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Edwin Lord Weeks Auction Price Results

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Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903)  Embarquement de chameaux

Lot 2: Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903) Embarquement de chameaux

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903) Embarquement de chameaux Ecole américaine Huile sur toile, signée et datée «E.L. Weeks 1880» en bas à droite. 89,5 x 153 cm Edwin Lord Weeks est peut-être avec Frederick Arthur Bridgman le plus célèbre des peintres orientalistes américains. Né à Boston en 1849, il arrive à Paris en 1874, où il rejoint l'atelier de Léon Bonnat, après différents voyages en Egypte et en Palestine. Bonnat encourage le Réalisme et la peinture de « plein air », une formation qui s'avère excellente pour Weeks dont les sujets de prédilection (paysages, scènes de marché ou architectures orientalistes) sont riches d'ombres et de lumières. Entre 1872 et 1880, Weeks voyage à travers l'Algérie, la Syrie, la Palestine, séjourne au Caire en 1875, et s'attarde tout particulièrement au Maroc. Ses voyages qu'il reprend inlassablement l'amènent en Turquie, Inde, Afghanistan, Iran, Asie Centrale, etc. Weeks exposa à Paris, à Berlin, à Munich, à Londres, à Boston et à Philadelphie. Ses oeuvres sont conservées dans de nombreux musées dont les plus importants sont : le Musée d'Orsay (Paris, France), le Getty Museum (New York, Etats-Unis), le Metropolitan Museum (New York, Etats-Unis), le Dallas Museum of Art (Texas), le Brooklyn Museum (New York), et la National Gallery (Londres, Royaume-Uni). Notre tableau est une oeuvre majeure dans la production d'Edwin Lord Weeks. Exécuté dans son atelier parisien, cette composition reflète l'acuité de ce peintre explorateur. Dans cette large composition, le talent de Weeks rend la majesté hiératique des hommes. On perçoit la lenteur qui régit cet embarquement. Le ciel est traité sobrement, l'architecture lointaine est esquissée, tandis que le miroitement de l'eau est sublime et lumineux. Weeks a peint quatre versions de ce tableau, dont nous présentons la version la plus grande et la plus aboutie. Bibliographie : Gerald M. Ackermann, les Orientalistes de l'Ecole américaine, ACR Edition, 1994, p. 234-257. Lynne Thornton, Les orientalistes peintres voyageurs, ACR Edition, 2001.p. 295.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Along the Gháts, Mathura'

Lot 13: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Along the Gháts, Mathura'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Along the Gháts, Mathura Signed E. L. Weeks l.l. Also bears the artist's stamp (circle and star) l.l. beneath the artist's first two initials Oil on canvas 25 3/4 x 32 in. (65.4 x 81.3 cm) Property of the Portland Public Library Ulrich W. Helsinger in his catalogue for the exhibition at Vance Jordan Fine Art Inc, Edwin Lord Weeks, Visions of India, page 9, New York, October 31-December 12, 2002 (a loan to the exhibition arranged by Barridoff Galleries)

Condition Report: This report, dated Sept. 12, 2012, was prepared by Anthony Moore of Anthony Moore Conservation: The painting is in excellent condition. It has been pasted-lined onto linen canvas and is structurally sound. There are fine visible stress cracks above the buildings at center and along the right edge. The painting has been cleaned evenly. There is a 1/2 inch square hole in the sky at the upper right that has been inpainted as well as minor inpainted losses in the sky at the upper right edge. There is inpaint at the edges of the upper and lower left edges as well as at the center of the right edge. There is a synthetic varnish over the surface. Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron'

Lot 14: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron Signed and dated E. L. Weeks 1871; l.l. Oil on canvas 24 x 34 in. (61.0 x 86.4 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine (Please see lots 14-50, which is the Broder collection) Kathleen Duff Ganley in the catalogue essay for the University exhibition, Edwin Lord Weeks-His Art: It is in this painting [Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron] that Weeks begins to develop his feel for light and sensuous material elements that became eloquent in his later works";. Other images of the Everglades in the Broder collection are dated 1871 and at least one from that date is specifically inscribed "Miami" Scholarly studies as well as links online routinely refer to the current work as a view of the Florida Everglades. Weeks is known to have traveled to the Florida Keys early in his career; and he is known to have produced fully realized paintings like the current example developed from earlier studies and sketches, He is known to have returned to Boston in the same year after also traveling to South America and Europe where he had studied with Bonnat. He undoubedly met and was influenced by Gérôme as well, but probably was never his student, as sometimes believed. Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: This report, dated October 22, 2012, was prepared by Anthony Moore of Anthony Moore Conservation: The painting is in excellent condition. It has been wax lined onto aluminum and linen canvas . There appear to have been two small puncture holes , one ¾" in tree line at left side, and the other ½"at the base of the tree at left side. There were flaking paint chips in the foreground lower left and in the shadow of the tree which has been inpainted. There was an abrasion in the tree line at the right side. A synthetic ketone varnish has been applied to the surface. PLEASE NOTE: This is an updated condition report. The original report, prepared in-house, had also been that the painting is in excellent condition, but it is in better condition than previously reported, per the above report from Moore.

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Edwin  Lord Weeks - 'Florida Everglades'

Lot 15: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Florida Everglades'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Florida Everglades, 1871 Dated "Dec. 26, 1871" l.l. Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 12 x 8 in. (30.5 x 20.3 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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EDWIN LORD WEEKS (AMERICAN 1849-1903) CAMEL TRAIN 15cm x 23.5cm (6in x 9.25in) and another by the same hand (2)

Lot 16: EDWIN LORD WEEKS (AMERICAN 1849-1903) CAMEL TRAIN 15cm x 23.5cm (6in x 9.25in) and another by the same hand (2)

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Description: EDWIN LORD WEEKS (AMERICAN 1849-1903) CAMEL TRAIN Initialled, watercolour and bodycolour 15cm x 23.5cm (6in x 9.25in) and another by the same hand (2)

Condition Report: The works are initialled. They were purchaased by a private collector from a website which was selling off the contents of a book of sketches by Weeks. The condition is good, suggesting they have been kept out of the light, and they bear old (yellowed) tape marks on the back, presumably the medium that fixed them into the book. Condition Disclaimer Under the Conditions of Sale applicable to the sale of the lot, buyers must satisfy themselves as to each and every aspect of the quality of the lot, including (without limitation) its authorship, attribution, condition, provenance, authenticity, age, suitability and origin. Lots are sold on an 'as is' basis but the actual condition of the lot may not be as good as indicated by its outward appearance. In particular parts may have been replaced or renewed and lots may not be authentic or of satisfactory quality. Any statement in relation to the lot is merely an expression of opinion of the seller or Lyon & Turnbull and should not be relied upon as an inducement to bid on the lot. Lots are available for inspection prior to the sale and you are strongly advised to examine any lot in which you are interested prior to the sale. Our condition report has not been prepared by a professional conservator, restorer or engineer.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Flowering Agave, Florida'

Lot 16: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Flowering Agave, Florida'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Flowering Agave, Florida Dated and inscribed "Jan. 20, '71, Miami" c.r. Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 11 1/2 x 8 3/4 in. (29.2 x 22.2 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron; and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India; and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Outside the Walls'

Lot 17: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Outside the Walls'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Outside the Walls OIl on panel 9 7/8 x 14 in. (25.1 x 35.6 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron; and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India; and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, little to no restoration, possibly in need of cleaning Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Courtyard, North Africa (Formerly NearEast Courtyard)'

Lot 18: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Courtyard, North Africa (Formerly NearEast Courtyard)'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Courtyard, North Africa (Formerly Near East Courtyard) Watercolor 18 3/4 x 13 in. (47.6 x 33.0 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Literature and Exhibition: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, lent by Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr., #15 Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron; and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India; and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, laid down on thin cardboard almost certainly original and more recently the cardboard laid down on a museum quality mat inserted into appropriate plastic corners, good color/possibly some minor aging, tear from the edge of about 2" above the left arch, visible in the illustration, little to no paint loss at the tear, possibly some other minor abrasion not immediately apparent and of little or no consequence including an insignificant paper loss at the extreme lower left corner, might clean some but appears as a very strong image in person. But for some more recent matting and framing of this lot and lot 18 by the current owner, these watercolors have been untouched for a century, largely in storage trunks and backs of closets, still very much intact with some minor restoration due depending on the taste of the owner. Very strong appearance in person. Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Arab Market'

Lot 19: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Arab Market'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Arab Market Watercolor 20 x 14 in. sight (50.8 x 35.6 cm) sight Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Provenance: Literature and Exhibition: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, lent by Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr., #17 Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known - finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, not laid down, two museum quality hinges on the back at the top, tear with little or no paint loss that can be seen in the image from the right edge just above the start of the arch on the right and going diagonally toward center for about two inches with little or no paint loss, also a slight surface scratch also with little or no paint loss of about 2" in from the edge a few inches further down on the same side, little to no paint loss, good color/some minor aging. Insignificant paper loss at far extreme lower left corner and scattered paint loss at the extreme edges normally hidden by the mat (the latter therefore not visible in the images) Anything of significance is visible as described above in the image. But for more recent matting and framing of this lot and lot 18 by the current owner, these watercolors have been untouched for a century, largely in storage trunks and backs of closets, still very much intact with some minor restoration due depending on the taste of the owner. Might clean some but appears as a very strong image in person Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of an Arabian White Stallion (Formerly Study of a White Horse)'

Lot 20: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of an Arabian White Stallion (Formerly Study of a White Horse)'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of an Arabian White Stallion (Formerly Study of a White Horse) Oil on canvas 15 x 19 in. (38.1 x 48.3 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Provenance: Literature and Exhibition: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, #1, lent by Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr., page 32, illustrated Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known - finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron; and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India; and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, lined, otherwise little to no restoration Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin  Lord Weeks - 'Study of Seated Figure with Ox, North Africa'

Lot 21: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of Seated Figure with Ox, North Africa'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of Seated Figure with Ox, North Africa Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 5 x 8 1/2 in. (12.7 x 21.6 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known - finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron; and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India; and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Dusk'

Lot 22: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Dusk'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Dusk Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 5 x 8 3/8 in. (12.7 x 21.3 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known - finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Seated Man in a Turban, North Africa'

Lot 23: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Seated Man in a Turban, North Africa'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Seated Man in a Turban, North Africa Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 17 x 14 1/2 in. (43.2 x 36.8 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, lined on board, minor small area of restoration on body, none on head or turban, scattered minor areas of restoration in background Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'The Cowherd'

Lot 24: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'The Cowherd'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 The Cowherd Oil on canvas 7 x 9 1/2 in. (17.8 x 24.1 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, not lined, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin  Lord Weeks - 'Study of a White Horse '

Lot 25: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a White Horse '

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of a White Horse Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 13 3/4 x 17 1/2 in. (34.9 x 44.5 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Brown Horse'

Lot 26: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Brown Horse'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of a Brown Horse Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 11 1/8 x 14 1/8 in. (28.3 x 35.9 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Brown and White Cow (formerly Study of Cow)'

Lot 27: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Brown and White Cow (formerly Study of Cow)'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of a Brown and White Cow (formerly Study of Cow) Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 7 x 11 in. (17.8 x 27.9 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Provenance: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, lent by Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr., #36 Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'White Cow'

Lot 28: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'White Cow'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1949-1903 White Cow Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 7 x 11 in. (17.8 x 27.9 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks American, 1849-1903 Landscape with a Figure on a Mule

Lot 28: Edwin Lord Weeks American, 1849-1903 Landscape with a Figure on a Mule

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks American, 1849-1903 Landscape with a Figure on a Mule Oil on canvas 23 1/2 x 36 inches Provenance: Estate of the artist Minnie Weeks Goodwin Family, Berwick, ME Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr. Merwyn E. Bronson, Berwick, ME C Property of a Greenwich Village Collector

Condition Report: Wax relined. Scattered craquelure throughout. Frame rubbing. There is a 23 vertical line of inpaint in the canvas at the center left, another 23 inch vertical line of inpaint in the center, there is a 5 inch vertical line of inpaint in the sky at the upper right corner and some scattered touches in the sky and the trees. Any condition statement is given as a courtesy to a client, is only an opinion and should not be treated as a statement of fact. Doyle New York shall have no responsibility for any error or omission. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Young Water Buffalo'

Lot 29: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Young Water Buffalo'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Young Water Buffalo Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 4 1/4 x 7 7/8 in. (10.8 x 20.0 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks American, 1849-1903 Beggar Woman

Lot 29: Edwin Lord Weeks American, 1849-1903 Beggar Woman

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks American, 1849-1903 Beggar Woman Signed E. L. Weeks (ll) Oil on canvas 18 x 14 inches C Property of a Greenwich Village Collector

Condition Report: Dirty varnish. Scattered craquelure throughout. There is a repaired hole in the center right, approximately 1/2 round. Three tiny dents in the dress of the woman at center and one on the woman's hand, each approximately 1/8 inch round. There is another dent pushing from the reverse, approximately 1 inch round in the doorway at the center right. Visible stretcher marks. There is no further restoration visible under Uv light. Any condition statement is given as a courtesy to a client, is only an opinion and should not be treated as a statement of fact. Doyle New York shall have no responsibility for any error or omission. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Ram'

Lot 30: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Ram'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of a Ram Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 11 1/2 x 15 in. (29.2 x 38.1 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Provenance: Literature and Exhibition: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, lent by Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr., #34, illustrated Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Donkey'

Lot 31: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Donkey'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Donkey Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 11 x 14 in. (27.9 x 35.6 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, probably none Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Fanny, A Portrait of Frances Hale Weeks, the artist's wife'

Lot 32: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Fanny, A Portrait of Frances Hale Weeks, the artist's wife'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Fanny, A Portrait of Frances Hale Weeks, the artist's wife Oil on panel 10 3/4 x 6 3/4 in. (27.3 x 17.1 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Provenance: Literature and Exhibition: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903, catalogue for the exhibition above, University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, #11, illustrated Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - ' Veiled Girl of India'

Lot 33: Edwin Lord Weeks - ' Veiled Girl of India'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Veiled Girl of India (It has been suggested that this image may be of a Bedouin, North Africa.) Oil on canvas 24 1/8 x 12 in. (61.3 x 30.5 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, lined, otherwise little or no restoration Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'At the Shore on the Nile'

Lot 34: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'At the Shore on the Nile'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 At the Shore on the Nile Watercolor 11 x 15 1/4 in. (27.9 x 38.7 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, rough at the extreme edges beyond the image with three very minor tears at the edges into the margins, two of them very slightly into the images Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord  Weeks - 'Island Temple, Egypt'

Lot 35: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Island Temple, Egypt'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Island Temple, Egypt Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 5 x 8 1/2 in. (12.7 x 21.6 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of Camels, North Africa,'

Lot 36: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of Camels, North Africa,'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of Camels, North Africa, Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 5 x 8 1/4 in. (12.7 x 21.0 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse  Holding a Rifle'

Lot 37: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse Holding a Rifle'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse Holding a Rifle Oil and graphite on paper 18 x 14 1/4 in. (45.7 x 36.2 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, not examined out of frame Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin  Lord Weeks - 'At Table, A Study'

Lot 38: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'At Table, A Study'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 At Table, A Study Oil on canvas 15 x 18 1/8 in. (38.1 x 46.0 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, not lined, little to no restoration, mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord  Weeks - 'Trees and Wall of Jerusalem. formerly Trees of Jerusalem'

Lot 39: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Trees and Wall of Jerusalem. formerly Trees of Jerusalem'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Trees and Wall of Jerusalem. formerly Trees of Jerusalem inscribed "Jerusalem, Oct.8" l.l. Graphite 10 1/2 x 14 1/2 in. (26.7 x 36.8 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Provenance: Literature and Exhibition: The Art of Edwin Lord Weeks (1849-1903), University Art Galleries, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire 1976, lent by Burton W. F. Trafton, Jr., #23 Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, not laid down Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Shoreline'

Lot 40: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Shoreline'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Shoreline Signed "ELW" and dated illegibly l.r. Watercolor 6 1/2 x 9 1/4 in. (16.5 x 23.5 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, some minor soiling, possibly in need of cleaning Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Figure on a Forest Path'

Lot 41: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Figure on a Forest Path'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Figure on a Forest Path Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 14 x 11 in. (35.6 x 27.9 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Orchard in Blossom'

Lot 42: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Orchard in Blossom'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Orchard in Blossom Oil on paper mounted on paper 9 x 12 3/4 in. (22.9 x 32.4 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin  Lord Weeks - 'Figures in a Grove of Trees, Morocco'

Lot 43: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Figures in a Grove of Trees, Morocco'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Figures in a Grove of Trees, Morocco Oil on canvas 15 x 24 in. (38.1 x 61.0 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, lined, little to no restoration otherwise Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord  Weeks - 'Woman with a Hoe'

Lot 44: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Woman with a Hoe'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Woman with a Hoe Monogrammed "ELW" l.r. Oil on paper mounted on board 11 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (29.2 x 26.7 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, very minor scattered paper splits with no apparent loss, noticeable in image with very close inspection, no apparent restoration Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Man Seated By the Shore'

Lot 45: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Study of a Man Seated By the Shore'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Study of a Man Seated By the Shore Oil on paper mounted on board 10 1/4 x 10 in. (26.0 x 25.4 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, very minor scattered paper splits with no apparent loss, noticeable in image with very close inspection, no apparent restoration Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'New England Meadow with Trees and Spires'

Lot 46: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'New England Meadow with Trees and Spires'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 New England Meadow with Trees and Spires Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 8 x 12 in. (20.3 x 30.5 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Passing Storm'

Lot 47: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Passing Storm'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Passing Storm Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 9 3/4 x 13 1/4 in. (24.8 x 33.7 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Florida Autumn'

Lot 48: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Florida Autumn'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Florida Autumn Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 8 1/2 x 12 in. (21.6 x 30.5 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good condition, good appearance, little to no restoration, appears to be mint or very nearly mint Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Stairway, India'

Lot 49: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Stairway, India'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Stairway, India Oil on canvas 17 x 12 7/8 in. (43.2 x 32.7 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known?-f?inely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India&, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good appearance, good condition, lined, otherwise little to no restoration (probably none at all) Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Portrait of a Turbaned Man'

Lot 50: Edwin Lord Weeks - 'Portrait of a Turbaned Man'

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks Am. 1849-1903 Portrait of a Turbaned Man Oil on canvas mounted on Masonite 15 x 10 in. (38.1 x 25.4 cm) Property of Bernard Broder, Gorham, Maine Ellen K. Morris, PhD, who is currently preparing a catalogue raisonné of the artist writes about the Broder collection (lots 14-50) as follows: Comparatively little is known or understood of Edwin Lord Weeks' earliest works. In part, this must be because many of them fall outside the context of the works for which the artist is primarily known-finely rendered works recording his travels in North Africa, India and Persia. But the early works also remain more obscure because so many of them have been held by Weeks' extended family and rarely come to market. This group of works is therefore all the more remarkable in its scope and breadth. These rarely-seen early paintings demonstrate Weeks' raw talent, and significantly contribute to our understanding of the artist's development. Indeed, these early works make it apparent why Weeks was able to develop his mature style so rapidly. They demonstrate that he possessed substantial artistic abilities even before his training in Paris, and they document that his habit of sketching in oil, in situ, was one that he developed early in his career. Specifically, the Florida paintings serve to explain why Weeks' mature works largely manage to avoid the stiffness of many of his academic orientalist contemporaries. These early works demonstrate how much of Weeks' style predated--and transcended--his formal academic education. Indeed, in documented early examples such as Florida Everglades with Great Blue Heron and Flowering Agave, Florida we see Weeks already handling foliage in the loose 'painterly' manner that would distinguish his work throughout his career. It's difficult to overstate the importance of this quantity of studies. Academic paintings are primarily known through finished works; rarely are the studies for those paintings accorded the significance they merit, and rarely are they seen in number. Yet here we have a trove of studies--the raw materials of academic painting--the architecture, landscapes, figures and animals that were typically sketched individually and brought together only in finished studio works. Whether due to the estate sale following his untimely death, or the diligent stewardship of his extended family, Weeks' studies are somewhat more common on the market than those of his contemporaries. But even accounting for this, the quantity and breadth of studies and preliminary works here is remarkable, ranging as they do from the earliest of his work all the way to the end of his career. Such studies reflect an appealing immediacy, even as they demand a certain level of connoisseurship to fully appreciate. It's easier to dismiss a study such as White-Robed Man in a Turban on a Horse as an unfinished cartoon than it is to see it as the important window into an artist's working method that it truly is. And preliminary works like Outside the Walls, Stairway, India, and At Table, A Study highlight how fundamental the rendering of light and shadow was to Weeks' selection of subjects and compositions. Thus the breadth and depth of the works here affords a rare behind-the-scenes view of Weeks' working method, from composition to rendering of detail. In that, this large group of studies adds immeasurably to our understanding of the artist's body of work.

Condition Report: Good aoppearance, good condition, lined, otherwise little to no restoration Please be sure to read the disclaimer in our auction terms. It may be very helpful in explaining how we judge condition and interpreting what we mean by certain words or phrases that may be a kind of shorthand for longer explanations.

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EDWIN LORD WEEKS, (AMERICAN 1849-1903),

Lot 73: EDWIN LORD WEEKS, (AMERICAN 1849-1903), "BENARES"

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Description: EDWIN LORD WEEKS (american 1849-1903)/span "BENARES" Signed with initials, inscribed and dated 'ELW / Benares / 16/3/83' bottom right, oil on canvasboard 20 x 30 in. (50.8 x 76.2cm) provenance: /spanPrivate Collection, New York, New York. note:/span This lot will be accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Dr. Ellen K. Morris and will be included in her forthcoming catalogue raisonné.

Condition Report: In generally good overall condition with some restoration, but not a great deal. There is some restoration in the sky - mostly all in the left half of the sky, and only minor fill. There is an area of restoration in the water at lower right. There is some restoration to the center building between the stairs at left and stairs at right. There is some restoration to a part of the upper portion of the stairs at left. Descriptions provided in both printed and on-line catalogue formats do not include condition reports. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging. Interested bidders are strongly encouraged to request a condition report on any lots upon which they intend to bid, prior to placing a bid. All transactions are governed by Freeman's Conditions of Sale.

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EDWIN LORD WEEKS (1849-1903) PORTEUSE D’EAU WATER CARRIER Huile sur toile signée en bas à gauche. 78 x 50 cm (30.7 x 19,7 in.)

Lot 164: EDWIN LORD WEEKS (1849-1903) PORTEUSE D’EAU WATER CARRIER Huile sur toile signée en bas à gauche. 78 x 50 cm (30.7 x 19,7 in.)

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Description: EDWIN LORD WEEKS (1849-1903) PORTEUSE D’EAU WATER CARRIER Huile sur toile signée en bas à gauche. 78 x 50 cm (30.7 x 19,7 in.)

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Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition

Lot 223: Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition

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Description: Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition. hand embellished giclee on canvas. Includes certificate of authenticity. 26x30 inches approx. The signature is in the plate.

Condition Report: This is new in mint condition. Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition Hand embellished giclee on canvas from original oil from the 1850s. The signature is in the plate. Approx. size is 26x30 inches. Custom framed.

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Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition

Lot 223: Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition

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Description: Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition. hand embellished giclee on canvas. Includes certificate of authenticity. 26x30 inches approx.

Condition Report: This is new in mint condition. Edward Lord Weeks In the Dessert Limited Edition Hand embellished giclee on canvas from original oil from the 1850s. The signature is in the plate. Approx. size is 26x30 inches. Custom framed.

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Edwin Lord Weeks,

Lot 240: Edwin Lord Weeks, "In the Olive Grove" oil

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks, "In the Olive Grove" oil on canvas, 1876. Signed and dated lower left "E.L. Weeks 1876". Canvas: 13.5''H x 18.5''W; Frame: 20.5''H x 25.5''W. Provenance: Christie's New York, June 15 1999, Lot 290. Note: Dr. Ellen K. Morris will include this painting in her forthcoming catalogue raisonne for the artist. In reference to this painting Morris states, "Weeks was only twenty-seven when he executed this work, but it already shows his developing skills as a fine painter of the figures and animals, as well as his penchant for scenes set in bright sunshine with cool shadows. This can be clearly seen in the luxuriant costume of the standing shepherdess, whose vivid clothing contrasts markedly with the verdant setting." Edwin Lord Weeks (American/Massachusetts, 1849-1903) painted Orientalist genre scenes.

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1 piece. Original Photograph. Portrait

Lot 243: 1 piece. Original Photograph. Portrait

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Description: 1 piece. Original Photograph. Portrait of Edwin Lord Weeks. Ca. 1900. Albumen print, cabinet card - 6 3/8 x 4 inches (161 x 101 mm). Weeks, Edwin Lord (1849-1903), American painter, generally considered to be the greatest American Orientalist.

Condition Report: Descriptions provided in both printed and on-line catalogue formats do not include condition reports. The absence of a condition statement does not imply that the lot is in perfect condition or completely free from wear and tear, imperfections or the effects of aging. Interested bidders are strongly encouraged to request a condition report on any lots upon which they intend to bid, prior to placing a bid. All transactions are governed by Freeman''s Conditions of Sale.

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Edwin Lord Weeks (American 1849 - 1903), Unsigned Florida Landscape, oil on board, 11

Lot 411: Edwin Lord Weeks (American 1849 - 1903), Unsigned Florida Landscape, oil on board, 11" x 8"

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks (American 1849 - 1903), Unsigned Florida Landscape, oil on board, 11" x 8"

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Edwin Lord Weeks (attributed to) (6pcs)

Lot 1055: Edwin Lord Weeks (attributed to) (6pcs)

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Description: Edwin Lord Weeks (attributed to) Massachusetts (1849-1903) SCENIC VIEWS-SKETCHES graphite on paper, unsigned; one inscribed on verso, EL Weeks H10" W14 1/4" (6pcs)

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