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John William Waterhouse Auction Price Results

John William Waterhouse (1849-1917)  Please Register/Login to access your Invaluable Alerts

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THE LADY OF SHALOTT, 1888 BY JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE

Lot 271Z: THE LADY OF SHALOTT, 1888 BY JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE

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Description: LITHOGRAPH, IMAGE SIZE: 7X5", FRAMED: 13 3/16X11 3/16"ALL ITEMS COME UNFRAMED, FRAMING AVAILABLE AT ADDITIONAL COST.

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THE LADY OF SHALOTT, 1888 BY JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE

Lot 271Z: THE LADY OF SHALOTT, 1888 BY JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE

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Description: LITHOGRAPH, IMAGE SIZE: 7X5", FRAMED: 13 3/16X11 3/16"ALL ITEMS COME UNFRAMED, FRAMING AVAILABLE AT ADDITIONAL COST.

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The Magic Circle, by John William Waterhouse

Lot 430: The Magic Circle, by John William Waterhouse

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Description: The Magic Circle, by John William Waterhouse. Pagan Sorceress Fire Witch with Dagger Snake and Black Raven. 25.4 cm x 20.3 cm and recently custom mounted on acid free museum quality board.

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JOHN WATERHOUSE REFLECTIONS HAND SIGNED LIMITED ED. GICLEE

Lot 551T: JOHN WATERHOUSE REFLECTIONS HAND SIGNED LIMITED ED. GICLEE

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Description: Limited Edition Hand Signed Giclee By John Waterhouse Titled "reflections". Medium: Giclee On Deluxe Paper [signed And Numbered By The Artist]. Edition Size: 195. Paper Size Is 24" X 17". Image Size: 20" X 13". Comes With A Certificate Of Authenticity

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

Lot 1: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) Sketch for 'A Mermaid' oil on canvas 27¾ x 17¾ in. (70.5 x 45.2 cm.)

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Study for 'Circe'

Lot 3: Study for 'Circe'

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917) Study for 'Circe' pencil, red and white chalk on grey-blue paper 11 5/8 x 12¼ in. (29.5 x 31.1 cm.)

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Study of a girl's head

Lot 4: Study of a girl's head

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917) Study of a girl's head red and black chalk, on buff paper 14¾ x 12 1/8 in. (37.5 x 31.1 cm.)

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John William Waterhouse

Lot 9: John William Waterhouse

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Description: John William Waterhouse Portrait of the Artist's Sister Mary Waterhouse 15 X 11 inches J. W. W. l.l.Charcoal

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No Image Available

Lot 10: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: Studies for Ophelia Pencil 24x17 cm (9.6x6.7 in).

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No Image Available

Lot 11: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: Study ofr >/Miranda, the tempest Pencil 22x29 cm (8.7x11.4 in).

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Lot 12: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: Study for >/Study of a woman Pencil 25x17 cm (10x6.7 in).

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

Lot 12: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

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Description: Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may signed and dated 'J.W. Waterhouse./1909' (lower right) oil on canvas, curved top 393/4 x 321/2 in. (101 x 82.5 cm.) PROVENANCE Sir Brodie Haldane Henderson, KCMG, Upp Hall, Braughing, Ware, Hertfordshire. Private collection, Canada, possibly purchased from The Fine Art Galleries, The T.Eaton Corporation Ltd (fragmentary label on reverse). Private collection, Canada, by 1973. LITERATURE A.L. Baldry, 'Some Recent Works by Mr J.W.Waterhouse, RA', Studio, vol. 53, 1911, p. 180, illustrated. A. Hobson, The Art and Life of J.W. Waterhouse, RA, London, 1980, pp. 133, 191 (no. 185), illustrated pl. 135. P. Trippi, J.W. Waterhouse, London, 2002, p. 200, cat. 173 (illustrated). NOTES The discovery of Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may represents another milestone in the growing appreciation of the art of J.W. Waterhouse. Never exhibited in public, and reproduced only once during the artist's lifetime, the painting could not be dated securely before its recent reappearance. Because it is signed and dated 1909, Gather Ye Rosebuds has now been established as the first in the Symbolist 'Persephone' series that engrossed Waterhouse from 1909 to 1914. This theme associates it with his masterworks Flora and the Zephyrs of 1897 (Fig. 1) and Boreas of 1904 (Fig. 2). All three pictures convey both sensuality and melancholy - the hallmarks of a distinctive Waterhouse type of feminine beauty that is paradoxically both natural and unearthly. The black-and-white photograph of the picture published in The Studio magazine in 1911 has long fascinated scholars because it shows the only canvas Waterhouse is known to have painted which is not rectangular. The picture was almost certainly given its unique format at the request of Brodie Henderson (1869-1936), a younger brother of the first Baron Faringdon (1850-1934), Waterhouse's most important patron. Certainly the painting's unusual shape and large scale indicate its significance to both the artist and his client. Although Waterhouse knew many of the leading artists and collectors of his time, they rarely mention him in their correspondence, and his rare surviving letters suggest a man of few words. Only his art remains to speak for him, and it is this which makes the rediscovery of a major painting momentous. Waterhouse's rise to prominence in the Royal Academy was both extraordinary and typical. Born at Rome in 1849, he was the son of a minor artist, William Waterhouse, and his wife Isabella Mackenzie, who was also a painter. In 1854 the family settled in Kensington, and by 1861 Nino, as the boy was known, was at school in Leeds. Here he relished Roman history, but contemplated a career in engineering. In 1870, while helping his father paint portraits, he entered the Royal Academy Schools to study sculpture, but it was paintings that he began to exhibit in 1872. In 1874 he sent his first picture, a classical allegory, to the Academy's summer exhibition. He was to show there almost every year for the next four decades. In his early work Waterhouse showed himself a competent follower of Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, and although the Impressionists' experiments with light and colour are reflected in his pictures of the early 1880s, he still clung to classical themes. A long series of museum acquisitions began in 1883, when the Art Gallery of South Australia purchased The Favourites of the Emperor Honorius . That year Waterhouse married the flower painter Esther Kenworthy, and the couple settled in Primrose Hill. Their neighbours included several members of the francophile New English Art Club, which was founded in 1886. Waterhouse's inventive pictures of women in classical settings made him a man to watch. In 1886 The Magic Circle was bought for the Chantrey Bequest, and Henry Tate purchased both Consulting the Oracle (1884) and Saint Eulalia (1885), a sensational work which ensured the artist's election as an Associate of the Academy the same year. Waterhouse acknowledged the honour from Venice, where he was painting genre subjects. In 1887 he became a regular and influential instructor at the Academy Schools. In the later 1880s Waterhouse experimented with the Impressionist-inflected techniques of Jules Bastien-Lepage, and it is ironic that one of his few works in this grey-toned naturalistic style, The Lady of Shalott (1888; Tate Britain), has become his best-known picture. For the rest of his career, Waterhouse followed Bastien's habit of carefully delineating faces and limbs while painting costume, foliage and other elements more broadly. These traits are exemplified by Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may . From 1890 he turned to the mythological temptresses of Homer and Ovid, but in the late 1890s he tended to intersperse classical subjects such as Pandora and Ariadne with literary figures favoured by the Pre-Raphaelites. These included Shakespeare's Ophelia and Juliet, Keats's La Belle Dame sans Merci and Lamia, and Tennyson's Mariana and Lady Clare. Acclaim for the Tennysonian Saint Cecilia (private collection) stimulated Waterhouse's election as a full Academician in 1895, and he soon began serving on the Academy's governing Council. The 'picture of the year' in 1897 was Hylas and the Nymphs (Manchester City Art Gallery), in which wistful and beguiling adolescents seduce a typically powerless youth. In 1900 Waterhouse moved to 10 Hall Road, a studio-house in that enclave of successful Academicians, St John's Wood. Here he painted our picture. Seventeen years later, he died in that house after a long struggle with cancer. The Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood famously sought to reinvigorate English art by avoiding academic convention. Ironically, the best-loved inheritor of their legacy today is Waterhouse, the paradigmatic Academician. Like his other masterworks, Gather ye Rosebuds epitomizes an important aspect of late Pre-Raphaelitism - the rendering of a spiritually significant theme, in this case a Greek myth about the immortality assured by natural regeneration, in an Academic manner influenced by modern French art. At first glance, the painting's meaning is straightforward: two beautiful nymphs, soulful and gently arousing, pick flowers in an expansive meadow. Two of their companions are seen in the distance. Waterhouse drew his title from the well-known poem by Robert Herrick (1591-1674), 'To the Virgins, to make much of Time', the opening stanza of which runs as follows: Gather ye rosebuds while ye may, Old time is still a-flying; And the same flower that smiles today Tomorrow will be dying. The warning carries the clear implication that the girls' beauty will fade along with that of the flowers they are picking, but, like half-a -dozen others which followed it, the picture also refers to the theme of regeneration as embodied in the ancient Greek myth of Persephone, or (to give her her Roman name) Proserpine. This myth was well-known to classically-educated Britons; the Times, for instance, in an article on 'Flowers that brighten Lent' published on 6 April 1914, observed that 'it was daffodils that Proserpine is said to have been gathering in the Sicilian meadows when Pluto seized her and carried her off to the infernal regions'. No doubt most readers would also have known that the rape of Persephone so distressed her mother, the harvest goddess Demeter, that she caused all vegetation to wither. Eventually Zeus, the ruler of the gods, ordained a compromise which mythologised the cycle of the seasons. Persephone became the queen of Hades in winter, but she was restored to Demeter every spring, causing flowers to bloom again. Although Waterhouse did not write about the significance of the Persephone myth to him, it was mentioned repeatedly in the lengthy biographical profile of him which appeared as the 1909 Art Annual. This was the deluxe Christmas Number of the Art Journal, written by the art journalist Rose E.D. Sketchley and published the same year that Waterhouse completed our picture. Because Sketchley interviewed the elusive Waterhouse personally, her account of his practice and philosophy remains precious today. She specifically cites Waterhouse's devotion to 'the last poem of living paganism', De Raptu Proserpinae (The Rape of Persephone), written in the style of Ovid by the Alexandrian poet Claudian (370-404 AD). Her assertion is all the more convincing as Waterhouse had been depicting Ovidian themes of abduction and transformation since 1873, when he exhibited a version of the well-known subject of Pygmalion and the statue. Since De Raptu Proserpinae was not published in English until 1922, both Waterhouse and Sketchley presumably read it in Latin. Like many commentators before and since, Sketchley rightly equated Waterhouse's paintings with poetry. Persephone wove a tapestry in nature's colours with a design featuring such elements and astrological bodies as water, earth, the sun and the stars. Singing as her tapestry brightened, Persephone was one of the images that inspired Tennyson when he was writing The Lady of Shalott. Today, Waterhouse's affection for Tennyson is better-known than his passion for Claudian or Ovid, although in fact he painted only five Tennysonian themes as against thirteen that were Ovidian in derivation. As a boy, Tennyson himself had partially translated De Raptu Prosperinae, and he later went on to publish his own Demeter and Persephone, in 1886. Given the poet's enthusiasm for the subject of Persephone, it is logical that Waterhouse decorated the title page of his own volume of Tennyson's works with a pencil sketch of the goddess bending down to pick flowers (Fig. 3). Waterhouse encountered Persephone throughout Victorian art and the literary canon, beginning with Homer and Ovid. Milton wrote in Paradise Lost of 'that fair field of Enna, where Proserpine, gathering flowers,/Herself a fairer flower by gloomy Dis Was gathered, '. 2 Ruskin, an exceptionally inventive interpreter of myths, touched on the subject in a lecture which he delivered at the Royal Institution in April 1861. Discussing how 'the difference in the operation of the flower and leaf' had 'attracted the attention of all great nations as a type of the various conditions of the life of man', he observed that the Greek approach to the subject was 'set forth in the fable of the Rape of Proserpine. The Greeks had no goddess Flora correspondent to the Flora of the Romans. The Greek Flora is Proserpine, the "bringer of death", because they saw that the force and use of the flower was only in its death. For a few hours Proserpine plays in the Sicilian fields, but, snatched away by Pluto, her destiny is accomplished in the Shades, and she is crowned in the grave.' Another influential commentator was Sir James Frazer. In his monumental study of world myths, The Golden Bough, 1890-1910, he related Persephone to a Greek myth that Waterhouse had celebrated in another painting of 1899, The Awakening of Adonis (Fig. 4). Here Venus rouses the dead Adonis, who had been transformed at death into the red anemone flower. 4 In both tales, Frazer argued, a goddess mourns her loved one, the 'embodiment of the vegetation...buried under the soil for some months of every winter [that] comes to life again, as from the grave.' 5 Frazer noted Demeter's ancient rites at Eleusis, where the Greeks re-enacted Persephone's abduction as a prefiguration of their own death and rebirth. The Eleusinian Mysteries were celebrated secretly in Victorian London by various occultist groups, including the hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, founded in 1887, of which the poet W.B.Yeats was a luminary. Although it cannot be proved conclusively, Waterhouse probably participated in some of these re-enactments. He painted the Order's symbol - a rising sun - into his 1896 masterpiece, Pandora (private collection), and the 1914 tombstone he designed for his brother-in-law features a rising sun. His inscription in a volume of his brother-in-law's poems - 'Sunrise/Midsummer Day 1913' - may also be significant. In 1909, Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may was the latest example of Waterhouse's longstanding fascination with the theme of girls picking flowers. This had begun twenty years earlier, in 1889, with the first of the three Ophelias which he showed at the Royal Academy. Throughout the rest of his career, he celebrated the traditional association of women with the beauty, simplicity and vulnerability of flowers. Prominent examples include La Belle Dame sans Merci (1893; Hessisches Landesmuseum, Darmstadt), and two pictures mentioned above, Saint Cecilia (1895) and Hylas and the Nymphs (1897). Like other Symbolists, Waterhouse saw flowers and women as representing the seeds of new growth. The view was blatantly reactionary by 1909, when women were campaigning vigorously for equality. Indeed three years later, suffragettes sought to make their point by destroying thousands of flowers in the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. The early Pre-Raphaelites, to whom Waterhouse's work consistently paid homage after 1888, had also associated women with flowers. Waterhouse must have been familiar with the innumerable examples by Rossetti, not to mention such a picture as Frederick Sandys's Gentle Spring (Fig. 5), first exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1865 and seen there again at the artist's memorial exhibition in 1905. Sandys's classicized earth-mother personifies fertility, even as the flowers trodden under her feet point to the inevitability of death. An equally powerful undercurrent in Gather ye Rosebuds is the eroticism of transformation. Two decades earlier, Waterhouse had focused on the fact that the Lady of Shalott and Ophelia were completely transformed by their passion - indeed, it drove both of them to a watery death. His exploration of this theme had continued with Flora and the Zephyrs (1897; Fig. 1), in which the nymph Chloris is abducted by the gentle god of the west wind and transformed into Flora, the goddess of spring. Why, we might wonder, did Waterhouse not assign to Gather ye Rosebuds an equally explanatory title, such as Persephone and her Maidens ? Indeed, why did he not depict Pluto sweeping Persephone into his arms? By 1909, Waterhouse had recognised that the heyday of such literal narratives had passed. As early as 1897, the Magazine of Art had noted 'the steady disfavour of the view that Art is the handmaiden of Literature', 7 and this is only one of many references to the phenomenon in contemporary art criticism. A relevant precedent in Waterhouse's work is the Boreas of 1904 (Fig. 2). 8 Ovid wrote that Boreas, the aggressive north wind, had courted the nymph Oreithyia unsuccessfully. As his wintry rule ended, he spied her picking new flowers and carried her off to become his wife. Educated observers recognised the theme of natural regeneration in this myth; in 1900 the critic W.S. Sparrow observed that it 'seems to exemplify the soul of good in things sometimes evil, Oreithyia personifying the eternal fruitfulness of nature, the corn and flower seeds which are so often sown in waste places by the most boisterous of destructive winds.' 9 In both expression and gesture the nymph in Boreas seems to indicate her awareness of this symbolic dimension to the story, yet the god himself is not seen. The reader is free to admire a decorative picture of a girl shielding herself from the wind, or to muse on the implication of the title - that the nymph is herself a flower plucked by the wind. Similarly, Waterhouse leaves viewers to devise their own interpretation of Gather ye Rosebuds, and indeed of all his subsequent Persephone pictures. Shortly before our picture was painted Waterhouse had intensified his exploration of miraculous transformations in two unusually dramatic scenes from Ovid. Both Phyllis and Demopho”n (1907) and Apollo and Daphne (1908) show nymphs being changed into flowering trees to escape the attention of some god or hero. In Gather ye Rosebuds, the artist, evoking a more characteristic mood of stillness, represents the moment before the aggressive god emerges from the underworld. Sketchley felt that Waterhouse saw 'nature as a process of the soul, a shrine, when, at last, the soul has found its stillness beneath the changing appearances of the body'. This rationale for the scenes of metamorphosis reflects the quite understandable preoccupation with mortality of a man turning sixty. The poem Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may was already on Waterhouse's mind in 1908 when he exhibited a completely different painting with this title at the Royal Academy (Fig. 6). This vision of a lady carrying a silver bowl of roses parallels the contemporary medievalism of such neo-Pre-Raphaelites as Edwin Austen Abbey, John Byam Shaw and Frank Cadogan Cowper. In The Soul of the Rose (Fig. 7), also of 1908, Waterhouse transferred his red-haired model to an enclosed garden. He may have intended the picture's title to refer to the Roman de la Rose, the thirteenth-century French allegory of courtly love in which the narrator seeks his beloved in a garden and finds her in the symbolic form of a rose. Our picture, then, follows on from a progression of related themes, treated in a number of earlier works. Waterhouse painted the landscapes of these various canvases in diverse manners, apparently for no reason other than his own delight. For some he returned to the leafy riverside settings he had perfected in Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus (1901; private collection). The present picture, however, marks new territory in the airiness of its arcadian landscape; even more than in Apollo and Daphne of the year before, he uses a bright palette to suggest fresh air and an even, silvery light. Like his friends Frank Bramley and Charles Sims, Waterhouse may well have been influenced by images of young people enjoying the outdoor life as promoted by Edwardian health reformers. Gertrude Jekyll's artfully informal gardens were also part of this wider context. Characteristic Waterhouse touches appear across the surface of Gather ye Rosebuds. Here is the little torrent of water that became a Waterhouse trademark, reminding viewers that water is the feminine element and serving as a compositional device to draw the eye downward. Beneath the sky - boldly painted with strokes of pink and white - are the beautiful purplish-blue mountains and soaring Italian pines that he used again and again not only in homage to Italy, his birthplace, but to Frederic, Lord Leighton, President of the Royal Academy, who had encouraged his rise through the institution's ranks. Waterhouse renders the flowers with his distinctive blend of realism and idealism: the narcissi are real enough to pick, yet the ethereal anemones seem to hover magically in the grass. 10 Sketchley characterised the Symbolism of such decorative landscapes as 'a region where all things are poetical symbols. The trees standing in thick groves against the sky, the streams and dainty fountains in the flowered grass... are vehicles of a poetical idea.' These features also appear in the Persephone pictures which followed. In 1910 Waterhouse sent to the Academy the untraced Spring spreads one green Lap of Flowers, in which a woman is seen picking flowers alone, as Persephone did when she wandered too far from her companions. For Song of Springtime (1913; Fig. 8) he developed the nymph standing in the background of Gather ye Rosebuds into an unusually sturdy, bare-breasted mother-figure collecting narcissi with children. Also exhibited in 1913 was Narcissus (illustrated in Hobson, op.cit., plate 128) which showed a single woman bending forward to pick flowers as the nymphs do in our picture. The series closed in 1914 with the kneeling Flora, whose title, though pertinent to the interrelationship of women and flowers, would more correctly have been Persephone. Ruskin's association of the two figures comes to mind. Gather ye Rosebuds embodies the very individual style of Waterhouse's maturity, the analysis of which vexed his contemporaries and challenges scholars today. In 1917 the Times observed that Waterhouse painted 'pre-Raphaelite pictures in a more modern manner' and called him 'a kind of academic Burne-Jones, like him in his types and his moods, but with less insistence on design and more on atmosphere.' 11 This 'atmosphere' had grown from the influence of Impressionism on Waterhouse about 1880. In the mid-1890s he perfected his own mature manner, which presents imaginatively romantic subjects in an academic modification of French realism. This brilliant synthesis made Waterhouse distinctive in his day, and enjoys international acclaim today. Waterhouse apparently painted alone; there is no evidence that he employed an assistant, nor of his wife helping in any way but as a sitter. His closest companions in the studio, therefore, were the models who posed for his favourite subjects - depictions of women engrossed in their own thoughts or supplicating or enchanting men, whether alone, in pairs, or in groups. Though we do not know their names, the models in Gather ye Rosebuds epitomise Waterhouse's female type and can be related to contemporary works by him; the brunette is clearly painted from the other model who posed for the heroine in Penelope and her Suitors (1912; Fig. 9), and the redhead appeared in the 1904 version of The Dana‹des (Fig. 10). Although he perpetuated the academic tradition of transcending the idiosyncracies of individual models, it is clear that Waterhouse relied on two or three favourite models during each phase of his career. Particular attention has focused on the redhead who appears, slowly ageing but always beautiful, in more than seventy paintings beginning with the Toilet of 1889, (private collection) and continuing through to the canvases which the artist left unfinished at his death in 1917. Scholars' search for her name has turned on a pencil study of her head for the 1905 Lamia, inscribed 'Miss Muriel Foster/Buxton Road Chingford' (Yale University Art Gallery). The most promising candidate is the Muriel Foster (1878-1969) whose second cousin was the architect Alfred Waterhouse; he could have introduced her to J. W. Waterhouse, his fellow Academician (but no relation). 1 2 Equally intriguing is the question of whether the red-haired 'Waterhouse girl' functioned as the painter's muse. Given their three-decade-long association the answer can hardly be other than affirmative. In his day, critics praised Waterhouse's capacity to compose without exhaustive preparations. From the model, he drew with red chalk or charcoal and made lively oil studies, yet he rarely planned the entire composition before setting to work at the easel. The outlines of the design would first be brushed in with thin, dark oil paint on the canvas's white ground; the forms were then laid in with neutral colour, before the virtuoso flesh painting - so vividly exemplified by the present painting - began. An unfinished oil sketch (Fig. 11) from the same period as Gather ye Rosebuds provides valuable insights into how Waterhouse built up his surfaces, with flesh passages always receiving the most careful attention. The composition of Gather Ye Rosebuds is anchored by the figures and drapery of the two nymphs in the foreground. In pose and conception they seem to echo widely-reproduced forerunners by Burne-Jones, such as The March Marigold of 1870 (Fig. 12). Across the picture, Waterhouse orchestrated a rich harmony of colours, enlivened by dramatic brushstrokes including touches of red and pink pigment; these vaguely suggest flowers but in fact are often in surprisingly illogical places. In the Impressionist tradition, such dabs give a shimmering and evanescent quality to the picture. Noticeable in certain areas is Waterhouse's non finito, the suggestive power of the unfinished. He began to explore this concept in the early 1890s in accordance with the Symbolist belief that not all phenomena should be rendered minutely or explained too carefully. During technical examination of Gather ye Rosebuds, two highly characteristic features were discovered. In the background, Waterhouse has painted and then covered over a third companion, where the large tree now stands. Such pentimenti appear in many of his paintings, confirming that he revised continually at the easel. Secondly, the stitching of an uneven edge under the frame reveals that the canvas was enlarged by the artist before he completed the composition; the same feature is found in Flora and the Zephyrs. 1 3 (Fig 1). The canvas itself is rectangular, as were all Waterhouse's documented pictures. Yet Gather ye Rosebuds is unique in showing that he consciously designed the composition in the knowledge that it would be encased in a frame with its aperture rounded at the top. He applied gold paint to the areas of the canvas he knew would be covered, probably to serve as a border beyond which he should not stray. The picture's large scale and shape give it the visual and visceral impact of an altarpiece, an association that the artist and his patron surely sought. Sir Brodie Henderson's reasons for requiring this shape are not recorded. We do know that he was introduced to Waterhouse by his older brother, the self-made financier and railway magnate Alexander Henderson, who started collecting Waterhouse's work in the 1890s and was knighted in 1902. Brodie was a civil engineer who built railways and other projects worldwide, often financed by his brother. In 1928-29 he served as President of the Institution of Civil Engineers, in which post he was painted by Waterhouse's fellow Academican Sir Arthur S. Cope (Fig. 13). Brodie's most important Waterhouse acquisition was Saint Cecilia, for which he paid the astonishing sum of œ2,300 at the sale of George McCulloch's renowned collection in 1913. Yet it is more revealing that, one year before Gather ye Rosebuds was painted, Brodie acquired The Soul of the Rose direct from the Royal Academy's Summer Exhibition. He may have prized the picture so much that he asked, perhaps commissioned Waterhouse to paint a worthy sequel. The artist was surely glad to oblige. In 1907 the pro-modernist Athenaeum declared that 'Mr Waterhouse is no longer hailed by fashion as the painter of the picture of the year'. 1 4 Indeed, the first decade of the twentieth century was hard on his entire generation of artists. The space allocated in newspapers to Summer Exhibition reviews shrank in the face of critical hostility to narrative pictures and declining interest among readers, who looked to the cinema for the escapist entertainment that large and eyecatching Academic works had once provided. In 1911 the Summer Exhibition drew 176,257 visitors, less than half its 1879 record of 391,197. Waterhouse would probably have agreed with W. Graham Robertson (1867-1948), who wrote that his generation had 'accidentally slopped over' into 'a new age...which (they) do not understand'. 1 5 Although Waterhouse remained artistically independent, Gather ye Rosebuds - indeed his entire twentieth-century oeuvre - cannot be understood without recognizing the fact that the Hendersons bought many of the pictures which he produced during this period. Sir Alexander's extended family ultimately owned more than thirty examples, including commissioned portraits. Brodie's brother Henry William Henderson (1862-1931) owned at least fourteen. He also attended Waterhouse's funeral in 1917. Brodie himself was away at the time, serving in the Royal Engineers, but he was represented by his wife and daughter. Research has yet to show how Brodie displayed Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may nor do we know when it left his collection, which was not dispersed en masse after his death in 1936. Whatever its original context in Henderson's home, Gather ye Rosebuds constitutes a unique record of what must have been a cordial collaboration between the artist and his patron. Its arrival in Canada by 1959 is unsurprising, in view of the country's close ties with Britain. Written on the back of the canvas are the words 'CAV, Oct 28th, 1959', offering evidence of its journey across the Atlantic prior to this date, as well as the cleaning and varnishing provided byt a renowned Toronto restorer, Frank Worrall. We know that Gather ye Rosebuds while ye may adorned a stately country home in the lake-district just north of Toronto, on the shores of Lake Simcoe. A favoured getaway of Toronto society, this painting was part of an extensive picture collection purchased by the present owner, along with the house and its contents, in 1973. Seeking advice on his artwork, the owner retained the expertise of the Odon Wagner Gallery. Mr Wagner and his assistant immediately recognized the importance of this long-lost Waterhouse. Over the ensuing months, their exhaustive research began to unveil the exceptional history of this piece. The world is fortunate to now recognize this outstanding painting and its distinguished heritage. Peter Trippi February, 2002 A graduate of London's Courtauld Institute of Art and New York University, Peter Trippi has worked at the Brooklyn Museum of Art and the Baltimore Museum of Art. He prepared the first entry on J. W. Waterhouse for the New Dictionary of National Biography, and is the founding Executive Editor of Nineteenth-Century Art Worldwide, the peer-reviewed, academic journal which premiered on the Internet in February 2002. 1 Times, 6 April 1914, p. 6. 2 John Milton, Paradise Lost, Book IV, lines 269-271. 3 E.T.Cook and A.Wedderburn (eds), The Works of John Ruskin (Library Edition), London, 1903-12, vol. VII (1905), p. 474. 4 Three different oil studies of anemones appeared in Waterhouses's studio sale, confirming his fascination with the flower's mythic heritage. 5 J.G. Frazer, The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion (3rd ed), part V, vol. 1, London, 1914, p. 40. 6 The grave is at Thurne, Norfolk. The volume is Verses in Various Moods by P.M. Feeney, 1911, printed by T. Fisher Unwin for private circulation only. This inscribed volume is at the British Library, shelfmark 11657.h.39. 7 Magazine of Art, vol. XX (May 1897), p. 58. Waterhouse did not abandon recognizable narratives, however; the following year he exhibited his third and final Ophelia (1910, private collection). 8 Boreas was preceded by the more ambiguously titled, but similarly composed, Windflowers at the Royal Academy in 1903. 9 Studio, Vol. 19, 1900, pp. 220-231. 10 Also here are the dogroses that he had sporadically introduced since the 1889 Ophelia, most prominently in Saint Cecilia. 11 Times, 12 February 1917, p. 9. 12 James K. Baker and Cathy L. Baker, 'Miss Muriel Foster: The John William Waterhouse Model', Journal of Pre-Raphaelite Studies, Spring 1999. 13 My thanks to John Schaeffer and Simon Howell for this information about Flora and the Zephyrs. 14 Athenaeum, No. 4152, 25 May 1907, p. 641. 15 Time Was: The Reminiscences of W. Graham Robertson, Hamish Hamilton Ltd, 1945, p. 324. SALESROOM NOTICE Please note the following details of the picture's appearance in Peter Trippi's catalogue raisonn‚: P.Trippi, Waterhouse, London, 2002, p. 200, cat. 173 (illustrated).

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JOHN  WILLIAM  WATERHOUSE,  R.A.,  R.I.

Lot 13: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

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Description: 1849-1917 THE  MAGIC  CIRCLE oil  on  canvas 88  by  60cm.,  35  by  24in.

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

Lot 14: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

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Description: Cleopatrasigned 'J.W.Waterhouse' (lower right)oil on canvas25 3/4 x 22 3/8 in. (65.4 x 56.8 cm.)

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Lot 14: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: A girl picking flowers in a meadow Pencil 25x17 cm (9.7x6.7 in).

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Lot 15: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: A pompeian interior, 1876 Pencil 24x31 cm (9.4x12.2 in) Init. inscr. D.

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Lot 16: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: A pompeian interior Pencil 23x31 cm (9.1x12.2 in) Hobson, p.34, 1980.

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JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917

Lot 17: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917

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Description: OFFERINGS23.5 by 14 cm., 9 ¼ by 5 ½ in.signed with initials c.r.: JWW; signed and inscribed with the title on an old label on the reverse: Offerings/ J.W.Waterhouseoil on canvasPROVENANCEMr Rex Brown of Coombe Dower, Croham Road, Croydon, given to his friends Mr & Mrs Frederick Lionel Quinby M.V.O. around 1940 and thence by descent to the present owner who was given the picture as a wedding gift in 1974EXHIBITEDLondon, Dudley Gallery, Winter Exhibition, 1879, no. 443, priced £25LITERATUREAnthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J W Waterhouse RA 1849-1917, 1980, cat no. 40, p. 181NOTEReproduced here for the first time and not exhibited publicly since the Dudley Gallery Winter Exhibition of 1879 Offerings is a fascinating rediscovery. A seminal work in Waterhouse's oeuvre it marks a transition away from the continental Salon style of his early works such as The Tambourine Girl (Townley Hall Museum, Burnley), his first Royal Academy exhibit Sleep and His Half Brother Death (Sotheby's New York, 11 December 2003, lot 71) and The Remorse of Nero after the Death of his Mother (private collection) exhibited in 1878 at the Dudley Gallery, Piccadilly. The paintings of the early 1870s had been influenced by the exhibits of the French academic painters particularly the grand classicism of Jean Leon Gerome. Offerings was the first of a series of pictures in which the influence of Lawrence Alma-Tadema replaced that of Gerome, a series of small paintings of everyday Roman life which includes Dolce Far Niente (Kirkaldy Museum and Art Gallery) and A Grecian Flower Market (Laing Art Gallery, Newcastle-Upon-Tyne) of 1880 and A Flower Market, Old Rome of 1886 (private collection). Waterhouse was still a student at the Royal Academy Schools when he painted Offerings a small panel of a young Pompeian or Roman girl dreaming of her beloved at a shrine devoted to Venus. Tadema was a regular visiting tutor at the Schools from 1877 onwards and clearly had a great influence upon the talented young student. Like Tadema, Waterhouse had been drawn to Pompeii and much influenced by his first visit there in 1876 when he made detailed watercolour studies of the frescoes and architecture. Waterhouse's visit to Pompeii was to have a significant effect upon the series of small paintings depicting domestic classical subjects which were painted with a realism which echoes the work of the painters William Logsdail and Henry Woods with whom Waterhouse became associated around this time. Woods and Logsdail painted Venetian subjects of street vendors and hawkers and the only difference between Offerings and Logsdail and Woods contemporary work was the period in which they are set. Like Woods, Logsdail and Tadema, Waterhouse painted romantic pictures which, although they were set in an ancient or foreign setting, could be understood by the nineteenth century audience. Unfortunately his interest in these domestic subjects was soon lost and he began to paint much grander subject paintings from classical mythology, history and literature, including Diogenes of 1882 (Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney), St Eulalia of 1885 (Tate Britain) and the famous Mariamne of 1887 (private collection). In the 1870s Waterhouse chose to exhibit his pictures at the Dudley Gallery housed in the flamboyant Egyptian Hall on Piccadilly. The Dudley Gallery was renowned as the predecessor of the Grosvenor Gallery, extolling the Aesthetic ideals of artists like Simeon Solomon, Walter Crane, Henry Holiday and Burne-Jones.The double handled iron bowl in Offerings was a prop from Waterhouse's studio and appeared in several other pictures including Dolce Far Niente, Diogenes and A Flower Market, Old Rome which also includes a shrine containing the same bronze figure of Venus and possibly the same Italian model.The composition of Offerings was reinterpreted over a decade later in Waterhouse's Flora (Sotheby's New York, 20 April 2005, lot 96) and the subject of a young girl making flower offerings at a roadside shrine was depicted in at least two versions of Arranging Flowers c.1890 and a medieval variant The Shrine of 1895 (private collection). The subject of devotional sacrifice was also pictured in The Household Gods of 1880 (Christie's, 4 November 1994, lot 100) which was part of the famous collection of Sir John Aird, and presumably also Sweet Offerings exhibited at the Liverpool Autumn Exhibition in 1882 (present whereabouts unknown). Offerings was the first of Waterhouse's paintings of a subject which was to preoccupy him for many years.

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

Lot 17: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917) Portrait of Miss Claire Kenworthy, half length, in a white dress oil on canvas 35 x 27 in. (88.9 x 68.5 cm.)

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John William Waterhouse (British, 1849-1917)

Lot 19: John William Waterhouse (British, 1849-1917)

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Description: John William Waterhouse (British, 1849-1917) Consulting the Oracle signed 'J.W. Waterhouse' (lower right) oil on canvas 17½ x 28½ in. (44.5 x 72.5 cm.)

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

Lot 20: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

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Description: Miss Betty Pollock signed and dated 'J.W. Waterhouse 1911' (lower right) oil on canvas 36 x 281/4 in. (91.5 x 72 cm.) PROVENANCE The sitter's father, Sir Adrian Pollock, and by descent. LITERATURE Anthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J.W. Waterhouse, London, 1980, p. 81, pl. 67 and p. 191, no. 181. EXHIBITION London, Royal Academy, 1912, no. 185. Liverpool, Liverpool Academy, Autumn Exhibition, 1912, no. 956 (lent by Sir Adrian Pollock). NOTES Like so many artists who had made their names painting literary, historical and symbolist subjects, Waterhouse found himself increasingly turning to portraiture as the taste for subject pictures declined towards the end of the Victorian era. Poynter, Dicksee, Draper (see lot 21), Henrietta Rae (see lot 19) and many others faced the same predicament. Waterhouse's sitters seem to have been invariably young girls or women, nor is this surprising in view of the nature of his subject pictures, in which women always play a central role, as victims, temptresses, or simply vehicles for the artist's concept of beauty. While this obviously made him happiest with female sitters, patrons no doubt saw him as ideally suited to paint their wives or daughters. Many of his sitters belonged to the Henderson family, his chief patrons during his later years. A charming study of Phillis Waterlow, the younger daugher of his friend and fellow artist Ernest Waterlow (see Hobson, op. cit., pl. 66), was sold at Christie's on 6 November 1995, lot 118. The sitter in this present portrait is Elizabeth (Betty) Pollock, daugter of Sir Adrian Pollock, KCMG (1867-1943). He was Remembrancer of the City of London 1903-12 and subsequently for many years City Chamberlain and Treasurer, a post which brought him a knighthood in 1921. Betty was born in 1898, it is said in the Speaker's House in the House of Commons, although if this was so, the circumstances are unclear. In later life she enjoyed a successful career on the stage, being known in particular as as mimic. When she died on 6 January 1970, her obituary in the Daily Telegraph read as follows: Elizabeth Pollock, who has died of a stroke, was one of the most subtly gifted mimics on the London stage during the 30s. Her imitations had a depth of observation, an almost devilish accuracy, to which none of her rivals could aspire. She had only to speak one line, for instance, in the voice of a certain much admired star and you were made to realise that the famous lady had been struggling all her life to eradicate a Cockney accent - and had not entirely succeeded. In 1932 Ivor Novello, in a successful comedy called 'Party', wrote a role specially for her in which she gave a series of brilliant 'take-offs' of famous people. A great future seemed assured to her but she suddently lost her nerve and confidence and left the stage prematurely. She was the daughter of the late Sir Adrian Pollock, City Chamberlain. She married J.C.I. McConnel by whom she had a son who survives her. Among her admirers was Noel Coward, as the following letter shows: 9th May 1936 Dear Betty As you have probably noticed, the Theatrical Garden Party, as a gay social function, has been deteriorating slightly during the last few years and we are trying this year, by a little concentrated effort, to bring it back to the good show it used to be. In order to do this we have had to think of a lot of new ideas for attractions, and I thought it would be an excellent plan to have an 'IMITATION TENT' with you and Binnie Hale and Bunch Keys just imitating your heads off for fifteen minute sessions during the afternoon. I would be most deeply grateful, so please be a darling and say you will. My love, Noel The date is June 9th at Regents Park. Waterhouse probably met the Pollocks through the actor-manager Gerald Du Maurier, who was a friend of both parties. He also had an influence on Betty's choice of career. According to another, more detailed obituary ( Times, 11 January 1970), she made her stage debut during the First World War as a hospital nurse on probation in Du Maurier's production of J.M. Barrie's A Kiss for Cinderella. Waterhouse's portrait, which shows the sitter at the age of fourteen and captures a certain sense of adolescent shyness, was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1912, together with his late masterpiece Penelope and her Suitors (Aberdeen Art Gallery; Hobson, pl. 77). (H. J. Draper's Mountain Mists, lot 21 in the present sale, also appeared that year.) It is not clear if the portrait's background represents some actual scene or is a figment of the artist's imagination, but the latter seems more likely. On the one hand, the Pollocks (according to Sir Adrian's Who's Who entry) had no country retreat which might have furnished the lily-pond in question. On the other, lily-ponds were very much part of Waterhouse's stock-in-trade, featuring, for example, in an Ophelia of 1894 and the famous Hylas and the Nymphs a few years later (Hobson, pls. 165 and 86). In other words, it would not have been difficult for him to transpose this familiar motif from a subject picture to a portrait, making Betty Pollock herself into a kind of Ophelia.

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Lot 20: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE (BRITISH, 1849-1917)

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Description: STUDY FOR I AM HALF-SICK OF SHADOWS, SAID THE LADY OF SHALOTT signed and inscribed J. W. Waterhouse/Mrs Ford from J. W. Waterhouse lower left - - pencil on paper 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 in. (34.3 x 24.2 cm.) (sight) The drawing is a study for his painting of 1916 which is in the Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto. The painting is based on the poem by Alfred Tennyson. We are grateful to Anthony Hobson for his assistance in cataloguing this lot.

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JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

Lot 20: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

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Description: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917 STUDY FOR MIRANDA (RECTO), SLIGHT SKETCHES OF TREE TRUNKS (VERSO) inscribed and dated on the verso: Clippesby/ April 1914 pencil 22 by 28cm., 8 1/2 by 11in.

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

Lot 23: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) Study for The Magic Circle oil on canvas 24¼ x 16¼ in. (61.5 x 41.2 cm.)

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John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I.

Lot 27: John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I.

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Description: signed  J.W. Waterhouse and dated 1916 (lower right); further signed and inscribed on a label on the reverse,oil on canvas,38 by 28 1/2 in.,96.5 by 72.3 cm

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Lot 29: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: Flora Oil/canvas 40x27 inches (102.2x68.5 cm) Inscr.

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JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

Lot 29: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

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Description: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917 A NEAPOLITAN FLAX SPINNER oil on canvas 41 by 19cm.; 16 by 7½in.

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JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

Lot 30: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

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Description: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849 - 1917 THE FAVOURITES OF THE EMPEROR HONORIUS signed l.r.: J.W.W. oil on board 20 by 28cm.; 7¾ by 11in.

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Lot 31: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: Miranda, the Tempest, 1916 Oil/canvas 40x54 inches (100.4x137.8 cm) signed & dated.

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Lot 32: WATERHOUSE, John William (1849-1917, British)

Description: Portrait of a gentleman wearing a dark suit and tie, s. Oil Painting (25x30in).

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Lot 34: John William Waterhouse (1849-1917)

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Description: Portrait of a Gentleman, half-length, in a black jacket and waistcoat, and red tie signed 'J W Waterhouse' (lower left) oil on canvas 30 x 25in. (77.5 x 63.5cm.).

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 John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I. , British 1849-1917 
 consulting the oracle oil on canvas

Lot 35: John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I. , British 1849-1917 consulting the oracle oil on canvas

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Description: signed J. W. Waterhouse lower right oil on canvas

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Lot 37: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

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Description: Circe oil on canvas 34 x 303/8 in. (86.3 x 77.2 cm.) PROVENANCE Possibly the artist's studio sale; Christie's, London, 23 July 1926, lot 19 (46 gns. to Sampson). Mr Tellwright. NOTES The picture is clearly related to The Sorceress, an unfinished canvas by Waterhouse of circa 1911, which would itself more suitably be called Circe since it is inscribed with this title on the back and includes two animals, the victims of Circe's charms, at the left (see Anthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J.W. Waterhouse, 1980, p.128, no. 182.) The attitude of the figures in each picture is almost identical. Circe was a favourite subject with Waterhouse and other artists in the late Pre-Raphaelite tradition. Waterhouse's main treatments of the theme are Circe offering the Cup to Ullyses (1891, Oldham; illus. Hobson, 1980, pl. 50; 1989, pl. 31) and Circe Invidiosa (1892, Adelaide; illus. Hobson, 1980, pl. 53; 1989, pl. 32). We are grateful to the late Dr. Anthony Hobson, and Peter Trippi for their help in the preparation of this catalogue entry.

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 - John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I. , 1849-1917 tristram and isolde oil on canvas

Lot 37: - John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I. , 1849-1917 tristram and isolde oil on canvas

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Description: signed and dated l.r.: J. W. Waterhouse/ 1916 oil on canvas

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JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

Lot 38: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

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Description: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917 FLORA signed l.l.: J.W. Waterhouse charcoal 53 by 38cm., 21 by 15in.

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JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

Lot 39: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I.

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Description: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE, R.A., R.I. 1849-1917 THE LOVE PHILTRE inscribed and signed on the reverse: The Love Philtre. J.W. Waterhouse oil on canvas 58.5 by 45.5cm., 23 by 18in.

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

Lot 39: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) A Study: Maidens Picking Flowers by a Stream oil on canvas 37 x 31½ in. (94 x 80 cm.) Painted between 1909 and 1914

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Lot 40: JOHN WILLIAM WATERHOUSE (ENG. 1849-1917)

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Description: FOREST STUDY oil on canvas board 18 x 12 in (46 x 30.5 cm) PROVENANCE Sale: Christie's, London, July 23, 1926 Private Collection See Illustration.

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

Lot 40: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917) Day Dreams signed 'J. W. WATERHOUSE' (lower right) pencil and watercolour heightened with bodycolour, on paper 17¾ x 10 3/8 in. (45.1 x 26.4 cm.)

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The Soul of the Rose

Lot 41: The Soul of the Rose

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Description: John William Waterhouse (1849-1917) The Soul of the Rose signed and dated 'J.W. Waterhouse/1908' (lower right) oil on canvas 34¾ x 23¼ in. (88.3 x 59.1 cm.)

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John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

Lot 42: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) Head of a Girl oil on canvas board 14 x 10 in. (35.5 x 25.4 cm.)

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                                        John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

Lot 44: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917)

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Description: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1848-1917) A street in Capri signed and inscribed 'J.W.Waterhouse/Capri' (lower right) and further inscribed 'A Street/in Capri' (on the stretcher)oil on canvas 17½ x 9 1/8 in. (44.5 x 23.2 cm.)

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Lot 46: John William Waterhouse, R.A., R.I.

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Description: 1884-1917 jason and medea signed l.r.: J W Waterhouse oil on canvas 134 by 107 cm., 52 3/4 by 42 in. From about the mid-1890s John William Waterhouse turned largely to mythological subjects, among the masterpieces of which are Hylas and the Nymphs (Manchester City Art Gallery), of 1896, and Flora and the Zephyrs (ex Sotheby's, London, 6 November 1996, lot 307), of 1898. A painting entitled Nymphs finding the Head of Orpheus (private collection) followed in 1901, while the present painting, Jason and Medea, was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1907. These paintings represent a departure from the canon of Pre-Raphaelite imagery upon which the artist had previously relied. It seems that Waterhouse came to relish the sinister associations and ominous character of Greek mythology, particularly in scenes which show moments of confrontation between gods and mortals. Among the paintings that Waterhouse made of this type are some of the most compelling and darkly beautiful of all Victorian paintings. Jason, the leader of the Argonauts, was loved by the sorceress Medea, who was the daughter of King Aeetes and to whose court Jason had travelled in his quest for the golden fleece. The ancient writers Pindar and Apollonius described how Medea, by her magical powers, assisted Jason, first by preparing an ointment of balsam that made Jason invulnerable and allowed him to perform the task of yoking the fire-breathing bulls and to plough a field and sow the dragon's teeth - the task that Aeetes had set him as a condition of releasing the golden fleece. Secondly, the ointment had the property of allowing Jason to foresee that from the dragon's teeth would grow an army of men who would attack him, but that by throwing a stone into their midst they would turn upon and kill one another. Later, after they had returned to Iolcos, Medea brought revenge upon the usurper Pelias (Jason's half-uncle, who had deposed Jason's father Aeson as ruler and who had sent Jason on the apparently impossible mission to recover the golden fleece in the belief that he would die in the search). Medea persuaded Pelias and his daughters that by boiling him in a cauldron and by adding magic potions she could bring him eternal youth. In the event he died, and Jason assumed his rightful throne. Waterhouse's painting Jason and Medea shows the sorceress carefully measuring out the magic ointment that will safeguard Jason and allow him to overcome the obstacles placed in his way by her father. She stares into the distance, entranced by the power of the magic spell which she invokes. Around her are the implements of her sorcery. Jason watches with trepidation, his anxiety expressed by the way his hands clutch at the spear. Waterhouse may perhaps have known Frederick Sandys's painting Medea (Birmingham Museums and Art Gallery), of 1866-8, in which the sorceress prepares a magic garment for use in her final act of revenge, the murder of Glauce, who had later supplanted Medea in the affections of Jason. Various elements are common to the two representations of Medea, for example the toads that play a part in the magic spells. If Waterhouse had not seen Sandys's painting, he may well have read Algernon Charles Swinburne's lurid account of it: 'Pale as from poison, with the blood drawn back from her very lips, agonized in face and limbs with the labour and the fierce contention of old love with new, of a daughter's love with a bride's, the fatal figure of Medea pauses a little on the funereal verge of the wood of death.' (Quoted in full, The Age of Rossetti, Burne-Jones and Watts - Symbolism in Britain 1860-1910, exhibition catalogue, Tate Gallery, 1997-8, p.161) Among a number of sketches for the figure of Medea, one was sold at Sotheby's on 15 March 1983, lot 74 (now in a private collection in Los Angeles). A related subject is the painting The Love Philtre, which was exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1914 (unlocated). Provenance: Wolf Harris (1909) Private collection Sotheby's, London, 6 November 1995, lot 239 Exhibited: London, Royal Academy of Arts, 1907, no.243 Literature: The Art of J.W. Waterhouse, R.A., 'Christmas Number' of the Art Journal, 1909, illustrated p.12 Anthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J.W. Waterhouse RA 1849-1917, London, 1980, pp.125, 189, catalogue no.158, illustrated pl.121 Anthony Hobson, J.W. Waterhouse, Oxford, 1989, p.89.

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Lot 47: John William Waterhouse, R.A. (1849-1917)

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Description: A Nude Girl in a Landscape oil on canvas laid down on board 32.3/8 x 211/2 in. (82.2 x 54.6 cm.) PROVENANCE F.W. Carman, Haslemere. NOTES This unrecorded work would appear to be a fragment of an unfinished painting, although the way in which it is made up about six inches from the bottom, together with the age of the frame, suggest that the cutting down was done at an early date, very likely by Waterhouse himself. On stylistic grounds the picture clearly dates from the later part of the artist's career, and the forms of the branches and blossom resemble those of the almond tree in Phyllis and Demopho”n, a work exhibited at the Royal Academy in 1907 (Anthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J.W. Waterhouse, R.A., 1980, p. 127, pl. 124). On the other hand the pose of the figure is reminiscent of The Flower Picker, a composition which exists in two versions, a watercolour of 1900 (Hobson, op.cit., p. 58, pl. 44) and a contemporary oil sketch (repr. Anthony Hobson, J.W. Waterhouse, 1989, p. 84, pl. 59). The figure in The Flower Picker is dressed, but Waterhouse often seems to have observed the practice, common to many academic artists, of establishing his figures in the nude before adding their drapery, and our sketch may represent this phase in a picture's development. The background also differs from that of The Flower Picker, which is set in the country whereas our picture was evidently intended to show a city in the distance. This again, however, would be characteristic of Waterhouse, many of whose later paintings are variations on a theme. We are grateful to Dr. Anthony Hobson for his help in preparing this entry.

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Lot 47: WATERHOUSE, John William (1849-1917, British)

Description: Nude girl in landscape, canvas laid down on board Oil Painting (22x32in).

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Lot 48: John William Waterhouse, R.A.

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Description: 1849-1917 the easy chair oil on canvas 83 by 67 cm., 32 1/2 by 26 1/2 in. !165000-247000 An unfinished sketch of this type by Waterhouse, which may have been undertaken as a study for a portrait or perhaps of a detail in a planned larger painting, shows the artist's instinctive and always pleasing manner of painting. Areas of colour are built up in translucent textures of thinned oil paint and without any elaborate under-drawing. The child's hands and face have received the closest attention, and she has already a sweet expression of resignation to the process of being painted. Even these areas, however, are treated in an empirical and responsive way, so that the painting is living and true in its representation. Provenance: The artist's studio sale at Christie's, 23 July 1926, lot 41 (bought Fry for 16 guineas) Sir Frederick Fry By whom sold at Christie's, 18 June 1943, lot 13 (bought Strasser for 2I guineas) Literature: Anthony Hobson, The Art and Life of J.W. Waterhouse RA, London, 1980, p.194, cat. no.246.

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Lot 49: WATERHOUSE, JOHN WILLIAM (1849-1917)

Description: Telling a story Oil/board 7x9 inches (18.8x23.6 cm).

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Follower of John William Waterhouse, RA, RI (British, 1849-1917) The Magic Circle

Lot 52: Follower of John William Waterhouse, RA, RI (British, 1849-1917) The Magic Circle

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Description: The Magic Circle oil on canvas91 x 61cm (35 13/16 x 24in).

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