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Lots related to Auguste%20Rodin%201840%201917%20Balzac for sale at auction

(25 lots returned )

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Dreweatts & Bloomsbury (25)
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A rare Tunbridge ware silk ribbon box of house type, circa 1840

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 16, 2015, 10:00 AM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £70 - £100

Description: A rare Tunbridge ware silk ribbon box of house type, circa 1840, the circular cottage with a thatched roof, a devil painted to one window, 12cm (4 3/4in) high

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A framed and glazed tapestry picture of Queen Victoria

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 16, 2015, 10:00 AM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £100 - £150

Description: A framed and glazed tapestry picture of Queen Victoria's King Charles Spaniel Dash, circa 1840, after Sir Edwin Landseer, Dash with Lory, Hector and Nero (1837) , in a burr-walnut frame, 52.5cm x 62.5cm overall

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A Victorian silver and Montrose agate horn shape vinaigrette for the...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 16, 2015, 10:00 AM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £300 - £400

Description: A Victorian silver and Montrose agate horn shape vinaigrette for the Scottish market, unmarked, circa 1840, with a cairngorm set in the thistle and leaf chased domed cover, a stiff leaf collar, a vacant shield reserve and a thistle tip also cairngorm set, the gilt interior with a dot pierced grille, with a suspension chain, 6.7cm (2 5/8in) long

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Daumier (Honoré) - A group of 6 caricatures for Caricaturana and 6 more for Histoire Ancienne,

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 17, 2015, 11:00 AM BST

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £600 - £800

Description: the first group created with Charles Philipon, 12 original hand-coloured lithographs, heightened with gum-arabic, the first group each c.280 x 230mm., or the reverse, the second group each c.290 x 200mm., one of the latter group with a small hole affecting text below title, Paris, Chez Aubert, c.1840 (12)

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A pair of John & Rebecca Lloyd of Shelton models of recumbent lion and lamb...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 16, 2015, 10:00 AM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £1,000 - £1,500

Description: A pair of John & Rebecca Lloyd of Shelton models of recumbent lion and lamb groups, circa 1840, the lions decorated in shades of brown, onn white, gilt-line bases, 12cm in length See D.G. Rice, English Porcelain Animals of the 19th century , (1989), p. 175, fig. 144 for a similar example attributed to Lloyd of Shelton. 'The lion shall lie down with the lamb', Isiah Chapter XI, verse 6. The famous lion tamer of the Victorian period, Isaac Van Amburgh is thought to have re-created this line from the Bible in a show at the Drury Lane Theatre in 1836.

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A Cotswold Heritage model of ‘Titan’ a vertical live steam table engine

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 23, 2015, 10:00 AM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £300 - £500

Description: A Cotswold Heritage model of Titan a vertical live steam table engine, having four reeded architectural columns supporting a single central cylinder with 7/8th inch bore by 2 ¼ inch stroke with side rods linked to the open crank, detailed supports and guides with 9 inch spoked flywheel, eccentric link to steam valve, polished brass oiler cups and builders plaque Heritage No T021 The whole mounted on supporting plinth. Total height 41cm Base 18cm by 19cm. This design of engines dates back to the early 1800 s when they were developed by Henry Maudsley and later put into production by Murdock Aitken & Co of Glasgow. Circa 1840.

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Walker (James) - Report of James Walker, Esq....on the Proposed Lines for a Northern Railway,

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 17, 2015, 11:00 AM BST

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £300 - £400

Description: 1835 § Gibbs (Joseph) Mr. Gibb's Reply to Mr. Walker's Report upon a Great Northern Railway, 1835, original printed wrappers, ink inscription and small ms. label to upper cover of each, some creasing and marking ; and Gibbs' 1835 report on the Northern Railway, 4to (3) Three rare reports on a proposed northern railway. The main constituents were the London & York and Direct Northern schemes. Peterborough-Lincoln opened on October, 1848 and London-Peterborough in August, 1850, with King's Cross opening on 14th October, 1852

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French diplomat in Elizabethan England.- - Letter signed

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 17, 2015, 11:00 AM BST

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £300 - £400

Description: Letter signed "…Mont" a diplomatic agent in London (unidentified), to the French ambassador (or another diplomatic figure), 1p. in French, folio, London, 15th August [1580s], referring to the writer's conversations with Elizabeth I, her thoughts on "le mariage" and that the Queen desires the King's friendship, edges chipped (including signature), folds, browned. The writer was clearly involved in negotiations at the highest level. The marriage and the participators are not identified. The writer also mentions Paul Choart, Seigneur de Buzanval, described as "adiant du Roy de Navarre", and the Lord Treasurer of England, "Millort tresorier". The addressee "le Roy V[ost]re Maitre" is perhaps the King of France. Elizabeth I said to the French ambassador in May 1587 that she wanted a perfect understanding with France (relations had been difficult in late 1586).

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No Image Available

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 17, 2015, 11:00 AM BST

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £100 - £150

Description: (Mark, later first earl of Lothian, perpetual commendator of Newbattle Abbey, b. in or before 1559, d. 1609) Charter, grant by Mark Ker to James Adamson of land at Cowthroppill in the lordship of Preston , D.s. "Marcus Comendatarii de Newbotle" and 2 others, manuscript in Latin, on vellum, folds, soiled but clear and legible, lacks seal, 365 x 700mm., 8th August 1586. ⁂ "On 10 July 1606 Ker was created earl of Lothian. Concurrently with the transformation of the Newbattle Abbey title and lands into a secular lordship, the monastic buildings were gradually replaced by a private dwelling, of which Sir John Scott of Scotstarvit wrote: 'And the father and son did so metamorphose the buildings that it cannot be known that ever it did belong to the church, by reason of the fair new fabric and stately edifices built thereon… instead of the old monks has succeeded the deer'. (J. Scott. The Staggering State of Scottish Statesmen, 1754.). - Oxford DNB.

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Gillray (James) - The State of War _ or _ the Monkey-Race in danger,

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 17, 2015, 11:00 AM BST

London, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £600 - £800

Description: the army of French apes being massacred by the Second Coalition of the British lion, Turkish ogre, Russian bear and Hapsburg eagle, original hand-coloured etching, 255 x 360mm., mounted on board support, slight fading, [BM Satires 9388], H. Humphrey, 1799; Buonaparté leaving Egypt, Napoleon prepares to board a boat in August 1799, a ragged army of French soldiers in futile pursuit, two officers waiting on board with sacks of gold, above the allegorical figure of Fame points down, disparagingly, original hand-coloured etching, 360 x 260mm., a tear to lower left corner, mounted on baord support, a small surface loss to upper right corner, [BM Satires 9523], H. Humphrey, 1800; Political-Dreamings! Visions of Peace! Perspective Horrors!, Windham, who spoke out against the treaty allowing France to keep her conquests, depicted in restless sleep in bed, surrounded by numerous visions, original hand-coloured etching, 255 x 355mm., mounted on board support, [BM Satires 9735], H. Humphreys, 1801 (3)

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A Cary/Gould-type lacquered brass portable compound microscope Unsigned

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £200 - £250

Description: A Cary/Gould-type lacquered brass portable compound microscope Unsigned, circa 1840 The part-tapered tube screw-fitting at the objective end into a threaded collar positioned at the top of a square section upright cut with teeth for the rack and pinion up/down adjustment of the stage, the platform fitted with sprung brass object retaining plate complete with tool post holes to leading edge, with pivoted plano-concave mirror applied to the cylindrical base section beneath, the whole mounted via a threaded recessed collar into the lid of the original ebony line inlaid mahogany box containing accessories including three objective lenses, forceps, specimen capsule and three bone sliders, the case 16cm (6.25ins) wide. The design of the current lot was devised during the early 1820's by William Cary (1759-1825) and was subsequently published by his former apprentice, Charles Gould, in his 1827 publication THE COMPANION TO THE MICROSOPE .

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A rare early Victorian W. and A. Smith type brass pantograph William and...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £100 - £150

Description: A rare early Victorian W. and A. Smith type brass pantograph William and Andrew Smith, London, circa 1840 Constructed from three rectangular and two cylindrical section members assembling to form a bisected parallelogram with bone wheels set at each end of the central member fitted with adjustable steel pivot point opposing sliders for the tracing stylus and pencil carrier each set against engraved ratio scales, the tracer beam engraved Invented & Made by W. & A. Smith, in original mahogany box with brass pivot block, tracing pointer and weighted pencil carrier, the box 61cm (24ins) long. The partnership between William and Andrew Smith is recorded in Gloria, Clifton Directory of Scientific Instrument Makers 1550-1851 as working from 46 Lisle Street, Leicester Square, London 1838-40. The design current lot was presumably developed during the two years that this partnership existed.

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An early Victorian small gilt and patinated brass four-glass mantel clock...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £2,000 - £3,000

Description: An early Victorian small gilt and patinated brass four-glass mantel clock Jose Rodriguez Losada, London, circa 1840 The circular twin chain fusee movement with five column-turned pillars and horizontal platform English lever escapement incorporating sprung split bimetallic balance and silvered SLOW/FAST curved regulation scale to rear, the backplate with engraved signature J. R. Losada, 105 Regent St., London over vertically positioned hour bell, the silvered brass single sheet Roman numeral dial with heart-pierced blued steel hands over shaped double-line border engraved reserve enclosing repeat signature J. R. Losada, 105 Regent St., London, 6514, to lower margin, the bevel-glazed case with rectangular aperture to the cavetto moulded top over full width front door incorporating 3.75 inch wide complex ogee pointed arch glazed dial aperture with raised triangular profile surround to exterior and canted silvered brass fillet to interior, the sides with generous bevel-glazed panels, the rear with conforming panel set into ah hinged door with spring clasp, the two tier plinth base applied with band of cast patinated brass stylised acanthus foliage over cavetto moulded skirt fitted with compressed bun feet, 25.5cm (10ins) high. Jose Rodriguez Losada is recorded in Loomes, Brian Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World as working in London 1839-75. Losada was a Spanish émigré who moved to London in 1835; he initially worked for James Moore French before setting up on his own specialising in complex precision clocks and marine chronometers for export to Spanish speaking countries. In 1864 he supplied 36 marine chronometers to the Spanish Government through the Royal Observatory at Cadiz. Losada died in 1875 leaving the business in the hands of his nephews José and Miguel Rodriguez who continued up until around 1890.

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A fine George III ebonised hooded wall alarm timepiece Thomas Ranger, Chipstead

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £2,500 - £3,500

Description: A fine George III ebonised hooded wall alarm timepiece Thomas Ranger, Chipstead, circa 1765 The posted movement with square section uprights and anchor escapement regulated by 23 inch lenticular bob pendulum, the alarm set behind the going train and sounding on a bell mounted above the top plate, the 5.25 inch square brass dial with silvered alarm disc and concentric signature Tho's Ranger, Chipsted to centre within applied silvered Roman numeral chapter ring with lozenge half hour markers, with single iron hand and angles engraved with foliate scroll spandrel decoration within a scribed line border, the ebonised pine case with ogee cornice above tall frieze and three-quarter columns flanking glazed dial aperture to the front door, the sides with conforming quarter columns applied to bargeboards at the rear, the bracket with cavetto throat moulding to table over shaped side supports and double-skinned backboard incorporating aperture for the weights to descend before an intermediate panel enclosing a further recess for the pendulum, the base terminating with an inverted ogee arch to backboard, 77cm (30.25ins) high. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: Illustrated and described in Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 55 pages 182-83. A clockmaker with the surname Ranger is recorded in Baillie, G.H. Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World as working in Chipstead before 1773. Darken further notes in TIME & PLACE that Thomas Ranger's working dates were probably circa 1740-73. The current lot is a particularly attractive and well thought-out example with the pendulum and weights divided from each other by an intermediate panel fitted in front of the backboard.

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A rare George II thirty-hour weight-driven 'hook-and-spike

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £1,200 - £1,800

Description: A rare George II thirty-hour weight-driven 'hook-and-spike' wall timepiece James Woolley, Codnor, circa 1725 The three wheel going train with anchor escapement regulated by seconds pendulum set between tapered plates united by four square section steel pillars, the backplate fitted with distinctive backcock incorporating long pendulum suspension arm, the 7.5 inch wide brass break-arch dial with matted centre and pierced iron hand within applied Roman numeral chapter ring with floating cruciform half hour markers and engraved signature Wolley, Codnor to lower edge, the angles with applied winged cherub head cast spandrels beneath conforming mount to arch, the dial plate fitted to an appropriately shaped board with pine box case to rear incorporating iron hanging hoop, spurs and removable back panel, 27.5 cm (10.75ins) high approx. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: Illustrated in Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 page 238, fig. 6. James Woolley is noted in Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks (on page 136) as 'one of the most renowned of provincial clockmakers' who was born in 1695 and lived until 1786 when he was succeeded by his nephew, John. James Woolley was born to a relatively wealthy family however he appeared to have had a wayward streak which led to him being caught poaching as a boy. His subsequent apprenticeship to the blacksmith Thomas Tantum of Lascoe lead him to become a clockmaker, a career in which he excelled. In 1726 Woolley presented a turret clock to the City of Nottingham and thus was enrolled as a Burgess; this no doubt brought him to the attention of possible clients thus secured his future. Although eight-day longcase clocks by Woolley are known he appears to have specialised in thirty-hour work; however the attention to detail lavished on his movements and the quality of finish seen on many of his dials are why they are so highly regarded by modern day collectors. The current lot is the first of probably only two documented wall clocks of this type by Thomas Woolley, with the other also being offered in this sale as the following lot. The design and layout of the movement is typically original and possesses many fine details such as the deep domed wheel collets, distinctive backcock casting and arched lower margin to the plates. The style of half hour markers and spelling of his name (without the second 'o') to the chapter ring, coupled with the êrly' design of spandrel casting would suggest that the current lot is one of Woolley's earlier clocks, and can be compared to a dial of an thirty hour longcase clock (dated to around 1720) illustrated in Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks on page 134, fig. 3/42.

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A rare George III seven-day weight-driven 'hook-and-spike

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £1,000 - £1,500

Description: A rare George III seven-day weight-driven 'hook-and-spike' wall timepiece with alarm James Woolley, Codnor, circa 1765 The four wheel going train with anchor escapement regulated by seconds pendulum set between tapered plates united by four square section steel pillars, with arched cut-out to lower margin and integral extension to the left hand side for the offset alarm mechanism which sounds on a bell mounted above, the backplate fitted with distinctive backcock incorporating long pendulum suspension arm, the 9 inch diameter circular single-sheet brass Roman numeral dial with alarm disc, pierced iron hand and engraved signature Woolley, Codnor to centre, applied to a caddy moulded square oak dial board fitted with pine box case to rear incorporating iron hanging hoop, spurs and removable back panel, 28cm (11ins) high including bell. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: The current lot is well documented featuring in Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks pages 277-80 figs. 5/29 to 5/32; and Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 54 pages 180-1 (where the movement is extensively illustrated). James Woolley is noted in Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks (on page 136) as 'one of the most renowned of provincial clockmakers' who was born in 1695 and lived until 1786 when he was succeeded by his nephew, John. James Woolley was born to a relatively wealthy family however he appeared to have had a wayward streak which led to him being caught poaching as a boy. His subsequent apprenticeship to the blacksmith Thomas Tantum of Lascoe lead him to become a clockmaker, a career in which he excelled. In 1726 Woolley presented a turret clock to the City of Nottingham and thus was enrolled as a Burgess; this no doubt brought him to the attention of possible clients thus secured his future. Although eight-day longcase clocks by Woolley are known he appears to have specialised in thirty-hour work; however the attention to detail lavished on his movements and the quality of finish seen on many of his dials are why they are so highly regarded by modern day collectors. The current lot is the second of probably only two documented wall clocks of this type by Thomas Woolley, with the other also being offered in this sale as the previous lot. The design and layout of the movement is typically original and possesses many fine details such as the deep domed wheel collets and castellated tooth form for the alarm crownwheel. The provision of an alarm and the fact that it has a duration of seven-days differentiates the movement of the current timepiece from the previous lot. These differences perhaps either demonstrates progression in Woolley's approach or willingness to satisfy the specific demands of a client. The relatively utilitarian appearance of the dial would suggest that the current timepiece was destined for ºckstairs' use of a large household with the alarm designed to alert staff at the beginning of the working day.

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A rare small English iron framed hooded wall timepiece with alarm Unsigned

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £3,000 - £5,000

Description: A rare small English iron framed hooded wall timepiece with alarm Unsigned, late 17th century The single-handed short duration movement with three-wheel train and verge escapement regulated by short side-swinging bob pendulum with pallet arbor pivoted above the frame between a transverse iron armature at the front and shaped brass cock at the rear, the alarm train set behind the going train with vertical hammer arbor fitted to the inside of the rear upright and sounding on a bell mounted on top of the case, the iron strip frame constructed with central bar riveted at the top to the horizontal full-depth top plate and bent forwards at the base to form a 'J', the front terminating with stepped tenons to take both the front movement bar and the dial, the rear with alarm mechanism set within an angled bracket secured via a tenon through to the top plate and a screw to the central movement bar just above the greatwheel pivot, the rectangular single sheet brass Roman numeral dial measuring 6.5 by 4.5 inches with alarm disc and single iron hand to centre within engraved chapter ring with stylised wheatear half hour markers, the oak wall hung 'salt box' type case with open front, removable top panel and incorporating movement mounting hook and original bell secured to the arched case backboard pierced for hanging at the top, 26.5cm (10.5ins) high overall. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: Illustrated in Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 8 pages 40-41. The current lot can be directly compared to a small hooded wall alarm timepiece (complete with verge escapement regulated by short bob pendulum swinging to the side) which was sold in these rooms on Tuesday 17th March 2015 (lot 64). The movement of this other example is similarly constructed to the current lot with detail differences confined to the extended rear movement bar (truncated on the current lot), the provision of a single iron armature for the pallet arbor pivots and the presence of passing strike (incomplete). A third clock of this type (but with anchor escapement) signed for George Wood of Nailsworth is also included in this sale (see following lot) suggesting that such timepieces were made in Gloucestershire. This possibility is further supported by the presence of a related but later clock by John Coates of Cirencester also illustrated in TIME & PLACE as exhibit 48 pages 164-5.

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A Queen Anne brass lantern clock John Walter, Honiton

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £2,000 - £3,000

Description: A Queen Anne brass lantern clock John Walter, Honiton, early 18th century The posted countwheel bell-striking movement with anchor escapement regulated by seconds pendulum swinging outside of the frame clock to the rear, the dial engraved with stylised stylised leafy sprays issuing from an urn positioned just above six o'clock beneath signature John Walter of Honiton Fecit to upper margin, with iron hand within applied Roman numeral chapter ring with stylised fleur-de-lys half hour markers, the frame with column turned corner posts beneath dolphin inhabited foliate pierced front fret, vase turned finials and domed bell bearer, on turned ball feet (unrestored, lacking side frets, side doors, top finial, backplate, pendulum and weight), 35cm (13.75ins) high. Provenance: The estate of a connoisseur collector of regional furniture, works of art and clocks. John Walter of Honiton appears to be unrecorded however the current lot can be dated on stylistic grounds to the early years of the 18th century. The movement is neatly made with wheels secured directly onto tapered steel arbors without collets and the dial is well engraved with the design reminiscent of other West Country makers of a slightly earlier period such as John London of Bristol, Arthur Davis of Westleigh, and Edward Bilbie of Chew Stoke - see Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE English Country Clocks 1600-1840 exhibits 7 (pages 38-9), 14 (pages 56-7) and 21 (pages 80-3). This clock has been stored away for many years and has only been recently re-discovered hence is offered in unrestored condition.

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A Queen Anne brass lantern clock John Smorthwait, Colchester

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £3,000 - £5,000

Description: A Queen Anne brass lantern clock John Smorthwait, Colchester, early 18th century The posted countwheel bell-striking movement with anchor escapement regulated by seconds pendulum swinging outside of the frame clock to the rear, the dial engraved with an asymmetric stylised leafy spray beneath signature Smorthwait In Colchester to upper margin, with iron hand within applied Roman numeral chapter ring with stylised fleur-de-lys half hour markers, the frame with column turned corner posts beneath foliate pierced and engraved front fret, vase turned finials and domed bell bearer, on turned ball feet, 40.5cm (16ins) high. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: The current lot is extensively illustrated and described in Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 29 pages 104-7. The life and work of John Smorthwait is extensively documented in Mason, Bernard Clock and Watchmaking in Colchester where he described as 'one of the most important of the early watch and clock makers'. John Smorthwait was born at Middleton-in-Lonsdale, Westmorland the second son of William Smorthwait in 1675. According to Mason he probably moved to Colchester circa 1706-7 and is believed to have taken over the stock-in-trade, tools and goodwill of the late John Spurgin (who died in 1699) from his widow, Jane. Smorthwait went on to become a prolific maker of clocks with around eighty examples signed by him recorded by Mason. In 1722 John Smorthwait married his second wife, Susan Flanner (his first wife died prior to his move to Colchester leaving him to bring-up his daughter alone) and became actively involved in matters relating to his local Parish of All Saints which he continued until his death in 1739. The current lot is a fine 'textbook' example of Smorthwait's work which is generally very typical of the archetypal form of lantern clock made in the provinces during the first quarter of the 18th century.

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A very rare mahogany electric longcase timepiece Unsigned but possibly by...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £1,200 - £1,800

Description: A very rare mahogany electric longcase timepiece Unsigned but possibly by The Reason Manufacturing Company, Brighton, to a design by Murday, circa 1908 The four pillar movement enclosing solid minute wheel and crossed-out motionwork driven by a four-division stepped cam mounted behind the movement alternately pulled and shunted by a sprung two-arm armature connected to the long pendulum crutch suspended via independent pivot above the movement and incorporating electromagnetic coil Hipp-toggle switchgear at the base, the long steel-rod pendulum suspended from a substantial 'A' frame behind the movement and with iron bar supporting twin cylindrical brass bobs over a fixed electromagnetic two-part impulse coil at the base, the 12 by 13.75 inch rectangular brass dial with subsidiary seconds dial to the fine foliate scroll engraved centre within applied silvered Roman numeral chapter ring with Arabic five minutes to outer track, with scroll pierced steel hands and fine overlaid foliate scroll pierced and engraved decoration to upper and lower margins, the swan neck pedimented case with complex cornice mouldings over rectangular glazed hinged dial aperture and fielded panels to sides, the trunk with ogee moulded cornice over full-width rectangular glazed door inset with ogee fillet mouldings, on plinth base fronted with a fielded panel over a moulded skirt, 215cm (84.5ins) high. The design of the current lot can be compared to that of an electric pendulum mantel clock patented by Thomas John Murday in 1908 and manufactured by the Reason Manufacturing Company Limited, Brighton illustrated in Shenton, Alan and Rita THE PRICE GUIDE TO CLOCKS 1840-1940 on page 416 (figure 243). Another related mantel timepiece was sold at Sotheby's New York MASTERPIECES FROM THE TIME MUSEUM PART FOUR, VOLUME III on 14th October 2004 for $2,040. Such mantel timepieces are particularly rare as Murday soon went on to develop models using balance wheel regulation for which he obtained another patent in 1910. The current lot may be unique and is offered with file of correspondence which includes an old photograph of probably the same clock (or possibly an identical second example).

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A very rare Regency mill timepiece movement Benjamin Harlow, Lane End

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £1,000 - £2,000

Description: A very rare Regency mill timepiece movement Benjamin Harlow, Lane End, circa 1825 The four pillar eight-day single train movement with going wheel train set low down between the plates incorporating offset anchor escapement regulated by seconds pendulum and with centre arbor fitted with motionwork for standard two-handed hour and minute notation, the upper margin with take-off square to rear (formerly driven by mill machinery at a rate of one revolution per minute) fitted with a flag to the arbor to advance a large diameter wheel centrally positioned between the plates connected via extensive motionwork for recording mill running time on the three upper subsidiaries to the dial over a four-week period, the 10.75 inch circular single sheet silvered brass dial with small standard Roman numeral chapter ring incorporating Arabic five minutes to lower section (for the timepiece) beneath similar Arabic numeral dial for recording mill running time flanked by subsidiary day-of-the working week (Sundays excluded) and concentric D/N (for day or night) indexed recording dials, the upper and lower chapter rings enclosing engraved signature Benj'n Harlow, Lane End to centres, diameter 27.5cm (10.75ins). Provenance: The property of a private collector, Derbyshire. Literature: The current lot is illustrated in Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 67 pages 218-9 and Robey, John The LONGCASE CLOCK Reference Book pages 898-89 (figures 12.121-123). Benjamin Wyatt Harlow is recorded in Loomes, Brian Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World as born in 1764 to Robert Harlow and first worked from Lane End (now Longton) near Stoke on Trent, Staffordshire before inheriting his father's workshop in Ashbourne in around 1828 where he remained in business until circa 1845. His brother, Samuel, was also a clockmaker who published The Clock-maker's Guide to Practical Clock Work in Birmingham in 1813. The current lot was made specifically for the purpose of recording the operational running time of mill machinery. The rear of the movement has a square which would have been connected (via take-off work geared to revolve once a minute) to the mechanism of the mill. The three upper subsidiaries to the dial would then index the hours, minutes, twelve hour periods (night or day) and the full days that the machinery would have been running throughout the working week. The lower dial is for actual mean time driven by a separate eight-day going train positioned between the movement plates. Theoretically if the mill had been running at optimum capacity at all times the indicated day and appropriate twelve hour period would have been correct, and both the upper 'mill' and lower 'time' dials would be synchronised at the end of the week. Naturally, in practice, there will have been times when the machinery would have been inoperative (or running slow), hence by the end of the week the 'mill time' would have been lagging behind. By recording the difference between the two the amount of 'running time' lost would have been obtained. Generally it appears that very few 'mill clocks' seem to have survived although John Robey mentions a complete example by Whitehurst made for Green's Mill, Derby as well as two other similar incomplete examples. Unfortunately it is not known for whom/which mill the current lot was made, however when first put to use it was probably deemed an invaluable tool bearing in mind the high degree of competition that would have existed between the numerous potteries and mills operating in and around Lane End, Staffordshire at the start of the 19th century.

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An unusual Victorian carved walnut striking drop-dial wall clock Samuel Bailey

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £600 - £800

Description: An unusual Victorian carved walnut striking drop-dial wall clock Samuel Bailey, Newcastle-on-Tyne, circa 1855 The four pillar twin chain fusee gong striking movement with shouldered plates and anchor escapement regulated by wood rod pendulum with brass cylindrical bob, the 11.5 inch circular white painted Roman numeral dial inscribed S. Bailey, Newcastle to centre and with steel fleur-de-lys hands set behind hinged patinated brass glazed bezel incorporating angled fillet to inside edge within repeating stylised leaf carved surround, the case with rectangular glazed drop-trunk flanked by foliate carved uprights continuing to form the ears beneath the dial and enclosing a mirror-backed interior, the sides with rectangular glazed panels beneath pierced side doors, the cavetto moulded base with scroll carved brackets flanking pendulum access flap to underside, 77cm (30.25ins) high. Samuel Bailey is recorded in Loomes, Brian Watchmakers & Clockmakers of the World, Volume 2 as working in Newcastle-on-Tyne 1852-58. An almost identical clock to the current lot bearing signature for John Ward of Kensington was sold in these rooms on Thursday 28th August 2014 (lot 78) for £850 hammer.

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A fine and well documented Charles II brass lantern clock George Newton, Seend

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £10,000 - £15,000

Description: A fine and well documented Charles II brass lantern clock George Newton, Seend, dated 1677 The posted countwheel bell-striking movement with verge escapement regulated by short bob pendulum swinging outside the frame to the rear and with unusual configuration of strike lifting with the warning lifting detent arbor positioned on the opposite side of movement from the countwheel locking detent arbor, the dial engraved with a central five-petal rose enveloped by stylised floral trails issuing from a vase positioned just above six o'clock, with pierced steel hand within applied Roman numeral chapter ring with simple wheatear half hour markers, the upper angles engraved with signature George, Newton incorporating date 16, 77 the lower angles decorated with leafy sprays, the highly distinctive frame with one-piece column turned corner posts beneath foliate pieced frets incorporating arcaded galleries to lower edges and dolphin engraved decoration to front, integral multi-knopped tall vase-and-cover turned finials and domed bell bearer cast with pierced leaf decoration between the limbs, with brass side doors and on acorn-turned feet, 43cm (17ins) high. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: The current lot is well documented featuring in Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks page 92 figs. 2/66 and 2/67; and Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 9 pages 42-5 (where the movement is extensively illustrated). The life of George Newton of Seend is documented by C. Thomas in his article GEORGE NEWTON, BLACKSMITH TURNED CLOCKMAKER, OF SEEND, WILTSHIRE published in the winter 1980 issue of ANTIQUARIAN HOROLOGY (vol. XII no. 4) pages 420-6. Thomas notes that George Newton was born sometime between 1600 and 1610 and was the eldest son of blacksmith Richard Newton from whom inherited the family business in 1625. In 1666 the famous diarist John Aubrey (1626-97) visited George Newton to discuss local iron ore deposits writing: "I went to the Smythe, George Newton, an ingeniouse man, who from a blacksmith turned clock maker and fiddle maker, and assured me that he has melted of this oare in his forge which the oare of the Forest of Deane will not do". Other contemporary entries dating between 1664 and 1679 note his service as churchwarden at Seend and Brian Loomes in LANTERN CLOCKS & Their Makers records Newton's marriage to Susan Harris in 1670. It would seem that George Newton's clockmaking activities primarily focussed around church clocks as noted in the records of various local Parishes including Steeple Ashton (1636-9), Melksham (1652-71) and Trowbridge (1674) which refer to his attention to the maintenance of existing clocks. In 1673 George Newton was contracted by the churchwardens of St. Thomas a Becket, Salisbury, to supply a new clock at a cost of £20 10s., with an additional 5s. paid up-front (presumably for expenses already accrued). The clock was duly installed later the same year and was subsequently attended to by Newton for which he received a further payment of £1 1s. 6d. in 1680. It is perhaps testament to George Newton's skills as a blacksmith and clockmaker that he was chosen to supply a clock for St. Thomas a Becket, as this Parish church in central Salisbury was the designated place of worship for the local Salisbury guild of blacksmiths and metalworkers. George Newton died in 1681 leaving the forge to his son (also called George) who appeared not to share his father's aptitude for clockmaking as no clocks by him are recorded; he died intestate in 1699 at the age of 53. Of George Newton only four lantern clocks by him are documented with possibly a fifth residing in a private collection yet to be published. The three other well documented examples can be found in the following sources: Clock dating to around 1645 signed GEORG NEWTN MEE FESET illustrated in Bruce, Bill and Hooper, John EARLY EN

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A fine and well documented William and Mary brass lantern clock Thomas Veale

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £7,000 - £10,000

Description: A fine and well documented William and Mary brass lantern clock Thomas Veale, Chew Magna, dated (16)95 The posted countwheel bell-striking movement with verge escapement regulated by short bob pendulum swinging outside the frame to the rear, the dial with central vestigial alarm disc within symmetrical foliate tulip engraved infill and with pierced brass hand within applied Roman numeral chapter ring with stylised fleur-de-lys half hour markers and concealing engraved initials TV and date • to the plate beneath, the angles engraved with bands of concentric brickwork, the typical 'Bristol' frame with one-piece column turned corner posts beneath lion and unicorn armorial engraved and pierced frets, integral multi-knopped tall vase-and-cover turned finials and domed bell bearer, with brass side doors, iron backplate and hanging hoop above spurs to rear, on tall disc-knopped feet, 42cm (16.5ins) high. Provenance: From the estate of an esteemed antiquarian horologist. Literature: The current lot is well documented featuring in Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks pages 92-4 figs. 2/66 to 2/68; Darken, Jeff (editor) TIME & PLACE, English Country Clocks 1600-1840 as exhibit 20 pages 76-9 (where the movement is extensively illustrated) and Loomes, Brian LANTERN CLOCKS & Their Makers page 192 figs. 11.12 and 11.13. Thomas Veale's dates are collated in Loomes Brian Lantern Clocks & Their Makers page 307 where it is noted that ¾llchambers records his freedom at Bristol in 1652, Moore records him as being of Bristol in 1660 when he was a bondsman to a marriage. George White records his marriage at Chew Magna 1656 to Charity Plaister. He was working to at least 1697. He left sons John and James, but no clocks are yet recorded by them'. The current lot utilises a frame casting derived from those originally favoured by the Chew Valley school of clockmakers with the earliest surviving dated example made by Edward Webb of Chew Stoke in 1676 (private collection). Several other clocks by Webb are known with dates ranging from 1678-93, with all of the documented examples sharing the same group of frame castings. These castings were also used by Edward Bilbie of Chew Stoke (who is believed to have succeeded Edward Webb in around 1695) for his earlier lantern clocks, long after Bristol makers had tended to opt for castings more closely related to London work of the period. The on-going use of such frames suggests that they were cast locally, perhaps initially by Edward Webb at his foundry in Chew Stoke (which was just over a mile from Thomas Veale's home at Denny Farm, Chew Magna), then by the Bilbie family after Webb's death in 1694. Of Thomas Veale five lantern clocks are documented, with all but one dated and made within the time span 1692-7. All these examples share the same basic frame castings, are signed with the initials TV either behind the alarm disc or chapter ring and can be found and compared in the following sources: White, George English Lantern Clocks page 230 fig. V/36 (undated example), page 231 figs. V/37 (dated ’) and V/38 (detail of dial only dated —). Bruce, Bill and Hooper, John EARLY ENGLISH LANTERN CLOCKS 1615-1700 page 50 (dated 1692). Darken, Jeff and Hooper John English 30 Hour Clocks page 92 figs. 2/66 and 2/67 (the current lot dated ’). All of the four dated examples share similar engraving executed with scrolling foliage issuing from a central point at the base of the dial centre, continuing symmetrically around the alarm disc and terminating with a central flowerhead motif at the top. The angles are decorated with the same concentric brickwork infill. The undated example (White, George English Lantern Cl oc ks page 230 fig. V/35) departs a little from the above similarities by incorporating larger more abstract scroll-work towards the lower margin of the dial centre and terminates with a female mask at twelve o'clock. It is perhaps interesting to compare this ex

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A fine and impressiveVictorian silver mounted walnut quarter-chiming...

by Dreweatts & Bloomsbury

September 15, 2015, 1:00 PM BST

Newbury, United Kingdom

Estimated Price: £2,000 - £3,000

Description: A fine and impressiveVictorian silver mounted walnut quarter-chiming presentation bracket clock with wall bracket John Moore and Sons, London, dated 1867 The six finned baluster pillar movement chiming the quarters on a nest of eight graduated bells and sounding the hour on a coiled gong, the going train with anchor escapement regulated by heavy lenticular bob pendulum with pivoted beam rise/fall regulation to the suspension, the 8.25 inch wide single sheet silvered brass arched dial signed JOHN MOORE & SONS, CLERKENWELL, LONDON, 14239 to centre and with blued steel hands within fine foliate strapwork engraved decoration to lower angles beneath arch incorporating subsidiary SLOW/FAST regulation and STRIKE/SILENT selection dials within conforming foliate infill, the ogee arch-top case surmounted by fine cast and chased Gothic foliate bud finials united by a pierced gallery running front to back over four further finials flanking the pediment applied with an oval silver gilt panel engraved with a view of St. Pauls Church, Rusthall and a pair of cast leafy rosettes to front, the hinged glazed dial surround decorated with further small silver rosettes to frame and with canted silvered brass fillet to interior, the angles inset with Gothic columns incorporating leafy caps and the sides with foliate scroll-pierced arched sound frets, on inverted breakfronted skirt base centred with further shaped gilt cartouche engraved PRESENTED BY, FRIENDS & NEIGHBOURS, TO EDWARD OTTLEY WOLLASTON ESQ., ON HIS LEAVING THE PARISH OF, ST PAUL'S RUSTHALL flanked by additional rosettes and concave moulded sections beneath the pillars, on original wall bracket with moulded inverted breakfront table over pierced scroll outline side supports, the mounts hallmarked for London 1867 (maker's mark S.S ), the clock 72.5cm (28.5ins) high; the clock on wall bracket 97.5cm (38.5ins) high overall. John Moore and Sons succeeded the partnership of George Handley and John Moore (both of whom were apprenticed to, and were successors of John Thwaites who died in 1800) on the death of George Handley in 1824. The firm worked from 38-9 Clerkenwell Close and became particularly well known for producing public clocks and supplying movements to other makers. The last of the Moore dynasty of clockmakers, Henry James, died aged 60 in 1899, however the firm is thought to have continued into the early years of the 20th century. St. Pauls Church, Rusthall, Tunbridge Wells was built to a design by Henry Isaac Stevens (1807-73) and was consecrated on 14th August 1850.

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