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The Property of a Distinguished American Private Collector

by Profiles in History

Platinum House

298 lots with images

December 18, 2012

Live Auction

26901 Agoura Road

Suite 150

Calabasas Hills, CA, 91301 USA

Phone: 310-859-7701

Fax: 310-859-3842

Email: Info@profilesinhistory.com

298 Lots
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Napoleon I and Empress Josephine. Document signed (

Lot 202: Napoleon I and Empress Josephine. Document signed ("Nap" and "Josephine") in French, 3 pages

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Description: 202. Napoleon I and Empress Josephine. Document signed (“Nap” and “Josephine”) in French, 3 pages (11 ½ x 8 ¼ in.; 288 x 208 mm.), “Paris,” December 1812, being a marriage contract between Monsieur Casmir Victor Guyon de Monttivault and Madamoiselle Elisa Marie Madelaine Guyon de Monttivault witnessed by Napoleon and Josephine, with the signature of Monsieur de Monttivault in addition to several notarial signatures; marginal spotting, remnants of mounting on verso of third page. Napoleon and Josephine sign as witnesses to a marriage contract. Casimir Victor Guyon de Monttivault was employed as an administrative officer at Malmaison by Empress Josephine for many years. His loyal service allowed him the opportunity to have his marriage contract endorsed by both Josephine and Napoleon. The signatures of both Napoleon and Josephine together in one document is rare.

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Peter I (Peter the Great). Letter signed, in Russian, 2 pages, (7 ¾ x 6 ¼ in.; 197 x 159 mm.)

Lot 203: Peter I (Peter the Great). Letter signed, in Russian, 2 pages, (7 ¾ x 6 ¼ in.; 197 x 159 mm.)

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Description: 203. Peter I (Peter the Great).  Letter signed, in Russian, 2 pages, (7 ¾ x 6 ¼ in.; 197 x 159 mm.), “Elbing,” 6 November 1711 to General Field Marshal Count Sheremetiev; numerals in red ink at foot of second page; browning, margin reinforced, some spotting.   Peter the Great issues orders for troop movements to one of his Field Marshals.  In the present letter Peter I shows the extent to which he involved himself in military affairs.  Here he is giving both tactical and strategic orders.  One order was for a small unit action and the other garrisoning of larger bodies.  Both were to be tied to international events to provide ‘disinformation’ to the enemy. This demonstrates Peter the Great is able to think both tactically and strategically at the same time. Peter I orders Sheremetiev to move the Cossack troops to the opposite bank of the Dnieper and to destroy their dwellings.  He instructs that seized troops should be garrisoned at the fortress, but in order to misinform the Turks, rumors should be set abroad that it is the Menshikov’s hired men who are settled there. The Polish senators should be told that the troops are garrisoned at the fortress provisionally until the King of Sweden is at Turkey.  The Field Marshal is also asked not to stay too long in Poland.  And as to his request to be sent troops stationed at Riga for the winter, he advises that it cannot be done. At the time this letter was written, Russia was at war with two countries--Sweden, since 1700, over Baltic territories, and Turkey, since 1710.  Peter I directed most of the wars himself, and also took part in some of the battles.  Russia was victorious over the Turks in 1713, and over Sweden in 1721. Letters signed by Peter the Great are extremely rare.

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Rommel, Erwin. Fine autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages, (6 7/8 x 4 ½ in.; 175 x 114 mm.)

Lot 204: Rommel, Erwin. Fine autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages, (6 7/8 x 4 ½ in.; 175 x 114 mm.)

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Description: 204. Rommel, Erwin. Fine autograph letter signed (“Erwin”), in German, 4 pages, (6 7/8 x 4 ½ in.; 175 x 114 mm.), “Munsingen,” 20 May 1913 to Dearest Mollinchen--Lucia Mollin, Rommel’s future wife; dampstaining.   21-year-old Erwin Rommel pens a wonderful handwritten love letter to his future wife, Lucia Mollin. Rommel writes in part; translated from German: My impatience for your picture, that is so long coming, you will understand...it is not already more than half a year, that my eyes saw you, but in my mind I see you a lot.  I am anxiously waiting to find out if we’re going to see each other again this year.  But we are going to have to see to it, that we both have a few days’ time for each other.  I hope you’re in favor of that... You know, actually I’m still the same man I was in Danzig.  Bodily in any case, totally innocent.  Maybe you don’t believe me, but I am speaking the whole truth.  Of course 90% of the people, male as well as female, are innocent today.  I don’t reproach anybody, quite the contrary, if I see two people free loving who have found what they’re looking for.  But I am different.  Only if you approach a girl with a lecherous motive, feign love to achieve your purpose, I find vile, I find bestial.  Totally different is my point of view, in a cause where sincere, true love brings two people together.  The act is then natural, is then noble.  Unfortunately the last case is a little rare.  The bestial induces one to take steps that one often bitterly regrets.  However, it takes energy to wait until one finds her, respectively him; one that he really loves, and one who doesn’t resent a union....  Presently I release my surplus strength in doing sports.  After eight hours of drills I still ride my bicycle to the Bodensee and row another two hours.  Due to those passions I’m being denounced as an oddball.  But I have, especially among the mature comrades a lot of friends...I don’t care about letters containing news of superficial things or just day to day questions, that show no feelings.  You just get unfamiliar with such correspondence, instead of getting closer...Be affectionately greeted and kissed.  From your Erwin” Rommel had begun his lifelong military career by enlisting as an army cadet in 1910, so perhaps his military service took him to Danzig from time to time.  World War I was soon to begin, and in 1915 Rommel received the Iron Cross (First Class). A remarkable letter of courtship in which Rommel discusses his philosophy regarding romantic relationships, as well as his current separation from the object of his affections.

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Sade, Donatien Alphonse Francois, Marquis de. Fine autograph letter signed, in French, 4 pages

Lot 205: Sade, Donatien Alphonse Francois, Marquis de. Fine autograph letter signed, in French, 4 pages

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Description: 205. Sade, Donatien Alphonse Francois, Marquis de. Fine autograph letter signed, (“de Sade”), in French, 4 pages, (7 7/8 x 6 in.; 200 x 152 mm.), [no place] June 1797 to Gaufridy, a lawyer and notary public in Apt; in fine condition. The Marquis de Sade describes the attacks on him during the French Revolution. Sade writes in full, translated from French: We have done the impossible, my dear attorney, to spare you the trip to Avignon, Messrs. Mestre and Bonefoi conducted themselves according to your views and have absolutely nothing to show for it. Perrin, no doubt on orders, is of a stubbornness without example, he absolutely won’t listen to anything. We acted, following the documents of M. Mezard to the letter, to whom you had the kindness to direct me. Here is a letter from him which I haven’t read and by which he no doubt sketches the conduct he has advised us to take and which we are following.  The enclosed document will tell you what’s what and save me the trouble of repeating it to you; it is therefore absolutely essential that you have the kindness to go to Avignon to deliver this document yourself to the court or to Perrin on Saturday morning; I implore you to come back to Saumane on Sunday for dinner, in view of the fact that I am leaving Monday on a journey of three weeks and I absolutely want to see you and speak: with you before leaving, it is of greatest urgency, so I’m expecting you Sunday for dinner without fail  Then it’s  good-bye until August 6, the date we will be reunited in Saumane, for your sake and that of Ripert and L----. You have precisely cut off my arms and legs, you have precisely made me lose my affair in Arles by not sending me Charles immediately as I had beseeched you; everything will be lost, the man in question was perhaps in Arles, now here I am tied down like the devil by Lombard, to whom the farm has been awarded as of August 1, if it isn’t finished before.  Oh, just heaven, what misfortune this delay is for me.  So as soon as he arrives, by tomorrow at least, I implore you without fail to be there on Saturday; if he doesn’t arrive until Saturday, there you have two more days lost, for on Sunday nothing can be done.  It is on bended knee, exactly on bended knee, that I beseech you not to make the slightest delay in the departure of Charles, I am expecting him for dinner tomorrow, Friday, without fail. These gentlemen arrived discontent, from Mazan the man in question was not content just to make publicly known everything he could say in opposition, he even had the audacity to spread the infamous slander that my affairs are very baldy off in Paris, where it is a fact that I have no other debts but two thousand ecus, of which one thousand were borrowed to make my journey and a thousand to effect payment on one of my newly purchased estates.  Isn’t that my duty?  These are bad affairs? Oh, what a droll villain, that M. deS. The Younger.  I’ll tell you what a villain B... is, but patience, he who laughs last laughs best, and I thank him for putting me in the position of not having any kind of Consideration for him whatsoever anymore. Meanwhile these gentlemen have with their words destroyed several prejudices; we shall see. The...affixed separately on your advice will be delivered on Tuesday the 18th while offering more.   That is why I am leaving Monday and want to see you Sunday.   Your Voux is more harm than good, he is a very inept gentleman. Courbin doesn’t get along with him at all, nor does he with Courbin, and in this way everything was awry, for Courbin, who conducts himself well enough, sent people to see the meadows at Mazan, and nobody was able to show these meadows, they had to notify Voux.  Your Serrurier has been to inspect the harvest, the [messenger] was up, the receiver from Mazan conducted himself well, he was given a down payment, and he promised that if such a thing happened again he would give notification at once.   If you were notified of it by express as a notary, it doesn’t mean anything; but it seemed pleasant to him to send it by mail, so that the messenger would eat off me for 5 or 6 days.  That Voux is a bad man. “The result:  I expect your son Charles tomorrow, Friday, for dinner.  You on Sunday on your return from Avignon, where I will have something very essential and very singular to tell you.  A thousand and thousands of pardons, my dear attorney. It’s a terrible summer for you, I sense it, but it has been 19 years since I have inconvenienced you, and when all this is finished maybe I’ll be all right without coming back to trouble your repose and your tranquillity. This remark is of some significance. Liotard from l’Isle is going to arrive to...and I think this turn of events is either for new reflections if there are any to be made or to embrace you.  At this very moment I receive a letter from my son who tells me that he is leaving at this very minute for Pris.  What do you say to all these extravagances? So don’t forget to bring us that...which you promised so much of Saumane; we can’t order anything regarding this estate without it don’t forget to bring the chocolate, I beg you. The beginning of my letter announced a document which was to be enclosed, and [I] explain to you [that] we had completely forgotten, in announcing it to you, the necessary formality of having this document presented to Perrin.    That is what the journey of Thursday is for.  By which I ask you to leave Friday morning, pass through l’Isle, at M. Liotard’s you will find the document which will have just been presented and which you will take with you to Avignon.  You will make use of it on Saturday and will pass through Saumane without fail on Sunday in returning to Apt.   Don’t forget this circumstance, I implore you, it being very essential, and I’ll see you Sunday before my departure of Monday morning.  I should be absent three weeks and I absolutely cannot pass through to see you beforehand.  In view of all this don’t forget that Charles is coming to dinner Friday at Saumane.  This condition is of the most extreme importance for me.  I heap my gratitude on you and embrace you with all my heart When Sade wrote this letter, he was living in abject poverty with the widow Quesnet. He had escaped the guillotine by chance the day before the Revolutionary leader Robespierre was overthrown, but his wealth and property was whittled away in the name of the French Revolution.  In the spring of 1797, Sade spent some time going around his dilapidated properties and dealing with matters connected with them. From Saumane, he wrote to the local authorities saying that he had come south to recover money due him from the estate but had found, to his astonishment, that the revolutionaries had confiscated much of it.   In order to recapture a share of the rents due him, Sade was forced to make a legal declaration that in fact he was a decent and upright citizen. It is in this letter, that he discusses that declaration. The property at Arles, over which he expresses anger at its loss, refers to the efforts of his long-suffering lawyer to complete the sale of the property which Sade himself had instigated during a recent visit. To add to his woes, Sade was under constant attack by his detractors, one of whom he also mentions in this letter, noting, ‘‘the best laugh is his who laughs last....” Sade, however, was a touch too optimistic.  By January of 1798 he moved to Versailles where the living was a bit less expensive.   There, he made his abode in an attic and fed on carrots and beans, finally obtaining work at the local theater where he received four pence per day as payment. A fine letter with significant content.

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Andersen, Hans Christian. Autograph letter signed, in English, 1 page (7 1/8 x 10 1/8 in.; 181 x 257 mm)

Lot 206: Andersen, Hans Christian. Autograph letter signed, in English, 1 page (7 1/8 x 10 1/8 in.; 181 x 257 mm)

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Description: 206. Andersen, Hans Christian. Autograph letter signed, in English, 1 page (7 1/8 x 10 1/8 in.; 181 x 257 mm.),  “Copenhagen,” November 1867 to an unnamed correspondent; marginal soiling, the leaf appears to have been removed from an autograph album as there is text about another manuscript on verso. Hans Christian Andersen’s heartfelt ode to England and Scotland--mentioning Charles Dickens, Walter Scott, Robert Burns and William Shakespeare.  Andersen writes in full: England and Scotland. I knew and loved those countries before my feet trod them. With [Captain Frederick] Marryat’s ‘Jacob Faithful,’ [1834] I had long before sailed up the Thames; by [Charles] Dickens I was led into London’s narrow lane and I listened to the throbbing hearts there; and in ‘Night and Morning’ [Edward George] Bulwer [first Baron Lytton] opened to my gaze the rich landscapes, with its towns, its churches, and its villages.” I was at home on Scotland’s mountains, and familiar with the deep lakes, lonely paths, and ancient castles. Walter Scott’s genius had wafted me thither: Walter Scott’s beneficent hand had extended to me the spiritual bread and wine, so that l forgot the earthly. I was intimate with [William] Shakespeare’s land and [Robert] Burn’s [Burns’] mountains before my corporal eye beheld them; and when at length l visited them, l was not received as a stranger.  Kind eyes regarded me, friends extended the hand to me. Elevated and humbled at the same time by so much happiness, my heart swelled with gratitude to God. 

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Flaubert, Gustave. Highly important autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 3/8 in.)

Lot 207: Flaubert, Gustave. Highly important autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 3/8 in.)

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Description: 207. Flaubert, Gustave.  Highly important autograph letter signed, (“G”), in French, 3 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 3/8 in.; 206 x 137 mm.),  [no place], Thursday, midnight, 7 October 1853; marginal spotting. An intimate autographed letter signed by Gustave Flaubert to his celebrated mistress, Louise Colet, concerning his writing of Madame Bovary: Oh, Bovary, what a grinding millstone it is for me. Flaubert pens in part, translated from French: I’ll not write you at length this evening, good, dear Louise.  I am so uneasy, I need more to lie down than to write again.  I have had a stomach and belly ache all evening, to the point of fainting, if I were capable of it.  I think it is indigestion. I also have a bad headache. I am exhausted. That’s what comes from going to bed too late too many nights! Since we returned from Trouville I have rarely gone to bed before 3 A.M.  That’s stupid, one gets exhausted.   But I would like so much to have this novel finished!  Ah! what discouragements sometimes, what cliff of Sisyphus to roll style up & prose, above all.  That will never end.  This week, however, and above all this evening (in spite of my physical sufferings), I have taken a g [rea] t step. I have resolved on a plan of the middle of my agricultural fair (it is of a dialogue of two, cut off by a speech, by words from the crowd & by the countryside!).  But when will I have them done!  How that vexes me that I would like to be relieved of it to come to visit you.  I have such a need for it & I desire you very much. B [ouilhet] will see you next week, I think. Well, not just to see you, and play tricks on me, hm, own up!  Last Sunday he had the intention of leaving next Tuesday.  I don’t think he has changed his mind.  As to the rest, he should have written you.  I didn’t say this vacation, dear Louise (that would not have made sense), but this winter my mother has to go to Paris.  I reiterate the promise of my engagement to you.  I will do everything I possibly can so that you can meet and get to know each other.  After that you will make arrangements as you see fit.  I am breaking my head to comprehend the importance you place in this.  But it is settled after all; let’s not talk about it anymore.  How right Leconte was to show Planche his teeth.  Those scoundrels!  It’s always the same, /Anoint a rogue, he will stab you; /Stab a rogue, he will anoint you. I Is the good Leconte getting on with his Celtic poem? This winter you will be a superb trio down there.  Me, my solitude begins & my life is going to take on a form the way I will spend it perhaps 30 or forty years more.  (I may very well have a dwelling in Paris, I will never stay there but some months of the year, most of my time I will spend here!)  So! -God is great!  Yes, I am getting old and that makes me feel old very much, this departure of B[ouilhet], although I hardly held him back, although I urged him to leave.  How my hair is falling out!  A wigmaker who cut it last Monday was alarmed by it, like the Captain of Ugliness, de Villemain. What saddens me is that I am getting sad, and, stupidly, in a somber way of thinking.  Oh, Bovary, what a grinding millstone it is for me. Friend Max has begun publishing his voyage in Egypt.  Le Nil to be a counterpart to The Rhin [Hugo’s book].  It is strange in its nothingness.  I’m not referring to the style, which is exceedingly flat, a hundred times worse than in Le Livre Posthume.  But as subject matter, as facts, there is nothing in it at all! The details he has best seen & the most characteristic in nature, he forgets them.  You, who have read my notes, will be struck by that.  What a sudden come-down.   I above all recommend his passage on the pyramids, where a hymn of praise to M. de Persigny stands out as an aside.  Did you answer the Crocodile?  Are you going to answer him?  Do I have to write him?  Adieu, I’ll smoke a pipe and go to bed, a thousand kisses to your ear.... It took Flaubert five long years of hard work to write Madame Bovary, his “grinding millstone.” Maxime Du Camp, who had founded the periodical Revue de Paris, urged him to make haste, but he would not.  When Flaubert wrote this letter, he had already been working on chapter 8 for months, and as he reveals, he has just “resolved on a plan of the middle of my agricultural fair.’’  In the completed novel, the author describes the event and intermingles in a masterful, unforgettable way the dialogue between Emma and Rodolphe, which seals their intention to begin an affair together, with the pompous speeches and animal auctions.  Madame Bovary eventually appeared in installments in the Revue from October 1 to December 15, 1856. The French government then brought Flaubert to trial on grounds of the novel’s alleged immorality, but he narrowly escaped conviction. Louise Colet was the only woman with whom Flaubert is known to have a passionate relationship.  She was his mistress over two periods of almost three years each--from 1846 to 1848 and from 1851 to 1854. The final affair ended in utter disaster. An extraordinary letter by Flaubert lamenting over his greatest work, Madame Bovary. 

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Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 208: Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand. Autograph letter signed ("Bapu"), in English, 2 pages, (6 1/8 x 6 in.)

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Description: 208. Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand.  Autograph letter signed (“Bapu”), in English, 2 pages, (6 1/8 x 6 in.; 156 x 152 mm.), “Delhi,” 11 January 1935 to “My dear Janamal”; marginal splits to horizontal fold. Mahatma Gandhi campaigns on behalf of the Harijans or “untouchables” --the lowest caste in India-- 50-60 million outcasts, the victims of Hindu discrimination.  Gandhi writes in full: I don’t think it w[oul]d do to have a helper who believes in untouchability. The matron sh[oul]d be free from ceremonial untouchability. The foundation must be well laid. Only you sh[oul]d be the matron, mother & everything till you get a good substitute. I think it w[oul]d be well for you both brother & sister to live under separate roofs. If the Ashram comes into being, that is the fittest opportunity for separation. You should daily practise Hindi writing. Never mind if you cannot write me in Hindi just yet. You must come again some other time to Wardha [a village] to polish your Hindi. We are all well, though the cold is somewhat trying. After Gandhi’s release from prison, August 1939, he began a country-wide tour to promote the Harijan cause, covering 12,500 miles in 10 months. During his tour, he called on caste Hindus to purge themselves of prejudice against the Harijans, and urged the Harijans to shake off their vice (drugs and drink), which hindered their absorption into Hindu society. Upon the conclusion of the tour, Gandhi was given a house at Magnwadi, near Wardha, by Sheth Jamnalal Bajaj, the financial sponsor of Wardha Ashram. Gandhi made it the headquarters of his new society, the All-India Village Industries Association, which was launched on 26 October 1934 with Gandhi as patron and Gandhi’s millionaire industrialist friends as backers. Then on 16 June 1936, Gandhi moved to a small village east of Wardha called Segaon. Its inhabitants were 600 Harijans. There, Bapu, hoping to create a model village, remained for three years, his home virtually becoming another Ashram. The present unpublished letter is not included in The Collected Works of MG containing Gandhi’s teachings regarding untouchability.

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Gandhi, Mohandas Karmachand. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 209: Gandhi, Mohandas Karmachand. Autograph letter signed ("M. K. Gandhi"), in English, 4 pages

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Description: 209. Gandhi, Mohandas Karmachand. 1869-1948. Autograph letter signed (“M. K. Gandhi”), in English, at the head, 4 pages, (8 1/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 206 x 133 mm.), “Ahmedabad,” 18 September [no year], to an unidentified “Dear friend”; tape reinforcement to folds.   In a letter to a dear friend, Gandhi imparts a wonderful morsel of wisdom--a personal creed that he quietly exemplified over his entire life: you have but to affect your surroundings instead of being affected by them.  Gandhi writes in full: I am surprised at your not receiving the draft orders.  Send a copy again herewith.  I shall anxiously await your criticism. Many have sent me theirs and I remain unmoved by it. There is little or nothing to alter. Miss  [Sonja] Schlesin  [his secretary] has lost her brother. You will recall the youngster’s features. I have in my hands a case of serious fever.   It is mostly the Tamil inmates. The case taxes all my energy and ability.  I think it will yield to the testament that is practically starvation.  She is suffering from over eating. He know[s] it’s bad Today is the 12th day. Then there is Ramdas [Gandhi’s son] just slowly recovering from a severe attack of dysentery. The third case is Midn [?] a friend suffering from incipient consumption [?].  You can well imagine my state.  However I am fairly calm. I have given this picture to show you that there are many men whom you know and who are suffering more perhaps than you are; for physical ailments are often far more principal than reformation of one ‘s liberty when it carries no stigma with it.   As I have said, you can turn your internment to many agrandise [?]; you have but to affect your surroundings instead of being affected by them. With love ever your Old friend. One of the most influential figures of the twentieth century Gandhi was known as “Mahatma” (in Sanskritmama: great; atman: soul) a title conferred on him by writer Rabindranath Tagore.  Gandhi’s familiar dress was merely a loincloth and a homespun blanket & cape.  Born into a wealthy Gujarati family Gandhi was raised as a Hindu. Passing the bar in 1891 Gandhi went to South Africa where he remained for 20 years. While in South Africa he became celibate, abstained from meat, tobacco, and alcohol and lived in voluntary poverty. He dedicated his life to the betterment of his people, renouncing threats, violence and weapons. Convinced that firmness in the truth or soul force (Satyagraha) was the strongest power in the world, he returned to India in January 1915, and campaigned on behalf of the “untouchables” in the caste system.  Calling for non-violent non-cooperation with government agencies, he also led a campaign for self-rule (Swaraj) after Britain’s refusal to grant substantial self-government after the war. His campaigns--which included protest marches, strikes, boycotts, non-violent civil disobedience, and hartal (strikes with prayer and fasting)--were often successful, though he was sometimes unable to control his supporters who resorted to violence. Gandhi was often jailed for the actions of his supporters.   In March 1930, Gandhi and hundreds of followers marched to the sea at Dandi to protest against the imposition of a tax on salt (the “Salt March”); eventually the Salt Law was relaxed.  Gandhi played an active part behind the scenes in the negotiations that led to the independence of India  (1947) and the appointment of a Congressional government under Prime Minister Jawahaflal Nehru  (1889-1964). Preaching a policy of unity between Hindus and Moslems, Gandhi was assassinated by a Hindu fanatic at a prayer meeting on 30 January 1948.

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Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand. Autograph letter signed, in English, 2 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.)

Lot 210: Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand. Autograph letter signed, in English, 2 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.)

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Description: 210. Gandhi, Mohandas Karamchand.  Autograph letter signed (“your old friend”), in English, 2 pages, (8 ¼ x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm.), “Ahmedabad,” 28 May [no year], to a dear friend; crude repair to marginal tears. In a stunning revelation of his innermost thoughts, Mohandas Gandhi gives a harsh criticism of his own teaching skills -- a talent which would, ironically, be one of his greatest legacies.  Gandhi writes in full: At the time of writing this I am not in my usual optimistic mood.  The sense of responsibility has weighed me down.  So many boys under my care & I a poor teacher at best.  This is positive recognition of my defects & not mock modesty.  I should know much more than I do.  And I know so little.  However I cannot avoid must not avoid other work & yet this teaching absorbs as it ought to all my time.  There is then a relapse our strain has revived my pleurisy.  I am much better now.  But there am I.  I want to give you everything and so you have this bit of news too.  Please however don’t be alarmed.  I shall have my usual mood in the course of a day or two.  The boys have returned from Honduras [?] with many sick ones among them.  Inagandal himself had a very severe attack.  Coopoo is suffering & so are Shaup & Chadalal.  Mrs Gandhi is down.  She strayed.  Here she could not resist her palate so you see I have a fair number of patients in my hands.  More I do not feel like giving you this week.  I will close by saying that the down will soon pass.

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Hesse, Hermann. Autograph manuscript and drawing signed, in German, 2 pages, (8 x 6 ½ in.)

Lot 211: Hesse, Hermann. Autograph manuscript and drawing signed, in German, 2 pages, (8 x 6 ½ in.)

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Description: 211. Hesse, Hermann.  Autograph manuscript and drawing signed (“H. Hesse”), in German, 2 pages, (8 x 6 ½ in.; 203 x 165 mm.), August 1929; in pristine condition.   A poem and a drawing all in the hand of Hermann Hesse. Hesse’s poem in full: Lampions in der Sommernacht Warm in dunkler Gartenkühle Schweben bunte Ampelreihn, Senden aus dem Laubgewühle Zart geheimnisvollen Schein. Eine lächelt hell zitronen, Rot und weiße lachen feist, Eine blaue scheint zu wohnen Im Geäst wie Mond und Geist. Eine plotzlich steht in Flammen, Zuckt empor, ist rasch verloht... Schwestern schauern still zusammen, Lächeln, warten auf den Tod: Mondblau, Weingelb, Sammetrot. The title of the poem, Paper Lanterns in a Nocturnal Garden,  is written on the first page,  above which Hesse drawn an illustration, in pen and ink and watercolors, of trees in a terraced garden decorated with circular lanterns in red,  yellow, orange, blue and white, and with mountains in the background.  The poem, in trochaic tetrameter, is written on the integral leaf: Warm in the dark garden coolness...Bright rows of light float...Giving off through the confusion of leaves...A soft mysterious shine...One smiles in bright lemon,...I Red and white ones plumply laugh...A blue one seems to live in the  branches like moon and spirit...One is suddenly ablaze... Flashes up, is quickly out...Her sisters quiver quietly... Smiling they await death... Moon blue, wine yellow, velvet red. A charming manuscript and drawing by the renown German author.

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Hugo, Victor. Important autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages, (9 5/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 244 x 184 mm.)

Lot 212: Hugo, Victor. Important autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages, (9 5/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 244 x 184 mm.)

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Description: 212. Hugo, Victor. Important autograph letter signed, in French, 2 pages, (9 5/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 244 x 184 mm.), “Paris,” 16 October 1830 to Baron Fain; integral address leaf with seal tear; Max Thorex stamp on recto of integral address leaf. Still a strong supporter of the Bonapartes, Hugo writes to Baron Fain, Private secretary to Napoleon I concerning critical words spoken and misdeeds committed against the deceased Emperor. Hugo writes in full; translated from French: It is my duty to thank you. your letter touches me more than I can say. Your works which are so eloquent in their simplicity are among those that will associate them with that master, Napoleon. It is you who have erected a monument to him. I have not done more than to bark at the foot of it, at the small and mediocre men who insult him. Envy and hatred have always persecuted genius. What is small seeks to belittle that which is great. That is the order of things. Napoleon proved it in his lifetime. Ordinarily, those miserable pesterings against renowned people stop at the grave. Yet, the Emperor is dead and those wretched tactics still continue on his account. For the sake of the great man let us be proud of them. This is one more exception that can be added to the exceptions of his destiny. An extraordinary autograph letter by Hugo proclaiming his complete loyalty to Napoleon long after his death.  

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Marx, Karl (Heinrich). Remarkable autograph letter, in English, 2 pages (8 x 6 ¼ in.; 203 x 159 mm.)

Lot 213: Marx, Karl (Heinrich). Remarkable autograph letter, in English, 2 pages (8 x 6 ¼ in.; 203 x 159 mm.)

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Description: 213. Marx, Karl (Heinrich).  Remarkable autograph letter, in English, 2 pages (8 x 6 ¼ in.; 203 x 159 mm.), Edinburgh, Scotland, 1847 to Archibald Alison; chipped at corners; mounting remnant at right margin on verso. Karl Marx discusses the effect of monetary policy on agricultural economics and foreign trade.  In this extraordinary letter Marx writes in part: Free Trade and a Fettered Currency The experience of every age has demonstrated that so great is the effect of capital and civilization applied to manufactures, and so considerable, comparatively speaking, the influence upon agriculture, that the old state can undersell the new one in the industry of towns, and the new one undersell the old one in the industry of the country.  The proof of this idea is in England, by the aid of the slavery we can undersell the  . . . of Hindostan in the manufacture of muslin from cotton grown on the banks of the Ganges.  But with all the advantages of chemical manure and tile draining, it is undersold in the supply of food by the cultivators on the freetrade.  The ultimate universal state would fall into the degrading dependence of ancient Rome on the harvests of Egypt and Libya.  Nearly all the manufactures in Lancashire and Lanarkshire are put on short hire.  Here then were all the sounds and marks of prosperity, so far as they depend on a state of unexampled vigour and efficiency was then attended, as we were constantly told it would be, by a corresponding repulse given to our manufactures.  The increased activity of our manufacturing compensated for the sterility of so large a part of our field.  The fact is just the reverse...have exceeded 6 million qurs  . . . total manufactured produce of the island is certainly not under £200,000,000 for the foreign markets of the world.  In free trade it has caused fifteen millions worth of domestic agricultural produce to be exchanged for fifteen millions worth of foreign agricultural produce...Distress also certainly to be ascribed to the supplanting of the natural substance, of a large part of home produce, by an equally large part of foreign product.  A powers of absorption goes on or the occurrence of  . . . but not the absorption of labour by capital by pauperism for their hundreds, while holders of notes though more numerous there for their pounds.  In 1846 £6,000,000 in postoffice orders were written.  It may seem pardonable to enumerate the easy pound of anything as equivalent to actual possession as influencing if not constituting a circulation; but of 2 well known to be so, and to have a corresponding effect on difficult times.  In commercial and manufacturing industry with the world, cheap capital was one of our chief advantages, but had our honest industry prosper or live when the interest of capital which was at 2½% is now at 8 to 10% and even during several days all quotations of it had ceased, and the best orders to our manufacturers were unexecuted owing to the entire paralysis of credit.  The  . . . consequent on the withholding the accommodation, profusely awarded at one time and abruptly withdrawn at another, are incalculable.  The theory is the adverse state of foreign exchange, from whatever cause arising, and whether temporary or otherwise.  To be corrected by making money scarce, and thereby lowering the value of all merchandise.  Do these reasons comprehend the losses occasioned by the depreciation of all monies when this is applied to correct every occasional fluctuation of exchanges?  How can it be supposed that you can suddenly create by cheapness new markets for goods rather than of necessity?  The absorption of capital for railroads though greatly desirable for those who require that capital for the ordinary purposes of trade, does not necessarily affect the operations of the bank to the integrity of the rates . . . . The great German political philosopher writes to Archibald Alison, a Scottish historian and author of the History of Europe during the French Revolution.  A fascinating letter with quintessential content from Marx.

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Rousseau, Jean Jacques. Autograph Letter Signed (

Lot 214: Rousseau, Jean Jacques. Autograph Letter Signed ("Rousseau"), in French, 1 page, (7 7/8 x 6 3/8 in.)

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Description: 214. Rousseau, Jean Jacques.  Autograph Letter Signed (“Rousseau”), in French, 1 page, (7 7/8 x 6 3/8 in.; 200 x 162 mm.), “Wooton,” 10 May 1766 to an unidentified female correspondent; with red wax seal, browned, skillfully repaired. A stormy life has made me sigh for repose. Rousseau writes in full; translated from French: Far from forgetting you, Madame, one of my pleasures in this retreat is to recall the happy times of my life; they have been rare and short-lived, but the memory of them increases them and it is the past which makes the present bearable for me, and I have too great a need of you to forget you.  However, I will not write to you, Madame; a stormy life has made me sigh for repose and I feel that I can have none of that except by giving up all correspondence outside the place I am inhabiting.  So I am taking up my position, too late no doubt, but soon enough to enjoy those days of peace which may be left to me.  Farewell, Madame; the friendship you have honored me with will always be with me and dear to me; may I pray also that you remember it sometimes. Written at the height of his infamous quarrel with David Hume, Rousseau’s letter seems to convey a desperate desire to escape the public attention that had dogged him from Paris to London to the remote town in the Derbyshire Peaks where he made his retreat.  Yet at the same time, its bold sense of resolution does not ring true.  Lodging at the home of Richard Davenport, a sympathetic gentlemen whom he had met while posing at the painter Ramsay’s, Rousseau in fact continued to write letters throughout the summer, complaining of the treatment he received at the hands of Hume, who had escorted him from France, helped him look for a place to live in England, and made efforts to secure him a pension.  His paranoia was aroused in April upon the publication of a spurious and sarcastic letter from Frederick II to Rousseau, in which the philosopher was attacked for his eccentricities, his lack of common sense, and his abiding sense of persecution.  Rousseau held Hume responsible for this epistle, and -- despite the pleas of his friends -- prepared his own letter in answer to the “hold” which he felt Hume now had over him (while travelling, he had heard Hume exclaim in his sleep, “I hold Jean Jacques Rousseau!”).  This eighteen-page diatribe of 10 July 1766 became a ‘cause celebre’ on both sides of the Channel and prompted Hume’s own “Concise Account.” The friendship between the two men, if it had ever truly existed, had now come to an end.

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Voltaire, Francois Marie Arouet. Autograph letter, in French, 4 pages, (9 1/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 232 x 184 mm)

Lot 215: Voltaire, Francois Marie Arouet. Autograph letter, in French, 4 pages, (9 1/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 232 x 184 mm)

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Description: 215. Voltaire, Francois Marie Arouet.  Autograph letter, in French, 4 pages, (9 1/8 x 7 ¼ in.; 232 x 184 mm.), At d’elices, 6 December [no year.], to the philosopher, mathematician, physicist and music theorist, Jean le Rond d’Alembert; in pristine condition. A personal letter to the philosopher d’Alembert discussing political issues and the King of Prussia with mention of Hume and Diderot. Voltaire writes in full; translated from French: I have just received your letter dated October 1. I am not sure if I have thanked you enough for the excellent work you wrote in honor of the memory of du Marsay, who might have not been remembered without it.  But I know that I will never be able to tell you how grateful I am to you for using your eloquence and reasoning to support me as I have heard you did regarding the loathsome murder of Servet [Michel Servet was burned alive in 1553 at Calvin’s instigation because of his unorthodox beliefs and publications] and also for what you wrote about the virtue of tolerance in the Geneva article.  I look forward to receiving a copy of it.  Some wretches feel so close to the [spirit of the] sixteenth century that they have dared to justify the murder of Servet in this century.   These contemptible people are priests.  I can assure you that I have not read a word of what they wrote. It was enough for me to know that they are a source of shame to all honest people.  One of these rascals has asked the Council of the 25 in Geneva for the files of this trial that will make Calvin execrable forever.   The Council has regarded this request an insult.   Magistrates despise the crime their ancestors were led into by fanaticism and some priest would like to canonize it!  You can be sure that this last despicable act will bring upon them as much hate as they deserve.  I have received only compliments from all honest local people. Who on earth is this young priest who wants to make you out to be a usurer?  Did you, by any chance, borrow some money at usurious rates when your Prussian, during the battle of Kolin, did not seem willing to pay the pensions?  But I am sure that at the battle of the 5th, everyone must have lent you money. Here is more bad news about the pensions. The Austrians, who arrived before Breslaw on the 22nd, avenged and humiliated us terribly. They attacked the Prussian entrenchments thirteen times for six hours. No victory before has ever been so bloody and horribly beautiful. We funny Frenchmen are quicker and we are all done in five minutes. The King of Prussia keeps writing me verses, sometimes as a man in despair, sometimes as a hero.   As for me, I try to live as a philosopher in my retreat.   He has obtained what he had always longed for, that is to defeat the French, to make them like him and to make fun of them.  But the Austrians are really making fun of him too.  He has won glory from our disgrace on the 5th, but he will have to content himself with this passing glory that he has won too easily. He will lose his territories along with the ones that he has gained, unless the French manage to lose their army again as they did during the 1741 war. Tell me about writing his story.  He will never leave this to anyone. He makes a point of doing it himself. Yes, you are right; he is unique.  Let us get back to you, who are as famous in your field as he is in his. I knew nothing about the silly thing you tell me. I will get some information about it and you will have me read the Mercure. I do as Cato, I always finish my harangue saying deleatur Catago. I must say that there are some lines in the eulogy of du Marsais that are really comforting.  Five or six philosophers working together would be enough to knock down the colossus. The point is not so much to prevent our lackeys from going to church; we have to shield family men from the tyrannical powers wielded over them by impostors, and to inspire people with a spirit of tolerance. This important mission has already succeeded. Sometimes. The vine of truth is cultivated by people like d’Alembert, Diderot, Bollinbroke, Hume, etc.  Had this King of Prussia of yours decided to limit himself to this Holy Mission, he would have lived happily and blessed by all European learned societies.  Truth is making so much progress that I have seen in my retreat some Spaniards and Portuguese who hated the Inquisition as much as the French do. Macte animo generose puer sic itur ad astrae. In the past, one would have said sic itur ad ignem. I do not like all the fuss du Marsais made before his death. I have read that this small-townish man from the Landes region who had written about the history of philosophy in such a provincial style, asked before he died that his book, Of the Great Men Who Died Laughing, be burned.  But who on earth knew that he had written that book? Talking about burning, please burn my letter. Mrs. D sends you her best regards.  The chatterbox gives you a big hug.  Do you still see the clearsighted blind Mrs. Du Deffant?  If you happen to see her, please tell her that I still think of her affectionately! The relationship between Voltaire and Frederick the Great began in 1736, when the Crown Prince was twenty-four years old and the philosopher some eighteen years his senior.  Throughout the rest of Voltaire’s life this relationship rode through the tides--its vicissitudes, asperities and periods of calm, even silence--and was accompanied by correspondence, visits, gifts and exchanges of verses and other writings. The relationship began with a young man, heir to the powerful throne of Prussia, spontaneously approaching Voltaire out of respect and admiration.  This early phase is mainly filled with literature and, above all, philosophy. On literature too there is much to exchange.  Frederick transmits some of his own compositions. In return, Voltaire dispatches numerous works, which Frederick is avid to obtain. Eventually, Frederick receives Voltaire’s major works which not only elicit passionate admiration but provoke differences in opinions, objections, discontent and cynical conduct, causing vacillations in their relationship from the bitterest quarrels to great intimacy. Haydn Mason in his biography, Voltaire, concludes that “The quarrels between Voltaire and Frederick have a heroic quality, as befits two personalities so vigorous, so complex and so enterprising.  Each recognised in the other a great man, for all their faults.  Frederick’s energy inspired the philosophe to work; Voltaire had never, he said, seen a man so industrious. Frederick for his part was to continue to see Voltaire not merely as a rascal, but also as a god.  Beneath the rancour, contempt, jealousies, lay an enduring reciprocal esteem . . . no place could house them together for long, the more so because the one was born to command and the other to seek his independence. An important letter with significant content from one philosopher to another.

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Armstrong, Louis. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 216: Armstrong, Louis. Autograph letter signed ("Louis Satchmo Armstrong"), 5 pages, (11 x 8 ½ in.)

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Description: 216. Armstrong, Louis.  Autograph letter signed (“Louis Satchmo Armstrong”), 5 pages, (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), “Chicago,” 5 April 1933 to an unidentified friend “Gate”; soiled, small splits at folds. Louis Armstrong writes a letter while listening to Duke Ellington’s orchestra on the radio:  The Great Satchmo writes while listening to the radio giving his praises to the Duke and reminiscing a little to his friend.   Armstrong writes in part: I’ve just gotten back home from my Tour down South - we had a lovely time.  Everybody was so glad to see me and- you know? - all the ‘Buh lony’ that goes along with it.  Ha.  Ha.  But sho ‘nuff Gate I am having a grand time on my tours. I am now sitting home in my dining room with some of the folks at home and we are listening to the Radio.  A swell program is now in session.   The Three Keys are now getting away ‘righteously’.  Late that Cats are after the Mills Brothers own hearts.   But I am still Crazy over those Boswell Sisters.   Bless their hearts.   They are from my home town, you know?  Fine Girls.   They think I am the Last word.  They played here at the Chicago Theatre the same week we played the Palace Theatre.   Ol Amos ‘N’ Andy’s just comin in on the radio.  They are still funny.  They ‘ll soon be making another movie so you all’l get another chance to see the funny boys again.   Like Em?  I bet your little boy does. Boy, you’re right, when you said we broke all records for doubling from the Trocadero - to the Hobborn Empire Theatres.  Some quick connections I really mean.   Ha.  Ha.   We was known to make time, Eh?  Gizzard?  Ha.  Ha. So by now it’s the wee hours in the morning - And we’re now listening to Duke Ellington’s Orchestra whom has just return ‘d to the Famous Cotton Club in New York.  Boy they are raising H--- no foolin’ My. My. My.  What a band.  Ol Duke has a new trombone player from California that’s really too tight.   His name is Lawrence Brown.   He was in my orchestra when I was in Hollywood the year of 1930.  He’s a trombone hound... A great informal and rambling letter from Armstrong to a good friend, written from his home in Chicago when he was there briefly between tours.  He mentions the great Duke Ellington, and makes some flattering comments about the Duke’s  new trombone player, Lawrence Brown,  who joined Ellington in the spring of 1932 and stayed with him until March, 1951, and then rejoined with him in May, 1960, staying throughout the sixties.

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Beethoven, Ludwig von. Autograph letter signed in pencil, in German, 3 pages, (5 ½ x 8 ½ in.)

Lot 217: Beethoven, Ludwig von. Autograph letter signed in pencil, in German, 3 pages, (5 ½ x 8 ½ in.)

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Description: 217. Beethoven, Ludwig von.  Autograph letter signed (“Beethoven”) in pencil, in German, 3 pages, (5 ½ x 8 ½ in.; 140 x 216 mm.), [no place, no date], to Tobias Haslinger (a friend and business partner of Beethoven’s publisher, Sigmund A. Steiner); browning and some marginal chipping. A disgruntled Beethoven writes of the second performance of his 9th Symphony and his Missa Solemnis. Beethoven writes in full; translated from German: Dear Friend You would really do me great injustice were you to suppose that negligence prevented my sending you the tickets.  I assure you that it was my intention to do so, but forgot it like many other things.  I hope that some other opportunity will may occur to enable me to prove my sentiments with regard to you.  I am, I assure you, entirely innocent of all that [Louis-Antoine] Duport has done, in the same way that it was he who thought fit to represent the Terzet [OP. 116] as new, not I.  You know too well my love of the truth; but it is better to be silent now on that subject, as it is not everyone who is aware of the true state of the case, and I though innocent, might incur blame. I do not at all care for the other proposals Duport makes, as by this concert I have lost both time and money.  In the greatest haste, your friend Beethoven After a symphonic silence of nearly twelve years, the aging German composer Ludwig van Beethoven began work on a new grand symphony in D minor, based on a choral setting of Schiller’s An die Freunde (“Ode to Joy”) which was to be, according to the master, “a pious song in a symphony in the ancient modes.”  The nature of this work combined several diverse elements that had been stirring in his imagination for many years, as he remarked, “For some time I have been thinking about three other great works.  Much is already planned; in my head, that is.  I must first get them out of the way; two great symphonies, each one different the ideas of which he fused into one, the 9th and an oratorio which became the Missa Solemnis.  But it will take a long time; you see, it’s not easy for me to bring myself to do any writing for some time now.  I sit and think; I’ve had the ideas for quite a long time; but they refuse to be committed to paper.  I’m terrified of starting such great works.  Once I’m inside them, all will be well...”Much of the work on this new symphony was completed in 1823, and finishing touches were added in February of 1824. On May 7, 1824, the premiere of this seminal work (and the one for which Beethoven is best remembered), the Symphony No. 9 in D minor, Op.125, took place at the Karntnertor-Theatre in Vienna, as arranged by Duport (who Beethoven derisively referred to as an “ex-dancer”).  In addition, the concert showcased parts of his Missa Solemnis, Op. 123- the Kyrie, Credo, and Agnus Dei- as well as another overture, that of The Consecration of the House. [A note: Beethoven himself considered the Missa Solemnis his greatest work, intending it to be his legacy and the crowning achievement of his life-long musical output, much in the same way that Mozart left his Requiem and Haydn, The Creation.  Beethoven labored over it for three years, and signed the score “Bitte für inneren und ausseren Freiden” or “prayer for inner and outer peace” - a fitting epitaph, and a summation of his troubled life. The first performance of the 9th Symphony must have been a remarkable sight.  According to violinist Joseph Michael Bohm, “Beethoven himself conducted, that is, he stood in front of a conductor’s stand and threw himself back and forth like a mad-man.  At one moment he stretched to his full height, at the next he crouched down to the floor, he flailed about with his hands and feet as though he wanted to play all the instruments and sing all the chorus parts.  The actual direction was in Duport’s hands; we musicians followed his baton only.”  The symphony was met with great enthusiasm by the breathless Viennese.  Many years later, the pianist Thalberg, who was among those present, recalled that after the scherzo had ended Beethoven stood turning over the leaves of the score, quite unaware of the thunderous applause (he was by this time almost completely deaf), until one of the singers pulled him by the sleeve and pointed to the audience behind him, to whom he then turned and bowed. Two weeks later (May 23), Beethoven gave a second performance, the one for which, in the present letter, he has expressed regret in not procuring complimentary tickets for Haslinger.  Duport was not only the conductor of the orchestra for this and the first performance, but also played a vital part in their organization.  At the second performance, Duport scheduled the Kyrie from the Missa Solemnis, and also a vocal trio for soprano, tenor and bass, Tremate, empi, tremate (Op. 116), that was announced by Duport as a “new” work, which it was not:  it had been written over twenty years before, and was purchased by Haslinger but not yet published.  Thus, Duport managed to enrage both the composer (whose mercurial temper was legendary) and the owner of the music.  It is interesting to note that Beethoven mentions in this type of concert, I have lost only time and money. Indeed, these first two performances of the 9th Symphony did not result in the windfall that would justify the time and effort the great composer had given to these two works; he had made a paltry 420 florins on the first concert, and 500 at the second, due primarily to the pleasant weather and the many “open air” patrons those who did not pay to enter the theatre but remained outside to enjoy the music.  Yet, despite this original disappointment in receipts, over 150 years later his great symphony remains one of the most beloved and often performed of any in the entire repertoire of classical music. An extremely rare and significant letter concerning the second performance of the 9th Symphony and the Missa Solemnis--his two greatest works--with the disgruntled tone that so perfectly embodies this musical icon. References: Published in The Letters of Beethoven ed. Emily Anderson, volume 3, number 1294, page 1130 (London: Macmillan, 1961), where the autograph manuscript is noted as not traced, but lists the letter as appearing in the sale catalog of G. Charavay in May, 1890. Translation herewith by Lady Grace Wallace from Dr. Ludwig Nohl’s Beethoven’s Letters (ca.1866).

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Berlioz, Hector. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages (9 ½ x 7 ½ in.; 241 x 191 mm.)

Lot 218: Berlioz, Hector. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages (9 ½ x 7 ½ in.; 241 x 191 mm.)

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Description: 218. Berlioz, Hector.  Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages (9 ½ x 7 ½ in.; 241 x 191 mm.), “Montmartre,” 16 December 1835 to his lifelong friend Humbert Ferrand at Belley; scattered spotting, address panel on verso of third page with seal tears. Berlioz experiences great success in Germany thanks to Franz Liszt. Berlioz writes in full; translated from French: I am not to blame for having kept you waiting so long for a letter; you can have no idea of what I have to do day after day, and how very little leisure I have, even when I have any.  But it is useless to expatiate on that subject; I am sure you do not doubt the pleasure I experience in writing to you.  I met A. Coste, the publisher of Italie pittoresque, yesterday; he told me that it is too late to send in any article for that work, as it is approaching a conclusion, but that if you like to send him any biographies of illustrious men and women for his publication, Galerie des Hommes lllustres de l’ltalie, which is to come out as a continuation of ltalie pittoresque, he will be delighted.  Send him the names of the subjects you chose, so as to avoid any chance of their being done twice over, or given to somebody else.  As nobody has paid any attention to the women, Coste would be glad if you would devote your self especially to them.  Your articles will be paid for at the rate of from a hundred to a hundred and twenty-five francs; I will do my best to get the hundred and twenty-five for you.  Thank you for your verses; if I can find time, I will try to hit upon a tune to match them. I should very much like to send you the score of Harold, which is dedicated to you.  It has been twice as successful this year as last, and it decidedly surpasses the Symphie fantastique.   I am glad I offered you the dedication before I made you acquainted with the work; to introduce it to you will be a fresh delight Frankly, I have written nothing which will suit you better.  An opera of mine has been accepted at the Opera; Duponchel is in a good humor; the libretto which, this time, will be a poem, is by Alfred de  Vigny  and August Barbier.  It is deliciously vivacious, and full of color.  I cannot set to work upon the music yet; metal fails me as it did my hero (you know, perhaps, that he is Benvenuto Cellini).  In a day or two I will try to find time to send you a few notes for the article you want to write, and especially about Harold.  I am most successful in Germany, thanks to the pianoforte arrangement of my Symphonie fantastique by Liszt I have received a bundle of newspapers from Leipzig and Berlin, in which Fetis shines brilliantly with light reflected from me.  Liszt is not here.  Besides, we are so intimately connected that his name would do the article more harm than good. Thank you for all you say about my wife and my son; I love them more and more every day. Henrietta is deeply sensible of all the interest you take in her, but your allusions to our little Louis delight her most.  In a postscript, Berlioz has added; The two extracts from Harold cannot be taken apart from the remainder without making nonsense of them. It would be just like sending you the second act of an opera Berlioz composed his second symphony, Harold en Italie, in the summer of 1834, in response to a request from Paganini for a work in which he might display a fine Stradivari viola.  Berlioz used the opportunity to devise an unusual symphony with concerto elements in which echoes of his Italian journey are presented in the cloak of Byron’s Childe Harold.  It was first performed that winter. Ferrand was Berlioz’s closest friend; a lawyer by profession, he was also a poet and novelist. They were students together, and from 1827, when Ferrand left Paris for Belley (90 km east of Lyon), they rarely met but corresponded frequently and devotedly.  Of all his correspondents it was Ferrand to whom Berlioz truly opened his heart.  His letters to him, spanning 43 years, provide the most expansive and vital autobiographical record -- comparable to his Memoires, but written for private rather than public consumption.

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Blake, Eubie. Autograph musical manuscript signed, 7 pages in pencil

Lot 219: Blake, Eubie. Autograph musical manuscript signed, 7 pages in pencil

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Description: 219. Blake, Eubie.  Autograph musical manuscript signed, 7 pages in pencil - pre-printed each with 12 staves, (12 ½ x 9 ½ in.; 318 x 241 mm.), being the 1921 song, “I’m Just Wild About Harry,” the new arrangement for Miss Swann--with words by Noble Sissle and music by Eubie Blake; some soiling. I’m Just Wild About Harry musical manuscript entirely in Eubie Blake’s hand. The song’s familiar lyrics, in part: “I’m just wild a-bout Har-ry And Har-ry’s wild a-bout me The hea’n-ly bliss-es Of his kiss-es fills me with ec-sta-sy He’s sweet as choc-late can-dy As just like hon-ey from the bee” Stamped on each page with Eubie Blake’s 1959 registration with Local 802. The manuscript was Blake’s personal gift to his close friend and protégé, Jim Hession. In the 1970’s, Hession, a jazz performer, met Blake, his musical mentor, and the two worked on and off together until Blake’s death in 1983. Blake passed on to Hession his knowledge of ragtime music. Hession’s first record was aptly titled “Eubie Blake Introducing Jim Hession.”A great association, lending superb provenance to the manuscript.

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Brahms, Johannes. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 220: Brahms, Johannes. Autograph letter signed ("J. Brahms"), in German, 2 pages (5 7/8 x 3 7/8 in.)

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Description: 220. Brahms, Johannes.  Autograph letter signed (“J. Brahms”), in German, 2 pages (5 7/8 x 3 7/8 in.; 149 x 98 mm.), “Karlsgasse 4, Vienna,” [no date], to an unidentified singer; light, scattered spotting. Brahms anxiously asks a singer about performing the smaller solos in the Passion. Brahms writes in full; translated from German: I was always apprehensive about asking you to do the smaller solos in the Passion.  Now I see that you sang next to Hill earlier, too.  Couldn’t you let me know whether you could take part in that way this time, too, and what you sang at the time (under Hellmesberger), I mean everything!?  I hope this note will be forwarded to Graz or wherever and that you will immediately write a note . 

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Donizetti, Gaetano. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, in Italian, (9 7/8 x 8 1/8 in.; 251 x 206 mm.)

Lot 221: Donizetti, Gaetano. Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, in Italian, (9 7/8 x 8 1/8 in.; 251 x 206 mm.)

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Description: 221. Donizetti, Gaetano.  Autograph letter signed, 3 pages, in Italian, (9 7/8 x 8 1/8 in.; 251 x 206 mm.), [no place, no date], to the music publisher Pacini, in Paris; light browning and spotting. Donizetti discusses the trials and tribulations of training young composers and students researching manuscripts. Donizetti writes, in part; translated from Italian: Have you seen M. de Couriz?  Have you asked him if he has had my letters yet?  If you haven’t done so, may I beg you to see him about this, and write to me from his place, at least so that I get a line from you telling me whether or not he has received them.  Most important of all, have you had my letter asking about his through the post yet?  I will tell Mr. Cherubini once more that however much I search Rome and Naples, they are unlikely to come up with the Palestrina originals; and if this does not let him up in the Sistine Chapel, I will begin to despair of carrying out his wishes.  I am not asking to do so, however, and who knows, one day this may be possible.  Do me the favor of giving it to Master Farole, and allow me to send you on a walk as far as the Madeleine, or if not, put it in the local post.  Greet M. Bordese from me, and ask him to pay my respects to the Thayer household, and not to forget this, even though Mr. Theodore has not written.  Does your good and clever son still write?  Greet him; God only knows when we shall meet.  Oh!  Patience! Don’t forget the many things you must tell all my acquaintances.  Tell my friend and lawyer that he must write to me.  And give my best wishes to your wife, your sons and your present and future daughters.  In a lengthy postscript he adds; We have here an influx of French gentlemen who study and do research on manuscripts.  Among them is a M. Briance, a great friend of Ivanoff, who on account of studying and falling off a horse has smashed his feet and wrenched his knee, his nose etc. etc.  Through studying music he already wants to start composing, before going in for the theater.  He began by studying three times a day, then twice and eventually only once.  Finally he gave up altogether and went on the stage, and it is a pity that he didn’t pursue this with his original enthusiasm, as he might have made something of it.  Barbara was disgusted and was quite wrong to make sinister voices go from him.  Perhaps he will be very honest; but it is easy to talk from here.  M. Venose, the other Frenchman, is leaving for Milan, where he hopes to find manuscripts.  Mme Bourgeois is still here.  She doesn’t seem to have studied music much, but is doing so with me and M. Vorzet, and both of them are researching manuscripts.  Mlle. Bernard made her debut at St. Carlo with Mme Serimode; if she had been as docile as that with me, things would have gone much better.  She is now promising to study with Gomano; she ought to have listened to people who know about the theater and not made a fool of herself, but there is still hope. A lengthy letter with wonderful content.

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Dvorak, Anton. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 222: Dvorak, Anton. Autograph letter signed ("Antonin Dvorak") in English, 2 pages (6 7/8 x 4 ½ in.)

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Description: 222. Dvorak, Anton.  Autograph letter signed (“Antonin Dvorak”) in English, 2 pages (6 7/8 x 4 ½ in.; 175 x 114 mm.),  “Prague,” 4 November 1890 to an unnamed publisher; light browning, repair to page folds. Dvorak writes a publisher concerning the sale of copyrights for two of his compositions. Dvorak writes in full: Responding to your last letter from 26 Octob[er]  1890, I should be very glad to give you the copyright of the Sinfony as well as that of my Requiem, and I only beg to ask you how much you will offer me A) if you will get the copyright of the Sinfony and Requiem for Great Brit. only B) if you will get the copyright of the Sinfony (without to be limited) and for the Requiem, only for Great Brit. C) if you will get the copyright as well for the Sinfony and the Requiem without to be limited.  The Requiem is finished (vocal score and Full score) and if you will please to look at it, I shall send it to you in a few days, when I get home from Frankfurt a.m. [am Main], for which place I leave to day. The two works Dvorak discusses in this letter are his Requiem Mass for chorus and orchestra, published in London in 1891, and his Symphony no. 8 in G. published in 1892 in London.

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Gershwin, George. Printed musical score signed (

Lot 223: Gershwin, George. Printed musical score signed ("George Gershwin May 8, 1930"), 42 pages, plus cover

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Description: 223. Gershwin, George.  Printed musical score signed (“George Gershwin May 8, 1930”), 42 pages (plus cover), (11 7/8 x 9 1/8 in.; 302 x 232 mm.), Harms Inc., New York, New York, 1925; cover is separated from the rest of the score at the left margin, some wear, corners chipped. Piano solo musical score for George Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue signed on the cover by Gershwin as well as by Paul Whiteman and members of his orchestra who premiered the composition--with Gershwin as soloist. The complete score for piano solo (with second piano included) of Gershwin’s popular Rhapsody in Blue boldly signed on the cover by George Gershwin.  In 1924, Gershwin appeared as piano soloist with Paul Whiteman’s Orchestra in the premiere of his Rhapsody in Blue. The composition created a new musical form- symphonic jazz­ and proved to be a stimulating influence on both jazz and classical music.  The score is also signed by many musicians (some unidentified), most of whom were members of “King of Jazz” bandleader Paul Whitman’s Orchestra in the 20’s and early 30’s, including: the “King of Jazz”, himself, bandleader Paul Whiteman (to whom the score is dedicated); guitarist Eddie Lang; trumpeter Andy Secrest; saxophonist Frank Trumbauer (“F.Trumbauer”); pianist/arranger Leonard G.Hayton; violinist Joe Venuti; clarinetist/saxophonist Izzy Friedman; trumpeter Frank Siegrist; bass saxophonist/tuba player “Min” Leibrook; trombonist William Rank (“Wm. Rank”); drummer George Marsh; Roy Maier; Roy Bargy; Kurt Dieterle; Matt Makeder; Michael Pingitore; Wilbur F. Hall; Mischa Russell; John Bonnan; Charles Strickfeld; Jack Fulton Jr.; Chester H. Hazlett; “Goldie”; Bernie Daley; Mike Trafficante.

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Gershwin, George. Typed letter signed, 1 page (8 x 6 ¾ in.; 203 x 171 mm.)

Lot 224: Gershwin, George. Typed letter signed, 1 page (8 x 6 ¾ in.; 203 x 171 mm.)

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Description: 224. Gershwin, George.  Typed letter signed, 1 page (8 x 6 ¾ in.; 203 x 171 mm.), “New York, New York,” 24 March 1932 toMiss Edith D. Moody; chipping at head, mounting remnants on verso. Composer George Gershwin is asked to compare Rhapsody in Blue (1924) to An American in Paris (1928). Gershwin writes in full: To clear up the situation about which you write, this is the fact­--RHAPSODY IN BLUE was written in three weeks of actual work.You also ask, in my opinion, is it outranked by AN AMERICAN IN PARIS.  It is very difficult for me to compare my compositions, as they both have such different qualities.  On 12 February 1924, Paul Whiteman and his Palais Royal Orchestra offered An Experiment in Modern Music which included Gershwin’s debut of Rhapsody in Blue. The historic jazz concert, with Gershwin at the piano, took place at New York’s Aeolian Hall.  The concert, the occasion for Gershwin’s historic debut of his new symphonic work Rhapsody in Blue, solidified Gershwin’s place in music history. Ferde Grofé orchestrated the composition. Gershwin claimed that the overall outline of the Rhapsody took shape in his mind while he was traveling by train to Boston for the out-of-town tryout of Sweet Little Devil; he began the main draft of the work on 7 January 1924.  He finished the sketch of the composition about three weeks after he started on January 25th.  Grofé’s scoring of the work took ten days and was completed on 4 February 1924. Rehearsals lasted five days. Whiteman called his concert An Experiment in Modern Music insisting, “The experiment is to be purely educational.” Rhapsody in Blue was the next-to-last piece on the program.  Gershwin appeared on stage, strode quickly and confidently to the piano, sat down, exchanged glances with Whiteman--and then came clarinet soloist Gorman’s opening wail; an exuberant, unexpected beginning that had the audience transfixed.  Gershwin’s hands flew over the keyboard.   After the Rhapsody ended, there were several seconds of silence­ followed by a crescendo of tumultuous applause and enthusiastic cries.  The Whiteman concert deserves credit for introducing what Rudy Vallee aptly called a kind of “symphonized syncopation’’ to the musical cognoscenti--by presenting it in a concert hall; Gershwin’s Rhapsody succeeded in bestowing “respectability” to jazz. Gershwin’s An American in Paris premiered at Carnegie Hall on 13 December 1928. Described as “a tone poem for orchestra” the New York Philharmonic Orchestra played the piece with enormous élan and obvious relish. An American in Paris shows a greater diversity of musical texture than Gershwin’s earlier works, mainly achieved by contrapuntally combining important thematic elements with figurations of one kind or another and with commensurate emphasis on detail. Indeed, comparing Rhapsody in Blue to An American in Paris would be like comparing apples to oranges.

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Hammerstein, Oscar, II. Autograph lyrics to

Lot 225: Hammerstein, Oscar, II. Autograph lyrics to "Oh What a Beautiful Morning!" from "Oklahoma!"

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Description: 225. Hammerstein, Oscar, II. Autograph lyrics to “Oh What a Beautiful Morning!” from “Oklahoma!”; accompanied by a typed note signed (“Oscar”)regarding the lyrics, (12 7/8 x 8 in.; 327 x 203 mm.), The lyrics are written in pencil on a yellow sheet of blue-lined legal folio, no place or date; rust stains from paper clip, marginal splits to horizontal folds.  Oscar Hammerstein’s most memorable verse from Oklahoma!,  Oh What a Beautiful Morning! Hammerstein writes in full: There’s a bright golden haze on the meadow, There’s a bright golden haze on the meadow, The corn is as high as an elephant’s eye And it looks like it’s climbin’ clear up to the sky! Oh, what a beautiful mornin’, Oh, what a beautiful day! I got a beautiful feelin’ Everythin’s goin’ my way! The accompanying typed note signed is approximately (8 ¼ in. x 5 in.; 209 x 127 mm.), on pink-toned “Oscar Hammerstein II” letterhead, dated March 3, 1958, to Lynn Farnol.  In full:  “Dear Lynn:  Here are the ‘pencilled lines’.  Sincerely, Oscar” Oklahoma! is one of a long line of popular scores Hammerstein produced in his long and successful career. His other great musicals include: Carousel (1945), South Pacific (1949), The King and I (1951) and The Sound of Music (1959).  In collaboration with Jerome Kern, the two were known for a number of well-known musicals in the 1920s and 1930s, including Sunny (1925), Show Boat (1927), Sweet Adeline (1929), Music in the Air (1932) and Very Warm for May (1939) as well as the songs I Won’t Dance (1935) and The Last Time I Saw Paris (1940).  Hammerstein wrote no less than 35 musicals in New York and 2 in London, of which there was a record number of 26 screen adaptations. 

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Holiday, Billie (Eleanora Fagan). Poignant autograph letter signed, in pencil, 2 pages

Lot 226: Holiday, Billie (Eleanora Fagan). Poignant autograph letter signed, in pencil, 2 pages

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Description: 226. Holiday, Billie (Eleanora Fagan). Poignant autograph letter signed (“Lady Billie Holiday”), in pencil, 2 pages (10 ¼ x 8 in.; 260 x 203 mm.), Box No. PMB A, “Alderson, West Virginia,” 12 July 1947 to her husband, Joseph Guy, 10 Reed St., County Prison, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; the letter is stamped “CENSORED BY:” (and initialed) at the top of page one. An emotional letter from Billie Holiday incarcerated on narcotics charges, to her husband, also in prison. Holiday writes, in full with misspellings uncorrected:  Joe Darling. Your letter just arrived and it just makes me sick the way people set there sevls [their selves] up to be so true blue. Bama has told everybody on the street he gave you money a darlor [dollar] indeed could he spare it. As for Bobby I am sure he will send you some when he can. He said he had to wait until pay day and as you know sweetheart he has got a wife and two kids. But hasn’t he wrote to you yet. He owes me a letter also. Well hes working on 52nd st and has to travel way over to Jersey. But I don’t think he will let us down. We are going to the Movies tonight so I will finish this when I get back. Well baby I am back from the Movies it was called Sister Kennedy [Sister Kenny, 1946] with Rosland Russel [Rosalind Russell]. It was a very good picture but it made me kind of sad thinking about the last show we seen together odd man out [“Odd Man Out”, 1947] rember [remember] I shall never forget darling its lights out now so I will finish this in the morning. I am going to try so hard to dream of you. Don’t laugh. Sometimes I am lucky and can there goes the lights Well darling its night again. After I got thru [through] my work today I just couldn’t write. I cried for the first time. Oh darling I love you so much I am so sorry you have to stay there in Phila. It must be awfully hot. Yes baby I gained nine pounds and I am getting biger all the time gee you wont love me fat (smile) But you must look wonderful. Youer [you are] so tall and you needed some weight. So thank heavens for that and what ever happens at your trial sweetheart keep your chin up don’t let nothing get you down. It won’t be long before were together agian [again]. My lights has been out every [ever] since I last saw you. But they will go on agian for us all over the world. Write to me Joe as soon as you can. Ill always love you as ever your Lady Billie Holiday. American jazz vocalist, known as “The First Lady of the Blues,” Billie Holiday exhibited highly individual phrasing and intonation, and was known for her dramatic intensity and impeccable timing. She first sang professionally in Harlem nightclubs in 1930 and made her first record in 1933. Touring as a vocalist with some of the more popular big bands of the 1930s (Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Count Basie, Duke Ellington), she came to fame as a major jazz artist, with her popular songs Strange Fruit, Fine and Mellow, and Them There Eyes.This poignant heart-wrenching handwritten letter from Lady Billie Holiday to her husband, incarcerated in a Philadelphia prison came at a time when Holiday was incarcerated herself. She was arrested in Philadelphia in May 1947 for possession of narcotics and sentenced in June by the Philadelphia Federal Court to a year and one day. Lady Day’s successful solo career was marked by personal tragedies including the heroin addiction that led to her death. Her autobiography, Lady Sings The Blues was written in 1956.

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Kern, Jerome David & Hammerstein, Oscar, II. Printed musical score signed, 8 pages (11 7/8 x 9 in.)

Lot 227: Kern, Jerome David & Hammerstein, Oscar, II. Printed musical score signed, 8 pages (11 7/8 x 9 in.)

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Description: 227. Kern, Jerome David & Hammerstein, Oscar, II.  Printed musical score signed, 8 pages (11 7/8 x 9 in.; 302 x 229 mm.), First edition, printed by T.B. Harms, New York, 1927. Superb score for the song Ol’ Man River signed by its lyricist, Hammerstein and composer, Kern. Boldly inscribed on the cover by Kern: This copy of the first edition is inscribed To The Drake Memorial Museum by its well-wishers who then signs his name beneath Hammerstein’s signature.  The cover contains a colorful printed drawing of a scene from the musical.

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Lehar, Franz. Autograph letter signed, in German, 3 pages (8 ¾ x 7 7/8 in.; 222 x 200 mm.)

Lot 228: Lehar, Franz. Autograph letter signed, in German, 3 pages (8 ¾ x 7 7/8 in.; 222 x 200 mm.)

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Description: 228. Lehar, Franz.  Autograph letter signed, in German, 3 pages (8 ¾ x 7 7/8 in.; 222 x 200 mm.), “Vienna,” 18 June 1939 to Most Honored Reichminister!; in pristine condition. Lehar hopes the overture he is writing for the Berlin performance of The Merry Widow will please Hitler. Lehar writes: Allow me today to send a song which I have composed at the suggestion of Henn Staatskommisar Gauleiter Biirkel.  On the 28th of June I am to conduct a great concert in the Wartburg in Saarbriicken.  It will begin at 10:15 pm, and will be carried by radio to Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Switzerland, Belgium and England.  Hamburg, Cologne, Stuttgart and Leipzig are likewise broadcasting the concert. It would make me exceedingly happy if the Herrn Reichminister found the opportunity and time to hear the concert.  I am writing an overture for the Berlin performance of The Merry Widow and I hope that it will meet with the approval of the Fuhrer.  The outline is already finished, and has proven to be a success.  My revision of The Merry Widow for the German Opera House was a bit too operatic.  The Munich performance of The Merry Widow had a great success, but the plot suffered from being divided into 33 acts.  You received the essence of a review.  I believe that I have now found the right way and form, so that The Merry Widow will equally delight the eye and ear, and the special problem requires that on special occasions it will be performed as a festival. As I was, due to your obligingness, able to remain longer in Paris, it was possible for me to renew contracts from earlier  times, and  the first result  was  that  I had  the opportunity to direct  in  Paris’  Empire  Theatre the 1,000th performance of  Land of Laughter.  What the dear emigrants did to disturb this festive performance, I will tell you personally.  I hope that I will soon be able to advise you of further successes.  I have wanted so very much to send to the Fuhrer a copy of my Saar song, but I don’t know how one would take this.  At the time, I sent a little Jubilee sheet from the 50th performance of The Merry Widow in Theater on the 0[der], and somewhat unknowingly allowed myself to begin a mistake. An important letter with significant content.

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Lennon, John. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 229: Lennon, John. Autograph letter signed ("John and Yoko"), 8 pages, (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.)

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Description: 229. Lennon, John. Autograph letter signed (“John and Yoko”), 8 pages, (11 x 8 ½ in.; 279 x 216 mm.), 29 September 1971 to Eric Clapton, being a handwritten draft copy.  The content of the final version sent to Clapton is unknown.  In this draft Lennon writes unequivocally of his respect and admiration for Clapton and how their minds could transform music and the world.  In pristine condition. John Lennon writes to Eric Clapton about forming a group together. Lennon pens in full: I’ve been meaning to write or call you for a few weeks now. I think maybe writing will give you and yours more time to think. You must know by know that Yoko and I rate your music and yourself very highly, always have. You also know the kind of music we’ve been making and hope to make. Anyway, the point is, after missing the Bangla-Desh concert, we began to feel more and more like going on the road, but not the way I used to with the Beatles--night after night of torture. We mean to enjoy ourselves, take it easy, and maybe even see some of the places we go to! We have many ‘revolutionary’ ideas for presenting shows that completely involve the audience--not just as ‘Superstars’ up there--blessing the people--but that’s another letter really. I’ll get more to the point. We’ve asked Klaus, Jim Keltner, Nicky Hopkins--Phil Spector even! To form a ‘nucleus’ group (Plastic Ono Band)--and between us all would decide what--if any--augmentation to the group we’d like--e.g. saxs, vocal group, they all agreed so far--and of course we had YOU!!! In mind as soon as we decided. In the past when Nicky was working around (Stones, etc.) bringing your girl/woman/wife was frowned on--with us it’s the opposite, Nicky’s missus--will also come with us--on stage if she wants (Yoko has ideas for her!)--or backstage. Our uppermost concern is to have a happy group in body and mind. Nobody will be asked to do anything that they don’t want to, no-one will be held to any contract of any sort--(unless they wanted to, of course!) Back to music. I’ve/we’ve long admired your music--and always kept an eye open to see what you’ve been up to lately. I really feel I/we can bring out the best in you--(same kind of security, financial or otherwise will help) but the main thing is the music. I consider Klaus, Jim, Nicky, Phil, Yoko, and you could make the kind of sound that could bring back the Balls in rock ‘n’ roll. Both of us have been thru the same kind of shit/pain that I know you’ve had--and I know we could help each other in that area--but mainly Eric--I know I can bring out something great--in fact greater in you that had been so far evident in your music, I hope to bring out the same kind of greatness in all of us--which I know will happen if/when we get together. I’m not trying to pressure you in any way and would quite understand if you decide against joining us, we would still love and respect you. We’re not asking you for your ‘name,’ I’m sure you know this--it’s your mind we want! Yoko and I are not interested in earning bread from public appearances, but neither do we expect the rest of the band (who mostly have families) to work for free--they/you must all be happy money wise as well--otherwise what’s the use for them to join us. We don’t ask you/them to ratify everything we believe politically--but we’re certainly interested in “revolutionizing” the world thru music, we’d love to “do” Russia, China, Hungary, Poland, etc. A friend of our just got back from Moscow, and the kids over there are really hip--they have all the latest sounds on tape from giant radios they have. “Don’t come without your guitar” was the message they sent there are millions of people in the East--who needed to be exposed to our kind of freedom/music. We can change the world--and have a ball at the same time. We don’t want to work under such pressure we feel dead on stage or have to pep ourselves up to live, maybe we could do 2 shows a week even, tentatively (nothing definite) goes like this: I know we have to rehearse sometimes or other, I’m sick of going on and jamming every live session. I’ve also always wanted to go across the Pacific from the U.S. thru all those beautiful islands--across to Australia, New Zealand, Japan,--wherever, you know--Tahiti--Tonga--etc, so I came up with this. How about a kind of “Easy Rider” at sea. I mean we get EMI or some film co., to finance a big ship with 30 people aboard (including crew)--we take 8 track recording equipment with us (mine probably) movie equipment--and we rehearse on the way over--record if we want, play anywhere we fancy--say we film from L.A. to Tahiti, we stop there if we want--maybe have the film developed there--stay a week or as long as we want--collect the film (of course) we’ll probably film wherever we stop (if we want) and edit it on board etc. (Having just finished a movie we made around our albums ‘Imagine’ & ‘Fly’--it’s a beautiful surreal film, very surreal, all music, only about two words spoken in the whole thing! We know we are ready to make a major movie). Anyway it’s just a thought, we’d always stay as near to land as possible, and of course, we’d take doctors etc, in case of any kind of bother. We’d always be able to get to a place where someone could fly off if they’ve had enough. The whole trip could take 3-4-5-6 months, depending how we all felt--all families, children whatever are welcome etc. Please don’t think you have to go alone with the boat trip, to be in the band. I just wanted to let you know everything we’ve been talking about. (I thought we’d really be ready to hit the road after such a healthy restful rehearsal.) Anyway, there it is, if you want to talk more please call us, or even come over here to N. York. We’re at the St. Regis, here til Nov. 30 at least (753-4500-ext/room 1701) all expenses paid of course! Or write. At least think about it, please don’t be frightened, I understand paranoia, only too well, I think it could only do good for you, to work with people who love and respect you, and that’s from all of us. Lots of love to you both from, John & Yoko. Progressive Beatles artist, John Lennon, created the Plastic Ono Band in 1968, which propelled his break from The Beatles. He was tired of the menial work with the band and searched for music that was more profound and would “revolutionize music and the world.” Eric Clapton joined Lennon and others in the Plastic Ono Band’s Live Peace in Toronto 1969 performance on 15 December 1969, where Clapton, Lennon, George Harrison and other famous rock stars performed Give Peace a Chance, a politically charged tune. At the time of the letter, Clapton’s band CREAM already broke up and Derek and the Dominos dissolved. Clapton was preparing for a solo career when Lennon attempted to grab him for his “super group”. Lennon refers to missing the “Bangladesh” concert, which was the only live concert Clapton appeared in after going on a one year hiatus to manage personal problems including a broken heart and a heroin addiction. This concert proved to be a disaster for Clapton as he passed out on stage only to be revived to finish the show. Lennon continued his solo career and moved to New York in August of 1971, a month before this letter was written. During this time, he worked on his legendary song, Happy Xmas (War is Over), which was released in December. Due to Lennon’s aggressive anti-war message, he was on the deportation list and was denied permanent residency in the U.S. until 1976. He continued to create music until his life was cut abruptly short when Mark David Chapman shot and killed Lennon on 8 December 1980. An extraordinary letter from one legendary musician to another.

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Liszt, Franz. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages (11 ¼ x 8 ¾ in.; 286 x 222 mm.)

Lot 230: Liszt, Franz. Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages (11 ¼ x 8 ¾ in.; 286 x 222 mm.)

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Description: 230. Liszt, Franz.  Autograph letter signed, in French, 3 pages (11 ¼ x 8 ¾ in.; 286 x 222 mm.),“Weimar,” 5 May 1851 to a member of the royal family to whom he refers as Your Royal Highness; light soiling, internal tear to third page not affecting text. Liszt writes to the Royal Family fiercely urging support for the Goethe Foundation at the time of the 100th anniversary of Goethe’s birth.  Liszt writes; translated from French: As Her Imperial Highness the Grand Duchess deigned to send me the lines which Your Royal Highness did me the grace of addressing me, I dare to express the very respectful homage of my sincere gratitude to you.  The cause of the Goethe Foundation has entirely to do with Weimar’s Past and Future, in involving a superbly intelligent and effective protection of the development of Thought and Art, across the vicissitudes of the one generation to the other.  How could I be permitted to doubt the sympathies which the Princess of Prussia had the kindness to show for this cause?  How could I believe that Your Royal Highness would deprive it of her powerful support, as it is founded in the name of her glorious memories and her glorious hopes? His Grace the Hereditary Grand Duke felt from the beginning that in this grave and high occurrence it was not a matter of simply granting the citizens of Weimar the right to remember Goethe, but rather to make Weimar, Germany, and consequently Europe participants in the productive luster, in the comprehensive benefits of Goethe’s genius.  To realize this grand idea, to detach it from the vagueness of words, the morass of equivocalities, and finally to fix it in indelible characters, i.e., in notable, regular, and imposing deeds, His Grace will need all the laborious perseverance, all the indefatigable active courage, resolute and resigned at once, which are the supreme privilege of grand devotions. May I be permitted to hope that at her next visit to Weimar, Your Royal Highness will authorize me to speak more explicitly with her about the Goethe Foundation and the most suitable means of ensuring its active vitality, on which I dare say I have reflected thoroughly; and if then Your Royal Highness deigns not to disapprove of the views of intentions which make up in some way a part of my debt of gratitude toward her august house, my hope to see the tradition of the past powerfully vivified by the work of the present, will change to certainty. During the weeks leading up to the Goethe celebrations to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the Goethe’s birth Liszt became engrossed with the idea of establishing a Goethe Foundation for the distribution of prizes in the arts.  The idea eventually came to nothing despite the immense amount of effort Liszt invested in the project. Still, it is notable because it reveals Liszt’s grasp of administrative detail and his flair for organizing artistic matters on a national level.  Whatever its flaws, the Goethe Foundation would at least succeed in drawing national attention to Weimar.

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Liszt, Franz. Autograph letter signed, (

Lot 231: Liszt, Franz. Autograph letter signed, ("F Liszt"), in German, 3 pages (8 ¾ x 5 ½ in.; 222 x 140 mm)

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Description: 231. Liszt, Franz.  Autograph letter signed, (“F Liszt”),in German,3 pages (8 ¾ x 5 ½ in.; 222 x 140 mm.), “Weimar,” 18 June 1884 to an unnamed Baron. Liszt proclaims his admiration for the work of Richard Wagner. Liszt writes, in part: My boundless admiration persists for Wagner’s lofty genius.  What fruitful creativity and effect did he achieve, consistently progressing from Tannhäuser to the Ring of the Nibelung and the wonderful Parsifal! - The art of our century finds its edification and its glory in it.  The modest measure of what I wrote about Wagner in letters is at the service of publication.  In a postscript, Liszt has added; Until we meet as friends in mid-July in Bayreuth.

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Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix. Letter Signed, in German, 4 pages (10 ¼ x 8 ¾ in.; 260 x 222 mm.)

Lot 232: Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix. Letter Signed, in German, 4 pages (10 ¼ x 8 ¾ in.; 260 x 222 mm.)

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Description: 232. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix.  Letter Signed (“F MB”), in German, 4 pages (10 ¼ x 8 ¾ in.; 260 x 222 mm.), Berlin, 9 April 1830 to C[arl] Klingemann...London to be forwarded to...Dr. [Friedrich] Rosen; scattered spotting, marginal fraying, seal tear. While staying in Berlin, Mendelssohn shares his observations on the cold and malicious nature of the Berliners.  The composer laments about the way the denizens seem to make it a point to treat the artists poorly during performances. Mendelssohn writes in part: On the Festival you already know the details from Klingemann; it has become one of our dearest recollections, and I think it is my best composition.  A few weeks later the surgeon declared my knee to be completely cured, and I thought I would be leaving shortly, but then the bitter cold came and I postponed the journey and began a large work (a symphony for orchestra, on which I worked a lot every day; it isn’t quite finished, but I hope I can finish it before my departure, as I have already begun the last movement.  My illness surprised me a few days before my departure, I had already taken my leave and had started to pack; now I’ll have to postpone that at least a fortnight longer, but then I think I can leave; my plan is to go from here via Weimar to Munich, then through the Tyrol to Vienna; from Vienna I intend to go to Venice and Upper Italy in the middle or toward the end of summer, and then I think I’ll spend next winter in Rome and Naples, then in the spring, if it is permitted to spend so much time on a plan, go to Paris and then to London from time to time, where there may be much smoke and fog and great crowds and poverty, but where pretty nice people live, too, and where I wasn’t so bad off for a year.  But will I find the same people there then?  On this, as on your whole Let (that is Sanscrit for the future) I ask you to let [me] know a lot, also about everything which is dear and precious to me in London, and about our friends at some length.  For you have a sharp eye, professor, and when you are sitting on the blue sofa, or silently making tea, or modestly gliding to and fro in the halls of the university with a light red [folder] and a long black robe, you will still make your accurate remarks and comments, and I expect more from you than from many a Berlin lady. What I have to tell you about Berlin, at last, is little and not pleasant, the people are cold, malicious, and make it a point of honor never to be content; even when [Henriette] Sonntag performed recently she was received quite coldly and was palpably slighted in favor of the others in the cast; her sister, who performed the next evening, was almost completely hissed from the stage, for which the other faction took revenge, and in their first scene (in Othello), all the participants were hissed at and Mme. Sonntag had a curtain call, and at that they speak, think, and do nothing differently than Mme. Sonntag and the factions for and against her.  But is such formation of factions something a reasonable and interested public should do and doesn’t it spoil any enjoyment of the work of art and all joy of the artist?  But that’s how they are in big and little things, and the Flower Market that opened yesterday in the University Gardens, for which a single gardener has obtained a monopoly, is just as good a proof of it as the dearth of operas other than by Spontini and Auber for which the Royal Theater has in turn obtained a monopoly, and like the monotony of the parties and conversations here; God will improve this when He has nothing to do but that, but I’m afraid He’ll get other things and so much to reform that the Berliners’ turn won’t come for a long time, so for now they are good enough.  Let me know what the Johnstons are doing, whether Ritter is still the same as back then, and whether Miihlenfels has been successfully introduced to society and speaks French with Federita.  Let me know, too, about the stone monkeys, the wooden chairs from King Edmund the Cannibal’s time, and the scraped-off portraits.  My chests from England arrived a few days ago and filled me with longing again.  Have you been back to Atwood’s again since then, and did you entertain the fellow with some Ikojan Atchi?  You see how I have learned from you. In short, write me about each and every thing, but especially, write me. Friedrich Rosen became Professor of Sanscrit at the University of London (later University College) in 1827, at the age of twenty-two.  Carl Klingemann was Mendelssohn’s close friend and collaborator who wrote the words for many of the composer’s songs.  Karl Wilhelm Ludwig Heyse had been Mendelssohn’s tutor until 1827.  The Festival is possibly the Grosse Festmusik zum Dareifest (Grand Festive Music for the Durer Celebration) of 1828. The Symphony may be the Fingal’s Cave Overture written in 1830.  One of the Liechtenstein songs is doubtless Frühlingslied (Song of Spring), op. 19, no. 1. 

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Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages

Lot 233: Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages

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Description: 233. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix.  Autograph letter signed (“Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdy”) at the conclusion and with initials after the first page, in German, 4 pages (9 x 7 3/8 in.; 229 x 187 mm.), “Leipzig,” 18 March 1839 to the Committee for this year’s Lower Rhenish Music Festival in Dusseldorf; light browning. Mendelssohn, the 1839 Director of the Lower Rhenish Music Festival, writes the festival’s committee recommending the works to be included. Mendelssohn in part: I hasten to answer, as the time is indeed approaching and is beginning to press.  Against the march and chorus from the Ruins of Athens, which you are adding to the second day, it is only natural that I have nothing to object; I would suggest putting the piece right after the Eroica Symphony, where it would certainly have a good effect.  But I wouldn’t know what cantata by Bach to suggest for the second day as now programmed; I don’t know any which would fit in as regards the time it needs and even more as regards style; if another piece needs to be selected, I would perhaps suggest the chorus by Haydn ‘...Vain Cares;’ but it seems enough to me,  anyway.  In 1833 with you and 1834 in Aachen, the program of the 2nd day was shorter than this; last year in Cologne it was at least no longer, and so I think: 1) Eroica Symph[ony], march and chorus by Beeth[oven], new hymn by Spohr.  2) Overture and Psalm -would be quite a sufficient program.  To be sure, if Herr Rietz doesn’t keep his promise, quite a substantial overture would have to be selected, to make the second part as interesting as possible. But this time the main thing for me would be if you could manage to have Alceste performed in the theater.  You write of the difficulties with the chorus; they are indeed the biggest ones that can place themselves in its way, to my knowledge, but even if they couldn’t be removed, I would prefer seeing Alceste performed with a very bad chorus a hundred times more than giving up the idea completely.  First, in Alceste the main thing is Alceste herself, then Admet, then Hercules, and then only the chorus, and with a performance to be expected from Frl. von Fassmann and Tichatschek or Eichberger or some other outstanding Admet, the chorus recedes in any case into the background.  Then there is the second question if it is impossible to improve the chorus?  Couldn’t 12-20 of the best chorus singers be brought in from Cologne and Aachen?  I would with pleasure come a week earlier myself for this and hold separate rehearsals for the chorus every day to make this performance possible.  Finally, several passages could and in such a case would have to be deleted, such as the ball in the second act and similar passages in which the chorus plays too much of a main part, and as I said, that would be that much more feasible as Alceste herself and her and Admet’s suffering are definitely the main thing in the opera. As several of your members know, I already felt the urgent wish for something new in the course and sequence of the music festival last year, and I said so.  My suggestions on this were perhaps not practical, but now, through this coincidence, the opportunity arises this time in Dusseldorf, at least, of giving the festival a new attraction of the kind I had in mind.  If this music festival performs the Messiah on the first day, then the Beethoven symphony with a miscellaneous program, and finally a Gluck opera (and even if it is most inferior in execution and even if it has the worst chorus, but beautifully sung in the main roles and beautifully played by the orchestra), this would indeed be something new, as I wished, and because of that this music festival would be outstanding as compared to all the earlier ones. I would therefore very much wish that this plan, even if it be only the hope of it, be mentioned already in your first tentative announcements - how differently would the music festival appear because of it!  In the interest of the public, too; in regard to the box office it would also make a palpable difference.  Of course I assume that the performance would have to be considered in conjunction with both the others, and only those would receive tickets to the opera who had attended the music festival on the preceding days or had been participants in it.  And even if the prices were not raised, the proceeds would be significant.  Not to mention the enjoyment all friends of music would derive from it. I ask you to let me know your answer as soon as possible, as I would, as I said, to this end make my departure earlier, if necessary. In any case your speedy answer is now very much desired, as the time is now fast approaching... In a postscript, Mendelssohn has written, The fine tenor here, Schmidt, just came to ask if he couldn’t take part in the music festival; he would try to arrange things so that he could come there at that time and take a solo pan.  I told him you had written Tichatschek, but he claims that he is giving guest performances in Berlin at Pentecost and would thus not be able to come to the Rhine.  Also, the things that Schmoetzer and Eichberger, whom I mentioned to him, are also detained.  So I don’t hesitate to let you know about his wish.  In a second postscript written in the left margin of the first page Mendelssohn has added; Please have the kindness to hand the enclosed letter over to Director Schadow. The Lower Rhenish Music Festival (Das Niederrheinische Musikfest) was one of the most important festivals of classical music, which happened every year with few exceptions between 1818 and 1958 at Pentecost for 112 times.  The Festival was held in various German cities over time and the directors included Robert Schuman, Richard Strauss, Franz Liszt, Otto Goldschmidt, Anton Rubinstein, Hans Richter & Richard Strauss.

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Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix. Autograph letter signed, in English, 2 pages

Lot 234: Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix. Autograph letter signed, in English, 2 pages

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Description: 234. Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, Felix.   Autograph letter signed (“Felix Mendelssohn Bartholdi”), in English, 2 pages (10 x 7 5/8 in.; 254 x 194 mm.), “Leipzig,” 25 February 1841to Charles Neate, Director of the Philharmonic Society in London; with the integral address leaf attached; address panel on fourth page with seal tear and red wax seal. Mendelssohn voices his discontent over his Symphony No. 3 in A minor and, indeed, almost all his other compositions. In the body of his letter, the composer writes, in part: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your friendly letter of the 18th of Jan., for which I beg to say my best thanks.  I do not know Moscheles’ communication to which you refer in the beginning of it, but cannot deny that I felt rather surprised to receive an invitation from the Philharmonic Society to write a new movement to my Symphony in A, while I thought I had never acquainted the Society of my intention of doing so.  I even confess that your letter does not alter my ideas on that subject; for although I am perfectly aware that I had once such a plan and spoke of it to you, as I did to many of my musical friends at that time, I very much doubt I have spoken the words which you mention in your letter; indeed I cannot have done so, or at least you cannot have considered that conversation as intended for the Philharmonic Directors, because I find the year after it had taken place the Symphony was performed at that Society, which circumstance you seem to have forgotten. Accordingly as you had not communicated to the Philharmonic up to June 1838 what your impression is of the words I said to you in September 1837 they must either not have been intended as a communication to that Society, or you will give me credit for being surprised when I found a fact mentioned after so many years of which I thought I never gave the Society a direct notice. But all this merely refers to the invitation to write a new movement to an old composition of mine.  It is quite erroneous and far from what my true feelings are if you suppose in your letter, that I required the least explanation, why this Symphony ‘has not been performed.’  Of such a thing I shall never complain or express any regret, because I always consider it as a natural consequence of the real value of a composition, and you recollect that I often mentioned to you and to other friends how far from satisfied I feel with this, and indeed with almost all my other Compositions.  I need hardly add that my personal feelings of high regard and esteem towards the Philharmonic Directors individually are and shall always be the same; that I am well aware that I have amongst them some of my kindest and best friends in your country, friends to whom I am indebted for the benevolent reception which I so often meet with in England which will ever remain a source of pleasure and pride to me; and that my gratitude to those friends will and can not be diminished as long as I live... It was almost a year later, on January 20, 1942, before Mendelssohn finished writing his Symphony No.3 in A minor, the “Scottish” Symphony.  It was dedicated to Queen Victoria who regarded Mendelssohn as her favorite composer, and indeed, he was the most popular of nineteenth century composers in England where his main reputation was made.  The English pianist and violoncellist, Charles Neate, was one of the original members of the Philharmonic Society, of which he was for many years a director and often a performer, and occasionally conductor, at its concerts.

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Porter, Cole. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 235: Porter, Cole. Autograph letter signed ("Cole"), 4 pages, (7 ¼ x 5 3/8 in.; 184 x 137 mm.)

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Description: 235. Porter, Cole.  Autograph letter signed (“Cole”),4 pages, (7 ¼ x 5 3/8 in.; 184 x 137 mm.), “Paris,” 8 February 1932, on imprinted stationery of “The Travellers,” to the singer Peggy Wood in London. Cole Porter sends his best wishes to Peggy Wood shortly before the opening of Jerome Kern’s The Cat and the Fiddle.   Porter writes in full: I saw by the papers, &, last night, lear[ne]d from Cockie, that you were rehearsing in The Cat & the Fiddle.  I cant tell you how happy I am.  Its a great show &, I’m sure, even better for London than for New York.  And you will make a great person of that part.  I have been so worried about you.  And this is the reason I write you.   For no one ever behaved as beautifully as you did during the long delays of our dead Star Dust. If I can, I shall be there to cheer you on your opening night... Less than a month after Cole Porter wrote this letter, on March 4, 1932, the London production of Jerome Kern’s The Cat and the Fiddle opened, with Peggy Wood playing the role of Shirley Sheridan.  The production was a pioneer effort in its adaptation of the operetta tradition to a more intimate, contemporary setting, with great pains having been taken by Kern and lyricist Otto Harbach to integrate the music as an important part of the story.   Peggy Wood was a veteran of the operetta, having made her debut in 1910 in Naughty Marietta.  Among her operetta roles, she was most memorable in Maytime, in which she sang “Will You Remember?” and “The Road to Paradise.”  Peggy Wood eventually became a star on stage and screen appearing on television and screen.  Her final role was as the wise Reverend Mother in The Sound of Music opposite Julie Andrews At the time this letter was written, Porter was working both as composer and lyricist on The Gay Divorce which would open November 29, 1932 on Broadway.  The musical, which starred Fred Astaire, introduced the beloved song, “Night and Day.”

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Puccini, Giacomo. Autograph letter signed, in Italian, 4 pages (7 x 5 5/8 in.; 178 x 143 mm.)

Lot 236: Puccini, Giacomo. Autograph letter signed, in Italian, 4 pages (7 x 5 5/8 in.; 178 x 143 mm.)

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Description: 236. Puccini, Giacomo.  Autograph letter signed, in Italian, 4 pages (7 x 5 5/8 in.; 178 x 143 mm.), “Torre del Lago, Tuscany,” 11 November [1913], on his imprinted stationery, to his close friend Claudio Clausetti in Milan; with envelope. The theaters are full . . . it is Fanciula, Bohéme, Butterfly. In his news-filled letter, Puccini writes of his successes, his concerns about the staging of Manon Lescant in Berlin and his anxiety over his next great project. Puccini writes in part; translated from Italian: Thanks for your letter. I will give Houppelande to Adami for a trial translation, but I think that he will succeed.  You will see that Manon will not be on in Berlin even on the 29th. I am glad at the delay.  This way I can go to the Maremma a bit.  As soon as you’re there write me how things are going.  In the meantime I wish you a good trip.  Tito [Ricordi]’s letter is getting to be a comical matter!  What is being born in the mountains? Whatever he may say, I already have an answer ready, short and to the point.  From Vienna concrete and serious offers of 200,000 kroners have arrived for a comic opera with prose (not an operetta).  I’m procrastinating, taking a breath, but I’m not saying no.  There the theaters are full for the Fanciulla [del West] as in Schwerin, as well, as Serra writes me, in sending me the suggestion of engaging Holzhausen, who is too expensive.  So in the week in Vienna, it is Fanciulla, Boheme, Butterfly-that’s what Vict[or] Mangiagalli writes me.  With Adami we are trying and trying but for now in pain [presumably relating to Tabarro], and indeed already the lost telegrams are a true pain, and the ukases [official decree] to you (and to me).  Have a good time in Berlin [with Manon] and try to manage something more orderly and with less full chorus in the first act.  And I recommend the scenery in the 2nd be elegant, with everybody in gloves and with ...of the 1700s.  In the 3rd, full scenery in the background, and big ships with prows of the period as in certain etchings I saw in Paris.  And the desolation of the 4th act: it begins with a late, red sunset, and afterwards, blue night, poetically tragic, principally in the progressively red sundown and poetically tragic after nightfall, I can’t see Holzmann much and especially the tenor.  Work on [mollifying] Maestro Fatuo for me, and so long... At the time of this letter Puccini was going through a difficult time in his personal and professional life.  After the death in June 1912 of Giulio Ricordi (Puccini’s paternal figure and music publisher who had first recognized his talent and sustained him through adversity), the composer experienced “a period of confusion.... Always, when one opera was launched, he floundered for a while before really getting down to another.   But this time it was worse.   He seemed to grope in all directions, including several already tried and discarded....  And his own gloom deepened.  From Milan, early in 1913, he wrote Elvira [his mistress whom he later married], ‘I have no libretto.  I have no work.  My publisher is my enemy’”  (William Weaver, Puccini: the Man and his Music). Puccini’s Manon Lescant was his third opera and his first great success.  It premiered in Turin in 1893.

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Puccini, Giacomo. Autograph letter signed twice (

Lot 237: Puccini, Giacomo. Autograph letter signed twice ("G Puccini" and "G. P."), in Italian, 1 page

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Description: 237. Puccini, Giacomo.  Autograph letter signed twice (“G Puccini” and “G. P.”), in Italian,1 page (7 3/8 x 11 ¾ in.; 187 x 298 mm.), “Viareggio,” 11 November 1918; address panel on verso. Puccini declares D’ Annunzio’s poetry does not translate to lyric theater.  Puccini writes in full; translated from Italian: Thank you for your letter.  Everything that you say I foresaw and expected.  The Poet [D ‘Annunzio] does not transfer well to lyric theater: review him, and you will see that I am right.   The true, unadorned, simple sense of humanity is lacking:  everything is paroxysm and exaggeration, and with a very overdone expression. Beautiful and varied words which are not heard in music leave the stage open to the drama and this is what must not happen.   I have written to [Emma] Carelli about substituting for the missing [Carmen] Melis.  Where can I look next?  The woman she suggests has not got the form nor the dramatic presence needed for Tabarro.   I wrote to you about Labia.  What do you think?  What does Tito think about it?  If Carelli had exhibited her in another opera, earlier, I should accept her.  Could you send me some copies of the score for p [iano] and c [voice]. In a few days Sadun will be coming, and I shall have to give her the three parts and give her a copy for the studio.   And the sketches for S.A.?   Are you sure that the scenes have been well done?  Have you been doing anything about it?  Look at them, please....” In a postscript, Puccini has written, “Carignani is rather in the dumps:  could I ask you to send him some work?  You would perform an act of real kindness.  I do ask you to think about it.  Our Italy is from the top of the Brenner to the sea!

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Puccini, Giacomo. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 238: Puccini, Giacomo. Autograph letter signed ("Giacomo"), in Italian, 4 pages (7 5/8 x 5 5/8 in.)

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Description: 238. Puccini, Giacomo.  Autograph letter signed (“Giacomo”), in Italian, 4 pages (7 5/8 x 5 5/8 in.; 194 x 143 mm.), “Torre del Lago,” 23 May 1921 to Rose [Ader in Hamburg]; with original envelope. Puccini writes an impassioned letter to the soprano Rose Ader, with whom the composer had fallen in love after seeing her singing the title role in his Suor Angelica just a few months before. Puccini writes in full; translated from Italian: You are my only joy, and I dedicate every instant of my life to you.  I try to give vent to my feelings by putting as much poetry into Turandot as I can, and now I am working with much zest.  I am in the 1st act, but make progress every day.  Just now I had to set cruel things to music.  Now I am beginning a moonrise-there is poetry in it, but at bottom it is tragic.  But here and there, there is no lack of oases where I can do my melody.  All of this is conceived and done in your name, in your love for me, for which I am so grateful to you and so reciprocal.  How happy you make me when you write me!  When your letters arrive they give me an intonation of joy all day.  And when I think of the trouble you go to writing in German and then translating, I feel moved how good you are, what an angelic creature you are!  You are my whole consolation, and if I didn’t have you any longer, I would be a poor man like anybody, and instead, with your love, I am the prince of the world!  You inspire sweet sentiments in me, an aesthetic made up entirely of thoughts of tenderness and beauty and goodness!  Dear, admirable creature, sent me by God to give joy to this poor artist, far away and sad.  Thanks, dear, thanks from the depths of my heart.  Adieu, my joy, treasure, unspeakable comfort of my soul, I adore you as my goddess! In March 1920, Puccini had read a copy of Carlo Gozzi’s play, Turandot, and decided then that it would be the subject of his new opera.  He set his librettists to work at once, and by January 1921, after much development of and alterations to the draft of the first act of the libretto, he was satisfied with the revisions, stating it was unusually beautiful and strikingly original.  In late March Puccini was happier and more certain of the opera than ever.  He was anxiously awaiting the second act and urged his poets to begin work at once on the third.  He wrote...that he had never cared so much for a work as he did for Turandot...Such was his excitement and his passion for work that even a slight delay in the arrival of the libretto upset him...Nonetheless, by the beginning of May Puccini had started on the composition of the first act.  As usual, he complained...of the difficulties involved and of the infirmities of old age (Puccini was then 62 years of age).  The composer was enjoying and was stimulated by his work, and his only problem at the time was loneliness and a need to discuss his problems...(but) in spite of his feelings of isolation, Puccini finished his work on the first act during the summer of 1921; the librettists, too, went ahead, and completed the libretto for Act Two.  They were all pleased with the results (Howard Greenfeld, Puccini).  Puccini continued to labor over Turandot for three more years until it was almost finished, when his heart gave out on 29 November 1924, following an operation for throat cancer.  The score was completed by Franco Alfano, and the opera premiered under the direction of Arturo Toscanini at La Scala on 25 April 1926. Puccini had met the young opera singer, Rose Ader, when she was singing the role of Mimi in the composers opera, La Boheme.  William Ashbrook, in his study of Tbe Operas of Puccini, notes that  “All this time he worked on the orchestration of Act I, there were  other things...that occupied  Puccini’s attention.  One was Rose Ader, a  soprano in whom Puccini became interested...She had been singing in Vienna, but Puccini persuaded her that she would have more of a career if she learned  her  roles -- Violetta, Gilda, etc. - in Italian, and  he tried to use his influence to get her engagements...” 

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Schumann, Robert. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 239: Schumann, Robert. Autograph letter signed ("R. Schumann"), in German, 2 pages (8 3/8 x 5 in.)

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Description: 239. Schumann, Robert.  Autograph letter signed (“R. Schumann”), in German, 2 pages (8 3/8 x 5 in.; 213 x 127 mm.), 10 May 1839 to My dear Herr [Beiker]; light browning. Schumann calls Schubert a miserable man and requests an essay on the doctrine of Karl Marx. Schuman writes in full; translated from German: Since you mention Sch. in N., it occurs to me that we really ought to mention his [Logiken] in the journal as, in effect, the most important recent literary undertaking (at least in quantity).  Would you like to write such an article?  There must be a superfluity of material for ... Otherwise, as you say, Sch[ubert] is a most miserable man, to whom we should really pay no attention, but he knows how to look the public directly in the eye, and that really has to be said, briefly and clearly.  Think about it.  Another thing: I have asked some supporters of our journal to fetch Herr Erich for a weekly walk, on Sundays (at 11 a.m.), to have a mutual discussion about the journal, its weal and woe, to suggest and adopt alterations, where desirable, etc. etc. Would you like to take part in the walk?  Please let me know soon.  In a postscript, Schumann has added; I have already asked you for an essay on Marx’s doctrine; do you remembering that?  [Merz] wrote to me some time ago and asked for you.

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Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 240: Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich. Autograph letter signed ("Tch"), in pencil, in Cyrillic, 4 pages

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Description: 240. Tchaikovsky, Peter Ilyich. Autograph letter signed (“Tch”), in pencil, in Cyrillic, 4 pages (6 3/8 x 5 1/8 in.; 162 x 130 mm.), “Mannia,” [undated]; with envelope. Tchaikovsky gives final guidance on an overture soon to be performed. Tchaikovsky writes in part; translated from Russian: The overture is finished and Giloti will give it to you.  Now 1.  See to it that it is transcribed according to Erdmansdorffer’s markings; 2. , Write to [him] telling him that you and I would like and request it to be performed at the first concert, so that he can learn it perfectly, so that the faults in the parts can be corrected, and explaining that this will greatly facilitate my performance of the overture at my Petersburg concert.  My own opinion is that it has come off remarkably well, and as long as the lips of the wind section and the fingers of the string players are not too weary at the end, then the effect will be colossal.  Do not make any corrections now as I would hate that.  If something unexpected crops up, we will correct it during rehearsal.  I think the instrumentation is colorful and brilliant and there is only one thing I am afraid of: from the beginning of the repeat of the 2nd theme up to the end, the difficulty of the music is perhaps beyond the limits of what is possible.  But I can’t be responsible for this, it’s impossible to imagine anything easy.  Once more...if on examination you find something not to your taste, do not correct it without me...Take care of the title page... The instructions refer to notes from Max Erdmannsdörfer, a German conductor and pianist who was the principal conductor of the Russian Musical Society concerts in Moscow from 1882 to 1889.  Tchaikovsky had a high opinion of the conductor and even let him conduct several premiere performances of his works in Moscow.  The letter appears to indicate that Erdmannsdörfer was to conduct the overture in another venue (Moscow?) before it was to be performed in St. Petersburg. Letters in Tchaikovsky’s hand are excessively rare.

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Verdi, Giuseppe. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 241: Verdi, Giuseppe. Autograph letter signed ("G. Verdi"), in Italian, 2 pages (7 5/8 x 5 in.)

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Description: 241. Verdi, Giuseppe.  Autograph letter signed (“G. Verdi”), in French, 2 pages (7 5/8 x 5 in.; 194 x 127 mm.), “London,” 26 May 1875 to an unnamed gentleman; light, scattered spotting. Verdi reveals his distaste of cantatas responding to a request for such a composition for the 1876 Birmingham Festival. Verdi writes in full, translated from Italian: I have just received your letter and the book which contains the programme of your music festival.  As I have had the honor to tell you viva voce, I could not tell you at the moment whether I will have time to compose for the 1876 Birmingham Festival.  But in any case it would not be a cantata that I will write, still less a secular cantata, as you describe it.  I do not like this genre of composition, which for me has no artistic significance.  Please therefore accept my apologies if I am not responding as you would like me to. An interesting letter revealing that Verdi in no way minced his words when it came to his opinion on music.

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Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed, in German, 3 pages (8 x 5 3/8 in.; 203 x 137 mm.)

Lot 242: Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed, in German, 3 pages (8 x 5 3/8 in.; 203 x 137 mm.)

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Description: 242. Wagner, Richard.  Autograph letter signed, in German, 3 pages (8 x 5 3/8 in.; 203 x 137 mm.), Z[urich, Switzerland], 22 January 1854 To the Lady Conductor (“An Die Kapellmeisterin”), [Princess Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein], the mistress of Franz Liszt; with integral blank. Wagner writes an impassioned apology to Princess Carolyne Sayn-Wittgensteirn & Franz Liszt.  Wagner writes in full; translated from German: I can say nothing to the long and good letter which I just received from you but one short word:  I am ashamed!  Just blame it on a raging urge to live that I try to combat my situation -- which reason would dictate that I accept it in complete passiveness -- often with passionate ardor.  The most painful thing for me then is the impossibility of taking action for myself:  if I then cause others trouble and grief, I only rage against myself.  I certainly did torment Franz cruelly; may he forgive me for it! It is really cowardly of me that I get upset about such trifles:  there you see how childish I am actually.   Pardon me! One thing in your letter gave me a real shock of pleasure:  you mention the possibility that Liszt’s piano would have to support you (I mean the two of you!).-- Well, then I would have to go along.  I’ll travel around with you.  I have already written you too much, for you were only supposed to hear about my chagrin, nothing else.  Farewell!  Keep your faith and courage.  And see to it that Franz isn’t angry with me! By 1854, Wagner had completed the text of The Ring of the Nibelung and was at work on the music of Das Rheingold.  The argument with Liszt may have arisen over the pianist’s agreement to conduct Die Nibelungen (the opera of Heinrich Dorn, Wagner’s bitter opponent), first performed at Weimar on 22 January 1854, the date of Wagner’s letter to Princess Sayn-Wittgenstein.  Alternatively, the dispute may have been connected with Liszt’s arrangements for the performance of Wagner’s works in Berlin.  Though the composer’s letter to the Princess is couched in terms of respect and affection, she did not reciprocate these feelings and she did much in later years to provoke disagreement between Liszt and Wagner.

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Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages (5 5/8 x 4 1/8 in.; 143 x 105 mm.)

Lot 243: Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages (5 5/8 x 4 1/8 in.; 143 x 105 mm.)

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Description: 243. Wagner, Richard.  Autograph letter signed, in German, 4 pages (5 5/8 x 4 1/8 in.; 143 x 105 mm.), “Zurich, [Switzerland],” 9 February 1857 to [Joseph Tichatscheck], the celebrated tenor; with original envelope; repair to horizontal folds. After discussions with Franz Liszt, Wagner writes to the celebrated tenor, Joesph Tichatscheck on the performance of Rheingold and Walküre.  Wagner writes in full; translated from German: Today I am sending off to you the manuscript of the piano score of Rheingold. Be so kind as to provide for the copy.  Shortly, I will also send you the last act of Walküre.  I take great pleasure in knowing that those things are in your hands and I am certain that they will be safe from indiscretion there.  Should you perform them at some time, don’t forget to invite Old Fischer in my name.  I owe this mark of consideration to that faithful soul.  Let me also hear, at some point, if you like the things.  They are difficult, no doubt, and especially in Rheingold there is perhaps the most difficult task of its kind ever set upon a tenor.  I am talking about the part of Loge.  When I went over it recently with Liszt, it suddenly came to his mind that he could think of no one else than you who had this characteristic accent that is so necessary here.  I told him I had already engaged you for [the part of] Sigmund.  But it is possible that I will have to demand from you the Loge as well. In any case, I am counting on you with all my might. So do not dare commit yourself as of Spring 1859, because then you are under an engagement to me! Once more, I thank you with all my heart for your valuable presents so dear to me.  In this sense the score, as your present, has a doubly nice meaning to me. Unfortunately, I feel very worn out again due to the effects of the winter climate and after having finished the first act of Siegfried, I must have already taken a break to recover: at Easter, however, I will be moving into a nice country house near Zurich with a pretty garden, in a most wonderful location like I have always wanted. I owe this to the sympathy of a friend who is concerned about my artistic development and who lets me have it at a very low rent. So I will recuperate and work diligently.  Don’t you forget to visit us there.  Also let me hear from you soon, and give my kindest regards to the few friends I have.  The best from my wife, and be assured of my everlasting friendship... A letter of exceptional content discussing two of his great works and mentioning his collaboration with Franz Liszt.

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Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed, in German, 2 pages, (8 3/8 x 5 3/8 in.; 213 x 137 mm.)

Lot 244: Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed, in German, 2 pages, (8 3/8 x 5 3/8 in.; 213 x 137 mm.)

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Description: 244. Wagner, Richard.  Autograph letter signed, in German, 2 pages, (8 3/8 x 5 3/8 in.; 213 x 137 mm.), “Munich,” 14 June 1865; light browning. Wagner writes to a friend on the success of the premiere of Tristan und Isolde on 10 June 1865.  Wagner writes in full; translated from German: I still cannot get over it that I permitted you to depart so unceremoniously and in such a bad mood and entirely without having received the slightest compensation for the thwarted purpose of your visit.  I am sticking to the enclosed note.  It was written on the eve of your departure; with it I had hoped to stall you.  But unfortunately my manservant was not able to reach you in time.  This has hurt me very, very much!  Now I wonder whether you will be at all pleased when you hear that on the tenth and the thirteenth instant two excellent performances of Tristan finally did take place?  Next Sunday we perform it for the third and last time.  The applause grew, especially during the second performance, till it reached the character of a furioso, which is remarkable indeed if one keeps in mind that this happened with a normal and rather ordinary audience.  Everything went just splendidly; I am sure that you too would have been satisfied.  How would I have wished you could have witnessed this!  Please be so good and forward this news...to all my good friends in Pesth.  They who have had such a bad time of it have become very close and very dear to me. Tristan und Isolde is an opera, or music drama, in three acts by Richard Wagner to a German libretto by the composer.  It was composed between 1857 and 1859 and premiered in Munich on 10 June 1865 with Hans von Bülow conducting. 

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Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed (

Lot 245: Wagner, Richard. Autograph letter signed ("Rich Wagner"), in German, 2 pages (8 5/8 x 5 ½ in.)

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Description: 245. Wagner, Richard.  Autograph letter signed (“Rich Wagner”), in German, 2 pages  (8 5/8 x 5 ½ in.; 219 x 140 mm.), “Berlin,” 28 January 1873 to [Ernst W. Fritsch, his publisher]; with integral blank leaf attached; light soiling. Wagner writes to his publisher on issues with the printing of The Ring of the Niebelung and of his working as a conductor. Wagner writes in part; translated from German: God knows where you could have sent that other correction-sheet! I only received something in Schwerin.  I shall stay here a while longer, for the present, so send everything to me here, until further notice -- Thiergarten Hotel -- where you even visited me at one time.  If you want me to kill myself conducting concerts, then my baton is also at your disposal in Leipzig.  I shan’t do it under a guarantee of 5000 Thalers.  I refused Dresden and Prague because they could not give me such a guarantee.  This may make me appear in a very disgusting light, that is, if one does not consider, that if I wanted to undertake the Bayreuth concerts at 1000 Thalers, I should have to give about 200 performances-- which Mr. Reinecke might be able to stand, but not I.  One more thing!  Your weekly is not having a good enough sale in Hamburg.  Fritz Schuberth promised me to look into that, and you must therefore send him about 25 trial numbers.  Find out, if you can, how things stand with the problematic second edition of The Ring of the Niebelungen at J.J. Weber’s.  That strange gentleman does not seem to have any desire to make use of the rights he wrested from me.  Since he agreed in writing, that his claims ended next year, I firmly believe that he wants to make things difficult for me, inasmuch as no copies have been available from the public in such a long time.  Couldn’t you bring some light and order into this matter?  If he gives up the edition, then we could publish a separate edition of the work. A fascinating letter in which Wagner deals with the practical side of his extraordinary career: tending to the scheduling and compensation rates for my baton and getting his great work Der Ring des Nibelungen published.

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Weill, Kurt. Autograph musical manuscript signed, 6 pages, (12 3/8 x 9 ½ in.; 314 x 241 mm.)

Lot 246: Weill, Kurt. Autograph musical manuscript signed, 6 pages, (12 3/8 x 9 ½ in.; 314 x 241 mm.)

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Description: 246. Weill, Kurt.  Autograph musical manuscript signed, 6 pages, (12 3/8 x 9 ½ in.; 314 x 241 mm).  New City 30 May 1942, on Chappell No. 2 and Rayner, Dalheim & Co. lined music paper; light soiling. A complete musical manuscript by Kurt Weill of his Song of the Free. The entire manuscript, lyrics, and music are beautifully penned in jet black ink.  The musical portion of the manuscript is six pages in length.  On page one of the manuscript, Weill has written; Song of the Free by Archibald MacLeish , Music by Kurt Weill  On the cover (music lined paper), Weill has written; The manuscript of The Song of the Free (The United Nations Anthem)  for  Gertrude Lawrence  as a token of my undying affection.  Kurt Weill. New City  May 30, 1942.  German composer Kurt Weill immigrated to the United States in 1936, and his interest in American music and literature became a vital part of his music.  Weill set the poetry of many American poets and writers to music, including Walt Whitman, Robert Frost, Archibald MacLeish and Maxwell Anderson.  According to the Kurt Weill Foundation for Music, Song of the Free was composed for the war effort between February and April, 1942.  Titled by Weill Song of the Free (The United Nations Anthem), the song may have been used as part of a radio broadcast celebrating “United Nations Day,” which was June 14, 1942. At that time, the “United Nations” referred to U.S. Allies in World War II (the United Nations, as we know it today, had not yet formed).  An important musical manuscript, with an important association between Weill and the three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning Modernist poet, Archibald MacLeish.  Musical manuscript material in Weill’s hand is extremely rare.

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Bell, Alexander Graham. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (9 ½ x 6 in.; 241 x 152 mm.)

Lot 247: Bell, Alexander Graham. Autograph letter signed, 1 page (9 ½ x 6 in.; 241 x 152 mm.)

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Description: 247. Bell, Alexander Graham.  Autograph letter signed, 1 page (9 ½ x 6 in.; 241 x 152 mm.),“Cambridge, Massachusetts,” 21 September 1883 to F. B. Sanborn; written on stationery imprinted with “Editor’s Office, Science:  An Illustrated Weekly Journal”; some smudging. Remarkable Alexander Graham Bell autograph letter signed requesting information on heredity and deafness for his research. Bell writes in full: I am collecting statistics concerning the causes of deafness--and concerning cases of hereditary deafness caused by the inter-marriage of deaf mutes.  I should feel very much obliged if you could let me have a copy of the list of deaf mutes of Mass. prepared by you a few years ago--or tell me where I can find a copy.  My address is ‘Scott Circle--Washington, D.C.’ Franklin Benjamin Sanborn was an author and philanthropist, secretary of the state board of charities, and a founder and officer of many institutions, including the Clarke School for the Deaf.  It was through his association with the school for the deaf that Bell wrote to him, gathering statistical information for his researches in deafness, heredity, and eugenics.  “Bell had a lifelong interest in teaching the deaf to speak, an interest intensified because his mother and his wife were deaf...His interest in the deaf led Bell to publish several articles on hereditary deafness...” DSB II: 582-3.  The information he requested from Sanborn was most likely used in his work on The Formation of a Deaf Variety of the Human Race, a study of the results of the marriage of the deaf, published in 1884.  Through his study of marriage among the deaf, Bell was led to give attention to the whole field of longevity and eugenics, the culmination of which was his Duration of Life and Condition Associated with Longevity, published in 1918. The letter is written on the stationery of the Journal Science, which Bell created and began publication in 1883. 

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Boyle, Robert. Letter Signed, (

Lot 248: Boyle, Robert. Letter Signed, ("Ro Boyle"), 3 pages (7 3/8 x 5 7/8 in.; 187 x 149 mm.)

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Description: 248. Boyle, Robert.  Letter Signed, (“Ro Boyle”),3 pages (7 3/8 x 5 7/8 in.; 187 x 149 mm.), 23 May 1657 to the English Royalist and diarist, John Evelyn; scattered spotting, skillful repair to second leaf. The only known letter of Boyle to Evelyn.  In an ornate style, Boyle discusses his pioneer experiments regarding air. Boyle writes in full: I should not have so long restrain’d the just Presentments I had of your late Favours, had I not been daily in Expectation to be able to snatch some time from my Occasions to pay you my Acknowledgements at your own House:  But now the Uncertainty of some Affaires that detain me here, beginning to make me feare least my Silence might be imputed to a wrong Cause.  I think myself engag’d to delay no longer to returne You my humble Thanks for the favour of yr. obligeing Letter & to assure you that tho’ the Excellency of what you write cannot but make me thinke yr. Silence an Unhappines, Yet I was lesse troubled at yr. not writeing, than to find Yr.  Indisposition has been the Cause of it, For it cannot but be unwellcome News to a Person addicted to experimentall Learning, to be inform’d tht. soe great a Mr. in it & Patron of it as Mr. Evelyn is honour’d by the Unkindneses of Nature to prosecute his skillfull Enquiries into the Secrets of it; But as Yr. Indisposition may well passe for the general Calamitys of the Commonwealth of Learning, soe I hope you will make the returne of yr. Health an Universal Advantage to it, by imparting (at least to natures Votaries) those curious & useful Arts with whose Knowledge you had design’d to oblige & enrich them, For though You but too justly complain tht. the Age & Country we live in, doe not value reall Learning as highly as it merits, yet I confesse I am apt to thinke that the surest & most obligeing way to make men value it, is to lett them see by its reall & usefull Productions how vast a Disparity there is betwixt experimentall & notionall Learning, which makes me become an earnest Suitor to you that you will be pleas’d to vouchsafe, at least to some Friends to Philosiphie & to Mr Evelyn a sight of those very desireable Particulars which you mention in Yr. Letter & I dispaire not when I shall next have the Happines to exchange a few Words  with You but that some Expedient may be found to reconcile the disclosure of many Secrets, with the keeping up & secureing the Reputation of Learning. In the meane Time I must returne you my merited Thanks for the Receipt of the Varnish, which though I doe not yet thoroughly Apprehend (by reason of Yr. Friends obscurity in some Expression) I am endeavouring by tryall to understand better, & to their acknowledgements I must add others as due as they, for the wellcome Favour you were pleas’d to doe me in allowing me to obey Yr. Command, by presenting you the way of preserving some sorts of Flowers wch. I enclose verbatim as I found it in a Paper wherein I set it down for my own Remembrance.  And as for yr. other Commands concerning Dr. Wilkins I have lately had an Opportunity to obey them, & find him as I expected very sensible of yr. Civility’s to him, & soe much your servant, that he is almost as much soe, as he that is most Ambitious to deserve the Title of Sr. Boyle, British physicist and chemist, is one of the most important scientists of the seventeenth century. He invented the compressed-air pump and discovered the importance of air in propagation of sound. He is one of the first members of the group that became the Royal Society. In 1656, Boyle moved to Oxford where he met and naturally befriended John Evelyn, a gentlemanly amateur of science.  It was during his Oxford period, from 1656 to 1668, that he conducted pioneering experiments in which he demonstrated the physical characteristics of air and that air is necessary for combustion, respiration, and the transmission of sounds. Boyle’s views on varnishes were communicated to the English reformer, Samuel Hartlib, and were mentioned in his diary for the year 1657 (R.E.W. Maddison, The Life of the Honourable Robert Boyle)as well as in the present letter to Evelyn. The flowery style of Boyle’s letter is very much in keeping with the self-conscious learnedness of other mid-seventeenth century men of science, a minority in England at any time but the more so during Cromwell’s Protectorate, before the flood of experimentation and exchanges of information which coincided with the early years of Charles II’s reign. 

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Curie, Marie. Pierre Curie. New York: Macmillan, 1923. Octavo (8 ½ x 5 5/8 in.; 216 x 143 mm.)

Lot 249: Curie, Marie. Pierre Curie. New York: Macmillan, 1923. Octavo (8 ½ x 5 5/8 in.; 216 x 143 mm.)

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Description: 249. Curie, Marie. Pierre Curie. New York: Macmillan, 1923.  Octavo (8 ½ x 5 5/8 in.; 216 x 143 mm.), 242 pages; bound in quarter-leather morocco. First American edition, in English, preceding the French edition, inscribed and signed on front flyleaf: to Mrs. Arthur Woods/with the best wishes of/M. Curie Curie, a Polish born physical chemist, investigated radioactivity leading to the discovery of polonium and radium.  Madame Curie’s biography of her husband and collaborator, Pierre, also contains a lengthy autobiographical section recording the principal events of her own life.  This first American edition, in English, preceded the French edition, which appeared in 1924.

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Curie, Pierre. Autograph letter signed, in French, 1 page; and drawing

Lot 250: Curie, Pierre. Autograph letter signed, in French, 1 page; and drawing

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Description: 250. Curie, Pierre.  Autograph letter signed (“P Curie”), in French, 1 page (8 3/8 x 5 ¼ in.; 210 x 133 mm) and drawing (6 ¼ x 4 in.; 155 x 100 mm.), “12 Rue Cuvier, Paris,” 11 April 1906 to an unidentified “Monsieur”; crude repair to horizontal fold, marginal fraying, soiled. Curie requests magnets and draws a diagram of exactly what he needs. Curie writes in full; translated from French: If you will have the kindness to have made various magnets for my laboratory.  I would very much like to receive these magnets as I need them for my studies/inquiries/investigations.  Please I pray of you to request that one not forget this small request. A significant letter relating to the magnets Curie needed for his research.

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Darwin, Charles. Fine autograph letter signed 3 pages (7 ¾ x 5 in.; 197 x 127 mm.)

Lot 251: Darwin, Charles. Fine autograph letter signed 3 pages (7 ¾ x 5 in.; 197 x 127 mm.)

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Description: 251. Darwin, Charles. Fine autograph letter signed 3 pages (7 ¾ x 5 in.; 197 x 127 mm.), 12 Upper Gower Street, Thursday [no date], to his friend and colleague, John Gould; some soiling, repair to page fold and seal tear. Charles Darwin, mortified, returns John Gould’s first volume of his Birds of Australia citing he cannot afford such a luxury. In this extraordinary letter, Darwin painfully declines the first volume of a subscription to Gould’s magnificent Birds of Australia. The work consisted of 600 plates in 7 folio volumes published between 1840 and 1848.  Darwin writes in full: I have looked through the first number with great interest. I can truly say I never saw anything half so beautiful. I feel mortified at being compelled to return your volume, but my circumstances, now that I am a married man, will not really justify me in indulging myself in such a luxury as the possession of your unrivalled and magnificent work. I cannot, of course, think of keeping this number and returning the two I possess, (which are now at my father’s at Shrewsbury) as you so very kindly offered, and I sincerely regret that I am precluded from showing, in the smaller way of being a subscriber, my warm respect for your zeal and talents in the pursuit of Science. An extraordinary exchange between Darwin and John Gould, the greatest figure in bird illustration after Audubon. Darwin and Gould worked together extensively after Darwin’s second voyage on HMS Beagle and returned bird specimens which were relayed to Gould for identification. Darwin married on 29 January 1839 and fretted terribly about finances in expectation of a burgeoning family.

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