discouraged about not finishing  my long novel. However-. Your section has certainly produced a Big Boy in this man Faulkner. He’s fine!  Thanks for your kindness in writing me. A wonderful letter with fine literary content.  Fitzgerald letters from this period in the author’s career are most desirable.

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Fitzgerald, F Scott. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (6 5/8 x 8 ½ in.; 168 x 216 mm.)

Lot 119: Fitzgerald, F Scott. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (6 5/8 x 8 ½ in.; 168 x 216 mm.)

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Description: 119. Fitzgerald, F Scott.  Autograph letter signed, 1 page (6 5/8 x 8 ½ in.; 168 x 216 mm.), “Great Neck, Long Island,” [no date] to HoraceWade; light rust stain from the paper clip. Fitzgerald gives advice on the root of all success to inspire a child whose aspirations are to publish his works. Fitzgerald writes in full: A confidence in your own supreme ability in some one field, however limited, and an always untiring and always experimental interest in that field -- this, it seems to me, lies at the root of all success.  If you use this please don’t add to it or change anything in it.  Glad to be of any assistance. F. Scott Fitzgerald wrote inspiring letters to Horace Wade, a mere child, looking to write his own novels. By the age of eleven, Wade wrote and published his first novel, In The Shadow of the Great Peril.

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Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (7 x 5 ½ in.; 178 x 140 mm.)

Lot 120: Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (7 x 5 ½ in.; 178 x 140 mm.)

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Description: 120. Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages (7 x 5 ½ in.; 178 x 140 mm.), “Havana, Cuba,” 29 October 1934 to Alfred H. Barr, Jr., Director of the Museum of Modem Art, on imprinted stationery of the Hotel Ambos Mundos, with the original envelope marked Personal; marginal splits to horizontal folds. Hemingway on the art market and the Spanish Civil War. In this fascinating letter begins with art and ends with war. Hemingway writes in full:Thank you very much for your letter and for the advice you gave Mr. Sheiser about arranging the Quintanilla show.  He has gotten it fixed up for Pierre Matisse’s gallery end of Nov. 1st week of December.  You were quite right about the prices.  The Miro (The Farm), really, stands up marvellously.  It has gained rather than lost.  I went to see his last stuff and it did not mean a damned thing to me except that it was pleasant.  But have often found that what I dont understand at the time gets too clear finally.  I think it is a wonderful thing for modern painting that the bottom has dropped out of it financially.  Hard on the boys but there will be better pictures.  The good pictures will be worth just as much and much more in the end (we’ll all be dead but the pictures wont be). Between ourselves Poor old Quintanilla is in jail now in Madrid since 2 weeks waiting a court martial trial.  The army beat the revolution this last time.  It was very badly managed and too many people talked about it before it started.  I will hear by cable as soon as he is tried.   You would like him, has one of the finest intelligences we [have] ever known and the etchings are very good.  These little bastards around N.Y. that talk about revolution now do not know very much about the practice of it.  They should have had to urinate on their hands sometime trying to wash the smear from the back-fire of a Thompson gun out of the fork between your thumb and forefinger, on a roof with troops coming up the stairs-Thats what the[y] look at- peoples  hands.  In N.Y. you are a revolutionist if you picket the Macaulay company and then go on to a Literary Tea (the event of the season).  Had an invitation to do both.  If you dont answer they put you down as a Fascist.  Think I’ll write a story putting down the exact events of a day on which one receives in the mail in Havana an invitation to picket the Macaulay Co. and go on afterwards to a Literary Tea announced as The Event of the Season...In a postscript, Hemingway has added, Am going across tonight to KW and will mail this there. The painting, The Farm, was a masterpiece by Miro, which Hemingway had purchased in Paris in 1925, as a present for his wife, Hadley, for her thirty-fourth birthday.  The American poet, Evan Shipman, who had also coveted the picture, magnanimously offered to shoot dice for the right to buy it. Although Ernest won, the price of 5,000 francs, it was far more than he could afford.  They all scurried around borrowing the money and triumphantly brought home the picture in a cab.  Miro came to see it where it hung above the bed,  content that it had fallen into such good hands. Hemingway was ecstatic with his purchase.  According to Carlos Baker in his biography of Hemingway, the author found Miro to be “the only painter who had ever been able to combine in one picture all that you felt about Spain when you were there and all that you felt when you were away and could not go there.”The Farm was later bequeathed to the National Gallery of Art in Washington by his widow, Mary.   Hemingway also collaborated in promoting a one-man show of the etchings of Luis Quintanilla at the Pierre Matisse Gallery in New York.  Quintanilla was being held without bail in Madrid on charges of conspiracy against the Spanish government.  The New York show opened on 21 November and attracted wide attention.  The following day Pierre Matisse asked Hemingway to sign and circulate a petition to help get Quintanilla out of jail.  Hemingway responded with enthusiasm: “Luis, was not only a damned fine artist but also one of the ‘best guys’ he had ever known.” Hemingway’s own support for the Spanish Civil War was considerable, raising money for the Loyalists who supported the government of the republic against the uprising of General Franco, and writing about the war as a correspondent.  Although the war was not fought, in earnest, until 1936, there were, by 1934, general strikes in Valencia and Zaragoza, fighting in Madrid and Barcelona, and a bloody rising by miners in Asturias that was suppressed by troops led by Franco. References: Carlos Baker. Ernest Hemingway, (1969).

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Hemingway, Ernest. Typed letter signed (

Lot 121: Hemingway, Ernest. Typed letter signed ("Ernest"), in pencil, 2 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

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Description: 121. Hemingway, Ernest. Typed letter signed (“Ernest”), in pencil, 2 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), Hotel Ambos Mundos, “Havana, Cuba,” 11 March 1940 to his friend Walter Winchell, the American Newspaper Columnist, who had a nationally syndicated column for the New York Daily Mirror (1929-1963). Hard at work on his longest novel, For Whom The Bell Tolls, author Ernest Hemingway writes to Newsman and friend Walter Winchell to calm rumors of his rift with his second wife, Pauline, and comments on his progress. Hemingway writes in full; his handwriting in bold: If it looks like anybody is beating you (a lucky punch by a prick. Remember Al McCoy knocking out George Chip) you can say, with my backing, ‘No matter what you hear about the Hemingway rift there will be no action until his book is finished. White people (meaning Pauline) [Pfeiffer Hemingway, his second wife--separated in the fall of 1939 and were divorced in November 1940] don’t try to put good writers out of business.’ You can leave out the good writer part if you think it’s a publicity gag. But I’ve worked on this novel [For Whom the Bell Tolls--he began writing it on 1 March 1939] every day for one year and thirteen days and got up this morning at 3:30 and worked till seven so as to have the day for income tax. For your information book is (I mean because I’m not trying to write you publicity for me but because you have always been a pal and I don’t want you to think I lied to you there one time) the book is; now about 130,000 [pages]. I’ve tried to write the best one I ever could and have done nothing else; no articles; no nothing no doubt all this time Am in the stretch now and win. Charles Scribner [Hemingway’s publisher] has read what I have of it and thinks it has F. to A. [Farwell to Arms] beat. But hell, he’s my publisher. You remember we told you, Tom Smith and I, about a phony who went around impersonating me and staying at the Explorers Club? [In 1935, an imposter identifying himself as Ernest Hemingway had turned up in Chicago, and proceeded to follow the ladies’ club public-speaking circuit from coast to coast, autographing copies of Ernest’s books, and even spending some time at the Explorers’ Club in New York, where he made a practice of taking young men to breakfast.] This Pietro Di Donato is worse. I met him in a café (Florida Bar) never saw him again. I was with party of six. He crashed it. I was nice to him because he was a punk and can’t write except in orgasms and was trying to tell him how to slow up that emotion a little so people would believe all of it. He was a nice like a wop. So when he found out where [Martha] Gellhorn lives and then gave in interview in Miami to the Herald, I think, that he had had a wonderful time visiting me there. He’s still full of it. Like the juice of the Poppy. I would not lie to you and I tell you I saw him once in Florida Bar and for maybe thirty mintues. Gellhorn was there. That’s all. Have worked quiet for a year and thirteen, no twelve days, so now they are digging for you like a badger so will have to shove. Now see if I can earn my keep. Batista is a fat 5-3 for President. Martin Dies 80,000 Aliens in Cuba are there because it was the first stop. They are like the aliens all our forefathers were (But am not writing propaganda). Too many of them have ended up on Cay Sal and the other uninhabited Bahaman cays for them to trust any alien runners. There is some alien running now but prices are too high and the immigration patrol too good to make it practical. Smart Rooshians don’t have to travel in smacks. Hell I’ve been up since 3:30 a.m. and it’s ten p.m. and that’s all I can think up. But if they do dig me out I’ll cover you. But that in the first paragraph is the only straight dope there is out. I’d like to get a break for a couple of months. Have a swell place in Camaguey province where can’t get in by road and anybody you saw it would be like Stanley and Livingston and then tell them nothing. Will the play make dough? Have you an idea. Criticisms very mixed. Sometime you can publish this letter (if you ever wanted to) but don’t do it now. Only the itemsof interest. Ernest. Hemingway adds a lengthy postscript: P.S. One of the funniest things ever happened to me was out in Wyoming driving south from Sun Valley and listening to one of your Sunday nights in the car.  All of a sudden it came “Attention E.H. Attention E.H. Nobody is trying to double cross you. Nobody is trying to double cross you. Stand by for a further message.” Well I thought who isn’t trying to double cross me. Good old Walter. Who do you suppose it is that isn’t trying to double cross me? Howard Hawks? Howard Hughes? Shipwreck Kelly? Barney Glazer? Pretty soon I’ll get the message. Then it came, “Attention E.H. Attention E.H. the boxer.” That’s subtle of Walter I thought. That’s me. Like when I hit that guy in the Stork with that invisible punch. Then it came, ‘The New York police are looking for you in connection with the death--’ I thought somebody’s been going out of windows or something and my ticker stopped. Then it turned out to be that Nazi guy and I thought Hell I can prove I didn’t do that. I was in Sun Valley all the time. But it was a wallop. (If that ones any good to you it’s yours.) Best to Sherman and Kelly and all the guys. I hope to be there by May. This letter from author Ernest Hemingway to journalist/radio commentator, Walter Winchell, is dated 11 March 1940, after Hemingway labored for over a year on his longest novel, For Whom the Bell Tolls, published on 21 October 1940. Hemingway’s comments in the first paragraph make it clear that he doesn’t want to make public his separation from Pauline Pfeiffer Hemingway, his second wife, until his book is finished. She departed his life in fall 1939; they were divorced in November 1940. Ernest and Pauline’s marriage had lasted 13 years, during which time he had produced seven books. The uncontested decree was based on charges of desertion; Pauline was given custody of their sons. In Pauline’s place had come Martha Gellhorn, whom he met in December 1936, in Sloppy Joe’s, the Key West bar Hemingway frequented. She joined him the next year in Spain where he was helping prepare the documentary film, “The Spanish Earth.” The two married in Cheyenne, Wyoming on 21 November 1940. Hemingway’s book For Whom the Bell Tolls was based on an incident in the Spanish Civil War (1936-39). It tells the story of Robert Jordan, an idealistic American college professor, who has come to Spain to fight with the Republican army. He is assigned to a band of guerrillas led by Pablo and his wife, Pilar, a powerful peasant woman. Jordan’s task is to blow up a bridge of strategic importance. He falls in love with Maria, a young Spanish girl who had been raped by the Fascists. During the three days Maria and Jordan are together, they try to forget the impending event as the passion mounts between them. However, there is jealousy and distrust among the peasant members of the group, but Jordan is able to complete his mission, though he is wounded and left to die on the hillside. Many of Hemingway’s friends appeared in the book, sometimes under their actual names, sometimes in thin disguises. For instance, Maria, the heroine, bore the name of the nurse whom Ernest had met at Mataro in the spring of 1938, though she did not have blond hair as did the heroine. Apparently, the blond hair was a secret tribute to his new love, Martha Gellhorn. Robert Jordan, the hero, bore a resemblance to Major Robert Merriman of the 15th International Brigade, the one-time professor of economics from California.

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Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 122: Hemingway, Ernest. Autograph letter signed ("Ernesto"), 7 pages in pencil

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Description: 122. Hemingway, Ernest.  Autograph letter signed (“Ernesto”), 7 pages in pencil, (6 5/8 x 5 1/8 in.; 168 x 130 mm.), at sea (Night before we get to Hawaii), February 1941 on Matson Line letterhead stationery, to George Brown (a close friend who had given boxing lessons to Ernest in his New York City gym). Enroute to the Far East, Ernest Hemingway writes of his stopover in Los Angeles/San Francisco to approve casting for the film version of For Whom The Bell Tolls.  Hemingway recounts his trip to California and his cruise to Hawaii in his inimitable style. Hemingway writes in full: We had an OK trip to Los Angeles.  Went OK there.  Stayed with Coopers who met us with the big new Cadillac double funeral hearse he bought his wife for Xmas and they had a dinner that night with one swell broad (Carole Landis) that all the married or uglies jumped all over because she got a little drunko.  But she was only 22 and I said to them they should have seen what guys like me or Cooper were like when we were drunk at 22.  Coopers wife (Rocky) and I beat Cooper and Marty [Hemingway’s wife Martha] 5 set of tennis to win 11 dollars in 2 days.  But no money changes hands that way on acct of husband and wife.  I think Marty and I could beat them but Mrs C. likes to win very much.  More even than giggy.  She has very extensive taught [i.e., taut] ground strokes but she has a high bouncing serve that I could set myself and murder so it is better for her happiness that we are partners. Marty was much prettier than the hollwood shes and looked like a human being instead of a kennel entry but I shudder to think what would pass with the Colonel faced by them blondes altho lots of them were 22-23 years old which is aged in the Colonels book. With a cold my ears gave me hell on the plane.  Never had that before.  San Francisco was fine.  We ate very well and saw Mike Ward, an old pal, and his wife and [David O.] Selznick [Hollywood producer of Gone With the Wind and would produce For Whom the Bell Tolls] shipped up Ingrid Bergman to look her over for Maria for the picture.  She is perfect.  Really swell.  Not like those Hollywooders. On this boat it has been rough as a bastard all the time.  The gym guy wouldn’t box.  He rubs too and he says he is afraid it would hurt his hands altho he says he teaches boxing.  (he comes from Hollywood too where I guess hands hurt easy.  Probably his thumbs swell up).  It was a shame because I was going to left hook him in the profile like Barney Gimbel ruining a bum.  But I worked on the big bag instead but couldn’t rouse no really dirty feeling against it on such short acquaintance and when you get close to it the fucking thing seems sort of dead and helpless and not like ones fellow man.  I practiced hitting it in the balls a little. Tomorrow we get into Honolulu.  It sounds more like a ½ jig Coney Island or Polynesian Miami Beach all the time.  The food on this boat is swell tho.  Marty sends her love.  We got a bang out of the wire.  I miss you and the reading Colonel and working out and all the fun we have but will be back soon with a lot of new lies and stories.  Take care of yourself.  While his novel For Whom the Bell Tolls was briskly selling from coast to coast Ernest and his new wife Martha (“Marty”) flew to Los Angeles (27 January 1941) from New York for a two-day visit in Hollywood, where they were the guests of Gary Cooper and his wife.  Cooper was slated to play the role of Jordan in the 1943 film version of Hemingway’s novel.  The role opposite the protagonist Jordan - that of Maria - had not yet been cast.  At the time, young actress Ingrid Bergman was on a skiing holiday at June Lake on the Nevada border.  She was summoned by producer David O. Selznick to meet with the Hemingways, lunching with them at a San Francisco restaurant.  As the letter indicates, Ernest was greatly please with Bergman’s non-Hollywood look.  During their meeting, he told her that she would have to cut her hair short to play the part.  She eventually got the role, and appeared on screen with closely shorn hair.  After their brief stopover on the West Coast, Ernest and Martha boarded the SS Matsonia for the Far East, first stopping in Honolulu, where they were greeted by Ernest’s aunt Grace, and where Ernest was beset by college professors at the University of Hawaii with questions about his novel. When For Whom the Bell Tolls finally premiered (10 July 1943), two years after Hemingway signed the contract - due, it is assumed, to Hollywood’s fear of General Franco of Spain, he was displeased.  He commented that Hollywood had flunked again, just as they had done with his Farewell to Arms.

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London, Jack. Autograph letter signed, 5 pages, (4 ¼ x 5 ½ in.; 108 x 140 mm.)

Lot 123: London, Jack. Autograph letter signed, 5 pages, (4 ¼ x 5 ½ in.; 108 x 140 mm.)

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Description: 123. London, Jack. Autograph letter signed, 5 pages, (4 ¼ x 5 ½ in.; 108 x 140 mm.), “Glen Ellen, Sonoma, California,” [9 August 1910] to Cha[rle]s L. Pryal in Oakland, California; With the original envelope; some soiling, rust stains from paper clips. Jack London reflects on his scrapes with the law with more than a tinge of bitterness. London writes in full: Please pardon my long delay in answering.  I have been away and have only just now returned.  I guess you & I are heartily in sympathy in this matter of police judges.  The trouble is that they are very small and insignificant cogs in a large and powerful machine. As for me, I dare not fight the whole machine.  If I had a million dollars I would fight the whole machine. As it is, I can confine myself only to the one insignificant cog that treated me vilely.  If I could enlist the capital, I’d shake the rotten graft organization of Alameda County to its foundations.  Just the same, I’d like to see the letter you mention.  Of course, it will be strictly confidential.  Thanking you for your kind letter. The event that Jack London discusses in this letter occurred in 1894, when he was eighteen years of age.  His youth had been spent in lawlessness and adventure.  After he quit school at age 14 to escape poverty, he “looted orchards and oyster beds, and he had run away from furious owners and patrolmen . . . .He himself met with random violence in New York City, when a policeman bloodied his head just because he looked shabby and was holding a book.  He learned to avoid the law, because it carried a club.  Finally, he suffered from the injustice of the law.  He was arrested for vagrancy in Buffalo after visiting Niagara Falls.  He knew the reason for it.  When John London had been a special constable in Oakland, he had lived on the fees paid him for arresting tramps the rotten graft organization.  Now Jack was given thirty days in jail, and was cut off by the judge in mid-sentence as he tried to speak up for his rights as an American citizen the one insignificant cog that treated me vilely.  Once in jail, he found himself in a nightmare more terrible than any of his dreams” (Andrew Sinclair, Jack: A Biography of Jack London). 

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Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. Autograph letter signed (with initials), 4 pages, (6 x 4 in.)

Lot 124: Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. Autograph letter signed (with initials), 4 pages, (6 x 4 in.)

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Description: 124. Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth.  Autograph letter signed (with initials), 4 pages, (6 x 4 in.; 152 x 102 mm.), “Cambridge,” 30 January 1855 to Nathaniel Hawthorne; mounting remnants at left margin of first page with tear at foot of left margin not affecting text. Longfellow to Nathaniel Hawthorne on all things literary. In this exceptional literary letter Longfellow writes to his friend Hawthorne in Liverpool on the aspects of their correspondence and on James Russell Lowell and Edgar Allan Poe.  Examining Hawthorne’s offer to act as conduit for Longfellow’s English correspondence, Longfellow objects:  I want to know if it costs you anything: for if it does, you must not think of it, unless you will open a mercantile account with me.   If I pay pence and you pay shillings, this new Ocean Penny Postage of mine is a failure. Longfellow goes on to comment on the scarcity of Edgar Allan Poe autographs, writing, please tell Mr. Bright that I cannot furnish him with an autograph of Poe.  Written only a few years after Poe’s death, this letter is a very early report of the now­ notorious rarity of Poe autographs.  Longfellow goes on to state that; Lowell is delivering some delightful Lectures in Boston on English Poets.  I think he will be my successor.  What do you think of it?  Longfellow was correct in his prediction.  In his journal the following day, he noted that James Russell Lowell had been chosen to succeed him as Professor of Modern Languages at Harvard.  Longfellow had resigned professorship to pursue the writing of his greatest work, The Song of Hiawatha, published later in 1855.  Longfellow closed his letter apologizing to Hawthorne for not visiting him in England:  I have not the courage to move with so many children. A superb, long letter with unusually fine literary content. It is a wonderful specimen of American literary history, tying together four of the most important figures of American letters, Longfellow, Hawthorne, Poe, and Lowell.

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Mitchell, Margaret. Typed letter signed (

Lot 125: Mitchell, Margaret. Typed letter signed ("Margaret"), with two handwritten corrections, 1 page

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Description: 125. Mitchell, Margaret.  Typed letter signed (“Margaret”), with two handwritten corrections, 1 page, (10 7/8 x 7 1/8 in.; 276 x 181 mm.), “Atlanta, Georgia,” 22 September 1936 on her name-imprinted stationery, to her friend, Edwin; some soiling, rust stain from paper clip. Annoyed with foolish and absurd rumors circulating about her, Mitchell writes with resignation: Anyone who is fool enough to publish a book deserves anything that lands on them. The author of Gone With the Wind writes in full: Your letter was something to treasure forever.  Thank you for it, for the affection expressed in it, for your belief in me and all the fine things you said about the book and about me.  I was going to write to you at the same time I wrote to Herschel about the blasted newspaper story -- but my heart failed me.  I just got so mad that I got sick every time I thought of it.  And the doctor had told me to avoid every thing that would upset me and so give my eyes a chance to get well.  Then, too, I was afraid you might think I thought you had spread such a story.  And I didn’t think that about either you or Herschel. I wrote Herschel in the hope that he might have heard the story and could give me its source or that he might throw some light on the matter, tell me if anything I said while in Blowing Rock could possibly have given foundation to such a story I am enclosing the clipping.  I believe from the attitude of the story that it might have originated at Blowing Rock.  Please return the clipping. I can and have taken with some grace a lot of foolish and absurd rumors that have gotten around about me.  I can even bear to read that I was born the year after Lee surrendered-- and not burst an artery.  Naturally, I’ve had to bear a lot of them.  And I can do it.  But I just can’t stand any lies about John or my father or brother or any other member of my family.  It isn’t their fault that I wrote a best seller.  They are just the innocent by standers.  I figure that I was asking for trouble when I published a book.  Anybody who is fool enough to publish a book deserves anything that lands on them.  But not their kin.  I’ll have to stop writing about it because I’m getting mad all over again. About coming to Florida -- we are both looking forward to the trip -- but God knows when.  The situation is this.  First, my eyes.  I cant plan anything until they are well again.  And I don know when that will be.  Next, there hangs over me the trip to N.Y. to the Macmillan brawl-- otherwise known as the literary tea.  Formerly, I was supposed to go there in the middle of October.  Then, my real vacation depends on when John can get his vacation.  God knows when that will be.  He has lost his first lieutenant and is having to reorganize his whole office.  So he cant get away any time soon.  Probably  around Christmas will be the nearest time he can get away.  By the way, do Herschel and Norma intend to come South?  I’d like to come when they come if possible for I’d so like for John to meet them. ...you and Mabel were sweet to want us to stay at your house and I appreciate it but we aren’t going to do it.  In the first place I wouldn’t wish on my mortal enemy the worry of having us, with our queer hours of sleeping, eating and bath taking.  In the second place, as I think I told you, John’s idea of Heaven -- and a proper vacation, consists of sleeping till one or two in the afternoon and then having his breakfast in bed.  So we always stay at a hotel.  Yall have got a hotel in Winter Park, fairly near your diggings, haven’t you?  This is the second letter I’ve written since the old eyes blew their fuses and so I’ll have to stop here. Thank you again for being a friend. A wonderful letter revealing Mitchell’s reaction to publicity following the publication of Gone With the Wind. 

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[Poe, Edgar Allan]. Collection of Poe memorabilia including his fiancée's engagement ring

Lot 126: [Poe, Edgar Allan]. Collection of Poe memorabilia including his fiancée's engagement ring

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Description: 126. [Poe, Edgar Allan]. Collection of Poe memorabilia including his fiancée’s engagement ring, a lock of his hair, family correspondence, photographic portraits, including one of Poe, and a silver spoon; all enclosed in a half morocco clamshell box with elaborately tooled spine, raised bands, red morocco labels, inset red morocco label on front cover.  The letters and photographs are in an album within the box, inside the box there are three recesses housing the gold ring, the lock of hair and the spoon. A rare collection of Poe memorabilia direct from descendants of Edgar Allan Poe, includes a lock of his hair. The collection consists of: family correspondence; a small gold engagement ring inscribed inside  “Edgar”; a small lock of Poe’s hair; five Poe family carte de visite portraits including one of the poet, his aunt and mother-in-law, Maria Poe Clemm, his cousin Elizabeth Herring Smith, and his first cousin once removed Eliza Poe Chapman Haydon; and a small daguerreotype portrait of Poe’s sister Rosalie Mackenzie Poe.  The correspondence and other documents are from the family of Poe’s aunt Eliza Poe Herring and include letters by Maria Poe Clemm and Rosalie Poe.  There is also a silver spoon which had some sentimental significance for the Poe family. This is explained in an accompanying document by a member of the Poe family.  All of these pieces come directly through the family of Poe’s aunt Eliza Poe Herring (1792-1822) and her daughter Emily V. Herring Chapman Beacham (1822-1908). The ring is accompanied by a statement signed by Mrs. Beacham’s four great grandchildren after the death of their mother, Mrs. Beacham’s daughter Eliza. “The Poe ring was given to Mrs. Emily Virginia Beacham by Edgar Allan Poe’s sister Rosalie Mackenzie Poe [who received it directly from Poe’s  fiancée Elmira Royster Shelton] in 1865 at Baltimore Maryland...Mrs. Beacham gave the ring to her only child, a daughter by her first husband, Nathan Chapman.  This daughter, Eliza Poe Chapman, married in 1858 at Baltimore, John Henry Nathan Chapman.  The rest of the statement traces the family Haydon’s history and brings the provenance of the ring up to date. The actual history of the ring is interesting and significant as well as sad.  Poe and Elmira Royster Sheldon were childhood sweethearts before his enrollment at the University of Virginia. According to Mrs. Shelton, her father intercepted Poe’s letters to her, in effect terminating their romance.  Meeting again after many years, during which she had been married and widowed (and a series of tragic relationships for Poe complicated by his alcoholism) their romance began again in the summer of 1849 and thus they became engaged. Poe presented her with this ring.  Though Poe had sworn off drinking and had even joined the Richmond Sons of Temperance, he was to die later that year after being found semi-conscious on the streets of Baltimore. Memorabilia relating to Poe is excessively rare and the present collection is of great sentimental significance.  

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Rand, Ayn. Typed letter signed, 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ¼ in.; 267 x 184 mm.)

Lot 127: Rand, Ayn. Typed letter signed, 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ¼ in.; 267 x 184 mm.)

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Description: 127. Rand, Ayn.  Typed letter signed, 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ¼ in.; 267 x 184 mm.), “New York,” 18 May 1943 to Lorine Pruette of the New York Times Book Review; smudge to signature. Rand thanks Lorine Pruette of the New York Times for a positive review of The Fountainhead. Rand writes in full: You have said that I am a writer of great power. Yet I feel completely helpless to express my gratitude to you for your review of my novel. You are the only reviewer who had the courage and honesty to state the theme of ‘THE FOUNTAINHEAD.’ Four other reviews of it have appeared so far, in the daily papers--and not one of them mentioned the theme nor gave a single hint about the issue of the Individual against the Collective. They an spoke of the book as a novel about architecture. Such an omission could not be accidental. You have said that one can not read the book ‘without thinking through some of the basic concepts of our times.’ You know, as I do, that the theme is actually overstated in my novel, that it’s in every line. If one reviewer had missed the theme, it could be ascribed to stupidity. Four of them can be explained only by dishonesty and cowardice. And it terrified me to think our country had reached such a state of depravity that one was no longer permitted to speak in defense of the Individual, that the mere mention of such an issue was to be evaded and hushed up as too dangerous. That is why I am grateful to you in a way much beyond literary matters and for much more than the beautiful things you said about me and the book, although they did make me very happy. I am grateful for your great integrity as a person, which saved me from the horror of believing that this country is lost, that people are much more rotten than I presented them in the book and that there is no intellectual decency left anywhere. If it is not considered unethical for an author to want to meet a reviewer, I would like very much to meet you. I have met so many Ellsworth Toohey’s that it would be a relief to see a person of a different order. THANK YOU. Rand is an American writer who espoused her philosophy of objectivism and “rational selfishness” in novels. The Fountainhead was Rand’s first wildly successful novel with over 6.5 million copies sold.  She later wrote her magnum opus Atlas Shrugged, which is popular to this day and has recently been made into a movie.

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Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, (7 1/8 x 4 ½ in.; 181 x 114 mm.)

Lot 128: Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, (7 1/8 x 4 ½ in.; 181 x 114 mm.)

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Description: 128. Stowe, Harriet Beecher. Autograph letter signed (“H.B. Stowe”), 3 pages, (7 1/8 x 4 ½ in.; 181 x 114 mm.),  “Andover,” 22 June 1863 to Mrs. Nathaniel (Sophia) Hawthorne, wife of the celebrated American writer; mounting remnants on verso of third page. Harriet Beecher Stowe writes to Mrs. Nathaniel Hawthorne. Stowe writes in full: Mr. Stowe & I have long desired to renew our acquaintance with you, but Concord is rather too far off for a card-case call & this leads me to say that on Saturday next we shall pass your house on our way to a friends’ with whom we pass Sunday, & we propose to ourselves then the pleasure of calling & seeing you & Mr. Hawthorne & your family once more-- Only, should there chance to be a driving snow storm we should perhaps not undertake the visit - & of course must lose the call.  Your whole region is to me terra incognita known only in your husband’s descriptions, so I ardently hope the sun may shine & the skies prove propitious.  In such a case we hope to look in upon you, about two or three o clock  - Remember me kindly to your daughter & Mr. Hawthorne & believe me ever faithfully yours H B Stowe This letter by Stowe was written just one year before Nathaniel Hawthorne’s death.  At the time, he lived in Concord, Massachusetts with his family - his wife, Sophia  (married In 1843) and his son, Julian (who entered Harvard in the fall of 1863).  The letter intimates that the Stowes and Hawthornes had previously been acquainted, though at present they haven’t seen each other for some time.  Perhaps that previous meeting took place on foreign soil - in England.  Hawthorne traveled there in 1853 (with his wife and son), staying for four years; Stowe went to England twice in 1853 (for her health), and 3 years later, in 1856, for an extended tour of the continent.  Obviously, Stowe is exhibiting her literary way with words when she admits it will take a driving snow storm to keep her from visiting (note the date of the letter is 22 June).  An extraordinary literary association.

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Thoreau, Henry David. Autograph manuscript, 3 pages, (9 ¾ x 7 ¾ in.; 248 x 197 mm.)

Lot 129: Thoreau, Henry David. Autograph manuscript, 3 pages, (9 ¾ x 7 ¾ in.; 248 x 197 mm.)

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Description: 129. Thoreau, Henry David.  Autograph manuscript, 3 pages, (9 ¾ x 7 ¾ in.; 248 x 197 mm.), 18 July 1839, The Assabet;marginal water staining and fraying repaired. Henry Thoreau pens all 12 stanzas of his poem The Assabet for Ellen Sewall.  Up this pleasant stream let’s row For the livelong summer’s day, Sprinkling foam where’er we go, In weather as white as driven snow; Ply the oars, away! away! Now we glide along the shore, Plucking lillies as we go, While the yellow sanded floor Doggedly resists the oar, Like some turtle, dull and slow. Now we stem the middle tide, Ploughing through the deepest soil, Ridges pile on either side, While we through the furrow glide, Reaping bubbles for our toil. Dew before and drought behind, Onward all doth seem to fly, Naught contents the eager mind, Only rapids now are kind, Forward are the earth and sky. Sudden music strikes the ear Leaking out from yonder bank Fit such voyageurs to cheer - Sure there must be fairies [naiads]1 here, Who have kindly played this prank. There I know the cunning pack, When you self sldficient will All its telltale hath kept back, Through the meadows held its clack And now babbleth its fill. Silent flows the parent stream, And if rocks do lie below, Smothers with her waves the din. As it were a youthful sin, Just as still and just as slow. But this gleeful little rill, Purling round its storied pebble, Tinkles to the self some tune From December ll1llil June, Nor doth any drought enfeeble. See the sun behind the willows,  Rising through the golden haze, How he gleams along the billows, Their white crests the easy pillows Of his dew besprinkled rays. Forward press we to the dawning, For Aurora leads the way, Sultry noon and twilight scorning, In each dew drop of the morning, Lies the promise of a day. Rivers from the sun do flow, Springing with, the dewy morn, Voyageurs ‘gainst time do row, Idle noon nor sunset know, Ever even with the dawn. Since that first away! away! Many a lengthy league we’ve rowed, Still the sparrow on the spray Hastes to usher in the day With her simple stanza’d ode. July 18,1839 1 In his Journal, Henry used the word “naiads” rather than “fairies”. Thoreau writes all 12 stanzas of his poem The Assabet, which he also entered in his Journal (and dated 18 July 1839).  Composed two days before Ellen Sewall’s arrival, The Assabet was probably written with Ellen’s brother Edmund in mind, though it seems to be entirely appropriate for Thoreau’s time with Ellen during her visit, with its images of a boat trip. [The images are also an early working of Thoreau’s 31 August -13 September 1839 Concord-Merrimack boat trip with his brother John, which he described in A Week on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers.] This is the actual poem Thoreau sent to Ellen Sewall in Scituate in the late summer of 1839. Interesting to note, the present poem constitutes the first poem Henry David Thoreau gave to Ellen Sewall. In 1840, Thoreau proposed to Ellen Sewall. Sewell’s father, a Unitarian minister, found Thoreau to be a rabble-rouser with his antislavery and freethinking ideas. He instructed his daughter to reject the offer. Thoreau never married.

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Thoreau, Henry David. Walden; or Life in the Woods. Boston Ticknor and Fields, 1854

Lot 130: Thoreau, Henry David. Walden; or Life in the Woods. Boston Ticknor and Fields, 1854

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Description: 130. Thoreau, Henry David. Walden; or Life in the Woods. Boston Ticknor and Fields, 1854; with seven line fragment tipped in.Octavo, (7 3/8 x 4 ½ in.; 187 x 114 mm.), Vignette on title showing Thoreau’s hut, lithographed plan of Walden Pond, 8 page publisher’s catalogue dated April 1854 inserted between rear endpapers; some wear, original brown cloth covers decorated in blind spine lettered in gilt; minor discoloration to covers. First edition. A fine copy of Thoreau’s celebrated account of transcendentalist self-sufficiency. The title vignette shows the author’s hut, as drawn by his sister Sophia. References: Allen 8; BAL 20106; Borst A2.1.a; Grolier, American 63.

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Whitman, Walt. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ¾ in.; 267 x 197 mm.)

Lot 131: Whitman, Walt. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ¾ in.; 267 x 197 mm.)

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Description: 131. Whitman, Walt. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ¾ in.; 267 x 197 mm.), “328 Mickle St. Camden,” 25 May 1889 to a friend named Herbert; some creasing, marginal splits to folds. Walt Whitman provides text for a friend’s speech on the subject of Leaves of Grass and his poetic and patriotic mission. Whitman sends along a paragraph herewith to work into his correspondence speech or toast: I think a great deal of that point of my “mission.” I hope you will weave it in. Whitman’s paragraph reads in full: Your Washington, Jefferson and Monroe have given you emphatic warnings against “entangling alliances” with any European people, or any foreign people. But there is a power and faculty in the race--adhesiveness is the phrenological term--the magnetic friendship and good will of the common humanity of all nations--that they would have certainly encouraged and all the good publicists would ever encourage. This faculty Leaves of Grass is the book, and Walt Whitman is the poet, beyond any hitherto known: he scatters it not only through all the states of this immense and variform Union, but all the lands and races of the globe. America, to him stands really greater in that, than in all its wealth products and even intellect. By him poetry is to be its main exemplar and teacher. A profound paragraph from one of America’s most beloved poets.

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Audubon, John James. Autograph Manuscript Episode The Lost Portfolio

Lot 132: Audubon, John James. Autograph Manuscript Episode The Lost Portfolio

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Description: 132. Audubon, John James. Autograph Manuscript Episode The Lost Portfolio from his renowned episode of the Ornithological Biographies with a few autograph revisions, 3 pages, (16 3/8 x 10 ¼ in.; 416 x 260 mm.), [no place 1830], in a quarto morocco gilt folding box. Audubon’s autograph manuscript episode of The Lost Portfolio from his Ornithological Biographies.  An extraordinary manuscript from Audubon’s great work, Ornithological Biographies, constituting pages 564 - 567 of Volume III.  Audubon writes in part: Whilst at the City of Natchez on the 31s Inst[ant]  of Dec[embe]r 1820, my kind friend and relative N[icholas] Berthoud Esqr. proposed to me to accompany him in his  Keel  Boat  to New  Orleans, and  I gladly  accepted his offer.  At one o’clock the steam boat Columbus hauled off from the Landing and took our bark in tow being secured to her by two ropes attached to our bows.  The steamer was soon under full head way and little else than the thought of soon reaching the Mississippi’s Emporium of Commerce filled our minds.  Toward evening however several enquiries were made respecting particular portions of the Luggage amongst which was to have been, one of my Portfolios, which contained a number of Drawings made whilst gliding down on the Rivers Ohio and Mississippi from Cincinnati, to Natchez, and some of which were very valuable to my collection as being very raw, and some indeed hitherto unfigured and perhaps undescribed species.  The Port Folio was not found on board, and I recollect, sadly too late, that I had brought it under my arm to the margin of the stream and there had left it to the care of one of my Friend’s servants, who in the hurry of our departure had neglected to take it on Board.  Besides the Drawings of Birds there was a sketch in black chalk in this collection to which I always felt greatly attached whilst absent from home, but alas now I was set to the mere recollection of the features of the objects from whence my Life’s happiness as a man has been rendered interestingly happy.  When I thought during the following night of the loss I had now met with through my own want of attention and Care, for I blamed not the servant but myself, and half dreamt of the book having been picked up by some of the numerous Boatmen lounging along the Shores - of the pleasures they would feel in pasting the Drawings around their Cabins or nailing them on the steering oars of their...[flat boats], or perhaps displaying the whole by a distribution of them amongst their congruous gangs, I felt scarcely better of[f] than  I had done  some Years previous to this when the Norway rats, as you well know devoured a much Larger collection . . . On the 16th of March 1821 I had the gratification of receiving a letter from Mr. A. P. Bodley of Natchez informing me my Portfolio had been found and afterward had been deposited at the office of the Mississippi Republican and that by sending an order for it, the whole would be forward to me.  The 5th of April was the day on which my Drawings were returned to me through Mr. Garnier.  So very kind had been the finder of it, that when I opened the contents and carefully examined each one of the Drawings the whole were in as good as when left on the shore of the Lower Town of Natchez save one, which was missing and probably kept by way of commission by the he who had first picked it up . . . . A comparison between this manuscript and the printed text reveals that the integrity of Audubon’s writings was to a large extent maintained by his editor and scientific advisor, William MacGillivray.  When Audubon wrote the Ornithological Biographies, it underwent intense competition with three other bird books being produced at the same time.  The ornithologist expected his “Episodes” would make the difference and mark his success:  “I have studied the character of Englishmen as carefully as I studied the birds of America.  And I know full well that in England novelty is always in demand [A.B. Adams, John James Audubon].”  And in his published address to his readers, Audubon appeals, “To render more pleasant the task which you have imposed upon yourself, of following an author through the mazes of descriptive ornithology, permit me, kind reader, to relieve the tedium which may be apt now and then to come upon you, by presenting you with occasional descriptions of the scenery and manners of the land which had furnished the objects that engage your attention.  The natural features of the land are not less remarkable than the moral character of her inhabitants...” Provenance:  Christie’s New York 26 May 1977, lot 91, sold to John F. Fleming--Christie’s New York, 18 November 1988, lot 20, sold to the present owner.

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Audubon, John James. Autograph Manuscript Episode The Lost Portfolio

Lot 133: Audubon, John James. Autograph Manuscript Episode The Lost Portfolio

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Description: 133. Calder, Alexander.  Autograph letter signed (“Sandy & Louisa”), with a large pen and ink drawing, colored with red and blue pencils, in French and English, 1 page (10 ½ x 8 ¼ in.; 267 x 210 mm.), “Paris,” 29 March 1933 to James Reggie; light soiling. American sculptor, Alexander Calder, writes a charming letter to James Reggie about returning to America after Calder’s wife gives birth to their child which incorporates a whimsical detailed drawing. Calder’s drawing is a figural nude portrayal of his wife from her knees to her chest, expectant with their toothed son, still in her womb, waving an American flag in his right hand and a French flag in his left.  His letter is written primarily to the right and below the illustration. Calder begins: My wife she has one, and, then, we will soon return to America [in French], in May, late, or June, early, and we thought we’d stop off at C.S.H. and make Harbor Harris Hoopie for a day or 2.  Do let us know if you [are] to be home by that time.  This thing is due to explode about August, so you needn’t be worried about any indiscretions on your premises.  From N[ew] Y[ork] we expect to go to Richmond to stay until we hear the fuse sizzling.  Our love to the Fleishies, and yo’ mama & papa, an’ yo’selfe. Calder is best known for his original constructions of bent wire, metal, and other materials of two types termed by him stabiles (‘static abstract sculptures’) and mobiles (‘plastic forms in motion’).

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Catlin, George. Autograph letter signed twice with initials (

Lot 134: Catlin, George. Autograph letter signed twice with initials ("G. C."), 8 pages (8 3/8 x 5 ¼ in.)

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Description: 134. Catlin, George. Autograph letter signed twice with initials (“G. C.”), 8 pages (8 3/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 213 x 133 mm.), “Dieppe, France,” 17 September 1857 to John Solomon Rarey, horse tamer and author of The Modern Art of Taming Wild Horses (1856), who gave instruction to Queen Victoria and her family in England in 1857; in fine condition.   Having just returned from South America, where he spent four years amongst the savage Tribes of Brazil, famed Indian artist, George Catlin, offers some of his works for sale to horse trainer J.S. Rarey. Catlin informs Rarey that he is laboring very hard on my numerous notes and sketches, preparing them for publication, then provides vivid descriptions of the capture and breaking of wild horses by N. American Indians and by S. American gauchos and Indians. Catlin writes, in full: Just returning from a toilsome and hazardous Tour of 4 years amongst the savage Tribes of Brazil, and other parts of South America. I feel as if no form or ceremony was necessary in communicating with you, though a stranger to me. Your noble discovery has made you a ‘man of the world,’ and a benefactor of mankind: And the untiring labours of my life, (the first half of which you are probably acquainted with) will furnish to history and science, that which will secure me a name, but nothing to my Banker’s account. In a comfortable atelier [workshop], and at a very light expense, I am laboring very hard on my numerous notes and sketches, preparing them for publication. And having seen the announcement of your Lecture and illustrations to be given in Brighton on Tuesday, I was strongly tempted to run over, to witness your beautiful method; but the dread of two passages across the channel, at this windy season, has decided me the other way. Every American will be proud of your noble achievement, and all (except the envious) will exult in your complete success. I have through the whole of my life, looked with sympathy upon that noble animal, kicked & starved, & dragged and beaten about, by brutes, far more wicked, and scarcely more intelligent, and, like yourself, I always have thought that more would be accomplished by kindness and gentleness than by wanton cruelty. You probably have read some account I gave in my work on the N. Am. Indians, of the cruel mode practiced by those people, in taking and breaking the wild horse. I took pains (as I have said in my word) to witness many of those exciting scenes, which necessarily involve great cruelty and fear & exhaustion, in overtaking and choking the animal down by main force:  but I always observed that when this was accomplished, and man, by his arts, had gained the mastery, the gentlest and kindest treatment was applied, such as patting on the nose--stroking the hand over the eyes and ears, and down the mane and neck, and exchanging at the same time, the breath from their nostrils, when the animal seemed to recognize a friend instead of an enemy, into whose hands it had fallen, and to whose will, as far as the creature could understand it, it was always obedient and its fear being annulled, attachment and fidelity, like those of the dog, were the consequences. I have made several oil paintings with great care & study, (and which I hope in London or N. York to be able to show to you) of the Gauchos and Indians taking wild horses on the plains of the Oronoko, in Venezuela, with the lasso and the deadly Bolas. For capturing horses, the lasso is used altogether--& the manner of taking and breaking is much the same as amongst the N. Am. Indians. The Bolas is used for ‘killing horses,’ which is done to a great extent in that country for hides & hair. The Bolas with its deadly coil, wraps the horses neck & legs so instantly, while it is at its fullest speed, that the fall is all but sure destruction to the animal, and the knife instantly does the rest. These scenes were excessively cruel and pitiable, but spirited and exciting in the extreme, and the beholder is astonished at the quickness & certainty of the death. From my long and wearisome wanderings I have returned in an impoverished state of my funds, and until I can ‘get upon my legs’ again, am anxious to dispose of some of the works of my own hands, as the legitimate means of paying expenses: and with this view, have taken the liberty of sending you the album in which this letter is enclosed, believing that you might feel disposed to possess and perpetuate this Record of those abused & fast vanishing Races, whose looks and customs I have devoted the best part of my life and means, in rescuing from oblivion. This selection of 100 of the most notable portrait of my collection was made with great care, by my own hand, with the view of publishing, in the same form, but which plan I have long since abandoned, and if it should please you, I know of no one into whose hands I should feel more satisfied to place it, and for the moderate price of £ 50. There are many persons in England who would give £ 100 for it, if they could see it. And I could not afford to repeat such labour for a less sum than £ 150. I know you will be able to appreciate the drawings, and I believe at all events, the examination of them will afford you amusement. Messrs. Pickford & Co. Bond St. Brighton, to whom I forward the album, have the means of daily forwarding anything to me with safety. If you should keep the album, the price may be paid to them for me, or in the other event, the album left with them to be transmitted to me. The enclosed fac-simile letters by my old friend the Baron de Humboldt will show you the manner in which he estimated my labours, & his friendship for me.  . . . In a postscript, Catlin asks that his correspondent not let anyone know he has returned from his lengthy stay in South America as he is not quite ready as yet to announce myself to my friends or the public . . . .” Then, the artist makes one more sales pitch: If you should keep this work you will have what no other person on Earth can possess as there is no duplicate of it in existence. Interesting to note is a notation at the bottom of the last page, in an unidentified hand: G. Catlin, Indian Traveller about Album Rarey bought of him for £40.

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David, Jacques Louis. Important autograph letter signed (

Lot 135: David, Jacques Louis. Important autograph letter signed ("David"), in French, 2 pages, (9 3/8 x 7 in.)

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Description: 135. David, Jacques Louis.  Important autograph letter signed (“David”), in French, 2 pages, (9 3/8 x 7 in.; 238 x 178 mm.), 14 June 1806 to Monsieur Darn, Director-General of the House of the Emperor, State Councillor and Commander of the Legion of Honor; in pristine condition. Napoleon and Josephine each request a portrait of Pope Pius VII from Jacques Louis David and anxiously await his coronation paintings. Appointed court painter by Napoleon, David herewith writes to Monsieur Darn, Director-General of the House of the Emperor. David writes in full:  I have received the letter you did me the honor of writing me on the 9th of this month in response to the request I made of you to designate the place where I should deposit the portrait on foot of His Majesty for the city of Genoa as well as the three portraits of the Pope.  You tell me that it is customary that the paintings which are made for His Majesty are deposited in the Musée Napoléon, which is the sole depot of the objects of art belonging to the Emperor. Permit me to remark to you...that this custom may be justified for works ordered by the director of the museum, but that for mine the case should be different, as it was you yourself and not the director of the museum who ordered the portrait of the Holy Father, that it was the Emperor himself who asked me for a repetition of the portrait of the Pope for himself, as the former had to leave for Rome, and that the Empress also demanded one for herself. I will have the honor of presenting myself to you on Monday morning.  I will have the honor of making my observations to you, and if you persist, I will always consider it my duty to submit to your orders. I am engaged in the response to be made to your two letters of April 9 and June 16 of last year on the four questions you put to me, i.e., what I think would be fair to grant me as a price for each of the coronation pictures, their dimensions, when they will be finished, and to add a note on their composition.  I would have already finished it [the response] long since, if I hadn’t been distracted by the immense amount of work.  However, I am counting on having the honor of giving it to you on Monday morning.... In the left margin of the letter are the following notations: This letter was placed on my table; I have already answered it & sent it to M. Duroz.  M. Darn has kept the draft of his answer. Anextraordinary letter recording with great detail David’s artistic output as court painter for Napoleon.

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Gauguin, Paul. Autograph letter signed in French, 3 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.)

Lot 136: Gauguin, Paul. Autograph letter signed in French, 3 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.)

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Description: 136. Gauguin, Paul.  Autograph letter signed (“P. Gauguin”) in French, 3 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.), [1882], to Camille Pissarro; light, scattered staining. Paul Gauguin writes to impressionist painter Camille Pissarro about becoming a “full time” painter.  Gauguin laments that he is now working in finance and is just an “amateur” painter. Gauguin writes in part: The Masters or the Great, as you call them, painted pictures; in that statement there are two things to be examined: the first depends on what one understands by pictures - exactly like beauty it is relative, the second, which is what I want to discuss, is how did the Masters paint pictures.  They began their education young for the most part - I mean by that that they learned all the ways of varying a formula (a formula which at certain periods tends to transform itself) - so they reach a certain age with a sure hand, a precise memory, ready to paint pictures.  Some, like Delacroix, carried out a lot of research for them selves, but you should be aware nonetheless that, apart from methods, colour, etc., Delacroix at the end of the day remained the painter as before (i.e. in the grand tradition) in his compositions.  He undoubtedly has a certain style of his own (he is a man of genius) which makes itself felt, but there remains always the same manner of composing.  Certain things, like the decorations for the Chambre de Députés, can be found in some of Rubens’ pictures.  In sum the picture belongs to painting in the grand manner, which is literary in form.  Our own times are becoming very difficult for us: painting in the grand manner is no longer justified, or else it becomes episodic, as in battle-pieces.  There remains for us genre or landscape; and indeed it is in this latter direction that all the paintings of the most recent masters has been moving - look at Courbet, Corot, Millet. As for what concerns you, I think the time has come (always provided that it accords with your temperament) to do more in the studio - but with ideas matured in advance from the point of view of the composition and of the subject.  According to this way of thinking, you have only to devote all you have learned before to what you are going to do now and not to look for a new vision of nature - and you will improve at once If not, continue to look for other things; but in that case you will need a dose of youth and determination which might weary you, particularly through dissatisfaction.  Do not concern yourself with what Renoir & Co. may say.  I know why they talk like that (we will chat about it next time)... In closing, Gauguin reveals to Pissarro his burning desire to become a full time painter: I cannot resign myself to remain all my life in finance and as an amateur painter.  I have got it into my head that I shall become a painter as soon as I can discern a less obscured horizon and that I shall be able to earn my living by it . . . . An extraordinary letter from one painter to another with highly important content.

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Gauguin, Paul. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (9 5/8 x 5 7/8 in.; 244 x 149 mm.)

Lot 137: Gauguin, Paul. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (9 5/8 x 5 7/8 in.; 244 x 149 mm.)

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Description: 137. Gauguin, Paul.  Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (9 5/8 x 5 7/8 in.; 244 x 149 mm.), French Establishments in Oceania, Public Works and Land Registry, Office of the Chief of Service, Papeete 12 January 1899, to Daniel de Monfried; corner chipped. An exceptionally fine letter written during Gauguin’s difficult final years in Tahiti. Gauguin writes in full: I cannot thank you too much for what you just sent me:  this money comes just in time to let me return to my domain.  For a month I did not seem to work more than a fortnight a month, my foot made me suffer that much.  When will I get well?  You did the right thing in letting Delius have “Nevermore”: he will pay more for it then Vollard.  Another time, this Vollard bought pictures of Brittany by me at Bernard’s at a higher price than now.  Oh, well, better to sell cheaply than not at all.  You remember that you reproached me for having given this picture a title don’t you think that this title Nevermore is the reason for this purchase? Perhaps!   Whatever the reason, I am pleased that Delius is its owner, as it is thus not a speculative purchase so as to resell it, but so as to love it; then he will later want all the more people to visit him and compliment him on it, or even better, they will make him discuss this subject.  You don’t say anything appreciative about what I sent you last; was it a bad impression or rather a result of your business at the moment?  It seems to me that the Credit Lyonnaise has Chaudet paid at 1%, where you pay 2; in any case I profit by it, because commerce in Tahiti gives me 3%.  As of now, I think that my situation is clearing up; I have no more debts, a small advance, some hope; as soon as my foot leaves me in peace a little, I shall resume working.  Until then it is useless to touch a paintbrush, I wouldn’t do anything good; [it would be] without consistency, and [with] large interruptions; well, when I am in ordinary circumstances and have enthusiasm, I’ll very quickly plunge to work.  Well, at this moment, stretched out on the bed.  I work mentally and [have] arrived at a certain propitious moment, everything is concentrated, and the execution will be rapid.  And you, my dear Daniel, plagued by business, you are going to quit painting for a whole year and suffer from it; write me as in the past, if not about business, then at least about everything that interests and occupies you.  Paris isn’t necessary to art, as youth seems to suppose (keeping up with current events, as Pissarro says).  Dangerous enough for 1/2 personalities.  For 50 years, the gardeners do double dahlias, then one fine day they return to simple dahlias. Many friendly regards to my friends and all best wishes to you . . . . Gauguin’s final years in the South Pacific were difficult ones.  Snubbed in Papeete by those who disapproved of his moral character, he lived a lonely life with only Pahura, a native woman, as his companion.  His money problems were chronic.  “In addition to his extravagances and regular expenses, he now had to pay for expensive drugs, mostly of the pain-killing variety; not only were his skin problems worse, but his unhealed leg [broken in 1894 during a brawl with some fishermen in Brittany] began to hurt intensely, forcing him to abandon his work for his bed.  In frustration he wrote a stream of anguished letters to friends, cursing fate and begging for financial help” [Andersen, Gauguin’s Paradise Lost].  Eventually his bandaged legs drove away his few remaining friends, who believed he was a leper.  In 1896 Gauguin suffered a series of heart attacks; since he was too poor to seek help at the hospital he decided to kill himself with arsenic.  The attempt failed and the painter recovered sufficiently to take a job as a draftsman in the Public Works Department at six francs a day.  He was forced to move closer to Papeete in order to work; but the money sent by de Monfried in early 1899 allowed him to return to Pahura and painting.  Nevermore, the work mentioned in this letter, had been completed in 1897.  It shows a nude girl reclining on a bed in a flowered room; she is listening  to the gossip of two hooded old  women,  while a strange  bird [“the bird of the devil  biding his time,” as Gauguin explained in a letter to de Monfried] perches on the window sill.

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Millet, Jean François. Autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm.)

Lot 138: Millet, Jean François. Autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm.)

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Description: 138. Millet, Jean François.  Autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm.), “Cherbourg,” 31 January 1871, to mon cher Sensier; with integral blank leaf. A despondent Millet writes about his reaction to the fall of Paris at the end of the Franco-Prussian War. Millet writes in full: At last, my dear Sensier, it is all over! We are delivered up to all the insults & all the devastations.  Disgrace & ruin!  Is that where this France is?  I hear the derision of the nations regarding it.  I had lost my head over it, I am annihilated.  These horrible conquerors are going to be a broom of destruction for Paris. They are going to be carrying off all the good testimonials of human intelligence with them, of which we have so many of all kinds, and what they can’t take off with them they will destroy.  Oh, who could cry enough tears at all that! What a disgrace! What a disgrace! To see the conquering general have his crown of haughtiness put on his head & parade around with it among us. Tell us what has happened to you and yours.  You told us that Mme Sensier had recovered well enough & that your children were very well. May they continue to be so! Yesterday Marie received a letter from Felix dated the 19th.  He was well, but he is very despondent.  His grandmother Fenardent has died & his Aunt Pauline has been bedridden for a long time.  He has engaged an attendant for her. We embrace all of you. Millet had just cause to moan over the horrible conquerors.  Over the past year the French endured many military defeats and much upheaval.  Napoleon III was captured with his whole army 2 September 1870.  When the news reached Paris two days later the French Second Empire was overthrown in a bloodless coup d’état launched by General Trochu, Jules Favre, and Léon Gambetta.  They removed the second Bonapartist monarchy and proclaimed a republic led by a Government of National Defense, leading to the Third Republic.  Rejecting Bismarck’s conditions for an Armistice the fighting continued for another four months with defeats for the French at Metz, Orléans, Amiens, Bapaume, St. Quentin and Le Mans before the final siege of Paris was to end the war.

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Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.)

Lot 139: Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.)

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Description: 139. Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.), “Rouen,” 25 February 1892, to his future wife, Alice Hoschedé; light browning; chipped corner of first leaf and repair to horizontal folds & page fold. Monet discusses the progress of his series of paintings of Rouen Cathedral. Monet writes in part: When I got here the weather was superb [and] I started to work at my new window, where I am quite comfortably settled.  The cathedral is just amazing in the sun.  I have started two paintings but I experienced some disappointment this morning; I went to my former spot, but I could not settle there because of the painters who are cleaning the wooden floor of the apartment.  The fine weather is going on, I am pleased, but damn, this cathedral is so much work, it’s dreadful, and I hope the weather won’t change too much. Monet concludes his letter by stating he intends to return to Giverny on Saturday. He had dinner with Mr. Depeaux  (a coal merchant and a collector from Rouen) and went to the theater.  His health is as good as can be; besides, I am very careful and I watch my diet.  He is going to have dinner at his brother’s and notes; I hope there won’t be too much butter. One of the two paintings referred to in this letter is in the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.  The other is in a private collection.  The house referred to here belonged to the architect Louvet, who was refurbishing it.  Monet would ultimately begin another eight paintings from this location.  These paintings, as well as those from a second location, all begun in 1892, are now in museums and private collections around the world, including the Musee d’Orsay in Paris, the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., the Sterling and Francine Clark Institute in Williamstown, Massachusetts, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston.

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Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, 4 pages, (8 ½ x 5 ¼ in.; 216 x 133 mm.)

Lot 140: Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, 4 pages, (8 ½ x 5 ¼ in.; 216 x 133 mm.)

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Description: 140. Monet, Claude.  Autograph letter signed, (“Claude”), in French, 4 pages, (8 ½ x 5 ¼ in.; 216 x 133 mm.), Saturday evening [March 9, 1893] to his wife, Alice née Hoschedé; small splits to horizontal fold. Monet writes his wife about feeling depressed and doubting his abilities as a painter. Monet writes in full: I was hoping for a wee little word from you, but nothing came; oh yes, a letter from Blanche, for which I am grateful.  I am not answering her this evening, as I am feeling worse and very blue.  I hope your trip went well and that you have managed to find a maid for Suzanne.  Well, tomorrow I’ll be up to date on that.  I am slaving like a madman, but alas, you can say all you want, I have emptied my bag and am not good at anything anymore.  Everything leaves at once, the weather isn’t very constant: yesterday splendid sun, this morning fog, in the afternoon sun, which went into hiding just when I needed it. Tomorrow it will be gray-black or water, and I am very afraid I’ll once again give up and suddenly return.  I worked well, I didn’t overdo anything.  This evening I wanted to compare what I have done all these days with the old canvases, which I avoided seeing too much, so as not to fall back into the old habits, and the result is that I was right last year for being unsatisfied.  It is horrible, and what I am doing this time is also bad, bad in another way, that’s all. It will be necessary not to want to do it quickly, to try and try again to do it over once and for all.  But I feel the laxness coming.  I am finished and this is good proof that I have absolutely emptied my bag. Blast it, those who think I am a master cannot see far, well intended, yes, but that’s all.  Happy the young, those that think it is easy:  I was, that’s over, and meanwhile, I will be there at 7 tomorrow.  Pardon me, I am going to cause you pain, but to whom should I speak of my pain if not to you?  I was to dine this evening with Mme Depeaux, but fortunately she  has let me know  that as her son is ill, he cannot  visit her; it would  be another  time.  You can certainly imagine that in my state of mind I was relieved.  I send you all my thoughts in a kiss and am going to try to sleep.  Until tomorrow.  I am hoping for a long letter from you. Monet wrote this letter during the second year that he painted twenty of the thirty canvases that would eventually constitute the series on Rouen Cathedral. His mention of the weather reflects on a fundamental concern of his visual work.  “Though all these pictures are dated 1894, they were in fact done in two separate batches, in 1892 and 1893 (in both cases between February and mid-April), painted from three different angles, and then completed at Monet’s Giverny studio” [Sylvie Patin, Monet: The Ultimate Impressionist].Monet’s work on the Rouen Cathedral began at a time of religious revival in France.   It was also a time when France, as a country, was expressing self-doubt.  Patriotic themes were popular and the Gothic cathedral was considered very French.  But while most artists tended to paint cathedrals as awe-inspiring structures, Monet preferred to stress their humbler, more communal qualities.  The cathedral series suggested Monet’s ties to his country’s past, but it also demonstrated a faith that went beyond dogmas and priests.   Monet himself never entered the cathedral until 1893, a year after he started painting it, and only then to listen to a choir perform in a special ceremony.  Monet meant for his cathedrals to be seen as a group and refused to exhibit any of them until all were finished.  They were so exhibited just once -”twenty versions of the Cathedrals were displayed at the exhibition of Monet’s recent works at Durand-Ruel’s gallery in May 1895. Their importance was not missed by contemporary painters and writers” [Patin].  Fellow artists were stunned by the technical complexity and visual excitement of the cathedrals. It was said that seen together, they took on a life of their own. After a decade of growing attachment to Alice Hoschedé, and a year after the death of Alice’s husband Ernest, Monet ended the ambiguity that had surrounded his domestic life by marrying her on July 16, 1892.

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Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, in pencil, 5 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm)

Lot 141: Monet, Claude. Autograph letter signed, in French, in pencil, 5 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm)

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Description: 141. Monet, Claude.  Autograph letter signed, in French, in pencil, 5 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm.),  “Giverny,” 14 June 1918 to Dear Madame and Friend, [Julie Manet], the daughter of painter, Berthe Morisot and Edouard Manet’s brother, Eugene. Monet advises a family friend on how to safeguard her collection against the advancing Germans (the Boches).   Shortly before the Battle of the Marne and while United States Marines and the French Army were locked in fierce fighting in the Battle of Belleau Wood, Monet provides guidance to Julie Manet to hide the works which are so dear to you. Monet writes in full: I do not wish to waste an instant in replying to your letter and in telling you that, in my opinion, you are doing the best thing. I do not think that the Boches will get to Paris, but it is best to be forewarned.  You are in the best place, out of all danger, and you can, I think, easily find a place where you can put the works which are so dear to you; you must not think of the cost.  So, the only possible thing (and it is well worth the trouble) is to find an ordinary moving service, or a truck, and transport the things to the specified location. If you have no one in Paris who could do this for you, would you like me to get in touch with M. Durand-Ruel or M. Bernheim? These two could easily sort it all out, in fact they would be absolutely delighted to be involved in the safekeeping of the beautiful things which you posses. A word of hope as fast as possible, and it will be done as you wish. Here, as you can imagine, we are living in anguish, but with lots of hope. Business is good; Madame Salera and her children are with us. Fortunately, the news from those who are away [at war] is good, and as for my eyes, I am still missing a lot of colors and also a lot of work. I ask myself why sometimes, but this has happened, and up to now I have taken no precautions, and I do not know what I would do if-but in any case, it won’t happen, and I will only decide at the chosen moment.  I hope you are all well, the little ones and the grown-ups, and that we will have the great pleasure of seeing you if you are having guests at Mesnil.  Madame Jean Monet and Madame Salera join with me in sending out very best wishes and friendship. Claude Monet was an old and dear friend of Julie Manet’s family and was her guardian following the 1895 death of her mother.  Julie, herself a talented painter who studied under Renoir, inherited her mother’s art collection, which included works by Manet, Monet and Degas.  In 1900, she married Ernest Rouart, also an artist and the son of a wealthy industrialist-art collector.  This letter was written shortly before the World War I Battle of The Marne, in which the Germans advanced to within forty miles of the outskirts of Paris. Fearful of Paris coming under attack, Manet asks Monet’s advice on how to safeguard her extraordinary personal art collection.

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Parrish, Frederick Maxfield. Highly important early archive of 18 autograph letters signed

Lot 142: Parrish, Frederick Maxfield. Highly important early archive of 18 autograph letters signed

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Description: 142. Parrish, Frederick Maxfield. Highly important early archive of eighteen autograph letters signed (“Fred”), 55 pages, various sizes, various locations including Annisquam, Massachusetts where he shared a seaside studio with his father; “Northcote” in Cornish, New Hampshire, his father’s home and onboard the steamer Providence, 1892-1894. Written to My Dear Daisy, a young artist at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts with whom Parrish felt an intimate and artistic bond; in fine condition. Superb early archive of 18 beautifully handwritten letters in Parrish’s elegant & artistic hand, including his self-doubts and misgivings about his first exhibited oil painting Moonrise (1893). A charming group of early letters portraying Parrish as a young, self-doubting art student seeking to learn his chosen path as an artist. In an undated letter Parrish writes: ...for this summer (I) have not gone in to turn out a raft of sketches--but have endeavored, irrespective of results, to buckle down and learn something...if I have learned nothing else, I know that art is no picnic. Having received a “mad angry” note from Daisy, probably related to Parrish’s lack of artistic output and his inability to supply any works for an exhibition, Parrish, himself despondent about his artistic progress, replies in his letter of 22 October 1893: So all I ask is--not mercy, for I don’t deserve that--but that you and your fellow hangers will not think that these are the way that I intend to represent nature at some future date, for I assume you they are not. I send them to Mr. Whipple and he will turn them over to your hanging committee--and you can hang them or electrocute them, which ever you think will be the least painful. If you promise not to tell a soul, you can share with me the dark double-dyed secret that as my beloved parent advised me to send a couple to the Academy’s exhibition in December, I have keep (kept) the two best here. After requesting that Daisy send him a list of the compositions required at the Academy for the month of November, Parrish writes on November 1893: I don’t know just how good friends we are, for I heard mention of some of my things in the exhibition which leads me to conclude that you must have hung several of them: and even if hung away high up it is a low down trick. But I suppose it serves me right in having the brazen audacity to send them. I wish you would tell me about it--who is there, and all. But I hope I may be mistaken and you didn’t hang more than a couple... In his letter of 6 November 1893, Parrish writes of his first exhibited oil painting, Moonrise, at the Philadelphia Art Club: You know I told you in secret confidence that I sent a little thing to the Art Club--and I can be very sure it will not be accepted, for it is very characteristic of me, flat and an attempt at the decorative, etc., but if you go to the exhibition when it is opened you might let a fellow know, you know, if you saw it anywhere. Look high! You may understand when I ask if one, even at our stage in the art, is justified in liking a thing he has done. But sometimes you may, I think. The one I sent is supposed to be a moonlight. One glorious night last summer I walked across Cape Ann at one o’clock in the morning. It was moonlight and not a trace of breath of air. The impression that night made upon me I shall never forget. The next morning I painted what I felt, and the result I sent to the art club. I was painting for a while simply living in it, and imagined I saw before me something of what I did feel, & resisting hosts of technical faults and all sorts of things I wanted to change, I just let it go as it was. So you see I wont think it queer if they do not hang it. It needs lots of explaining and that is why I tell you: but you understand don’t you. I hope it doesn’t sound conceited, but there is just one little place in it that I felt wasn’t done by me. Nobody I’m sure can see anything in it, but technically it is atrocious, and I just sent it along for fun. But in case, you know, you might tell a fellow if it isn’t there. It’s a little blue thing 10 x 12... I wish I could have been there the night of the auction, it must have been fun. And how they realized so much. Such tremendous prices too?: $6.50 for my poppy field! Why that pays better than serious work. I wonder who bought the flagellants, daddy nearly died over it, & Lille and I couldn’t get him away from it. Parrish talks about his busy schedule, and then remarks about an upcoming teaching appointment: Did you know I am going to teach next winter? Oh, my yes. They have been at me for quite a while,& finally persuaded me to criticize a decorative class 3 evenings in the week at the School of Industrial Art. I shall have a salary with which by economic handling I shall be able to ride there & back & get weighed once a week & come out square. The letters end just as Maxfield Parrish’s artistic career begins to take off. His first major commission was undertaken in 1894, when he was just concluding his studies at the Pennsylvania Academy. He was asked by architect Wilson Eyre to assist in the renovation of the Mask & Wig Club. It was there that Parrish designed and executed the Old King Cole mural as well as other wall decorations. He established a studio in Philadelphia, and remained there to do book and magazine illustrations and advertisements designs until 1898, when he moved to New Hampshire. Parrish’s magazine illustrations career began in early 1895, when several of his watercolor studies for wall decorations at the Mask & Wig Club--after their exhibition at the Pennsylvania Academy in December, 1894--were sent to a New York exhibition, where they came to the attention of a member of the Harper & Brothers’ Art Department--Thomas W. Ball. Ball asked Parrish to submit a design for a special 1895 Easter cover for Harper’s Bazaar. Between 1895-1900, Parrish designed covers for at least 5 different Harper & Brothers’ periodicals. His first illustrated book was Mother Goose in Prose, the first book written by L. Frank Baum published in December 1897. A rich correspondence revealing Parrish’s very beginnings as an artist.

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Pissarro, Camille. Autograph letter signed, (

Lot 143: Pissarro, Camille. Autograph letter signed, ("C. Pissarro"), in French, 4 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.)

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Description: 143. Pissarro, Camille.  Autograph letter signed, (“C. Pissarro”), in French,4 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm.),  Eragny-sur-Epte, [December 12, 1885] to his niece, Esther. Pissarro provides lengthy commentary on the current market for his work, the recent English elections, and family news.  Pissarro writes in full: At last I am at Eragny, where I am going to have to slog at some fans, for times are hard and for the moment that is the only thing for which there is a market.  Pictures--it’s no good counting on them-no one understands what a picture is. The longer I go on the more I despair of current ideas, not only on art but on everything--from time to time one is surprised to find an oddity (un Hiroquois) who dares to believe and to see differently from what is customary.  Let us move on to other ideas, newer and above all less tearful--I wanted to reply exactly to your letter. It was a firm determination--but there you are, at the moment of writing impossible to put my hand on that delightful letter in which, so kindly, you speak to me of many things, of Frederic, of pink colors for your frame etc. etc.  Happily I have been able to preserve the piece of silk not ‘pink’ but definitely faded Grenadine.  I am going to try to obtain this color with vermilion, light chrome yellow and perhaps veronese green or cobalt blue, I really don’t know, for it is not orangey and it is not pink, it is by trying that we shall arrive at the same. As to politics you are astonished by the English elections--if you read Kropotkin’s book the chapter ‘representative government’ p. 169, you would be quite indifferent whether Mr professor Beesley were elected or anybody else, whether it be Chamberlain, the so-called radical or the Grand Turk, it comes to the same thing for the people who work hard and who die of hunger. Know therefore my little Esther that the best way to be free is not to delegate powers to anyone whatever!--to who else to the intriguing lawyers, one must do one’s business oneself if one wants it to be well done.  As in your frame, one would only have one’s self to blame.  England is absolutely at the same degree of cretinism as we are, except that as a result of her idiotic and Protestant education she is blinded by a semblance of false respects, of false morality and of false liberty.  France or at least the Latin race is certainly freer of this hodge-podge, she will obviously be more apt to advance along the new way!  So the elections a load of rubbish!!!!--after having been in a shocking blue funk over them only the bourgeois still attach any importance to them, the tergiversations of the elections are logical, from a social point of view - but I am just thinking - Frederick finds himself as a direct result of his naive indifference, an Anarchist without knowing it, Horrors mother would say!!! Lucien has transcribed your letter to Nini, she has just got a place in Paris to keep the lions, I don’t know what she thinks she will decide, it’s probable that you will have word of her directly.  We are overjoyed to know that you are going to visit us, I do hope that this time Alice will not miss her portrait -I am keen to do it, we await you impatiently.  Punch has arrived at this instant.  The Keen drawings, extraordinary, splendid, what an artist-do tell Alfred that we have not got last year’s Almanac in our collection, so tell him to try and get it for us, it would be very kind of him, as always, moreover Our compliments to you all... In a lengthy postscript, Pissarro has added, I am sending you by post a small parcel containing the orangey color ready prepared.  I am putting in with it a little peau de gant which you will put in a glass of water.  Put it on the fire to boil until it has melted, strain it and then use it to dilute.  Spread on the frame with a brush while it is still moist, flatten it down with the palette knife.  When it is dry, if necessary you could (pourra)  But I don’t understand why you are using orangey tint, there is hardly any blue in the picture,  pure pink is more what it needs. An informative letter on Pissarro’s views on the art market and politics. His remarks on the English elections refer to the first time a majority of adult males could vote and yet the balance of power in Parliament changed little.

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Van Gogh, Vincent. Extraordinary autograph letter signed, in French, 4 pages (8 x 5 ¼ in.)

Lot 144: Van Gogh, Vincent. Extraordinary autograph letter signed, in French, 4 pages (8 x 5 ¼ in.)

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Description: 144. Van Gogh, Vincent. Extraordinary autograph letter signed (“Vincent”), in French, 4 pages (8 x 5 ¼ in.; 203 x 133 mm.), on grid paper, “Saint-Remy de Provence,” 20 January 1890 to “M. & Mme. Ginoux” (Joseph Ginoux and Marie Ginoux-Julien); with envelope addressed in Van Gogh’s hand to: Monsieur  Ginoux, Cafe de la gare, Place Lamartine, Arles; spotting, repair to page fold. Less than seven months before his death, Van Gogh shares his thoughts with an ailing friend: Illnesses are there to make us remember again that we are not made of wood. With great poignancy and introspection, Van Gogh writes to his friends, the proprietors of the Café de la Gare in Arles, after learning Madame Ginoux has taken ill again. Madame Ginoux had suffered from a bout of the flu and was then suffering from nervousness and anxiety most likely related to menopause. Finding parallels with the timing of the bouts of their respective illnesses, Van Gogh offers words of encouragment and extends his friendship. Less than seven months before his tragic death, Van Gogh could not be more lucid and reflective on the subject of illness. Van Gogh writes in full: I do not know whether you remember- I think it quite strange that about a year ago since Mrs. Ginoux was ill at the same time as I was; and now it has been so again since-- just around Christmas --for a few days I was taken quite badly this year, however it was over very quickly; I have not it less than a week.  Since, therefore, my dear friends, we sometimes suffer together, it makes me think of what Mrs. Ginoux said -- ‘When people are friends, they’re that way for a long time.’ I myself believe that the annoyances one experiences in the ordinary routine of life do us as much good as bad.  The thing that makes one fall ill, overcome by discouragement, today, that same thing gives us the energy, once the illness is over, to get up and want to discover the next day. I can assure you that the other year it almost vexed me to recover my health --to be better for a longer or shorter time -- continuing always to fear relapses-- almost vexed --I tell you--so little desire did I have to begin again. I’ve very often told myself that I’d prefer that there be nothing more and that it was over.  Well yes-- we’re not the masters of that-- of our existence and it’s a matter, seemingly of learning to want to live on, even when suffering. Ah, I feel so cowardly in that respect, even when my health returns. I still fear.  So who am I to encourage others, you’ll rightly say to me, it hardly suits me. Anyway, it’s only to tell you, my dear friends, that I hope so ardently, and that moreover I dare hope, that Mrs. Ginoux’s illness will be of very fleeting, and that she’ll recover from it entirely enlivened. But she isn’t unaware how fond we all are of her, and wish to see her well. As for me, illness has done me good-- it would be ungrateful not to acknowledge that; it has calmed me , and I have had more luck this year than I dared hope for, quite unlike what I had imagined. But if I hadn’t been so well cared for, if people hadn’t been as kind to me as they have been, I think I would have dropped dead or completely lost my reason. Business is business, then duty too is duty, so it’s only right that I soon return for awhile see my brother. But it will be hard for me to leave the south, I can assure all of you who have become friends to me--friends for a long time. I’ve forgotten again to thank you for the olives you sent me the other time and which were excellent; I’ll bring you back the boxes soon. I’m therefore writing to you, dear friends, to try to distract for a moment our dear patient so that she resume her habitual smile, to please all of us who know her.  As I’ve told you, in a fortnight I hope to come and see you again, quite cured. Illnesses are there to make us remember again that we are not made of wood. That’s what seems the good side of all this to me. Then afterwards one goes back to one’s everyday work less fearful of the annoyances, with a new store of serenity. And even if we part, it will be while yet saying to oneself again: ‘and when people are friends, they’re that way for a long time--for that is the means to be able to leave one other.’ Well, more soon, and my best wishes for Mrs. Ginoux’s speedy recovery. Van Gogh suffered from acute anxiety and frequent bouts with mental illness for much of his adult life.  In February 1888, Van Gogh moved to Arles after living two years in Paris.  He arrived ill from alcohol abuse and smoker’s cough and soon found himself at the Café de la Gare, where he became friends with the proprietors, Joseph and Marie Ginoux.   The interior of the establishment was made famous in Van Gogh’s painting The Night Café. In Feburary 1890, just weeks after writing the present letter, Madame Ginoux became Van Gogh’s subject of five paintings entitled L’Arlésienne.  The version intended for Madame Ginoux is lost; it has been theorized that it was Van Gogh’s attempt to deliver this painting to Mrs. Ginoux that precipitated a crisis that was “the starting point for one of the saddest episodes in a life already rife with sad events” which began on 22 February.  This spell of depression lasted until the end of April, during which time Vincent was unable to bring himself to write though he did continue to draw and paint. On 27 July 1890 Van Gogh, at the age of 37, shot himself in the chest.  The bullet was deflected by a rib bone and passed through his chest without doing apparent damage to internal organs, probably stopped by the spine.  He was able to walk back to the Auberge Ravoux where he was attended to by two physicians. Neither had the capability to perform surgery to remove the bullet, so they left Van Gogh alone in his room smoking his pipe.  The following morning, his brother, Theo, rushed to be with Vincent and within hours he died due to an untreated infection to his wound. Theo reported his brother’s last words were: “The sadness will last forever.”   An astonishing letter clearly revealing Van Gogh’s awareness of his own illness as he attempts to console another. Letters by Van Gogh are extremely rare at auction and the present letter is arguably the finest Van Gogh letter in private hands. References: Vincent Van Gogh. The Letters. Amsterdam, Van Gogh Museum, 2009, letter 842.

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Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph manuscript, 2 pages (10 ½ x 7 7/8 in.; 267 x 200 mm.)

Lot 145: Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph manuscript, 2 pages (10 ½ x 7 7/8 in.; 267 x 200 mm.)

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Description: 145. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph manuscript, 2 pages (10 ½ x 7 7/8 in.; 267 x 200 mm.), Undated [ca. 1926] with a few revisions; first page devoid of 3 inches of paper, marginal fraying and chipping, the two pages affixed together at head. Ramblings from a man who has loved and lost with the blame firmly placed upon his own shoulders. I am regarded as though I had stolen myself, gone off with what was not my own. And I am traduced, derided, despised, held up to public contempt and loathing. My character is remorselessly assassinated: no means however vile are spared to injure my property or my work. It is a falsity that men respect and honor independent of thought and action. Tolerance in anything or anywhere is plainly a gentle lie. It is in no man’s heart. The perception of Beauty is a moral test. The body is the first proselyte the soul makes. Our life is but the soul made known by its fruits,--the body. The whole duty of man is expressed in one line. Make to yourself a perfect body! To be a man is to do a man’s work! The true laborer is recompensed by his labor not by his employer. Laws are a matter of lawyers and judges. Lawyers and judges, as such, are not men of sense or principle but creatures of law: In any high moral sense they are not men at all! Earth song. Universal [in pencil]. I who have shown that I can behave particularly well am put under bonds for good behaviour! Every man should see that his influence is on the side of justice--and let the courts make their own characters. Men talk about Bible miracles because there is no miracle in their lives. Cease to gnaw that crust, there is a ripe fruit overhead! Woe to him who wants a companion, for he is unfit even to be the companion even of himself! We inspire friendship in men when we have contracted friendship with the gods. Any reverence, even [if] a material thing proceeds from an elevation of character? A vexing manuscript from Wright clearly revealing the effects of his personal upheavals.

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Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 146: Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph letter signed ("Frank"), 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ½ in.; 267 x 191 mm.)

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Description: 146. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph letter signed (“Frank”), 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ½ in.; 267 x 191 mm.), “Tokyo, Imperial Hotel” stationery, 9 June, no year, to Madame Kryuska; split to horizontal fold. A letter to Madame Kryuska divulging his wife’s misery. Wright writes in part: I want to say to you that I realize now as for some time past that I need look no further for a cause for Miriams wretchedness than my own crooked self. I have seen through the self-deception that puts a good face in a dirty deed when the dirty deed is mine. I ought not to have told you my feeling about M[iriam] and I am glad that what I said came out, only it didn’t come out just as I said it. But no matter. I might as well swallow the whole. It is near enough mine and it is false. I regret the hurt it gave Miriam first of all and after that the break between you and her. I hope to see that repaired. I thought more of saving my own face the other night than of saving her reputation. I have given her so much misery in return for her love that the real love I feel for her is perversely presented and belied by my own self. She is nearly mad with the misery of it. I know you will protect her in this. I don’t ask it for myself. I guess you know my failings any way. You have seen us together more than anyone else. You, no doubt remember what she said the other night in her terrible distress. Well it is all true every word of it. If ever I can help you in any way I shall be glad to.... A short time after this letter was written, the Wrights divorced and Miriam, who may have suffered from mental illness, had a particularly difficult time of it and died at a young age.

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Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 147: Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph letter signed ("Frank"), 1 page (10 ½ x 7 ½ in.; 267 x 191 mm.)

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Description: 147. Wright, Frank Lloyd. Autograph letter signed (“Frank”),2 pages (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), “Miyako Hotel,” Kyoto stationery, 11 June, no year. To the woman by my side, his estranged wife, Miriam; with original envelope. A personal letter from Wright to his estranged wife explaining special gold boxes he bought for her. Wright writes in full: A few little presents instead of words -- they are less treacherous and ambiguous. Two little gold lacquer boxes -- one of which will hold the ‘face paper’ -- the other something else. One larger gold box for ‘something else’. All three, treasures of the first order. Antiques. A couple of pieces of rare old brocade. [Keio] period -- accompanied by illustrated plate made from it for a work on brocade now being published -- to be used for a turban for ‘the woman’ in such manner as to yield its beauty to enhance hers without injury. I imagine it crowning her bronze hair and glorifying her lovely face. There was never, nor will [there] be another like it. A box of 41 pcs of old hair pins -- a new discovery in collecting -- old Tokugawa period silver and gold -- to make stick pins, or hat pins or hair pins -- the points can be sharpened you see. To interest her a little. She will say she would rather have the money but I came here to pay my bills and Hayashi told me to pick out something for about 100 yen, to show his appreciation of my visit. I picked the boxes for you. At Nomuros I remembered your longing for this piece and bought it at a bargain for 40 yen -- It will make a better hat than the sable and a rare one so do not say anything derogatory. The hair pins I selected from Nomuros collection at 1 yen each -­ they were so astonishingly cheap I fell at once. I remember the taunt that I had been careful not to give you cash. I will give you that too. It is hot, hot, hot here--but the Miyako is so much more attractive in summer. There is to be a celebration, a great one here on the 16th of July--I wish we might come. I feel that no words of mine can show my regret for what I am and shame for what I do. I guess my talent has screened me from myself all along. It is well that I have come face to face with myself unequivocally at last. And when my need is greatest I am alone. When my money is gone I need it most. In a postscript, Wright has added, Going back to­ night to the deserted room! When Wright wrote this letter, he and Miriam had recently become estranged, and they lived separately in different hotels in different cities.

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Boswell, James. Autograph letter in the third person with three integral signatures, 2 pages

Lot 148: Boswell, James. Autograph letter in the third person with three integral signatures, 2 pages

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Description: 148. Boswell, James. Autograph letter in the third person with three integral signatures (“Mr. Boswell”), 2 pages, (8 7/8 x 5 3/8 in.; 225 x 137 mm.),  [no place], 30 November 1785, to the publisher, Alderman John Boydell; horizontal fold skillfully repaired. Boswell sends John Boydell an inscription for a print as written by Dr. Samuel Johnson. Boswell writes in full: Mr. Boswell presents his best compliments to Mr. Alderman Boydell, and sends him the Inscription for the Print of Mary Queen of Scots as written by Dr. Johnson both in latin and in english, and that it may have its due respect the name of Dr. Johnson is subjoined to the inscription in each language. Mr. Boswell thinks it better not to refer to any particular Historian for the subject of the Print but to let people consult the various writers to have a full illustration. The inscription may be arranged in any way tht it will appear to the best advantage. Mr. Boswell should be glad to see a proof of it. At the time of Boswell’s letter, John Boydel was working on A Collection of Prints, Engraved after the Most Capital Paintings, an ambitious undertaking he began in 1769 and completed in 1792.  Contained in nine volumes, the publication was an enormous critical and financial success. The connection of James Boswell and Samuel Johnson to the work is historically important. Indeed, as Boydell was working away on his opus, so, too, was Boswell toiling away on his own.  Boswell’s Life of Johnson, published in 1791, claimed to be the greatest biography ever written in the English language, was well underway at the time of this letter.

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Boswell, James. The Life of Samuel Johnson. London: Henry Baldwin for Charles Dilly, 1791. 2 volumes

Lot 149: Boswell, James. The Life of Samuel Johnson. London: Henry Baldwin for Charles Dilly, 1791. 2 volumes

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Description: 149. Boswell, James. The Life of Samuel Johnson. London: Henry Baldwin for Charles Dilly, 1791. Two volumes quarto, (12 x 9 ¼ in.; 305 x 235 mm.), Engraved portrait of Johnson by James Heath after Sir Joshua Reynolds, two engraved plates of facsimiles by H. Shepard. Original white paper-backed blue-grey boards, remains of original paper labels. First edition, first issue, with “gve” on line 10, page 35 in volume one and the initial blank in volume two; Mm4, Nn1 (volume 1), E3, Oo4, Qq3, Zz1 and Ee2 (volume two) are cancels. A very fine copy in the original boards and entirely uncut. Boswell’s great work was published 16 May 1791 and achieved immediate critical acclaim. It has been out of print since. Only 1,750 copies of the first edition were printed. References: Grolier English 65; Rothschild 463; Tinker 338.

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Coryate, Thomas. Coryates Crudities first edition, small quarto, (8 1/8 x 6 ½ in.; 206 x 165 mm.)

Lot 150: Coryate, Thomas. Coryates Crudities first edition, small quarto, (8 1/8 x 6 ½ in.; 206 x 165 mm.)

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Description: 150. Coryate, Thomas. [Engraved title:] Coryates Crudities: Hastily gobled up in five Moneths travels in France, Savoy, Italy . . . [Letterpress title:] Three Crude Veines are Presented in this Booke . . . London: W[illiam] S[tansby for the author], 1611. Small quarto, (8 1/8 x 6 ½ in.; 206 x 165 mm.),  [472] leaves (collation as in Pforzheimer) including engraved title with contemporary hand coloring heightened with gold, four engraved plates (three folding), engraved text illustrations, woodcut initials and headpieces; three leaves (Ff4-6) spotted, leaf a3 with a slightly short outer blank margin, gathering b4 bound between a3 and a4, leaves Ff2-3 genuine but most likely supplied; the plates completely unshaved and intact although two have short closed tears, and the “Clock of Strasbourg” has been neatly mended with blank paper on verso to keep a closed tear from spreading. A fine, fresh and large copy in eighteenth century style antique calf, spine richly gilt; morocco backed slipcase. First edition. Coryate’s eccentric account of his peregrinations on foot though Europe in 1608.  A “there and back again” to Venice, Coryate ended his journey by literally hanging up his shoes in the parish church at Odcombe. The book is renowned for its series of faux-heroic elegies on the author’s achievements by Jonson, Campion and others of the Mermaid Tavern set. References: STC 5808: Pforzheimer 218; Keynes Donne, 70. Provenance: H. Bradley Martin (Sotheby’s New York, 30 April 1990, lot 2731).

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Dickens, Charles. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, (7 1/8 x 4 ½ in.; 181 x 114 mm.)

Lot 151: Dickens, Charles. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, (7 1/8 x 4 ½ in.; 181 x 114 mm.)

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Description: 151. Dickens, Charles. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages,(7 1/8 x 4 ½ in.; 181 x 114 mm.), “1, Devonshire Terrace York Gate Regents Park, [London],” 6 December 1841 to the Scottish author David Macbeth Moir. Charles Dickens looks forward to meeting Washington Irving.  Dickens sets off on his first visit to America a month after writing his farewell letter to the writer and physician David Moir. Dickens writes in part: For your hearty and cordial wishes, I thank you no less. I reciprocate them, I assure you, with unaffected sincerity and warmth of heart; and shake the hand you autographically extend to me, with a most emphatic squeeze. I am exceedingly sorry to leave home, for my household Gods, like Charles Lamb’s, ‘take a terrible deep root.’  But I look forward with a pleasure it would be hard to express, to seeing Washington Irving. So would you if you were going, I am sure. As I write his name and Lamb’s, a crowd of passages from your works come flocking upon me, very much akin to both; and I feel directly that you love them as well as I do. I shall only be six months gone, please God, My other half years of rest I mean to pass in England. There may be some railroad then--Heaven knows--which will tempt you to London. If I hear of it, I will subscribe my mite, that I may see you here. A very pleasant recollection of a very unpleasant night when we rode from Blackwood’s to Edinburgh inclines me to believe that we could be quite happy together for a whole day, even though it were the Twenty First of June... A significant letter linking Dickens to Moir and Washington Irving. References: Published in Letters, ed. M. House and G. Storey (Oxford, 1965-81), volume 2, pages. 440-441.

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