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Lots related to boat%20model%20model%20steam%20yacht for sale at auction

(497 lots returned of approx. 8,641 available)

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GRP inc Mixed diecast models. Lledo 39

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £60 - £80

Description: Mixed group of diecast models. Lledo 39 x individual models and 2 x Gift Sets; 5 x Matchbox Models of Yesteryear; 8 x Corgi Cameo Fina promotional models; 4 x Original Omnibus Buses and Trolleybuses (some missing outer boxes); plus others - Excellent to Mint in Fair to Near Mint boxes and 2 x Concept Models London RF Buses (one missing front doors) - Good and Excellent Plus in Good to Good Plus boxes. (66)

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Live Auction: 25 days 4 hours

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GRP inc Matchbox Models of Yesteryear maroon

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £70 - £90

Description: Matchbox Models of Yesteryear group of maroon window boxed Commercial vehicles including various Ford Model T and Talbot Vans, Steam Wagons etc - Excellent Plus to Mint in Good to Near Mint boxes. (64)

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GRP inc Corgi Vintage Glory of Steam No.80305

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £60 - £80

Description: Corgi Vintage Glory of Steam No.80305 Garrett Traction Engine with Dropside Trailer & Log Trailer "Wynn's"; No.20205 Foden Steam Wagon with pair of Dropside Trailers "Fuller's"; 4 x further Steam Models including Dibnah's Choice No.20001 Sentinel Steam Wagon with Dropside Trailer "Tarmac"; Burago 1/18th scale Dodge Viper RT/10 and Corgi Dad's Army Bedford O Series Van "W Hodges" - all generally Near Mint to Mint in Good Plus to Near Mint boxes, although Corgi models are not checked for correct literature, certificates etc. (8)

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Live Auction: 25 days 4 hours

Current bid: £35 (1 bid)

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QTY inc Lledo Days Gone, Corgi Classics

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £50 - £70

Description: Lledo Days Gone, Corgi Classics, Matchbox Models of Yesteryear and other similar diecast models including Brumm 1923 Morgan Cycle Car; Corgi Classics Lovejoy Morris Minor Convertible (box missing perspex window) etc - Excellent to Mint in Fair to Excellent boxes. 22 x Various unboxed Steam Wagons by Lledo, Matchbox Yesteryear etc - generally Excellent to Near Mint; further unboxed models including Corgi Classics, Models of Yesteryear etc, along with a couple of 1950's issue Dinky Toys one of which is repainted and incomplete - Poor to Excellent (qty)

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QTY inc Diecast models and magazines. 65

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £60 - £80

Description: Diecast models and magazines. 65 x Various Lledo individual models and Lledo Rolls Royce Set; 19 x Models of Yesteryear; Matchbox 40th Anniversary Gift Set (heavily sun faded box); 6 x Further models - Good to Mint in Fair to Excellent boxes (many boxes incorrect or sun faded). Quantity of Lledo Magazines, Model Collector and Collectors gazettes - Fair to Good. (qty)

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PCM UK-76805 IL-76 Uzbeckistan - this model

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £40 - £60

Description: PCM UK-76805 IL-76 Uzbeckistan - this model is presumed Mint as still sealed within Near Mint card box.

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Starting bid: £20 (0 bids)

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PCM406 Harrier GR3 XV744 - this model

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £40 - £60

Description: PCM406 Harrier GR3 XV744 - this model is still sealed within card box, presumed Mint in Mint card box.

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PCM048 Harrier GR9A ZD327 - this model

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £40 - £60

Description: PCM048 Harrier GR9A ZD327 - this model is presumed Mint as still sealed within card box.

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PCM404 Gloster Meteor MF14 WS843 - this model

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £40 - £60

Description: PCM404 Gloster Meteor MF14 WS843 - this model presumed Mint as still sealed within Near Mint/Mint card box.

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Model Bus and Magazine - plastic bus models

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £30 - £50

Description: Model Bus and Magazine group - plastic bus models by Brekina, Roskopf, Wiking and a Kovap modern tinplate bus, some unboxed - Good to Mint with Fair to Excellent boxes. (32 + a quantity of Diecast Modeller and similar magazines), Good.

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GRP inc EFE Bus Model and Code 3 - Code 3 models

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £80 - £120

Description: EFE Bus Model and Code 3 group - Code 3 models including Routemaster 40th Anniversary Commemorative; London Bus repaints "Norbiton Garage Open Day"; similar "Twickenham Garage Open Day" and others similar, also some standard models - Mint in Good Plus to Excellent Plus boxes. (20)

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Live Auction: 25 days 4 hours

Starting bid: £45 (0 bids)

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GRP inc Matchbox Models of Yesteryear - Y-22

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £40 - £60

Description: Matchbox Models of Yesteryear group - Y-22 1930 Model A Ford Van "Cherry Blossom Boot Polish"; Y-7 1930 Model A Ford Tow Truck "Shell" and others similar, also Y-27 1922 Foden "Frasers' Set" - overall models are Mint in Good Plus to Near Mint maroon window boxes. (37)

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GRP inc Days Gone and EFE model - 2 x BB1002

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £40 - £60

Description: Days Gone and EFE model group - 2 x BB1002 Scammell 6-wheel Box Van Whitbread and 3-piece tinplate Brewery Set; EFE 2-car model Sets, Gilbow Railway Collection 99636 4-car Roadster Set and others similar, also similar by Corgi, Cararama, Matchbox - overall models are Mint in Good to Excellent Plus boxes. (33)

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GRP inc Oxford Railway scale model vehicle

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £80 - £100

Description: Oxford Railway scale model vehicle group - 1:76 scale models including Land Rover Post Office, Jaguar Mk.II, white "Police", MG TC, racing green and others similar - models are Mint in Near Mint/Mint rigid plastic display boxes. (79)

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GRP inc Corgi Trackside Model - PO1004 4-model

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £80 - £100

Description: Corgi Trackside Model group - including PO1004 4-model Post Office Set and 5 other similar sets, Single Model Issues including DG201002 Morris LD Van "Pollock"; DG200003 Ford Transit Van "Securicor", dark blue/silver and others similar - Mint in Near Mint/Mint boxes. (76)

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GRP inc Corgi Trackside model - DG175013

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £50 - £70

Description: Corgi Trackside model group - DG175013 Scammell Handyman Log Trailer "Price of Llandovery"; DG214002 Thornycroft Nippy British Rail Dropside and others, also In Scotland and In Ireland 4-Model Sets - overall models are Mint in Good Plus to Near Mint boxes. (21)

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GRP inc Matchbox Superfast model - MB22 Jaguar

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £50 - £70

Description: Matchbox Superfast model group - MB22 Jaguar XK120, cream, racing number 414, MB38 Ford Model A Van "Pepsi Cola" and other hanging box issues, similar hanging card and illustrated box issues and later reissue Matchbox Originals - overall models are Good to Mint in Good (some hanging box issues have been opened) to Mint boxes. (47)

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Live Auction: 25 days 4 hours

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GRP inc Matchbox Models of Yesteryear and other

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £50 - £70

Description: Matchbox Models of Yesteryear and other diecast group - window box issues including Y-12 1912 Ford Model T "Suze"; Y-23 1922 AEC Omnibus "Rice Krispies", Y-12 1829 Stephensons Rocket and others similar, also models by Solido, Schabak, EFE, Classix and others, 3 unboxed - overall Excellent to Mint, boxes are Good to Near Mint. (54)

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Live Auction: 25 days 4 hours

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GRP inc Royal Mail diecast and white metal model

by Vectis Auctions Ltd

September 30, 2015, 10:30 AM GMT

Stockton on Tees, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £30 - £50

Description: Royal Mail diecast and white metal model group - De-Bo Toys Horsedrawn Royal Mail vehicle, red, black roof with grey horse, Graham Ward Gear Box Models Van, Post Boxes, figures and diecast models by Corgi, Lledo, Days Gone, interesting lot - Excellent to Mint (23)

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Oct. 1912 letter from a Titanic survivor about the

by Lion Heart Autographs

September 30, 2015, 12:00 PM EST

New York, NY, USA

Estimated Price: $4,000 - $6,000

Description: A Passenger from the Titanic’s Infamous Lifeboat No. 1, Writes to a Fellow Survivor, Referring to the Scandal to Which Their Names Would Forever Be Attached: “I am afraid our nerves are still bad, as we had such trouble & anxiety added to our already awful experience by the very unjust inquiry when we arrived in London” ********** TITANIC. [FRANCATELLI, LAURA MABEL; (1880-1967)]. ALS. (“M. Francatelli”). 3pp. 8vo. New York, (October 12, 1912). On Plaza Hotel stationery and with the original envelope. Francatelli was a first class passenger who survived the sinking of the Titanic by boarding the infamous Lifeboat No. 1 with her employer, fashion designer Lucy Duff-Gordon (1863-1835), her husband, wealthy Scottish nobleman Cosmo Duff-Gordon (1862-1931), and the recipient of our letter, New York businessman ABRAHAM LINCOLN SALOMON (1868-1959), along with a fifth passenger, New Jersey businessman Charles Stengel. ********** “Lady Duff Gordon is in New York again, very busy opening her two new houses in West 57th Street. We are staying here another week & Lady Gordon says she would so much like to see you before we leave, if you would just ‘phone and say when we may expect you to call. We do hope you have now quite recovered from the terrible experience. I am afraid our nerves are still bad, as we had such trouble & anxiety added to our already awful experience by the very unjust inquiry when we arrived in London. Lady Gordon’s mother is with us and she would so much like to meet you being one who shared our boat. Kindest regards. Yours sincerely…” ********** On April 11, 1912, the New York-bound luxury liner, Titanic, sailed on her maiden voyage from Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland, after having departed Southampton and Cherbourg the previous day. The world’s largest ship at the time, the Titanic carried scores of wealthy, upper-crust American and British citizens as well as hundreds of poor emigrants from Europe traveling in steerage. Three days into the transatlantic crossing, Captain Edward Smith received warnings about icebergs off the coast of Newfoundland, which, not inconsistent with accepted procedure, he ignored. On April 14, at 11:40 p.m., lookouts on the bridge spotted an iceberg in the ship’s path. Despite maneuvers to avoid it, the Titanic collided with the berg, leaving a huge gash on her starboard side. Twenty-five minutes later, Captain Smith prepared to evacuate passengers onto the woefully insufficient number of lifeboats. ********** Lucy Duff-Gordon, an influential fashion designer and sister of risqué novelist Elinor Glyn, later noted, “I had been in bed for about an hour and the lights were all out, when I was awakened by a funny, rumbling noise. It was like nothing I had ever heard before. It seemed as if some giant hand had been playing bowls, rolling the great balls along. Then the boat stopped and immediately there was the frightful noise of escaping steam, and I heard people running outside my cabin but they were laughing and gay,” (Titanic Voices: 63 Survivors Tell Their Extraordinary Stories, Holman). ********** When her secretary, Mabel Francatelli, noticed water streaming into her cabin on E Deck, she went upstairs to warn her employer: “…A man came to me and put a life preserver on me assuring me he was only taking precautions and not to be alarmed... When we got on the top deck, the lifeboats were being lowered on the starboard side... I then noticed that the sea was nearer to us than during the day, and I said to Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon ‘We are sinking’ and he said ‘Nonsense, come away,’” (from Francatelli’s sworn affidavit submitted to the British inquiry, quoted in Encyclopedia Titanica). ********** Soon, however, the reality of the situation became apparent to the Duff-Gordons and Francatelli. According to Lucy Duff-Gordon’s account, “On the port side was a scene of indescribable horror. Boat after boat was being lowered in a pandemonium of rushing figures fighting for places, tearing at each other, trampling women and children under foot. The Lascars [Southeast Asian sailors] from below deck had run amok and were battling like devils round the remaining boats… While we stood there people rushed by us in a headlong mob to get anywhere away from the hell of that struggling, yelling mob, and there were heart-rending shrieks as one boat, too hurriedly launched, upset and its occupants were shot out into the black depths of water below. ‘We will go round to the starboard side,’ Cosmo said. ‘It may be better there. It can’t possibly be worse.’ It was better, for although there were crowds, there was no confusion. The lifeboats were being quietly filled with women, while officers and male passengers helped to launch them,” (op. cit., Holman). Lucy Duff-Gordon refused to abandon her husband on the Titanic. “Suddenly we saw that everyone in the vicinity had dispersed, except for some sailors who were launching a little boat. We found out afterwards that it was not a lifeboat but rather the captain’s ‘emergency’ boat,” (ibid.). The crewmen, many of whom were firemen or “stokers” invited several passengers, including Francatelli and the Duff-Gordons, to join them in the boat. ********** By around 1 a.m. Francatelli, the Duff-Gordons, “and the two Americans, whose names we found out were Mr Stengel and Mr Salomon,” had joined seven crew members in Lifeboat No. 1, an emergency cutter with a capacity of 40, swung out along the starboard side of the Titanic, ready for quick action should someone fall overboard, (ibid.). Seeing no other passengers on the starboard side of the deck, the boat was lowered into the water with just 12 passengers at around 1:15 a.m. The fourth lifeboat to launch, it rowed away from the sinking vessel and the decision not to return to rescue any of the helpless passengers from the near freezing water later became a subject of much controversy. ********** From the lifeboat, the small party watched in shock as, at around 2 a.m., the Titanic cracked in half and plunged out of sight into the black water. According to the later testimony of Titanic fireman Robert Pusey, while on the lifeboat Lady Duff-Gordon commented on Francatelli’s loss of her (Francatelli’s) nightdress, prompting Pusey to complain that he and his fellow sailors had not only lost their kit but, once the ship sank, their wages, too. Sir Duff-Gordon promised the crew one month’s wages, “a fiver each to start a new kit,” once the lifeboat returned to safety, (“Testimony of Robert W. Pusey,” British Wreck Commissioner’s Inquiry: Day 11, Titanic Inquiry Project). At around 4:10 in the morning, they were rescued by the Carpathia and the next day Duff-Gordon kept his word and authorized Francatelli to issue each crewmember of Lifeboat No. 1 a check for ₤5. Unfortunately, this payment was later misconstrued by journalists as a payoff to row away from the doomed Titanic without taking on additional passengers for fear of being swamped. The press soon dubbed Lifeboat No. 1 “the Money Boat” and “the Millionaire’s Boat.” ********** Three days after rescuing the survivors of the Titanic tragedy, the Carpathia sailed into New York harbor, where a Congressional hearing was held, which concluded that emergency measures aboard the Titanic had been severely lacking and blaming the Titanic’s captain for ignoring the warnings of danger. The British government held its own inquiry, beginning on May 2, 1912. A panel of experts heard testimony over the course of 36 days, including that of the Duff-Gordons, the only passengers called to testify. Cosmo was questioned on the 10th and he and his wife on the 11th day of the hearing. (See G. B. Shaw’s essay on the subject, published on May 14, entitled “Some Unmentioned Morals,” in which he quotes from Lady Duff-Gordon’s testimony.) Additionally, every passenger aboard Lifeboat No. 1 was required to submit a sworn statement. Francatelli’s affidavit vehemently denies the unfounded accusations of bribery. The resulting report of the British inquiry reproved those aboard Lifeboat No. 1 for not returning to assist more passengers. ********** Our letter mentions the “very unjust inquiry” and also references the opening of Lucy’s new West 57th Street showrooms. It was the move uptown, from her showrooms on West 36th Street, which her business had outgrown, that prompted the Duff-Gordons to book passage on the first available ship to New York, which happened to be the Titanic. Lucy narrowly escaped death again when she canceled her passage aboard the Lusitania, which was torpedoed by a German submarine on May 7, 1915. Although they remained married, by 1915 the Duff-Gordons had become estranged and pursued their individual interests. Lucy’s impact on the world of fashion (as well as the influence of her sister, author Elinor Glyn) has been the subject of numerous books and museum exhibitions. Her fashion innovations include the introduction of the “mannequin parade,” a precursor of the runway show; the introduction of slit skirts and low necklines; using trained fashion models; and less restrictive corsets and lingerie. Her London couture brand, Lucile Ltd., was so popular that she opened branches in Paris, New York City and Chicago, and counted among her clients several generations of royalty, society ladies and Hollywood starlets. Her success was curtailed by a 1917 precedent-setting contract dispute which was decided against her in an opinion written by future Supreme Court justice Benjamin Cardozo. ********** Francatelli settled for a time in Manhattan and took several subsequent voyages across the Atlantic, including one in 1954, when she returned to her native England for good. ********** Abraham Lincoln Salomon, our letter’s recipient, was a wholesale stationer with offices on lower Broadway and in Philadelphia and a residence on Manhattan’s Central Park West. By marriage, he was a distant cousin of photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Following the disaster, Salomon became withdrawn, and refused to discuss the Titanic’s sinking for the rest of his life. He died a wealthy man at the age of 90. ********** The launching of Lifeboat No. 1 was depicted in the 1958 film adaptation of Walter Lord’s A Night to Remember, and a scene from James Cameron’s 1997 Titanic, in which Cosmo Duff-Gordon notes that it was “out of the question” to turn around and pick up survivors, was cut from the film’s final version. ********** Written on a folded sheet which is nearly bisected by a horizontal fold tear. Nominal paper loss on the second page along the fold does not affect any text. Light mounting residue on the blank fourth page. In good condition.

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Extremely rare menu from the last lunch served aboard the Titanic from a survivor of the notorious Lifeboat No. 1

by Lion Heart Autographs

September 30, 2015, 12:00 PM EST

New York, NY, USA

Estimated Price: $50,000 - $70,000

Description: A Menu from the Last Lunch aboard the Titanic, Hours Before She Struck an Iceberg********** TITANIC MENU. 1p. 8vo. R.M.S. Titanic, April 14, 1912. A menu from the last luncheon served aboard the Titanic, formerly belonging to first-class passenger ABRAHAM LINCOLN SALOMON (1868-1959), a wholesale stationer with offices in New York and Philadelphia and a resident on Manhattan’s Central Park West. Salomon survived the tragedy and carried this menu on board the infamous Lifeboat No. 1. Signed on the verso by another first-class passenger ISAAC GERALD FRAUENTHAL (1868-1932; “I. G. Frauenthal / 1493 B[road]way”), a New York lawyer and likely Salomon’s luncheon companion, who also survived the disaster by leaping from the Titanic’s deck into lifeboat No. 5. ********** Facing competition from the faster ships of the Cunard line, the Lusitania and the Mauretania, the White Star Line’s Titanic and her sister ships, Olympia and Britannic, were built with the intention of being larger and more luxurious than their competition. In order to create the impression that its passengers were in an elegant hotel, the first- and second-class public rooms were decorated in the most lavish manner and included elaborately carved wood paneling, etched glass partitions, and ornate furniture. The grand and sophisticated first-class dining saloon located on D Deck was capable of seating 500 guests. The “immense room has been decorated in a style peculiarly English – that… which… evolved by the eminent architects of early Jacobean times… The furniture of oak is designed to harmonise with its surroundings,” according to the White Star Line’s 1911 advertisements. ********** On April 11, 1912, the New York-bound Titanic set sail on her maiden voyage from Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland, after having departed Southampton and Cherbourg the previous day. The world’s largest ship at the time, the Titanic carried scores of wealthy, upper-crust American and British citizens as well as hundreds of poor emigrants from Europe traveling in steerage. ********** Naturally, the food on board the Titanic was as sumptuous as the décor. Every evening a bugler called passengers to dinner with the tune of “The Roast Beef of Old England,” a White Star tradition, and first-class dinners included up to 13 courses. The importance placed on the Titanic’s meals is reflected in the salary of its head chef, Charles Proctor, the highest-paid crew member after the ship’s captain. The menu for what would be the final luncheon aboard the ill-fated ship included consommé fermier; cockie leekie soup; fillets of brill; egg a L’Argenteuil; chicken a la Maryland; corned beef; vegetables; dumplings; grilled mutton chops; mashed, fried, and baked jacket potatoes; custard pudding; apple merinque; pastry; a buffet of salmon mayonnaise; potted shrimps; Norwegian anchovies; soused herrings; plain and smoked sardines; roast beef; round or spiced beef; veal and ham pie; Virginia and Cumberland ham; Bologna sausage; brawn; galantine of chicken; corned ox tongue; lettuce; beetroot; tomatoes; a selection of Cheshire, Stilton, Gorgonzola, Edam, Camembert, Roquefort, St. Ivel, and cheddar cheese; and, for an extra threepence or sixpence per tankard, “iced draught Munich Lager Beer!” ********** Because of assigned seating, passengers would have dined with the same companions throughout the voyage, thus it is likely that Frauenthal wrote his name on the verso of our menu and gave it to Salomon, so they could remain in touch following their return to New York City. Both men shared the commonality of their Jewish religion and businesses located on Manhattan’s Broadway. ********** Three days into the transatlantic crossing, Captain Edward Smith received warnings about icebergs off the coast of Newfoundland, which, not inconsistent with accepted procedure, he ignored. On April 14, at 11:40 p.m., lookouts on the bridge spotted an iceberg in the ship’s path. Despite maneuvers to avoid it, the Titanic collided with the berg, leaving a huge gash on her starboard side. Twenty-five minutes later, Captain Smith prepared to evacuate passengers onto the woefully insufficient number of lifeboats. ********** In addition to Salomon, Lucy Duff-Gordon, a prominent fashion designer and sister of risqué novelist Elinor Glyn, her husband Cosmo Duff-Gordon, and Lucy’s secretary, Mabel Francatelli, were passengers in Lifeboat No. 1. Describing the disaster as it unfolded, Lucy Duff-Gordon recalled, “I had been in bed for about an hour and the lights were all out, when I was awakened by a funny, rumbling noise. It was like nothing I had ever heard before. It seemed as if some giant hand had been playing bowls, rolling the great balls along. Then the boat stopped and immediately there was the frightful noise of escaping steam, and I heard people running outside my cabin but they were laughing and gay,” (Titanic Voices: 63 Survivors Tell Their Extraordinary Stories, Holman). ********** When her secretary, Mabel Francatelli, noticed water streaming into her cabin on E Deck, she went upstairs to warn her employer: “…A man came to me and put a life preserver on me assuring me he was only taking precautions and not to be alarmed... When we got on the top deck, the lifeboats were being lowered on the starboard side... I then noticed that the sea was nearer to us than during the day, and I said to Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon ‘We are sinking’ and he said ‘Nonsense, come away,’” (from Francatelli’s sworn affidavit submitted to the British inquiry, quoted in Encyclopedia Titanica). ********** Soon, however, the reality of the situation became apparent to the Duff-Gordons and Francatelli. According to Lucy Duff-Gordon’s account, “On the port side was a scene of indescribable horror. Boat after boat was being lowered in a pandemonium of rushing figures fighting for places, tearing at each other, trampling women and children under foot. The Lascars [Southeast Asian sailors] from below deck had run amok and were battling like devils round the remaining boats… While we stood there people rushed by us in a headlong mob to get anywhere away from the hell of that struggling, yelling mob, and there were heart-rending shrieks as one boat, too hurriedly launched, upset and its occupants were shot out into the black depths of water below. ‘We will go round to the starboard side,’ Cosmo said. ‘It may be better there. It can’t possibly be worse.’ It was better, for although there were crowds, there was no confusion. The lifeboats were being quietly filled with women, while officers and male passengers helped to launch them,” (op. cit., Holman). Lucy Duff-Gordon refused to abandon her husband on the Titanic. “Suddenly we saw that everyone in the vicinity had dispersed, except for some sailors who were launching a little boat. We found out afterwards that it was not a lifeboat but rather the captain’s ‘emergency’ boat,” (ibid.). The crewmen, many of whom were firemen or “stokers” invited several passengers, including Francatelli and the Duff-Gordons, to join them in the boat. ********** By around 1 a.m. the Duff-Gordons, Francatelli, “and the two Americans, whose names we found out were Mr Stengel and Mr Salomon,” had joined seven crew members in Lifeboat No. 1, an emergency cutter with a capacity of 40, swung out along the starboard side of the Titanic, ready for quick action should someone fall overboard, (ibid.). Seeing no other passengers on the starboard side of the deck, the boat was lowered into the water with just 12 passengers at around 1:15 a.m. The fourth lifeboat to launch, it rowed away from the sinking vessel and the decision not to return to rescue any of the helpless passengers from the near freezing water later became a subject of much controversy. ********** From the lifeboat, the small party watched in shock as, at around 2 a.m., the Titanic cracked in half and plunged out of sight into the black water. According to the later testimony of Titanic fireman Robert Pusey, while on the lifeboat Lady Duff-Gordon commented on Francatelli’s loss of her (Francatelli’s) nightdress, prompting Pusey to complain that he and his fellow sailors had not only lost their kit but, once the ship sank, their wages, too. Sir Duff-Gordon promised the crew one month’s wages, “a fiver each to start a new kit,” once the lifeboat returned to safety, (“Testimony of Robert W. Pusey,” British Wreck Commissioner’s Inquiry: Day 11, Titanic Inquiry Project). At around 4:10 in the morning, they were rescued by the Carpathia and the next day Duff-Gordon kept his word and authorized Francatelli to issue each crewmember of Lifeboat No. 1 a check for ₤5. Unfortunately, this payment was later misconstrued by journalists as a payoff to row away from the doomed Titanic without taking on additional passengers for fear of being swamped. The press soon dubbed Lifeboat No. 1 “the Money Boat” and “the Millionaire’s Boat.” ********** Three days after rescuing the survivors of the Titanic tragedy, the Carpathia sailed into New York harbor, where a Congressional hearing was held, which concluded that emergency measures aboard the Titanic had been severely lacking and blaming the Titanic’s captain for ignoring the warnings of danger. The British government held its own inquiry, beginning on May 2, 1912. A panel of experts heard testimony over the course of 36 days, including that of the Duff-Gordons, the only passengers called to testify. Cosmo was questioned on the 10th and he and his wife on the 11th day of the hearing. (See G. B. Shaw’s essay on the subject, published on May 14, entitled “Some Unmentioned Morals,” in which he quotes from Lady Duff-Gordon’s testimony.) Additionally, every passenger aboard Lifeboat No. 1 was required to submit a sworn statement. Francatelli’s affidavit vehemently denies the unfounded accusations of bribery. The resulting report of the British inquiry reproved those aboard Lifeboat No. 1 for not returning to assist more passengers. ********** The launching of Lifeboat No. 1 was depicted in the 1958 film adaptation of Walter Lord’s A Night to Remember, and a scene from James Cameron’s 1997 Titanic, in which Cosmo Duff-Gordon notes that it was “out of the question” to turn around and pick up survivors, was cut from the film’s final version. ********** The Duff-Gordons had booked passage on the first available ship to New York, which happened to be the Titanic, in order to attend to the opening of Lucy’s new West 57th Street showrooms. Lucy narrowly escaped death again when she canceled her passage aboard the Lusitania, which was torpedoed by a German submarine on May 7, 1915. Although they remained married, by 1915 the Duff-Gordons had become estranged and pursued their individual interests. Lucy’s impact on the world of fashion (as well as the influence of her sister, author Elinor Glyn) has been the subject of numerous books and museum exhibitions. Her fashion innovations include the introduction of the “mannequin parade,” a precursor of the runway show; the introduction of slit skirts and low necklines; using trained fashion models; and less restrictive corsets and lingerie. Her London couture brand, Lucile Ltd., was so popular that she opened branches in Paris, New York City and Chicago, and counted among her clients several generations of royalty, society ladies and Hollywood starlets. Her success was curtailed by a 1917 precedent-setting contract dispute which was decided against her in an opinion written by future Supreme Court justice Benjamin Cardozo. ********** Frauenthal, the Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania-born son of German-Jewish immigrants, was traveling aboard the Titanic with his brother Henry, a successful New York doctor who specialized in treating chronic joint diseases, and Henry’s new bride Clara, née Heinsheimer, whom he had wed in France just two weeks earlier. All three were saved by jumping into Lifeboat No. 5, but Henry broke the ribs of one of the boat’s occupants, Annie May Stengel, when he fell on her. Coincidentally, Mrs. Stengel was the wife of Charles E. H. Stengel, the fifth passenger aboard Lifeboat No. 1. In 1927, Dr. Frauenthal committed suicide by leaping from a hospital window. His wife, Clara, was institutionalized for the final 16 years of her life. Following the disaster, the menu’s owner, Abraham Salomon, became withdrawn, and refused to discuss the Titanic’s sinking for the rest of his life. ********** Subsequent to his rescue by the Carpathia, Isaac Frauenthal formed a committee with several survivors, including American socialite Margaret “Unsinkable Molly” Brown, to recognize the bravery of the Carpathia’s Captain Arthur Rostron and his crew. A month after their rescue, Brown honored the heroism of Captain Rostron with a silver cup and presented medals to the ship’s crew of 320. ********** Only three other Titanic lunch menus from this date are known: One was donated to the Greenwich National Maritime Museum by Walter Lord, author of A Night to Remember, and another sold for £76,000 (approximately $120,000) in 2012. ********** The top left and lower right corners of the menu are missing. Scotch tape discoloration in the left margin, with two tears along a fragile irregular crease. An extremely rare artifact made even more remarkable with such traceable provenance and association!

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1 of only 4 known tickets from the Titanic's Turkish Baths' weighing chair, from a survivor of infamous Lifeboat No. 1

by Lion Heart Autographs

September 30, 2015, 12:00 PM EST

New York, NY, USA

Estimated Price: $7,500 - $10,000

Description: A Fourth and Hitherto Unknown Printed Ticket from the Titanic’s Turkish Baths’ Weighing Chair, Linked to the Occupants of the Infamous Lifeboat No. 1********** TITANIC EPHEMERA. A ticket from the Henry Pooley & Son weighing chair device custom-made for the Titanic’s Turkish baths’ cooling room. 1p. 48mo. R.M.S. Titanic, (April 15 [?], 1912). The ticket bears the penciled names of three first class passengers (“Miss Francatelli / Sir Cosmo Duff Gordon / Lady”). Likely written in the hand of New York businessman Abraham Lincoln Salomon (1868-1959) a first class passenger aboard Lifeboat No. 1, this precious relic names the influential fashion designer Lucy Duff-Gordon (1863-1835); her husband, wealthy Scottish nobleman Cosmo Duff-Gordon (1862-1931); and Lucy’s secretary Laura Mabel Francatelli (1880-1967). The Duff-Gordons, Francatelli and Salomon are inextricably linked to each other as four of the five passengers who joined seven crewmembers in the infamous Lifeboat No. 1. On the ticket’s verso is printed “Henry Pooley & Son, LTD. / Sole Makers, / Birmingham & London.” ********** Facing competition from the faster ships of the Cunard line, the Lusitania and the Mauretania, the White Star Line’s Titanic and her sister ships, Olympia (launched 1910) and Britannic (launched 1914), were built the with the intention of being larger and more luxurious than their competition. In order to create the impression that its passengers were in an elegant hotel, the first- and second-class public rooms were decorated in the most lavish manner and included elaborately carved wood paneling, etched glass partitions, and ornate furniture. Amenities abounded, including electricity, a telephone system, gymnasium, squash court, heated swimming pool, elevators, barber, kennel, private massage room, tea gardens, the À la Carte Restaurant (nicknamed the Ritz), a large and sophisticated first-class dining saloon located on D Deck, and the opulent Turkish baths, where, for an additional fee of four shillings or one dollar, first class passengers could enjoy the steam room, hot room, temperate room, shampooing room, and cooling room. The baths were probably the most lavish rooms aboard the Titanic, decorated in a Moorish theme that utilized blue and green tiles and “Cairo curtains” that filtered the light from the portholes to convey “something of the grandeur of the mysterious East,” according to the White Star Line’s 1911 advertisements. Among the bath’s novelties were heating beds that utilized electric lamps and a weighing chair, located within the cooling room. The chair, based on Pooley’s model S133, was customized with a geometric design that matched the Moorish decor of the room, and was capable of printing, on a small cardboard ticket like the present example, the bather’s weight in stones and pounds along with the date. ********** On April 11, 1912, the New York-bound Titanic set sail on her maiden voyage from Queenstown (Cobh), Ireland, after having departed Southampton and Cherbourg the previous day. The world’s largest ship at the time, the Titanic carried scores of wealthy, upper-crust American and British citizens as well as hundreds of poor emigrants from Europe traveling in steerage. Three days into the transatlantic crossing, Captain Edward Smith received warnings about icebergs off the coast of Newfoundland, which, not inconsistent with accepted procedure, he ignored. On April 14, at 11:40 p.m., lookouts on the bridge spotted an iceberg in the ship’s path. Despite maneuvers to avoid it, the Titanic collided with the berg, leaving a huge gash on her starboard side. Twenty-five minutes later, Captain Smith prepared to evacuate passengers onto the woefully insufficient number of lifeboats. ********** Lucy Duff-Gordon, prominent fashion designer and sister of risqué novelist Elinor Glyn, later noted, “I had been in bed for about an hour and the lights were all out, when I was awakened by a funny, rumbling noise. It was like nothing I had ever heard before. It seemed as if some giant hand had been playing bowls, rolling the great balls along. Then the boat stopped and immediately there was the frightful noise of escaping steam, and I heard people running outside my cabin but they were laughing and gay,” (Titanic Voices: 63 Survivors Tell Their Extraordinary Stories, Holman). ********** When her secretary, Mabel Francatelli, noticed water streaming into her cabin on E Deck, she went upstairs to warn her employer: “…A man came to me and put a life preserver on me assuring me he was only taking precautions and not to be alarmed... When we got on the top deck, the lifeboats were being lowered on the starboard side... I then noticed that the sea was nearer to us than during the day, and I said to Sir Cosmo Duff-Gordon ‘We are sinking’ and he said ‘Nonsense, come away,’” (from Francatelli’s sworn affidavit submitted to the British inquiry, quoted in Encyclopedia Titanica). ********** Soon, however, the reality of the situation became apparent to the Duff-Gordons and Francatelli. According to Lucy Duff-Gordon’s account, “On the port side was a scene of indescribable horror. Boat after boat was being lowered in a pandemonium of rushing figures fighting for places, tearing at each other, trampling women and children under foot. The Lascars [Southeast Asian sailors] from below deck had run amok and were battling like devils round the remaining boats… While we stood there people rushed by us in a headlong mob to get anywhere away from the hell of that struggling, yelling mob, and there were heart-rending shrieks as one boat, too hurriedly launched, upset and its occupants were shot out into the black depths of water below. ‘We will go round to the starboard side,’ Cosmo said. ‘It may be better there. It can’t possibly be worse.’ It was better, for although there were crowds, there was no confusion. The lifeboats were being quietly filled with women, while officers and male passengers helped to launch them,” (op. cit., Holman). Lucy Duff-Gordon refused to abandon her husband on the Titanic. “Suddenly we saw that everyone in the vicinity had dispersed, except for some sailors who were launching a little boat. We found out afterwards that it was not a lifeboat but rather the captain’s ‘emergency’ boat,” (ibid.). The crewmen, many of whom were firemen or “stokers” invited several passengers, including Francatelli and the Duff-Gordons, to join them in the boat. ********** By around 1 a.m. the Duff-Gordons, Francatelli, “and the two Americans, whose names we found out were Mr Stengel and Mr Salomon,” had joined seven crew members in Lifeboat No. 1, an emergency cutter with a capacity of 40, swung out along the starboard side of the Titanic, ready for quick action should someone fall overboard, (ibid.). Seeing no other passengers on the starboard side of the deck, the boat was lowered into the water with just 12 passengers at around 1:15 a.m. The fourth lifeboat to launch, it rowed away from the sinking vessel and the decision not to return to rescue any of the helpless passengers from the near freezing water later became a subject of much controversy. ********** From the lifeboat, the small party watched in shock as, at around 2 a.m., the Titanic cracked in half and plunged out of sight into the black water. According to the later testimony of Titanic fireman Robert Pusey, while on the lifeboat Lady Duff-Gordon commented on Francatelli’s loss of her (Francatelli’s) nightdress, prompting Pusey to complain that he and his fellow sailors had not only lost their kit but, once the ship sank, their wages, too. Sir Duff-Gordon promised the crew one month’s wages, “a fiver each to start a new kit,” once the lifeboat returned to safety, (“Testimony of Robert W. Pusey,” British Wreck Commissioner’s Inquiry: Day 11, Titanic Inquiry Project). At around 4:10 in the morning, they were rescued by the Carpathia and the next day Duff-Gordon kept his word and authorized Francatelli to issue each crewmember of Lifeboat No. 1 a check for ₤5. Unfortunately, this payment was later misconstrued by journalists as a payoff to row away from the doomed Titanic without taking on additional passengers for fear of being swamped. The press soon dubbed Lifeboat No. 1 “the Money Boat” and “the Millionaire’s Boat.” ********** It is likely that during their time on Lifeboat No. 1 or following their rescue by the Carpathia, Salomon scrawled the names of Francatelli and the Duff-Gordons on the only piece of paper he had at hand, a single blank ticket from the Turkish bath’s weighing machine. ********** Three days after rescuing the survivors of the Titanic tragedy, the Carpathia sailed into New York harbor, where a Congressional hearing was held, which concluded that emergency measures aboard the Titanic had been severely lacking and blaming the Titanic’s captain for ignoring the warnings of danger. The British government held its own inquiry, beginning on May 2, 1912. A panel of experts heard testimony over the course of 36 days, including that of the Duff-Gordons, the only passengers called to testify. Cosmo was questioned on the 10th and he and his wife on the 11th day of the hearing. (See G. B. Shaw’s essay on the subject, published on May 14, entitled “Some Unmentioned Morals,” in which he quotes from Lady Duff-Gordon’s testimony.) Additionally, every passenger aboard Lifeboat No. 1 was required to submit a sworn statement. Francatelli’s affidavit vehemently denies the unfounded accusations of bribery. The resulting report of the British inquiry reproved those aboard Lifeboat No. 1 for not returning to assist more passengers. ********** The launching of Lifeboat No. 1 was depicted in the 1958 film adaptation of Walter Lord’s A Night to Remember, and a scene from James Cameron’s 1997 Titanic, in which Cosmo Duff-Gordon notes that it was “out of the question” to turn around and pick up survivors, was cut from the film’s final version. The Duff-Gordons had booked passage on the first available ship to New York, which happened to be the Titanic, in order to attend to the opening of Lucy’s new West 57th Street showrooms. Lucy narrowly escaped death again when she canceled her passage aboard the Lusitania, which was torpedoed by a German submarine on May 7, 1915. Although they remained married, by 1915 the Duff-Gordons had become estranged and pursued their individual interests. Lucy’s impact on the world of fashion (as well as the influence of her sister, author Elinor Glyn) has been the subject of numerous books and museum exhibitions. Her fashion innovations include the introduction of the “mannequin parade,” a precursor of the runway show; the introduction of slit skirts and low necklines; using trained fashion models; and less restrictive corsets and lingerie. Her London couture brand, Lucile Ltd., was so popular that she opened branches in Paris, New York City and Chicago, and counted among her clients several generations of royalty, society ladies and Hollywood starlets. Her success was curtailed by a 1917 precedent-setting contract dispute which was decided against her in an opinion written by future Supreme Court justice Benjamin Cardozo. ********** Abraham Lincoln Salomon, was a wholesale stationer with offices on lower Broadway and in Philadelphia and a residence on Manhattan’s Central Park West. By marriage, he was a distant cousin of photographer Alfred Stieglitz. Following the disaster, Salomon became withdrawn, and refused to discuss the Titanic’s sinking for the rest of his life. Six months after the disaster, Lucy Duff-Gordon’s secretary, Francatelli, wrote to Salomon on her employers behalf about their shared ordeal and to arrange a meeting in New York (See lot #102). The provenance of both the letter, menu (lot #103) and ticket can be traced back to Salomon. He died a wealthy man at the age of 90. ********** In 1914, the Pooley company was purchased by the Birmingham firm of W&T Avery Ltd., which had supplied weighing equipment to the Titanic’s mail room and whose managing director, William E. Hipkins, died aboard the Titanic. The Avery Historical Museum in Birmingham has one of the few surviving blank tickets from the Titanic’s weighing chair. Another ticket was sold in the United States in 1986 for $5,000 (₤3,570), (Titanic, Triumph and Tragedy, Eaton and Haas). ********** On September 1, 1985 an expedition mounted by French oceanographer Jean-Louis Michel of the Institut français de recherche pour l’exploitation de la mer (IFREMER) and underwater archeologist Robert Ballard of the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution became the first team to successfully map the location of the Titanic wreck, a feat which enabled divers to begin exploring the remains of the luxury liner over the subsequent decades. In 2005, James Cameron produced the Discovery Channel documentary “Last Mysteries of the Titanic” in which he explored the well-preserved Turkish baths. ********** The recto is unevenly toned by a piece of Scotch tape, now removed. In otherwise remarkable condition – an iconic relic from the Titanic’s magnificent Turkish baths!

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Remington .22 Short/Long Rife Model 511-P

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $300 - $750

Description: Remington .22 Short or Long Rife Model 511-P Scoremaster. BBL/KRR. Lever action. Side mount site. Excellent working condition.

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Remington .22 Short/Long Rife Model 341

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $300 - $750

Description: Remington .22 Short or Long Rife Model 341, Scoremaster. Serial # 56688. Lever action. Very good working condition.

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Remington .22 Auto Load Rifle Model 16

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $300 - $750

Description: Remington .22 Auto Load Rifle Model 16. Serial # 11233. Good working condition.

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Remington .22 Short/Long Rife Model 12

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $300 - $750

Description: Remington .22 Short/Long Rife Model 12. Serial # 836703. Collapsible site with pump action. Excellent working condition.

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Winchester Model 1890 22cal. Long Rifle

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $500 - $1,000

Description: Winchester Model 1890 22cal. Long Rifle. Last patent 1911. Matching Serial No. 551632. 23 1/2 inch barrel.

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Remington .22 Short/Long Rife Model 6

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $300 - $750

Description: Remington .22 Short/Long Rife "Improved" Model 6. Serial # 503103. Japaned finish. Good used working condition.

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Salesman Sample/Model Energy Plant

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $500 - $1,000

Description: Salesman Sample/Model Energy Plant. Good original condition. 30 X 17 1/2 X 13 inches.

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Cast Iron City of New York Steam Boat Pull Toy

by Showtime Auction Services

October 2, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $250 - $500

Description: Cast Iron City of New York Steam Boat Pull Toy. 30 % of original paint intact. 14 3/4 inches long.

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Model Smoking Tobacco Porcelain Sign

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $400 - $800

Description: Model Smoking Tobacco Porcelain Sign. Perimeter scratches and paint loss. 34 X 11 1/4 inches.

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National Cash Register Model 129

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $750 - $1,250

Description: National Cash Register Model 129. Candy Store Register. SN 433305. Excellent restored condition.

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National Cash Register Model 52 1/4

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $750 - $1,500

Description: National Cash Register Model 52 1/4. SN 148131C. Nickel with extended marble base and side receipt. Excellent restored condition.

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National Cash Register Floor Model 572-4F

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $1,000 - $2,000

Description: National Cash Register Floor Model 572-4F. SN 1319818. Marquee E.J. Martin & Son Co. Excellent restored condition.

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National Cash Register Model 211

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $1,250 - $2,000

Description: 1908 National Cash Register Model 211, SN 66541. Candy Store size. Rare copper flashed finish and original top sign. Excellent unrestored condition.

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1898 Columbia Hallwood Cash Register

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $750 - $1,250

Description: 1898 Columbia Hallwood Cash Register. Model 10-B. Excellent restored condition.

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1911 American Cash Register Model 522

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $500 - $1,500

Description: 1911 American Cash Register Model 522. SN 202098. Brass with marble on base and receipt on side. Excellent restored condition.

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1909 American Cash Register  Model 501

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $750 - $1,500

Description: 1909 American Cash Register Model 501. Saginaw, Mich. SN 200797. Amount button. Excellent restored condition.

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National Cash Register Model 14

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $1,250 - $2,000

Description: 1897 National Cash Register Model 14, SN 133054. Walnut case with original brass sign.

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National Cash Register Model 52 1/4

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $1,000 - $1,500

Description: National Cash Register Model 52 1/4. SN 375062. Brass with extended marble base and side receipt. Excellent restored condition.

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National Cash Register Model 327

by Showtime Auction Services

October 3, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Ann Arbor, MI, USA

Estimated Price: $1,000 - $1,500

Description: 1909 National Cash Register Model 327, SN 705425. Original milk glass slab panels, top sign with extended base. Excellent early restoration.

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VINTAGE JOHNSON 35 SEA-HORSE TOY MODEL ELECTRIC MOTOR

by Instant Auction

October 3, 2015, 12:00 PM PST

SPOKANE, WA, USA

Description: AS SHOWN. $8 SHIPPING US ONLY

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Starting bid: $25 (0 bids)

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Rapidayton Model #500

by Morphy Auctions

October 5, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Denver, PA, USA

Estimated Price: $4,000 - $6,000

Description: Has been professionally restored. Condition (9.5). Size 90"T.

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Starting bid: $1,000 (0 bids)

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Wayne Model #866 Clockface Gas Pump.

by Morphy Auctions

October 5, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Denver, PA, USA

Estimated Price: $3,000 - $5,000

Description: Has been professionally restored. Condition (9+). Size 80"T.

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Starting bid: $750 (0 bids)

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American model #48 Oil Lubster Cart on Wheels.

by Morphy Auctions

October 5, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Denver, PA, USA

Estimated Price: $2,000 - $3,000

Description: Has been professionally restored. Condition (9.5). Size 67X37X18".

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Bowser Model #245 Motor Oil Pump.

by Morphy Auctions

October 5, 2015, 9:00 AM EST

Denver, PA, USA

Estimated Price: $750 - $1,250

Description: Has been professionally restored. Condition (9+). Size 60"T.

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Starting bid: $200 (0 bids)

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Display Donald Duck - Pelham Puppets Display Range, modelled after the Walt

by Bamfords Auctioneers and Valuers Ltd

February 3, 2016, 10:30 AM GMT

Derby, United Kingdom

Description: Display Donald Duck - Pelham Puppets Display Range, modelled after the Walt Disney character, composite head and body, blue felt sailor's cap and shirt, boxed, late 1970's

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Live Auction: 151 days 5 hours

Starting bid: £5 (0 bids)

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